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Encyclopedia > Haley Barbour
Haley Barbour


Incumbent
Assumed office 
January 13, 2004
Lieutenant(s) Amy Tuck
Preceded by Ronnie Musgrove
Succeeded by Incumbent

Born October 22, 1947 (1947-10-22) (age 60)
Yazoo City, Mississippi
Political party Republican
Spouse Marsha Barbour
Profession Lawyer
Religion Presbyterian

Haley Reeves Barbour (born October 22, 1947) is the current Republican governor of Mississippi. He gained a national spotlight in August 2005 after Mississippi was hit by Hurricane Katrina. Since then he has been mentioned as a possible 2008 vice presidential candidate. Barbour has ruled out any desire to run for President, and has announced his intent to run for re-election as Governor in 2007.[2] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (994x1489, 416 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Haley Barbour Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Governors of Mississippi Territory, 1801–1817 Winthorp Sargent (Federalist) (7 May 1798–25 May 1801) William C. C. Claiborne (Democrat) (25 May 1801–1 March 1805) Robert Williams (Democrat) (1 March 1805–7 March 1809) David Holmes (Democrat) (7 March 1809–10 December 1817) Governors... For the ecclesiastical office, see Incumbent (ecclesiastical). ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Lieutenant Governor of Mississippi is the second-highest ranking executive officer in Mississippi, right below the governor. ... Amy Tuck is currently the Lieutenant Governor of Mississippi, a Republican. ... Ronnie Musgrove David Ronald Ronnie Musgrove (born July 29, 1956) is an American politician who was the governor of the U.S. state of Mississippi from 2000 until 2004. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mississippi. ... Yazoo City is a city in Yazoo County, Mississippi, United States. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Marsha Dickson Barbour has been the first lady of the state of Mississippi since 2004. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... Presbyterianism is a tradition shared by a number of Christian denominations which is most prevalent within the Reformed branch of Protestant Western Christianity. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Mississippi Republican Party is the state affiliate of the national Republican Party. ... Governors of Mississippi Territory, 1801–1817 Winthorp Sargent (Federalist) (7 May 1798–25 May 1801) William C. C. Claiborne (Democrat) (25 May 1801–1 March 1805) Robert Williams (Democrat) (1 March 1805–7 March 1809) David Holmes (Democrat) (7 March 1809–10 December 1817) Governors... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... The United States presidential election of 2008, scheduled to be held on November 4, 2008, will be the 55th consecutive quadrennial president and vice president of the United States. ...

Contents

Early years

Barbour, the youngest of three sons, was born in Yazoo City, Mississippi, where he was raised, to Grace LeFlore Johnson and Jeptha Fowlkes Barbour, Jr. [1] His father, a lawyer, died when Barbour was two years old. He attended the University of Mississippi in Oxford but skipped the first semester of his senior year to work on Richard Nixon's 1968 election campaign. He never earned a bachelor's degree. At the age of twenty-two, he ran the 1970 census for the state of Mississippi. He enrolled at the University of Mississippi Law School, receiving a Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree in 1972. Subsequently he joined his father's law firm in Yazoo City. [2] Yazoo City is a city in Yazoo County, Mississippi, United States. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... The University of Mississippi, also known as Ole Miss, is a public, coeducational research university located in Oxford, Mississippi. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... For other degrees, see Academic degree. ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The University of Mississippi, also known as Ole Miss, is a public, coeducational research university located in Oxford, Mississippi. ... // A law school is an institution where future lawyers obtain legal degrees. ... “J.D.” redirects here. ... J.D. redirects here; for alternate uses, see J.D. (disambiguation) J.D. is an abbreviation for the Latin Juris Doctor, also called a Doctor of Law or Doctorate of Jurisprudence, and is the law degree typically awarded by an accredited U.S. law school after successfully completing three years...


Lobbying career

In 1991, Barbour helped found Barbour Griffith & Rogers, LLC [3], a Washington, D.C.-based lobbying firm, with Lanny Griffith and Ed Rogers, two lawyers who formerly worked in the George H. W. Bush administration. In 1998, Fortune magazine named Barbour Griffith & Rogers the second-most-powerful lobbying firm in America. [4] In 2001, after the inauguration of George W. Bush, Fortune named it the most powerful. [5] The firm has made millions of dollars lobbying on behalf of the tobacco industry.[6] Barbour Griffith & Rogers, LLC is a Washington, D.C.-based lobbying firm. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... Look up fortune in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


Vioxx Case

Plaintiffs' lawyers in next year's federal Vioxx trials subpoenaed Haley Barbour, the former lobbyist whose clients included major drug companies. The suits include an estimated 45,225 plaintiffs, and Merck has agreed to let another 14,450 sue after their statute of limitation expires. Suits may center around plaintiffs who had strokes or heart attacks after taking the painkiller. [7]


RNC Chairman

In 1993, Barbour became chairman of the Republican National Committee. In 1994, during his tenure as RNC chair, Republicans captured both houses of the United States Congress, taking the House of Representatives for the first time in forty years. In 1997, on the subject of a $2.1 million loan from Hong Kong businessman Ambrous Tung Young to a Republican Party think tank in 1994, Mr. Barbour flip flopped. The foreign money trail to the Republican Party followed a roundabout route and enabled the think tank, in turn, to transfer money to the Republican Party for use in key Congressional races in 1994. [8] [9] The Republican National Committee (RNC) provides national leadership for the Republican Party of the United States. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party...


1982 campaign

In 1982, Barbour was the Republican candidate for United States Senate but lost to incumbent Democrat John C. Stennis. [10] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


During this failed bid for Senator a controversy arose at a campaigning stump. According to the New York Times, in the presence of the press an aide was complaining to Barbour that "coons" were going to be at a campaign stop at the state fair. Barbour warned the aide, in front of reporters, that if the aide persisted in racist remarks, he would be "reincarnated as a watermelon and placed at the mercy of blacks." [11] The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...


2003 campaign

After two decades in Washington, D.C., Barbour announced in 2003 his intention to run for governor of Mississippi. On August 5, 2003, he won the Republican gubernatorial primary over Canton trial attorney Mitch Tyner. is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


A photograph of Barbour with members of The Council of Conservative Citizens members appeared on their CCC webpage, and some commentators and pundits demanded that Barbour ask for his picture to be removed from the site, but Barbour refused. The CCC was in the past a proponent of segregation. Barbour stated that ""Once you start down the slippery slope of saying,'That person can't be for me,' then where do you stop?... I don't care who has my picture. My picture's in the public domain." Barbour's Democratic opponent, Governor Musgrove, declined to be critical, stating that he had also attended Blackhawk rallies in the past, and would have done so that year except for a scheduling conflict.[12] The Council of Conservative Citizens (CofCC) is an American paleoconservative political organization that supports a large variety of localized grassroots causes including white separatism, and which opposes racial integration,[1] multiculturalism and political correctness. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic...


2007 re-election

See also: Mississippi gubernatorial election, 2007

Barbour announced on February 8, 2007 that he would seek a second term as Governor of Mississippi. He defeated Frederick Jones in the Republican primary on August 7, and will face Democrat John Arthur Eaves, Jr. in the November general election. Eaves is an attorney who lost a bid for Congress in 1996. The Mississippi gubernatorial election, 2007 will be held on November 6, 2007. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Governors of Mississippi Territory, 1801–1817 Winthorp Sargent (Federalist) (7 May 1798–25 May 1801) William C. C. Claiborne (Democrat) (25 May 1801–1 March 1805) Robert Williams (Democrat) (1 March 1805–7 March 1809) David Holmes (Democrat) (7 March 1809–10 December 1817) Governors... John Arthur Eaves, Jr. ...


Governor Barbour received many Democratic endorsements, including Xavier Bishop, Mike Espy, Brad Dye, and Bill Waller. [3] Bill Waller and Brad Dye are conservative Democrats who served as Governor and Lt. Governor of Mississippi. Xavier Bishop is a long-time Democrat activists and the black Democrat Mayor of Moss Point. Mike Espy is a former Democratic Congressman from the 2nd District of Mississippi and served as Secretary of Agriculture under President Bill Clinton. Alphonso Michael Espy, usually called Mike Espy, (born November 30, 1953) was a U.S. political figure. ... Brad Dye (born December 20th, 1933 in Charleston, Mississippi was a Mississippi politician who served three 4-year terms as Lieutenant Governor of Mississippi (1980-1992). ... William Lowe Bill Waller, Sr. ... William Lowe Bill Waller, Sr. ... Brad Dye (born December 20th, 1933 in Charleston, Mississippi was a Mississippi politician who served three 4-year terms as Lieutenant Governor of Mississippi (1980-1992). ... Moss Point is a city located in Jackson County, Mississippi. ... Alphonso Michael Espy, usually called Mike Espy, (born November 30, 1953) was a U.S. political figure. ... The United States Secretary of Agriculture is the head of the United States Department of Agriculture concerned with land and food as well as agriculture and rural development. ... Order: 42nd President Vice President: Al Gore Term of office: January 20, 1993 – January 20, 2001 Preceded by: George H. W. Bush Succeeded by: George W. Bush Date of birth: August 19, 1946 Place of birth: Hope, Arkansas First Lady: Hillary Rodham Clinton Political party: Democratic William Jefferson Clinton (born...


Mike Espy noted Governor Barbour's competency and character as reasons for his endorsement. [4] Alphonso Michael Espy, usually called Mike Espy, (born November 30, 1953) was a U.S. political figure. ...


Governorship

Haley Barbour with Condoleezza Rice and other Governors

Barbour defeated incumbent Democrat Ronnie Musgrove in the general election on November 4, 2003, with 53 percent of the vote to Musgrove's 46 percent. Barbour became just the second Republican governor elected in Mississippi since Reconstruction, the first being Kirk Fordice. [13] He took office in January 2004. He announced the beginning of his re-election campaign at a series of meetings across the state on February 12, 2007. Image File history File links Condoleezza_Rice_with_Governors. ... Image File history File links Condoleezza_Rice_with_Governors. ... Condoleezza Rice (born November 14, 1954) is the 66th United States Secretary of State, and the second in the administration of President George W. Bush to hold the office. ... Ronnie Musgrove David Ronald Ronnie Musgrove (born July 29, 1956) is an American politician who was the governor of the U.S. state of Mississippi from 2000 until 2004. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... Daniel Kirkwood Kirk Fordice, Jr. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


During his campaign, Barbour signed the Americans for Tax Reform "Taxpayer Protection Pledge" and vowed not to institute any new taxes or raise any existing ones. [14] Americans for Tax Reform is an interest group seeking to reduce the overall level of taxation in the United States, at the federal, state and local level. ...


Barbour vs. The Partnership

Barbour's taxation policies have not been without contention. In March 2006 Barbour vetoed a bill that would lower grocery taxes, while simultaneously raising tobacco taxes.[15] Mississippians pay some of the highest grocery taxes in the nation.[16] The "Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids" insinuated that Barbour's lobbying-era affinity with the tobacco industry may also explain his 2006 proposal to dismantle Mississippi's controversial youth-tobacco-prevention program, called The Partnership for a Healthy Mississippi. [17] The Partnership is a private, non-profit group which receives $20 million annually and is led by former Attorney General Mike Moore. Moore created the organization when he, representing the State of Mississippi, settled a multi-billion dollar suit with the tobacco industry. According to the suit, the funds were to offset the extra costs incurred by Medicaid while dealing with smoking related illnesses. Opponents have consistently claimed that Moore uses the organization to further his political ambitions. The Partnership regularly offers up huge grants to political organizations such as the Legislative Black Caucus. Many point to even more facts such as The Partnership not allowing a public audit which in turn permits the group to have no public accountability of its expenditures of state funds. In 2006, Judge Jaye Bradley, the same judge that awarded Moore the annual $20 million in 2000, vacated her previous decision. Bradley claimed she did not decide against The Partnership because of its inability to perform but because she believes that the state legislature is the only body that can legally decide how state funds can be delegated. Following the decision, Barbour stated that it says a lot about Judge Bradley “…that she is a strong enough person to have the gumption to vacate her own order. The only way for the state to spend state funding is for the Legislature to appropriate it through the legislative process." [18] After an appeal by Moore, Barbour went on to win a Mississippi Supreme Court battle that prevented the tobacco settlement moneys from funding the program, maintaining that is unconstitutional for a judge to award state proceeds to a private organization. Barbour's lawyer stated The Partnership was "the most blatant diversion of public funds to a private corporation in the history of the state of Mississippi" as The Partnership refuses to allow a state audit of its expenditures of the state's money. [19] Medicaid is the US health insurance program for individuals and families with low incomes and resources. ... The Supreme Court of Mississippi is the highest court in the state of Mississippi. ...


Barbour has received his share of criticism for his refusal to approve a bill to increase the cigarette tax and decrease the grocery tax passed the state House of Representatives. Mississippi currently has the third-lowest cigarette tax and the highest grocery tax--while being the poorest state in the country. Barbour stated that the lack of revenue generated after the tax swap would quite possibly result in bankrupting the state government which was already fragile due to the devastation caused by Hurricane Katrina. The House of Representatives could produce no figures to dispute this assertion. Also, in his successful 2004 campaign, Barbour ran on the platform that he would veto any tax increase. [20] This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ...


Hurricane Katrina response

See also: Criticism of government response to Hurricane Katrina

On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina slammed into Mississippi's coast, killing 231 people, [21] devastating the state's $2.7 billion-a-year casino industry and leaving tens of thousands temporarily homeless. [22] (see Effect of Hurricane Katrina on Mississippi). Barbour's response was characterized by a concerted effort at evacuation, tough-minded talk on looters and an unwillingness to blame the federal government. [23] His response was compared, favorably, to that of Rudy Giuliani in the wake of the September 11 attacks. [24] [25] The criticism of the government response to Hurricane Katrina primarily consisted of condemnations of mismanagement and lack of preparation in the relief effort in response to Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Damage to Long Beach, Mississippi following Hurricane Katrina (click to enlarge) Hurricane Katrinas winds and storm surge reached the Mississippi coastline on the afternoon of August 28, 2005,[1][2] beginning a two-day path of destruction through central Mississippi; by 10 a. ... Rudolph William Louis Giuliani III, (born May 28, 1944) is an American lawyer, prosecutor, businessman, and Republican politician from the state of New York. ... The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ...


Barbour credited the countless government workers who helped southern Mississippi cope with the hurricane. But Barbour was praised by the coast's citizens as a strong leader who can communicate calm to the public and provide “a central decision-making point for when things get balled up or go sideways, which they do,” as Barbour says.


Barbour was blunt with the facts about the utter devastation of the coast, but his own demeanor in public appearances suggested that the state would summon the will to rebuild. Mississippi also reopened all of its public schools by November 2005.


While the reconstruction process doesn’t dictate how localities should rebuild, Barbour has touted New Urbanist principles in constructing more compact communities. “They have the chance to build some things very differently,” he says. “The goal is to build the coast back like it can be, rather than simply like it was.” [26] Overview New Urbanism is an urban design movement that became very popular beginning in the 1980s and early 1990s. ...


The evacuation order was issued by local officials more than 24 hours before the hurricane hit, and Mississippi activated 750 National Guard troops as of August 29, the day of the hurricane. [27][28][29] The United States National Guard is a reserve forces component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air National Guard). ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Infant mortality

In 2005, Mississippi had the highest infant mortality in the nation, and some public health workers blame Barbour's budget cuts. Barbour promised to cut Medicaid, and his administration required face-to-face meetings and stricter documentation for annual re-enrollment in Medicaid and CHIP. The face-to-face meetings were to prevent fraudulent claimants from costing Mississippi taxpayers millions of dollars annually. Non-elderly enrollees dropped by 54,000 from 2005 to 2006. Mississippi Medicaid director Robert L. Robinson said that correlation between the decline in Medicaid enrollment and infant mortality was "pure conjecture." In Mississippi, infant mortality jumped from 9.7/1,000 in 2004 to 11.4/1,000 in 2005, compared to the national average of 6.9/1,000 in 2005. The New York Times compared Hollandale County with Sharkey County, where the infant mortality for blacks was 5/1,000 from 1991-2005. In Sharkey County, The Cary Christian Center runs an intensive home-visiting system using local mothers as counselors, and buses pregnant blacks to pre- and post-natal classes[30].


Other actions in office

Barbour has been praised for translating his lobbying skills into success at winning over a legislature dominated by Democrats. He has called several special legislative sessions to force an issue [31][32].


When Barbour took office, the state of Mississippi had run a $709 million budget deficit for the 2004 fiscal year. With bipartisan support, and without raising taxes, Barbour implemented a plan called Operation: Streamline to cut the budget deficit in half [33]. He accomplished this largely by reducing spending on social services, most notably Medicaid; the 2005 budget drastically reduced coverage for 65,000 individuals classified as Poverty-Level Aged and Disabled (PLAD), most of whom qualified for the federal Medicare program, and also significantly limited prescription drug coverage. In 2005, the state was budgeted to spend a total of $130 million less on Medicaid than in the previous year [34] [35]. This trend continued in the state budget for the 2006 fiscal year. After a long special session, the legislature approved a budget that featured more social service cuts but also increased educational spending [36]. With tax revenues higher than expected during the 2006 fiscal year, due in large part to increased sales tax revenues in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, the state achieved its first balanced budget in years [37]. In the 2008 fiscal year budget, for the first time since its enactment in 1997, the state has fully funded the Mississippi Adequate Education Program [38] [39]. Medicaid is the US health insurance program for individuals and families with low incomes and resources. ... President Johnson signing the Medicare amendment. ...


Building on a 2002 tort reform bill passed by his predecessor [40], Barbour also introduced a new tort reform measure that has been described as one of the strictest in the nation [citation needed]. Barbour rarely made a speech during his gubernatorial campaign without mentioning this subject and was able to convert political support into law, overcoming the resistance of House Democratic leaders, who argued that further legislation would disenfranchise people with legitimate complaints against corporations [41] [42]. Barbour then embarked on a "tort tour" to encourage other states to follow Mississippi’s lead. "We’ve gone from being labeled as a judicial hellhole and the center of jackpot justice to a state that now has model legislation," says Charlie Ross (R), the chair of the state Senate Judiciary Committee[43]. Tort reform is the phrase used by its advocates who claim it is a change in the legal system to reduce litigations alleged adverse effects on the economy. ...


Under Barbour's leadership, Mississippi has enacted some of the most restrictive anti-abortion laws in the US, including a complete ban (with exceptions only in cases where the woman's life is threatened or she has been raped) in the event that the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade [44]. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the... Holding Texas law making it a crime to assist a woman to get an abortion violated her due process rights. ...


Footnotes

  1. ^ http://www.wargs.com/political/barbour.html
  2. ^ USA Today Campaign 2004 Mississippi Governor Retrieved May 10, 2007
  3. ^ Barbour, Griffith & Rodgers website
  4. ^ Time-Warner article on Barbour, Griffith & Rogers
  5. ^ Fortune magazine naming Barbour, Griffith & Rogers most powerful lobbying firm in America
  6. ^ Big Tobacco's 1997 Congressional Lobbying
  7. ^ Mcconnaughey, Janet. "Vioxx trials may focus on stroke victims", USA Today, 2007-07-29. Retrieved on 2007-11-02. 
  8. ^ Wayne, Leslie. "No Dice, Haley", New York Times, 1997-07-25. Retrieved on 2007-11-01. 
  9. ^ Wayne, Leslie. "Democrats Get to Scrutinize G.O.P. Asian Connection", New York Times, 1997-07-27. Retrieved on 2007-11-01. 
  10. ^ [http://en.allexperts.com/e/h/ha/haley_barbour.htm Haley Barbour at AllExperts
  11. ^ Raines, Howell. "Age Issue Is Focus of Mississippi Race", New York Times, 1982-10-20. Retrieved on 2007-07-16. 
  12. ^ Barbour won't ask CCC to take photo off Web site
  13. ^ http://www.encyclopedian.com/go/Governor-of-Mississippi.html
  14. ^ http://www.heartland.org/Article.cfm?artId=13792
  15. ^ Legislature should override pro-tobacco Barbour
  16. ^ Clarion Ledger article: Grocery, cigarette tax shift passes
  17. ^ Gov. Barbour’s Proposal Would Destroy One of Nation’s Best Tobacco Prevention Programs, Help Big Tobacco At the Expense of Mississippi’s Kids
  18. ^ No Moore Partnership?
  19. ^ Tobacco Wars
  20. ^ Nossiter, Adam (2007-03-07), "Powerful Governor Stands His Ground, Again, on Food Tax", The New York Times, <http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/07/us/07groceries.html>
  21. ^ http://www.sunherald.com/mld/sunherald/news/state/15388820.htm
  22. ^ Governor: Worse than Camille
  23. ^ Science Daily article on Barbour's reaction to Hurricane Katrina
  24. ^ WJLA.com article on Katrina reaction
  25. ^ Opinionjournal.com article on Katrina reaction
  26. ^ Steady in a Storm: Reassuring and rebuilding Mississippi after Katrina
  27. ^ Defenselink.mil report on National Guard activation
  28. ^ Homelandresponse.org report
  29. ^ Washington Post article on National Guard reaction
  30. ^ [1]In turnabout, infant deaths climb in south, by Eric Eckholm, New York Times, April 22 2007.
  31. ^ Mississippi House of Representatives Information Office. Highlights of 2004 Legislative Session. Press release. Retrieved on 2007-07-16.
  32. ^ Mississippi House of Representatives Information Office. Highlights of 2005 Legislative Session. Press release. Retrieved on 2007-07-16.
  33. ^ Kanengiser, Andy. "Gov. calls for cost-cutting", The Clarion-Ledger, 2004-01-29. Retrieved on 2007-07-16. 
  34. ^ Berry, Pamela. "Medicaid bill goes to Senate", The Clarion-Ledger, 2004-03-04. Retrieved on 2007-07-16. 
  35. ^ Dewan, Shaila. "In Mississippi, Soaring Costs Force Deep Medicaid Cuts", New York Times, 2005-07-02. Retrieved on 2007-07-16. 
  36. ^ Pender, Geoff. "Mississippi lawmakers pass $4.6 million (sic) state budget", The Sun Herald (Biloxi, Misssissippi), 2005-05-31. Retrieved on 2007-07-16. 
  37. ^ Mississippi House of Representatives Information Office. Highlights of 2006 Legislative Session. Press release. Retrieved on 2007-07-16.
  38. ^ "A Win for Mississippi", Rural School and Community Trust, 2005-05-01. Retrieved on 2007-07-16. 
  39. ^ Mississippi Department of Education. End of the 2007 Regular Legislative Session Reports. Press release. Retrieved on 2007-07-16.
  40. ^ Sawyer, Patrice. "Gov. signs business tort reform bill", The Clarion-Ledger, 2002-12-04. Retrieved on 2007-07-16. 
  41. ^ Ladd, Donna. "Face-Off: The Battle for 'Tort Reform'", Jackson Free Press, 2004-07-25. Retrieved on 2007-07-16. 
  42. ^ Ladd, Donna. "Tort Reform: Myths and Realities", Jackson Free Press, 2004-07-25. Retrieved on 2007-07-16. 
  43. ^ Steady in a Storm: Reassuring and rebuilding Mississippi after Katrina
  44. ^ Associated Press. "MS: Criminalize Abortion If R v. W Overturned", CBN News, 2007-03-22. Retrieved on 2007-07-16. 

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Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Clarion-Ledger is the daily newspaper in Jackson, Mississippi. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Sun Herald is a U.S. newspaper based in Biloxi, Mississippi, that serves readers along the Mississippi Gulf Coast. ... Biloxi and Mississippi coast The city derived its name originally from the Biloxi, a native American tribe: Biloxi (Tribe) Biloxi is a city located in Harrison County, Mississippi. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Rural School and Community Trust (Rural Trust) is a national nonprofit organization addressing the crucial relationship between good schools and thriving communities. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Jackson Free Press is an alternative weekly newspaper in Jackson, Mississippi founded in 2002 by Mississippi native Donna Ladd, author and technology expert Todd Stauffer and a group of young Jacksonians wanting a progressive voice in the state. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Mississippi Office of the Governor Haley Barbour official state site
  • Follow the Money - Haley Barbour 2006 campaign contributions
  • National Governors Association - Mississippi Governor Haley Reeves Barbour biography
  • New York Times - Haley Barbour News collected news and commentary
  • On the Issues - Haley Barbour issue positions and quotes
  • Project Vote Smart - Governor Haley Barbour (MS) profile
  • SourceWatch Congresspedia - Haley Barbour profile
  • Haley Barbour for Governor official campaign site

Articles

  • Barbour showed early talent for politics AP, November 5, 2003
  • Campaign 2004 - Haley Barbour USA Today
Preceded by
Richard Bond
Republican National Committee Chairman
1993–1997
Succeeded by
Jim Nicholson
Preceded by
Ronnie Musgrove
Governor of Mississippi
2004 – present
Incumbent
Persondata
NAME Barbour, Haley
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Barbour, Haley Reeves
SHORT DESCRIPTION Governor of Mississippi
DATE OF BIRTH October 10, 1922
PLACE OF BIRTH Yazoo City, Mississippi
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
WorldNetDaily: No to Haley Barbour (572 words)
As chairman of the GOP, Barbour was in the limelight, constantly on television and getting a national platform as a spokesman for his party.
But the disqualifier for Barbour is his history as a lobbyist for the Mexican government.
It might be Haley Barbour's pipedream – or it could be America's national nightmare.
Haley Barbour - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (867 words)
Haley Reeves Barbour (born October 22, 1947) is the current governor of Mississippi, and a Republican.
Barbour defeated incumbent Democrat Ronnie Musgrove in the general election on November 4, 2003, with 53% of the vote to Musgrove's 46%.
Barbour's response was characterized by a concerted effort at evacuation, tough-minded talk on looters and an unwillingness to blame the federal government.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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