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Encyclopedia > Halal

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Usul al-fiqh

(The roots of jurisprudence) Uṣūl al-fiqh (Arabic: ‎ ) is a term which literally translates to the roots of the law and refers to the study of the origins, sources, and practice of Islamic jurisprudence. ...

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Halal (حلال, alāl, halaal) is an Arabic term meaning "permissible". In the English language it most frequently refers to food that is permissible according to Islamic law.[citation needed] In the Arabic language it refers to anything that is permissible under Islam.[citation needed] It is estimated that 70% of Muslims worldwide follow Halal standards[1] and that the Global Halal Market is currently a USD 580 billion industry[2]. Its antonym is haraam. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Madhhab or Mazhab (Arabic مذهب pl. ... Minhaj means the way/the path. ... In Sunni Islamic jurisprudence, Qiyas is the process of analogical reasoning from a known injunction (nass) to a new injunction. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Ijmāʿ (إجماع) is an Arabic tern referring to the consensus of the ummah, the community of Muslims, those practicing Islam, or of the ulema, those learned in the relevant topic. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Ulugh Beg Madrasa, Samarkand, ca. ... An ijazah is a certificate used primarily by Muslims to indicate that one has been authorized by a higher authority to transmit a certain subject or text of Islamic knowledge. ... Istihlal (Arabic: ) is a term used in Islamic jurisprudence, or fiqh, to refer to the act of regarding some action as permissible, or halaal; the implication is that such a regard is an erroneous and improper distortion of Islamic law. ... Istihsan is an Arabic term for juristic preference and is one of the methods of reasoning for understanding the sources of shariah and itjihad. ... For other uses, see Risala (disambiguation). ... In Islamic context, the Ahkam (أحكام) are rulings and orders of the Quran and Sunnah. ... Halaal (حلال, halāl, halal) is an Islamic Arabic term meaning permissible. In English it is most frequently used to refer to food that is permissible according to Islamic law. ... Fard also farida (arabic فرض obligation, duty) is an Islamic term which denotes a religious duty. ... Fard (Arabic: ) also farida (Arabic: ) is an Islamic term which denotes a religious duty. ... Mustahab, recomended, is a Islamic term denoting a actions between Mubah (neutral) and Wajib (actions which must be performed). ... Mubah is an Islamic Arabic term denoting an action as neither forbidden nor commended; neutral. ... Acts and substances which should be evaded by muslims. ... For the Islamic term for sanctuary, see Haram. ... Batil is an Arabic word meaning falsehood, and can be used to describe a nullified or invalid act or contract according to the sharia. ... A term in Islam. ... Marja (Arabic/Persian: مرجع), also appearing as Marja Taqlid or Marja Dini (Arabic/Persian: مرجع تقليد / مرجع ديني), literally means Source of Emulation or Religious Reference. It is the label provided to Shia authority, a Grand Ayatollah with the authority to make legal decisions within the confines of Islamic law for followers and less-credentialed... Ulema (, transliteration: , singular: , transliteration: , scholar) (The people of Islamic Knowledge) refers to the educated class of Muslim legal scholars engaged in the several fields of Islamic studies. ... A Mufti (Arabic: مفتى ) is an Islamic scholar who is an interpreter or expounder of Islamic law (Sharia), capable of issuing fataawa (plural of fatwa). // Role of a Mufti in governments In theocracies like Saudi Arabia and Iran, and in some countries where the constitution is based on sharia law, such... Qadi (قاضى) is an Arabic term meaning judge. ... A Faqih is an expert in fiqh, or, Islamic jurisprudence. ... Muhaddith is an Islamic title, referring to one who profoundly knows and narrates hadiths, the chains of their narration (saneed), and the original and famous narrators. ... Mullah (Persian: ملا) is a title given to some Islamic clergy, coming from the Arabic word mawla, meaning both vicar and guardian. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Maulvi (also spelled: Moulvi, Mawlawi and Mawlvi Persian: مولوی) is an honorific Islamic religious title often, but not exclusively, given to Sunni Muslim religious scholars or Ulema preceding their names, similar to the titles Maulana, Mullah or Shaykh. ... For other uses, see Sheikh (disambiguation). ... A Mujaddid (Arabic: مجدد), in Islamic tradition, refers to a person who Muslims believe is sent by God in the first half of every century of the Islamic calendar. ... Hafiz or Hafez (Arabic: حافظ), literally meaning guardian, is a term used by Muslims for people who have completely memorized the Quran. ... Hakim is a title in various oriental languages, derived from two separate Arabic words, both transcribed into English as Hakim: // حكيم ħakÄ«m It means wise man or physician Furthermore, al-Hakim the Wise is #47 of names of Allah revealed to man حاكم ħākim It means a ruler, governor, or judge. ... Maulana is a title of respect, technically reserved for Muslim scholars or Ulema (plural of Aalim) who are knowledgable about Islam and have studied under a scholar or at a religious institution, e. ... Arabic redirects here. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Shariah (Arabic: transliteration: ) is the body of Islamic religious law. ... Arabic redirects here. ... Look up Antonym in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For the Islamic term for sanctuary, see Haram. ...

Contents

"Halal" the word

Malaysian halal certificate for a coffee brand

The use of the term varies between Arabic-speaking communities and non-Arabic-speaking ones. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Arabic redirects here. ...


In Arabic-speaking countries, the term is used to describe anything permissible under Islamic law, in contrast to haraam, that which is forbidden. This includes human behavior, speech communication, clothing, conduct, manner and dietary laws. Arabic redirects here. ... Islam (Arabic: ; ( ▶ (help· info)), the submission to God) is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions and the worlds second-largest religion. ... For the Islamic term for sanctuary, see Haram. ... For the Björk song, see Human Behaviour Human behavior is the collection of behaviors exhibited by human beings and influenced by culture, attitudes, emotions, values, ethics, authority, rapport, hypnosis, persuasion, coercion and/or genetics. ... Bold text This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A baby wearing many items of winter clothing: headband, cap, fur-lined coat, shawl and sweater. ...


In non-Arabic-speaking countries, the term is most commonly used in the narrower context of just Muslim dietary laws, especially where meat and poultry are concerned, though it can be used for the more general meaning, as well. This dichotomy of usage is similar to the Hebrew term kosher.[citation needed] Arabic redirects here. ... Muslim dietary laws provide a set of rules as to what Muslims eat in their diet. ... The word Hebrew most likely means to cross over, referring to the Semitic people crossing over the Euphrates River. ... The circled U indicates that this can of tuna is certified kosher by the Union of Orthodox Congregations. ...


Varying forms of Halal

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

Dhabiĥa Halal

Adherents to this philosophy maintain that in order for food to be considered halal, it must not be a forbidden substance and any meat must have been slaughtered according to traditional guidelines set forth by the Sunnah, known as dhabiĥa (Alternatively spelled "zabiha"). This is the strictest definition of Halal. Sunnah(t) () literally means “trodden path”, and therefore, the sunnah of the prophet means “the way of the prophet”. Terminologically, the word ‘Sunnah’ in Sunni Islam means those religious actions that were instituted by Muhammad(PBUH) during the 23 years of his ministry and which Muslims initially received through consensus... DhabiÄ¥a (ذَبِيْحَة, dhabiha, zabiha) is the prescribed method of slaughtering all animals excluding fish and most sea-life as per Islam. ...


Halal and dhabiha are two different concepts

 Main Article Difference between Halal and Dhabiha 

However, adhering to this philosophy can lead to the error of not separating the premise of halal and dhabiha. There is a very strict difference between Halal and Dhabiha, and this difference is made clear on the basis of Quranic scriptures. The difference between Halal and Dhabiha is that Halal is simply everything which is not speciefied as Haram in the Quran and Dhabiha is simply a ritual based not on Quranic mandate but only on Islamic tradition. In most cases they are being taken as to mean the same when they are not the same.


Permissibility of Halal meat

Main Article Difference between Halal and Dhabiha


It is permissible for muslims to consume the meat of an animal, that has been defined as Halal according to the relevant references from Quran, but has not been slaughtered by the ritual of Dhabiha, by simply invoking the name of Allah right before consuming it. This assertion is supported by Hadith (Bukhari, Volume 7, Book 67, Number 415)(See Main Article)


Kosher and Halal

Main article: Islamic and Jewish dietary laws compared

There is a great deal of similarity between the laws of Dhabiĥa halal and kashrut, and there are also various differences. Whether or not Muslims can use kashrut standards as a replacement for halal standards is an ongoing debate, and the answer depends largely on the individual being asked.[1] However, most Muslim authorities believe the terms are not interchangeable.[2].

A package of halal-certified (see green label on the package) frozen food (steamed cabbage buns) from Jiangsu province, China

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 616 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Chinese Islamic cuisine Halal Islam in China Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 616 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Chinese Islamic cuisine Halal Islam in China Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital... Bao redirects here. ...   (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chiang-su; Postal map spelling: Kiangsu) is a province of the Peoples Republic of China, located along the east coast of the country. ...

Explicitly forbidden substances

A variety of substances are considered forbidden (haraam) as per various Quranic verses:

  • Pork meat (i.e. flesh of swine)[Qur'an 2:173]
  • Blood[Qur'an 2:173]
  • Animals slaughtered in the name of anyone but Allah (God) (there are debates regarding the permissibility of meat slaughtered by Jews, i.e., kosher meat).[Qur'an 2:173]
  • Carrion[Qur'an 5:3]
  • "Fanged beasts of prey" as per the Sunnah, usually simplified to all carnivorous animals, with the exception of most fish and sea animals[citation needed]
  • All intoxicants (especially alcohol).[Qur'an 2:219]

There is some disagreement among Muslims regarding seafood, especially predatory sea creatures. IFANCA (Islamic Food and Nutrition Council of America) states, regarding the opinion of Islamic scholars:[3] The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Kosher foods are those that meet certain criteria of Jewish law. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... An American Black Vulture feeding on squirrel carrion For other uses, see Carrion (disambiguation). ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Carnivorism redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ...

  • All are in agreement that fish with scales are halal
  • Sunnis consider all fish to be halal, while some Shias consider only shrimp and fish with scales to be halal[4] Within mostly the Hanafi School of thought, there is a strong position that shellfish (shrimp, lobster, crab, clams, etc.) are prohibited[citation needed].
  • Most agree that frogs are haraam due to the prohibition of killing them in hadith.[citation needed] In fact it is common belief among Southeast Asian Muslims that animals who live on both land and sea (such as amphibians, some reptiles, and some species of bird) are off limits.[citation needed]

Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... Shiʻa Islam (Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite) makes up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%–35% of all Muslim. ...

Halal in non-Islamic countries

Halal certificate issued for dairy products by a German registered merchant

In Dearborn, Michigan, United States, home to one of the largest Muslim and Arab populations in the United States, a number of fast food chains like McDonald's introduced halal chicken nuggets. [3] In the UK, American-style fried chicken is becoming increasingly popular with the Muslim population, and hundreds of outlets serving Halal fried chicken have sprung up. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 424 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (547 × 773 pixel, file size: 107 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Halal certificate issued for dairy products by a German registered merchant. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 424 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (547 × 773 pixel, file size: 107 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Halal certificate issued for dairy products by a German registered merchant. ... Location in Michigan Coordinates: , Country United States State Michigan County Wayne County Government  - Mayor John B. O’Reilly, Jr. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants, primarily selling hamburgers, chicken, french fries, milkshakes and soft drinks. ... Chicken nuggets A chicken nugget is either whole or composed from a paste of finely minced chicken or chicken skin, which is then coated in batter or breadcrumbs before being cooked. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... Fried chicken fast food restaurants are a common sight in urban parts of the UK. Ingrid and her Trademark Rooster Poultry Empire - Thames Area The typical fried chicken restaurant is an individually owned business or part of a small chain and serves American-style fried chicken, emulating the well known...


Recent laws passed in the United States have made it illegal to sell, distribute, and/or produce food that has been mislabeled "halal," when it is determined that the food does not meet Islamic dietary standards. Similar laws protect kosher foods [4]. Some were struck down by the courts as an unconstitutional sanction of religious provisions[citation needed], but others were upheld as consumer protection regulations[citation needed]. See Kashrut. The circled U indicates that this product is certified as kosher by the Orthodox Union (OU). ... The circled U indicates that this product is certified as kosher by the Orthodox Union (OU). ...


McDonald's is intending to offer Halal meals in the United States and some parts of the United Kingdom with two of its franchises currently on trial, offering this service. All McDonald's Restaurants in Australia (two outlets in Melbourne and one in Sydney have Halal meals since 2006), India, Singapore, Malaysia and South Africa are Halal certified. [5]

Australian halal certificate for chocolate.

Depending on which definition of halal a Muslim chooses to adhere to, and the strictness with which the person chooses to adhere to it, living in a non-Muslim country can pose minimal or great difficulty. Image File history File links HalalCertAustralia. ... Image File history File links HalalCertAustralia. ...


Dhabiĥa Halal

Dhabiĥa halal is relatively difficult to adhere to in a non-Muslim country: DhabiÄ¥a (ذَبِيْحَة, dhabiha, zabiha) is the prescribed method of slaughtering all animals excluding fish and most sea-life as per Islam. ...

  • Depending on the presence or absence of a significant Muslim population in the area, finding grocery stores, meat stores, and restaurants which serve/sell dhabiĥa halal foods can be extremely difficult.
  • The abundance of pork and non-dhabiha meats at restaurants presents a rather difficult problem to overcome. While a Muslim will not order a non-dhabiĥa halal dish, there is a concern about cross-contamination. This is likely to occur when the dhabiĥa halal dish is prepared with the same cooking tools as other non-dhabiĥa halal dishes. Food and juices from the two dishes are likely to be exchanged, technically rendering the dhabiĥa halal dish as haraam.
  • Many apparently meat-free dishes, and even some desserts, contain pork, gelatin, or other non-conforming substances. There is also a concern in the Muslim community about food additives such as monosodium glutamate (MSG) that may use enzymes derived from pig fat in the production process. It is very difficult to avoid such food additives as they are widely used and are not declared on restaurant menus.
  • Alcohol, especially wine, is frequently used in cooking. It is largely used in sauces and cakes, and is also present as an ingredient in vanilla and other extracts. Some contend that this is not a concern, so long as the alcohol has been thoroughly burned off in the cooking process.

Since the turn of the 21st century, there have been efforts to create organizations such as the Muslim Consumer Group that certify food products as halal for Muslim consumers. For the Islamic term for sanctuary, see Haram. ... For the art collective, see Gelitin. ... This article is about the chemical compound. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


See also

For the Islamic term for sanctuary, see Haram. ... This is a sub-article to Hygiene in Islam, Healthy diet and Food and cooking hygiene. ... Istihlal (Arabic: ) is a term used in Islamic jurisprudence, or fiqh, to refer to the act of regarding some action as permissible, or halaal; the implication is that such a regard is an erroneous and improper distortion of Islamic law. ... Dhabiha (, ) is the prescribed method of slaughtering all animals excluding fish and most sea-life per Islamic law. ... The circled U indicates that this product is certified as kosher by the Orthodox Union (OU). ... This article presents religious views on unclean animals. ... This article is about practices and beliefs in relation to various animals as food. ...

References

  1. ^ Dorothy Minkus-McKenna. "the Pursuit of Halal". Progressive Grocer; Dec 1, 2007; 86, 17;
  2. ^ Marketing of Halal Products: The Way Forward by Dr. Saad Al-Harran & Patrick Low, Halal Journal Mar 03, 2008
  3. ^ Halal Digest
  4. ^ ['Aalim Network QR] Sea Food
  5. ^ Halal certified eating establishments in Singapore.

External links

Wikibooks Cookbook has an article on
Halal
  • Muslim method of slaughtering
  • Answering criticism of the concept
  • Answering criticism
  • What Is Halal?
  • Halal and Haram research
  • Consumers increasingly perceive kosher and halal food as safer Scientist Live
Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo-en. ... Wikibooks logo Wikibooks, previously called Wikimedia Free Textbook Project and Wikimedia-Textbooks, is a wiki for the creation of books. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Halal Journal (650 words)
Various leads are pointing to the fact that Malaysia has vast potentials to be a major Halal player on the international arena and global multinational giants are realising this fact, evident in the setting up of a Halal excellence centre here in Malaysia by the world’s largest food producer, the Nestlé Group.
If we accept the fact that an item is Halal until it is proven Haram, so if at the time of decision the item in questioning has not been declared Haram by the Quran and Sunnah or by a consensus of qualified people, we need to move on.
Halal World Expo, the most comprehensive Middle East event to focus on the increasingly global Halal industry, will take place from 9-11th of December in Abu Dhabi at the Abu Dhabi National Exhibition Centre.
Halal - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1717 words)
Adherents to this philosophy maintain that in order for food to be considered halal, it must not be a forbidden substance and any meat must have been slaughtered according to traditional guidelines set forth by the Sunnah, known as dhabiĥa.
Adherents to this type of "Bismillah Halal" generally believe that any food, whether or not it is a forbidden substance, becomes halal once "Bismillah al Raĥman Al Raĥim" (In the name of God the Beneficent the Merciful) is recited over the food.
Dhabiĥa halal is relatively difficult to adhere to in a non-Muslim country.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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