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Encyclopedia > Hal Jordan
Green Lantern


Hal Jordan as Green Lantern
Art by Ethan Van Sciver Image File history File links Mergefrom. ... The many incarnations of the DC Comics superhero Green Lantern have had many alternate versions of themselves. ... Image File history File links Greenlantern. ... Cover to Green Lantern: Rebirth #5 as drawn by Van Sciver. ...

Publisher DC Comics
First appearance Showcase #22
(October 1959)
Created by John Broome
Gil Kane
Characteristics
Alter ego Harold "Hal" Jordan
Team
affiliations
Green Lantern Corps
Justice League
US Air Force
Notable aliases Pol Manning, Parallax, Spectre, Human Starburst
Abilities Power Ring

Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. He is the second Green Lantern and arguably the most famous hero to bear that name. Created by John Broome and Gil Kane, he first appeared in Showcase #22 (October 1959). DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... Showcase has been the title of several anthology series published by DC Comics. ... John Broome (aka: pen names John Osgood and Edgar Ray Meritt) was a writer-contributor to DC Comics. ... Showcase #22 (Oct. ... The fictional Green Lantern Corps is an intergalactic police force featured in DC Comics, particularly series featuring the superhero Green Lantern, Earth’s member of the group. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ... Pol Manning was an identity assumed by the fictional comic book superhero Hal Jordan, otherwise known as Green Lantern. ... Parallax is a fictional character, a supervillain from DC Comics. ... The Spectre is a fictional cosmic entity and superhero who has appeared in numerous comic books published by DC Comics. ... The three of the four (Alan Scotts Starheart powered ring exlcuded) known variants of the power ring Zamaron (magenta), Oan (green), and Qwardian (yellow). ... Alice, a fictional character based on a real character from the work of Lewis Carroll. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... John Broome (aka: pen names John Osgood and Edgar Ray Meritt) was a writer-contributor to DC Comics. ... Showcase #22 (Oct. ... Showcase has been the title of several anthology series published by DC Comics. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Hal Jordan's revamp as the Green Lantern was one of many old DC Comics characters to emerge in the Silver Age of comics. Like many of his contemporaries, Hal Jordan became more identified with his heroic identity than the previous iterations of the characters. Controversy erupted among comic book readers in 1994 when Hal Jordan became supervillain Parallax and Kyle Rayner replaced him as the Green Lantern. Showcase #4 (September-October 1956), often thought the first appearance of the first Silver Age superhero, the Barry Allen Flash. ... Doctor Doom, one of the most archetypal supervillains and his arch-enemies The Fantastic Four (in background). ... Parallax is a fictional character, a supervillain from DC Comics. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ...


Jordan underwent a number of further changes in the 1990s including dying and later returning as a new incarnation of The Spectre. Hal Jordan returned to the role of Green Lantern in 2004's Green Lantern: Rebirth miniseries and is currently the protagonist of the current volume of Green Lantern. The Spectre is a fictional cosmic entity and superhero who has appeared in numerous comic books published by DC Comics. ...

Contents

Publication history

Recreated for the Silver Age

After achieving great success in 1956 in reviving the original Golden Age character The Flash, DC editor Julius Schwartz looked toward recreating the original hero, Green Lantern from the Golden Age of Comic Books. Like The Flash, Schwartz wanted this new character to have a different secret identity, origin, and personality than his 1940s counterpart. A long time science-fiction fan and literary agent, Schwartz wanted a more sci-fi based Green Lantern, as opposed to the mystical powers of Alan Scott, the forties Green Lantern. He enlisted writer John Broome and artist Gil Kane, who in 1959 would reintroduce Green Lantern to the world in Showcase #22 (September-October 1959). The Flash. ... Julius Julie Schwartz (June 19, 1915 – February 8, 2004) was a comic book and pulp magazine editor, and a science fiction agent and prominent fan. ... Superman, catalyst of the Golden Age: Superman #14 (Feb. ... For other uses, see Allan Scott. ... John Broome (aka: pen names John Osgood and Edgar Ray Meritt) was a writer-contributor to DC Comics. ... Showcase #22 (Oct. ... Showcase has been the title of several anthology series published by DC Comics. ...


Like E.E. "Doc" Smith's Lensmen, the new Green Lantern was a member of an intergalactic constabulary made up of many different alien species who were given a device that provided them with great mental and physical abilities; [1] however, both Broome and Schwartz had denied a connection between those stories from science fiction pulps and the Green Lantern comic book stories. Gil Kane drew from actor Paul Newman in creating Hal Jordan's likeness and redesigned the Green Lantern uniform into a very sleek form-fitting outfit of green, black, and white - quite the opposite of Alan Scott's red, yellow, green, purple, and black costume with a puffy shirt and cape. E. E. Smith, also Edward Elmer Smith, Ph. ... This article is about the American actor and race team owner. ...


The character was a success and it was quickly decided to follow-up his three issue run on Showcase with a self-titled series. Green Lantern #1 began in July-August of 1960 and would continue until #89 in April-May 1972.


This creative team was responsible for introducing many of the major characters in Hal Jordan's life. First and foremost was Carol Ferris, Jordan's love interest. She was in charge of Ferris Aircraft, and as such, Hal's boss. While she preferred Green Lantern to Hal Jordan, she took an active role in trying to win him over, even going so far as to propose to him in the old Leap Year tradition. Although she gave Jordan the time of day, her job and company always came first. Ferris was a strong-willed woman of authority at a time when this was rare, especially in comic books. Carol Ferris is a fictional comic book character published by DC Comics. ... For the 1921 film starring Fatty Arbuckle, see Leap Year (film). ...


Another unique addition to Green Lantern's supporting cast was his best friend, Tom Kalmaku, who was both Hal's mechanic and the chronicler of his super-hero adventures. An Inuit (Eskimo) from Alaska, Tom's nickname was "Pie" or "Pieface", in reference to Eskimo Pie ice cream sandwiches. Like "Chop Chop" from the Blackhawk comics, this nickname is now understandably viewed as racist and has been downplayed by most modern writers. However, unlike "Chop Chop", Tom was actually a competent and intelligent character with a well-rounded personality, not a stereotypical buffoon. Despite the unfortunate nickname, Tom Kalmaku was among the first minority characters to be portrayed in this manner and broke new ground for mainstream comic books. Tom would later be followed by another trail-blazing minority character, John Stewart, the first African-American super-hero of the DC Universe. Thomas Kalmaku is a character in DC Comics, associated with Green Lantern. ... For other uses, see Inuit (disambiguation). ... Blackhawk #12 (Autumn, 1946), Quality Comics. ... John Stewart is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC Universe, and a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps. ...


Jordan's masters, the Guardians of the Universe, were physically based on David Ben-Gurion, the first Prime Minister of Israel, and were developed from an idea Schwartz and Broome had originally conceived years prior in a story featuring Captain Comet in Strange Adventures #22 (July, 1952) entitled "Guardians of the Clockwork Universe".[2] The Guardians of the Universe are fictional characters in the DC Comics universe. ...   (October 16, 1886 – December 1, 1973; Hebrew: ) was the first Prime Minister of Israel. ... The Prime Minister of Israel (Hebrew: ראש הממשלה, Rosh HaMemshala, lit. ... Captain Comet (Adam Blake) is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero created by writer John Broome and artist Carmine Infantino. ... Strange Adventures was an American comic book published by DC Comics. ...


Schwartz and company also allowed Jordan to have a family, which was another rare thing at this time in superhero comics. While he didn't have a wife or children of his own, he had many interactions with his two brothers, Jack and Jim. The Brothers Jordan were primarily inspired by the Kennedy brothers, who rose to prominence during the sixties.


When compared to comics of the thirties, forties, and early fifties, Green Lantern broke new storytelling ground and can be seen as a precursor to the "Marvel Revolution" that would take place several years later.[citation needed] Whereas older comics treated each issue as a stand-alone with no real sense of temporal direction between issues, Green Lantern's issues followed the order of publication, with references within the stories to previous stories and adventures. Not only were references made, but subplots (such as Hal and Carol's romance, the marriage of Tom Kalmaku, etc.) were advanced showing actual growth in the character's lives. While these subplots rarely were given much notice in comparison to Marvel's storylines in the sixties and especially to today's modern stories, they were the first step toward this sort of serial storytelling instead of the episodic nature of older comics.


Likewise, Green Lantern was one of the first comics to be a part of a "shared universe". The Justice League of America united several superheroes that DC owned, just as the Justice Society of America had in the Golden Age. The crucial difference was that events occurring in the Justice League title were reflected and referenced in individual superheroes' titles (such as Green Lantern). For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a team of fictional superheroes whose adventures have been published by DC Comics. ...


Also adding to the advancement of the medium was Gil Kane's use of dynamic art.[citation needed] Whereas previously, comics had mostly stuck with a six panel page consisting of six equal sized rectangles, Kane's panels changed in size and shape to offer a more emotional and visceral experience. The action and/or scene dictated the art instead of being forced into a rigid box structure. In addition, while there had been plenty of flying superheroes in the past, none flew quite like Hal Jordan. Kane’s art made Hal look more like he was gliding or swimming through the air than the usual leaping or bullet-like flying motion of other superheroes. His fluid poses made Hal a more graceful and, as a result, realistic-looking flying man.[citation needed]


John Broome seemed to come up with stories centered on a common theme and then run them together within a fairly short time. For example, Green Lantern #2-4 each contained stories involving the anti-matter universe of Qward, issues #12 and #15 featured "Zero Hour" stories, and issues #6 and #12 involved Hal being sent to the year 5700 AD in the guise of Pol Manning.[3]


Starting in issue #17, Gardner Fox joined the book to share writing duties with John Broome. The quartet of Schwartz, Broome, Fox, and Kane remained the core creative team until 1970. Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. ...


The Era of Social Conscience

Starting with issue #76, Dennis O'Neil took over scripting duties and Neal Adams took over as artist. Their collaboration produced the most famous and celebrated runs on Green Lantern. Julius Schwartz remained editor and hand-selected the two to revitalize the title, whose sales had been slipping. O’Neil and Adams had already begun preparation for the classic run in the form of their re-workings of another DC character: Green Arrow. Dennis Denny ONeil is a comic book writer and editor, principally for Marvel Comics and DC Comics in the 1970s, 80s, and 90s, and Group Editor for the Batman family of books until his retirement. ... Neal Adams (born June 6, 1941, Governors Island, Manhattan, New York City) is an American comic book and commercial artist best known for his highly naturalistic style of illustration. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ...


Green Arrow was a character originally created by DC in 1941 (then known as National Comics). He was a wealthy businessman named Oliver Queen who wore a green Errol Flynn-esque Robin Hood costume and shot “trick” arrows in his efforts to fight crime. His characterization was fairly basic (borrowing heavily from Batman but lacking the depth and tragedy of that character) and as such remained a second or third string hero throughout the Golden Age. However, the character managed to survive the fifties (during which most superhero comics were eliminated due to lack of interest) by being a backup character in the Superboy comics. In 1961, DC added Green Arrow to the roster of the Justice League of America, but still remained in the background and fairly uninteresting. Errol Leslie Thomson Flynn (June 20, 1909 – October 14, 1959) was an Australian film actor, most famous for his romantic swashbuckler roles in Hollywood films and his flamboyant lifestyle. ... For other uses, see Robin Hood (disambiguation). ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Superboy is the name of several fictional characters in the DC Universe, most of them youthful incarnations of Superman. ...

The oft-reprinted three panels ushering in the O'Neil/Adams run in Green Lantern #76.

This changed in 1968 with Justice League of America #66. Written by Denny O’Neil, Green Arrow started to show resentment toward his fellow superheroes who wielded great power (as he himself, possessing exceptional skill but no actual super-powers, did not), but did little to help the ordinary people with ordinary problems. O’Neil continued to push Green Arrow’s tolerance for his peers, and a little less than a year later, Neal Adams (not working in any sort of cooperation with O’Neil) redesigned Arrow, giving him a goatee and more dynamic and fierce outfit. Justice League of America #74 (still being written by O’Neil) introduced Black Canary as Arrow’s love interest and issue #75 left him broke, his company and fortune stolen from him. O’Neil wanted to recreate Green Arrow to better represent a modern Robin Hood, but felt a rich man would be a poor champion of the downtrodden. Image File history File links GLGA76BS.jpg Written by Dennis ONeil. ... Image File history File links GLGA76BS.jpg Written by Dennis ONeil. ... Black Canary is a fictional character, a DC Comics superheroine. ...


Some time after this, Schwartz invited O’Neil to take over Green Lantern. Wanting to represent his own political beliefs in comics and take on social issues of the late sixties and early seventies, O’Neil came up with the idea of pitting Hal Jordan, who as an intergalactic cop stood for not only Law & Order but The Establishment, against Oliver Queen, who O’Neil had characterized as a profoundly outspoken liberal and stood for the Counter-Culture Movement. The first issue he wrote had Green Lantern capturing a street "punk" who was pushing around a man. All around him, people start throwing things at the bewildered Jordan. As he steps in to attack, he is stopped by Green Arrow, who explains that the man he defended was a slum lord "fat cat" and goes even further to show Lantern the conditions of the slum. At the roof, in a now famous scene, an old African-American man grills Jordan as to why he has not done much for the "black skins" of his own planet while helping out other different colored aliens of other planets.


Following Schwartz's approval of the story, Neal Adams was brought in to replace Gil Kane, much to the surprise of Denny O'Neil. And yet, the pair had already been working together on Batman (where Adams successfully reconstructed the character into a more dramatic "Dark Knight"), Adams had been the one to redesign Green Arrow's costume, and the artist had a growing reputation for one who did not back down and pushed for innovative, good ideas and therefore, was the perfect candidate to work with O'Neil.


The pair proved to be dynamic and stunning. They tackled a number of social issues including corruption, sexism, cults, consumerism, the environment, racism, poverty, and even (subtly) child molestation. However, none were more shocking and controversial than the issue explored in issues #85 and #86. Neal Adams drew the cover, which showed Green Arrow’s youthful side-kick, Speedy, shooting heroin. Editor Julius Schwartz did not want it published. Neither did publisher Carmine Infantino. It appeared that the cover, which at that point had no story, would be forgotten. But over at Marvel, Stan Lee had green-lit Amazing Spider-Man #96, which featured pills and presented an anti-drug message without the Comics Code Authority seal. Facing opposition and controversy, the Comics Code Authority revised its rules in regard to what could and could not be presented in comic books and, while still restrictive, became more lenient. As a result, DC approved Adams’ cover and O’Neil wrote a two-part story involving drugs with Speedy being hooked. Green Arrow, who was usually presented as being the more understanding and mentoring of the Arrow/Lantern duo, now had his world turned upside-down, not only unable to understand his own part in leading Speedy toward drugs, but even coming off as uncompassionate toward the troubled youth. With this story, Adams and O’Neil not only tackled a difficult social ill, but looked inward at the ways that their “champion of the everyman” could be wrong. New York Mayor John V. Lindsay wrote a letter to DC in response to the issue commending them, which was printed in issue #86. Cover for Spider-Woman #8 (November 1978). ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... The Amazing Spider-Man is the title of both a comic book published by Marvel Comics and a daily newspaper comic strip. ... The seal of the Comics Code Authority, which appears on the covers of approved comic books. ... John Vliet Lindsay (November 24, 1921–December 19, 2000) was an American politician who served as a Congressman (1959-1966) and mayor of New York City (1966-1973). ...


Despite unprecedented mainstream media coverage, critical attention, awards, and apparent increased sales, Green Lantern/Green Arrow was canceled, one of many titles that ended publication perhaps prematurely under the reign of Carmine Infantino. Julius Schwartz had a reprint of an older story published for issue #88 and saw the comic he began back in 1959 come to an end in 1972 with issue #89. However, he had Denny O’Neil and Neal Adams do one last story together, stretched out over Flash #217-219 as a backup story.


Fictional character biography

Green Lantern History at Large

It is important to note that Green Lantern is something of an anomaly in the greater DC Comics universe. While most titles were "rebooted" with the 1980s Crisis on Infinite Earths, Green Lantern's continuity remained (for the most part) intact with relatively few exceptions (the only rule being, if a future issue contradicted something that came before, the subsequent issue would have precedence). For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ...


The second Green Lantern is Hal Jordan, who in comics published in 1959 was a second-generation test pilot (having followed in the footsteps of his father, Martin Jordan) who was given the power ring and battery (lantern) by a dying alien named Abin Sur. When Abin Sur's spaceship crashed on Earth, the alien used his ring to seek out an individual to take his place as Green Lantern: someone who was "utterly honest and born without fear" (which would be later retconned in Green Lantern vol. 4 as someone instead who would "overcome great fear"). For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Test pilots are aviators who fly new and modified aircraft in specific maneuvers, allowing the results to be measured and the design to be evaluated. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Abin Sur is a fictional character and a superhero from the DC Comics universe. ... One of the fictional ships called the Starship Enterprise from Star Trek, one of the most famous fictional starships. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ...


The Beginning

Cover to Showcase #22 (October 1959), the first appearance of Hal Jordan. Art by Gil Kane

Hal Jordan had a longtime on-again off-again love affair with his boss, Carol Ferris. He fought colorful 1960s-published villains such as Star Sapphire (a mind-altered Ferris), Hector Hammond, and the rogue Green Lantern, Sinestro. He was also a founding member of the Justice League of America in The Brave and the Bold #28 (1959), where he became friends with the Silver Age Flash, Barry Allen. Later, Hal became friends with Barry's nephew, Wally West, the third Flash (then known as Kid Flash). Cover to Showcase #22 (October 1959). ... Cover to Showcase #22 (October 1959). ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Showcase #22 (Oct. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... Star Sapphire is the name of several female supervillains in DC Comics, all connected in origin. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sinestro is a fictional character, an alien supervillain in the DC Comics Universe. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... The Brave and the Bold is a DC Comics comic book that is currently in monthly publication in a second volume. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Barry Allen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the second Flash. ... For the science fiction author, see Wallace West. ...


Near the end of the sixties, Hal decided to finally propose to Carol only to discover that she'd already agreed to marry another man named Jason Belmore. Heartbroken, Hal quit his job as a test pilot at Ferris Aircraft and began travelling around America in a series of different jobs including a commercial pilot, an insurance investigator and a travelling toy salesman (where met and began dating Olivia Reynolds). The combination of this change in status quo and new competition from less idealized heroes published by Marvel Comics led to diminishing sales on Green Lantern, prompting a startling new direction... Olivia Reynolds is a fictional character, in the DC Comics universe. ... This article is about the comic book company. ...


Hard Traveling Heroes

Green Lantern vol. 2, #76 (April 1970). Cover art by Neal Adams.

In comics published in 1970, torn between dealing with the intergalactic problems of the Guardians and his individual, personal issues on Earth, Jordan travelled across the United States with fellow hero Green Arrow in a "search for America," highlighted by tensions between the pair due to their different outlooks on life. One memorable scene from this period saw Green Lantern confronted by an elderly black man, who noted that the Green Lantern had done much for aliens with fantastic skin colors, but asked what he had done for the "black skins." Cover of Green Lantern #76 This work is copyrighted. ... Cover of Green Lantern #76 This work is copyrighted. ... Neal Adams (born June 6, 1941, Governors Island, Manhattan, New York City) is an American comic book and commercial artist best known for his highly naturalistic style of illustration. ... Year 1970 ([[Rf 1970 == January 1 - The Unix epoch begins at 00:00:00 UTC January 2 - The last studio performance of The Beatles oman numerals|MCMLXX]]) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ...


The Guardians assigned one of their own to accompany the pair for a time, while temporarily reducing the power of their insubordinate Lantern's ring[citation needed]. Meanwhile, a new character was introduced named John Stewart, who was designated by the Guardians to assume the role of the Green Lantern of Space Sector 2814 should Jordan ever become unable to perform his duties. John was chosen for this task when Jordan's previous back-up, Guy Gardner, was injured saving a young girl during an earthquake. Gardner later recovered, but was left a vegetable when his Power Battery exploded and hurled him into the Phantom Zone and the Anti-Matter Universe of Qward. John Stewart is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC Universe, and a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps. ... Guy Gardner is a fictional character, a comic book superhero published by DC Comics. ... The Phantom Zone is a fictional prison dimension featured in the Superman comic books and related media. ... Qward is a fictional world existing within an antimatter universe that is part of the DC Comics universe. ...


During this period, Hal had fallen in love with psychic Kari Limbo, whom he met following Gardner's presumed death. When Gardner was discovered alive on Hal & Kari's wedding day, Kari left Hal at the altar to care for Gardner, now in a coma. Soon afterwards, Hal dissolved his partnership with Green Arrow and returned to Ferris Aircraft to work as a test pilot once again.


The 80s Exile

In comics published in the early 1980s, Jordan was exiled into space for a year by the Guardians in order to prove his loyalty to the Green Lantern Corps, having been accused of paying too much attention to Earth when he had an entire "sector" of the cosmos to patrol. When he returned to Earth, he found himself embroiled in a dispute with Carol Ferris. Faced with a choice between love and the power ring, Jordan chose to resign from the Green Lantern Corps. The Guardians called upon Jordan's backup, John Stewart, to regular duty as his replacement. The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... John Stewart is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC Universe, and a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps. ...


In 1985, the Crisis on Infinite Earths saw Jordan once again take up the mantle of Green Lantern, even as the Guardians withdrew from his dimension for a while to consort with their female counterparts, the Zamarons. Jordan helped organize the new Corps, with seven members residing on Earth, including several aliens, John Stewart, and Jordan's slightly-unbalanced "other backup," Guy Gardner. For a while, Jordan was romantically involved with a younger, alien Lantern named Arisia. The alien Lanterns took a more direct hand in human affairs, a fact not appreciated by human governments. (Kilowog helped create the Rocket Reds for the Soviet Union). Eventually, the Earth corps broke up, several members returning to their home sectors. The Guardians soon returned to this dimension, and Jordan worked with them to rebuild the fractured Corps. This article is about the year. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... The Zamarons are a fictional extraterrestrial race within the DC Comics universe. ... Guy Gardner is a fictional character, a comic book superhero published by DC Comics. ... Arisia is a fictional character featured in comic books published by DC Comics. ... Kilowog is a fictional superhero from DC Comics, and a member of the Green Lantern Corps. ... The Rocket Red Brigade is a DC Comics superhero team. ...


Green Lantern: Emerald Dawn

In December of 1989, following the cancellation of Green Lantern Corps at issue #224 (May 1988) (originally Green Lantern vol. 2 until the title was changed with issue #206 (Nov. 1986), DC cancelled its ongoing Green Lantern Corps title and made Green Lantern and his adventures exclusive to the failed Action Comics Weekly for a bit less than a year in 1988-1989, the origin of Hal Jordan was retold/retconned (in a similar manner to Frank Miller's Batman: Year One and John Byrne's The Man of Steel) in the 6-issue limited series Green Lantern: Emerald Dawn, written by Jim Owsley (issue #1), Keith Giffen & Gerard Jones (#2-6) with art by M.D. Bright and Romeo Tanghal. Here, published between the second and third volumes of Green Lantern (though chronologically the first Hal Jordan story in the modern day post-Crisis on Infinite Earths continuity), we learn what originally made Hal the man he is, and how he obtained the ring and under what conditions. We see his father die before his very eyes, we see him roll a jeep with his friends in it while driving a little less than sober, and we see how a person like this must manage a ring of power. Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... The fictional Green Lantern Corps is an intergalactic police force featured in DC Comics, particularly series featuring the superhero Green Lantern, Earth’s member of the group. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... Cover of Action Comics #1, which featured the debut of Superman. ... The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... Christopher James Priest, born James Christopher Owsley in 1961, is a writer of comic books. ... Keith Ian Giffen (born November 30, 1952) is an American artist, writer, and penciller of comic books. ... Gerard Jones is an American writer, born July 10, 1957 in Cut Bank, Montana, raised in Los Gatos and Gilroy, California. ... Mark D. Bright is a American comic book artist. ... Romeo Tanghal is a comics artist who has worked with the some of the best in the industry. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ...


As Hal Jordan is testing a new flight simulator, the machine suddenly seems to tear itself free of its moorings and begins to fly through the air. Hal lands near a crashed alien spacecraft, and a fatally injured alien, who tells Hal that he is this sector's Green Lantern. The dying man, Abin Sur, has chosen Hal to be his successor, using his Green Lantern power ring to bring him (and, unfortunately, the doomed flight simulator) to the crash site. He calls Hal a man without fear (though in the later fourth and current series of Green Lantern, this would be retconned to indicate Abin Sur told Hal, in fact, that he was a man that would "overcome great fear"). With this, Hal Jordan becomes Green Lantern. Abin Sur is a fictional character and a superhero from the DC Comics universe. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ...


Though treated on Earth like a superhero, Hal Jordan soon learns that Abin Sur was a member of an elite force of intergalactic police called the Green Lantern Corps, who work for the Guardians of the Universe. Instead of one Green Lantern wielding a magic ring, there are 3,600 Green Lanterns, each protecting a sector of the entire universe. Their rings are powered by a Central Power Battery on the Guardians' home planet Oa. Oan power rings must be recharged every 24 hours, and are ineffective against direct contact with the color yellow, due to a "necessary impurity" in the design of the rings. Jordan is assigned to patrol Sector 2814, which includes Earth. The fictional Green Lantern Corps is an intergalactic police force featured in DC Comics, particularly series featuring the superhero Green Lantern, Earth’s member of the group. ... The Guardians of the Universe are fictional characters in the DC Comics universe. ... For other uses of Oa and oa, see OA. Oa is a fictional planet located at the center of the DC Comics Universe. ... A yellow Tulip. ... Parallax is a fictional character, a supervillain from DC Comics. ...


It seems, at first, that Hal is less than up to the task. The first thing he does with the ring is goof off and have fun flying. But when an evil alien known as Legion appears, he discovers that the time has come to get serious. Legion appears both angry and unstoppable, and Hal finds out about his power ring's one flaw the hard way: Legion's entire body is yellow. Legion is a fictional supervillain in the DC Comics universe. ...


The conflict escalates when Legion attacks the Guardians at the Green Lantern Corps headquarters on Oa. Because of his color, even the full might of the Corps suffers heavy losses in battle after battle trying to neutralize the adversary. Even though Hal is technically still a trainee under the stern watch of the Green Lantern's drill sergeant-esque trainer, Kilowog, of the planet Bolovax Vik, we see a glimmer of the Hal that will one day emerge when he comes up with an ingenious plan to defeat Legion that impresses even the Guardians of the Universe. In the end, Hal Jordan returns to Earth to face the consequences of the mistakes he has made in his personal life, accepting a 90-day jail sentence resulting from his drunk-driving incident. After serving his time, he emerges to continue as Sector 2814's Green Lantern. The fictional Green Lantern Corps is an intergalactic police force featured in DC Comics, particularly series featuring the superhero Green Lantern, Earth’s member of the group. ... Kilowog is a fictional superhero from DC Comics, and a member of the Green Lantern Corps. ... The Guardians of the Universe are fictional characters in the DC Comics universe. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ...


Green Lantern: Emerald Dawn II

The story begins 90 days from the conclusion of the original "Emerald Dawn", and relates the events of Hal Jordan's actual drunk driving sentence in Green Lantern: Emerald Dawn II, the sequel 6-issue limited series (released from April to September 1991, again by the Emerald Dawn I creative team of writers Keith Giffen & Gerard Jones and artists M.D. Bright and Romeo Tanghal). He begins it in earnest, intending to serve his time with no question, though he still dreams of his time with the Green Lantern Corps and the adventures that yet lay ahead. Keith Ian Giffen (born November 30, 1952) is an American artist, writer, and penciller of comic books. ... Gerard Jones is an American writer, born July 10, 1957 in Cut Bank, Montana, raised in Los Gatos and Gilroy, California. ... Mark D. Bright is a American comic book artist. ... Romeo Tanghal is a comics artist who has worked with the some of the best in the industry. ... The fictional Green Lantern Corps is an intergalactic police force featured in DC Comics, particularly series featuring the superhero Green Lantern, Earth’s member of the group. ...


It is determined by the Guardians of the Universe that Hal Jordan's training requires the experties of another of their finest Green Lanterns, this time Sinestro of Korugar, who reportedly has the most orderly of all Green Lantern Corps-controlled sectors. Sinestro grudgingly agrees to further train Hal Jordan, and immediately appears in Hal Jordan's prison cell. A series of temporary jailbreaks ensues, during which Hal does his best to conceal his absence (either by making glowing replicates of himself still "asleep" in bed or by other means) while he completes a series of training exercises with Sinestro into outer space and alien worlds. Finally, when Sinestro is unable to establish contact with his homeworld, he takes Hal Jordan along with him to see what is the matter. What Sinestro finds, to Hal Jordan's shock, is a world in turmoil -- it seemed Sinestro's people have rebelled against him, tearing down banners and flags bearing Sinestro's image. In return for his protection, Sinestro has demanded a heavy price for his "protection" from his own people -- nothing less than hero worship, and the people were no longer willing to pay. The Guardians of the Universe are fictional characters in the DC Comics universe. ... Sinestro is a fictional character, an alien supervillain in the DC Comics Universe. ... Korugar is a fictional planet in the DC Comics Universe. ...


Hal Jordan does not stand idly by either, quickly calling in the Green Lantern Corps at large. Sinestro is arrested by his brethren, then promptly tried by the Guardians of the Universe and sentenced to exile to the Anti-Matter Universe of Qward. Qward is a fictional world existing within an antimatter universe that is part of the DC Comics universe. ...


Hal Jordan returns to Earth to serve the remainder of his sentence in relative peace.


It is also noteworthy that Guy Gardner plays the role of a social welfare caseworker over the course of this storyline, often aiding Hal Jordan and sticking up for him when questions are raised about his whereabouts during his trainings with Sinestro. In the end, during a prison riot, Guy Gardner loses control of his anger and we see a more familiar side of the Guy Gardner he would later become. Guy Gardner is a fictional character, a comic book superhero published by DC Comics. ... ...


Green Lantern: Ganthet's Tale

In the 1992 prestige format graphic novel Green Lantern: Ganthet's Tale (ISBN 1-56389-026-7) (story by Larry Niven, script & art by John Byrne), Hal Jordan first encounters Ganthet, one of the Guardians of the Universe. He asks Hal to help Ganthet battle a renegade Guardian, Dawlakispokpok (or Dawly, for short) who has attempted to use a time machine to change history. In the early era of the planet Oa, a character named Krona attempted to use a time-machine to see the beginning of time. In the process, Krona somehow accidentally 'bled' the universe of a billion years of life. Dawly intends to use his own time machine to thrust Krona to the end of time, preventing him from following through on his plan. During the battle, however, it turned out that Dawly is (or becomes) responsible for the mishap that caused the universe to be 'born old'. When Dawly's family is brought before the Guardians, Ganthet prevents the others from seeing his thoughts, allowing Hal to retain his memory of one of the biggest secrets of the Guardians. Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Prestige format is a term coined by DC Comics but now in wider use to refer to a square-bound comic book with cardstock covers. ... Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ... Ganthet is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses of John Byrne, see John Byrne (disambiguation). ... Ganthet is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... The Guardians of the Universe are fictional characters in the DC Comics universe. ... Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ... For other uses of Oa and oa, see OA. Oa is a fictional planet located at the center of the DC Comics Universe. ... Krona is a fictional extraterrestrial villain in the DC Comics universe. ...


Emerald Twilight and Zero Hour

Cover to Green Lantern (vol. 3) #50 (March 1994). Hal Jordan becomes Parallax. Art by Darryl Banks.

In the controversial 1994 Emerald Twilight storyline in Green Lantern vol. 3, #48-50, the villainous alien Mongul comes to Earth in a plot to take advantage of the death of Superman. Jordan defeats Mongul, but not before Coast City (Jordan's former home) is destroyed and all of its inhabitants murdered. He tries to use his ring to recreate the city, but the Guardians condemned this use of the ring for personal gain and demand that Jordan come to Oa for trial. Angered at what he saw as the Guardians' ungrateful and callous behavior, Jordan seemingly goes insane and attacks Oa to seize the full power of the Central Power Battery. The Green Lantern Corps attempt to defend Oa, but the enraged Jordan overwhelms them, crippling his fellow Lanterns (even cutting off the hand of Boodikka and reducing Kilowog to bone and ashes) and the Guardians. He then renounces the Central Power Battery to his life as Green Lantern, adopting the name Parallax. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (400x604, 87 KB)Cover to Green Lantern #50 (March 1994). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (400x604, 87 KB)Cover to Green Lantern #50 (March 1994). ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Emerald Twilight is the name for the story that was detailed in Green Lantern Vol. ... Mongul is a DC Comics supervillain created by Jim Starlin and Len Wein. ... Superman #75 (Jan. ... Coast City was a fictional city that appeared in stories published by DC Comics. ... Inmates at Bedlam Asylum, as portrayed by William Hogarth Insanity, or madness, is a semi-permanent, severe mental disorder typically stemming from a form of mental illness. ... The fictional Green Lantern Corps is an intergalactic police force featured in DC Comics, particularly series featuring the superhero Green Lantern, Earth’s member of the group. ... Boodikka is a fictional character featured in comic books published by DC Comics. ... Kilowog is a fictional superhero from DC Comics, and a member of the Green Lantern Corps. ... Parallax is a fictional character, a supervillain from DC Comics. ...


As Parallax, he initiates the Zero Hour: Crisis in Time, attempting to rewrite history to his own liking, but he is eventually defeated by a gathering of heroes. Jordan is replaced by Kyle Rayner as the Green Lantern of Earth when Rayner comes into possession of the last power ring, created from the shattered remains of Jordan's. During the same storyline, Alan Scott gave up his ring upon the death of members of the original Justice Society of America, and this ring is later crushed by Parallax. Alan Scott soon renounces his "Green Lantern" identity and begins to use the codename "Sentinel". This leaves Kyle Rayner as the sole bearer of the mantle of "Green Lantern." Zero Hour: Crisis in Time was a 1994 comic book miniseries and crossover storyline that ran in DC Comics. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... For other uses, see Allan Scott. ... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ...


Final Night

Promotional art for Green Lantern: Rebirth #1 (December 2004) cover, art by Ethan Van Sciver.

In the 1996 Final Night miniseries and crossover storyline, Jordan returns to his heroic roots, sacrificing his life to reignite the Sun (which had been extinguished by the Sun-Eater). Many super-heroes, including Superman, view this sacrifice as Jordan's redemption, one final heroic act. Batman is unconvinced, saying that one act couldn't make up for the evil that Hal had committed. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Cover to Green Lantern: Rebirth #5 as drawn by Van Sciver. ... Final Night was a 1996 comic book miniseries and crossover storyline published by DC Comics, which featured prominently the main heroes of the DC universe along with some of old. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ...


The Spectre, Spirit of Redemption

In the 1999 miniseries Day of Judgment, Jordan becomes the newest incarnation of the Spectre. [1] Soon after assuming this mantle, Jordan chose to bend his mission from a spirit of vengeance to one of redemption, also making other appearances through some of DC's other storylines, such as advising Superman during the Emperor Joker storyline (Where the Joker stole the reality-warping power of Mister Mxyzptlk) and erasing all public knowledge of Wally West's identity as the Flash after his terrible first battle with Zoom. A new Spectre series based on this premise, however, lasted only 27 issues before cancellation due both to poor sales and continued calls amongst comics fandom to return the character to his sci-fi roots as Green Lantern. Jordan was forced to return, temporarily, to the Spectre's mission of vengeance, following a confrontation between the new Justice Society and the Spirit King, who had managed to 'resurrect' the ghosts of all those the Spectre had damned to Hell. Day of Judgement was a DC Comics crossover in which the Spectre (whose previous host, Jim Corrigan, had left him when he ascended into Heaven) was possessed by the fallen angel Asmodel, who used the power of the Spectre to freeze Hell and release hordes of demons on the earth. ... The Spectre is a fictional cosmic entity and superhero who has appeared in numerous comic books published by DC Comics. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... The Joker redirects here. ... Mister Mxyzptlk (roughly pronounced Miks-yez-pit-lik, or Mix-yez-pittle-ik, also nicknamed Mxy) is a fictional supervillain who appears in DC Comics Superman comic books. ... For the science fiction author, see Wallace West. ... The Flash is a name shared by several DC Comics superheroes. ... Zoom (real name Hunter Zolomon) is a comic book supervillain in the DC Universe. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... The Spirit King is a character in the DC Universe; he was initially an adversary of the original Mister Terrific, but later expanded to be a threat to the entire Justice Society, particularly the Spectre and the Flash. ...


Green Lantern: Rebirth

DC brings back Hal Jordan as Green Lantern of Earth and largely exonerated him of his past crimes in the 2004/2005 miniseries Green Lantern: Rebirth (written by Geoff Johns, and pencilled by Ethan Van Sciver). It is revealed that Parallax was actually an ancient yellow parasitic "spirit" dating back to the dawn of time. The sentient embodiment of fear, Parallax traveled from world to world, feeding off the fear of sentient beings and causing entire civilizations to destroy themselves out of paranoia. Geoff Johns (born 25 January 1973 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American comic book writer, best known for his work for DC Comics. ... Cover to Green Lantern: Rebirth #5 as drawn by Van Sciver. ... Parallax is a fictional character, a supervillain from DC Comics. ...


The Guardians of the Universe had successfully imprisoned Parallax within the Central Power Battery on Oa. Parallax lay dormant for billions of years, its existence covered up by the Guardians to prevent anyone from trying to free it. Thus, it eventually came to be referred to as "the yellow impurity." This was the reason power rings were useless against the color yellow: Parallax weakened their power over the corresponding spectrum. Hence, only users who could master their fear could properly wield a power ring. When the renegade Sinestro was imprisoned in the Power Battery himself, his yellow power ring tapped into Parallax and awakened it.


Parallax then had psychically reached into Jordan's ring from its prison when he was at his weakest, causing increasing self-doubt and even causing his hair to turn white prematurely. Parallax's control over Jordan spiked with Jordan's grief over the destruction of Coast City, when, for the first time since acquiring the ring, Jordan was afraid--of what would happen tomorrow. Jordan's subsequent murderous activity was the result. Hal's apparent killing of Sinestro was revealed as an illusion on Sinestro's part, created as the final stage of Jordan's susceptibility to break his will. Once Jordan had destroyed the Central Power Battery, Parallax escaped its prison and fully grafted itself onto his soul. With Parallax free, Kyle Rayner's ring lacked the historical weakness against the yellow portion of the visible spectrum. Rayner discovered the truth behind Parallax at the edge of the known universe, just as Parallax began a battle with the Spectre for the continued dominance of Hal's soul. Coast City was a fictional city that appeared in stories published by DC Comics. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ...


The Spectre explains the entire story to Jordan: it drew in Jordan's soul in hopes of purging Parallax from Hal's body, and banishing it for all the fear it had created. Parallax briefly managed to take control of both Jordan and the Spectre, along with active Green Lanterns Guy Gardner, John Stewart and Kilowog, but after a fierce battle, Parallax is finally ejected from Jordan's soul and the other Green Lanterns are freed. The Spectre then departed to find himself a new host, while Ganthet guided Jordan's soul back to his own body, which had been preserved by the remnants of the energies Jordan had used to reignite the Sun during Final Night. Final Night was a 1996 comic book miniseries and crossover storyline published by DC Comics, which featured prominently the main heroes of the DC universe along with some of old. ...


With his soul and mind finally his own again, Jordan was resurrected and de-aged, again taking his place as a Green Lantern. Discovering Sinestro's deception and defeating him, Jordan and Kyle gathered the other Green Lanterns of Earth, along with Kilowog. They were able to rescue Ganthet, whom Parallax had possessed after his expulsion from Jordan's soul, and imprisoned the parasite back in the Central Power Battery on Oa. Despite this re-introduction of the "yellow impurity", it is important to note that the power rings' weakness against yellow no longer applies, as experienced wielders are now able to directly recognize its source and overcome the inherent fear.


Green Lantern (vol. 4)

Following up on the Green Lantern: Rebirth miniseries, DC Comics subsequently began a new Green Lantern (vol. 4) series starting with issue #1 (July 2005), with Hal Jordan once again the main character. Trying to rebuild his life, Hal Jordan has moved to the nearly deserted Coast City, which is slowly being reconstructed. He has been reinstated as a Captain in the United States Air Force, and works in the Test Pilot Program at Edwards Air Force Base. He also begins to develop a romantic attraction with his fellow pilot, the beautiful Jillian "Cowgirl" Pearlman. Edwards Air Force Base (IATA: EDW, ICAO: KEDW) is a United States Air Force airbase located on the border of Kern County and Los Angeles County, California in the Antelope Valley, 7 miles (11 km) due east of Rosamond. ...


In his new title, he faces revamped versions of his Silver Age foes Hector Hammond, The Shark and Black Hand. He and Batman team up to fight a new version of the Tattooed Man, at the end of which Batman finally comes to terms with Jordan's return as a hero and they begin to rebuild their past friendship. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Shark is the name of 3 DC Comics characters. ... Black Hand (real name William Hand) is a DC Comics supervillain and a recurring foe to Green Lantern. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... The Tattooed Man is the name of two of Green Lanterns enemies. ...


Hal also takes Kyle to Edwards Air Force Base shortly after his resurrection. He bribes the guard, a family friend named Johnny, in order to take Kyle on a joyride with one the base's jets. Afterward, a close bond begins to form between the two, as Kyle finally learns how to truly fly.


Infinite Crisis and 52

Hal helps with the decimation of the OMACs and Brother Eye, rescuing Batman from Brother Eye at the last minute, reaffirming Batman's newly regained trust in the metahuman population. He also fights alongside the world's heroes against the Society, defending Metropolis. Along with Guy Gardner, Hal leads the Green Lantern Corps attack against Superboy-Prime. OMACs are an organization of powerful cyborgs that exist in the DC Universe. ... OMACs are an organization of powerful cyborgs that exist in the DC Universe. ... The Battle of Metropolis is a fictional DC Comics event. ... Metropolis as depicted in the Superman Returns video game Metropolis is a fictional city that appears in comic books published by DC Comics, and is the home of Superman. ... Guy Gardner is a fictional character, a comic book superhero published by DC Comics. ... Superboy-Prime is a fictional character, a superhero turned supervillain in the DC Universe. ...


Along with John Stewart, Hal is involved in one of the first post-Freedom of Power Treaty confrontations. After a battle with the Great Ten and Black Adam, Stewart and Jordan are escorted to Russian airspace by the Rocket Reds. John Stewart is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC Universe, and a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps. ... The Freedom of Power Treaty is a fictional treaty in the DC Comics Universe. ... The Great Ten are a team of fictional superheroes sponsored by the government of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Black Adam is a fictional comic book character whose morally ambiguous nature has his character fall between the lines of heroism and villainy; as a result, he has associated himself with both superheroes and supervillains at different times. ...


One Year Later

Main article: One Year Later

As part of DC's reimagining of the entire universe, as of Green Lantern vol. 4, #10, the book has skipped ahead one year, bringing drastic changes to Hal Jordan's life, as with every other hero in the DC Universe. Over the "missing year", Hal shipped out as part of the United States Air Force's first operational F-22 Raptor squadron, assigned to bomb terrorist training camps. The details of this event are vague, with no reason given for the assignment. Hal, along with fellow pilots Shane "Rocket-Man" Sellers and Jillian "Cowgirl" Pearlman, are shot down somewhere over the former Soviet Union where they were captured and held as prisoners of war for a month. Hal is unable to escape as Green Lantern because he never carries his power ring with him when he flies. Hal has repeatedly encountered the Russians and their Rocket Red patrols while chasing intergalactic criminals as Green Lantern. Because of these encounters, Russia once issued a statement that they would not hesitate to use force against him if Checkmate failed to uphold the metahuman treaty legislation prohibiting metahumans from entering foreign air space. Hal's defense is that as the Green Lantern of Earth, he is not acting as an American when he crosses international borders. Among those threatening Hal are a new form of The Global Guardians. One Year Later event logo. ... “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... The Rocket Red Brigade is a DC Comics superhero team. ... Checkmate is a fictional covert operations agency within the DC Comics universe. ... Metahuman is a term to describe superhumans in the DC Universe. ... The Global Guardians are a team of DC Comics superheroes which hail from countries outside of the US. // History The Guardians are similar to the Justice League as they are also committed to fighting crime around the world. ...


Also in Green Lantern #10, while Hal is receiving a P.O.W. medal, an alien ship crashes to Earth and reveals to Hal an alien Green Lantern named Tomar-Tu, whom Hal had supposedly killed while under the control of Parallax. In Green Lantern #11, Hal discovers that the Green Lanterns that he had supposedly killed as Parallax are all still alive, and he and Guy Gardner go to rescue them, only to be attacked by Cyborg Superman. Parallax is a fictional character, a supervillain from DC Comics. ... Guy Gardner is a fictional character, a comic book superhero published by DC Comics. ... |caption=Cover to Superman (vol. ...


After returning to Earth, Hal is then attacked in Russia by a series of bounty hunters (including brainwashed Global Guardians under the Faceless Hunter's control) in an attempt by Amon Sur, son of Abin Sur, to reclaim his father's power ring. The attack results in the death of 23 people; in response, the Rocket Red Brigade attack Hal. When they fight each other to a standstill, the Justice League of America and Alan Scott arrive at the scene and resolve the conflict. ("Green Lantern" vol. 4, #14 and #15). After Hal rescues his fellow pilot Jillian "Cowgirl" Pearlman from her attacker, she recognizes the hero as her fellow pilot and friend. As they are about to share a passionate kiss, Hal is captured by Amon Sur, and forced to exhume Abin Sur's remains. John Stewart arrives to rescue Hal, leading to a confrontation with Amon Sur, who turns out to be the son of their predecessor, Abin Sur. During the fight, Amon receives a ring from the Sinestro Corps and vanishes. Hal brings Abin's body home and reinters him with a new tombstone. After Hal leaves, a yellow light appears in the sky; presumably Amon has arrived to visit his father's grave. The Global Guardians are a team of DC Comics superheroes which hail from countries outside of the US. // History The Guardians are similar to the Justice League as they are also committed to fighting crime around the world. ... The Faceless Hunter is a fictional alien in the DC Comics universe. ... Amon Sur is a fictional alien supervillain in the DC Comics Universe. ... Abin Sur is a fictional character and a superhero from the DC Comics universe. ... The Rocket Red Brigade is a DC Comics superhero team. ... The Justice League is a DC Comics superhero team. ... For other uses, see Allan Scott. ... The Sinestro Corps is a group of fictional characters, a villainous analogue to the Green Lantern Corps in the DC Universe led by the supervillain Sinestro. ...


Hal visits Jillian in her room at the base hospital, where she is being treated for injuries she has suffered. Before he leaves, she tells Hal that they need to talk about his double life and their feelings for each other.


After a few days, Jillian recovers enough to leave the hospital, and joins Hal on a date at Pancho's, a bar outside Edwards Air Force Base. At the same time, Star Sapphire, still obsessed with making Hal her mate, possesses Carol Ferris again, knowing Carol's history as Hal's former love. She attacks Hal at the bar, and during the fight, senses Hal's affection for Jillian. Star Sapphire leaves Carol's body to possess Jillian. Star Sapphire is the name of several female supervillains in DC Comics, all connected in origin. ...


Carol joins Hal in an attempt to rescue Jillian from Star Sapphire, and the two manage to defeat it and free Jillian. However, the Zamarons appear, demanding that Hal choose a mate. Thinking quickly, pretends to passionately kiss one of Zamarons, leading the gem to immediately possess her. The Zamarons retreat to their world in order to free their sister, after which they take the Star Sapphire and forge it into a "sapphire" power ring. The next 2 page spread shows the Zamarons in a room with a green, a yellow, and a "sapphire" lantern. Each lantern is displayed on one of three pedestals; a fourth stands empty. This may have undetermined future implications. Meanwhile, Hal visits Ferris Air and he finds out from Tom that Carol has divorced her husband Gil.


Aside from his own monthly title, Jordan is also a character of focus in the new Justice League of America series as a charter member of the revamped JLA. He is also involved in the first plotline of the Brave and the Bold monthly series, teaming up first with Batman and later Supergirl. His relationship with Batman appears to have fully recovered from his turbulent history, as the two are very professional and respectful of each other. When teamed with the fledgling Supergirl, Hal is very impressed with her cleverness, although he finds her flirtatious behaviour somewhat unnerving. The Brave and the Bold was a DC Comics superhero comic book which was published from August 1955 to July 1983. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... For other uses, see Supergirl (disambiguation). ...


Hal eventually decides to relinquish his full time status with the League due to his other commitments. His sector partner John Stewart takes over as the League's Green Lantern.


Sinestro Corps War

Main article: Sinestro Corps

Hal and the rest of the Green Lantern Corps find themselves at war with Sinestro and his army, the Sinestro Corps. During the battle, Hal, along with Guy Gardner, and John Stewart are being captured by Parallax to the Qwards. Hal attempts to flee Qward after being overwhelmed by Parallax. The Sinestro Corps begin to attack him until help arrives from the "Lost Lanterns". Their combined efforts hold off the Sinestro Corps before they're attacked by Parallax, who forces the Lanterns to confront their fears and kills Jack T. Chance. The remaining Lanterns flee underground and split into two teams. One team locates the missing Guy and John before being confronted by Lyssa Drak, who holds the two Lanterns captive. Hal manages to defeat Lyssa and free his friends, while the Lost Lanterns recover Ion. The earth-based Lantern then return home, only to find that New Earth, as the center of the Multiverse, is the Sinestro Corps' next target. The Sinestro Corps is a group of fictional characters, a villainous analogue to the Green Lantern Corps in the DC Universe led by the supervillain Sinestro. ... Sinestro is a fictional character, an alien supervillain in the DC Comics Universe. ... Guy Gardner is a fictional character, a comic book superhero published by DC Comics. ... John Stewart is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC Universe, and a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps. ... Jack T. Chance is a fictional character featured in comic books published by DC Comics he is a Green Lantern from the world of Garnet also known as Hellhole. ... Lyssa Drak is a fictional alien supervillain in the DC Comics Universe. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... A depiction of several alternate Earths within the Multiverse and the different variations of the Flash inhabiting each Earth. ...


The Sinestro Corps, and the Manhunters, invade Earth. The Cyborg Superman and Superboy-Prime attack Superman, while Hal confronts Parallax just before the latter is about to kill Hal's family. Parallax absorbs Hal inside himself. Hal is able to use a painting made by Kyle's mother to help Kyle overcome his fears and expel Parallax. Now the Parallax's original form, is then contained by Ganthet and Sayd within the Power Batteries of Hal, John, Guy, and Kyle. Ganthet and Sayd reveal that they're no longer Guardians. Ganthet gives Kyle a new Power ring and asks Kyle to become a Green Lantern again, which he agrees. The four men then take their Lanterns and hearing the Sinestro Corps oath, recite the classic Green Lantern oath, and the issue ends a shot of Sinestro and the other Sinestro Corps members with Hal saying: "Now let's go save the universe."


The story is ongoing.


Family

  • Martin Harold Jordan is the father of Hal Jordan. When Hal was a child, his father gave his jacket before going to fly the jet on the airfield, when his engines malfunctioned Martin tells his boss he has to eject. His boss, Carl, orders him to keep the plane in the air. The jet explodes and crashes in front of Carl, Carol and Hal.
  • Jessica Elizabeth Jordan is the mother of Hal Jordan. When her husband dies in the crash, Jessica and their sons move to Coast City. Jessica tells her son Hal not to become a pilot. During in time, Jessica's died in the hospital with deathbed, because her son Hal's broke her promise when he was eighteen. Before Jessica's death she refused to talk Hal until he quit the air force.
  • Jack Jordan is the older brother of Hal Jordan. He was a lawyer and would become the district attorney of the county in which Coast City was situated. Once when Jack, Jack's girlfriend Dee, fellow test pilot Andy and he went out for drinks, the drunk Hal loses control while driving home. Hal wakes up in the hospital but Andy has been critically injured in the accident.
  • Jim Jordan is the younger brother of Hal Jordan. He was the most footloose of the three, but would emerge to be more prominent than Hal or Jack in the stories. When Coast City is rebuilt, Jim can’t decide whether to return home feeling his wife Susan and his children Jane and Howard would be in danger. He then moves back to Coast City with other businesses and citizens but not enough to repopulate the city and he gets in financial trouble.
  • Lawrence 'Larry' Jordan, Air Wave, is a cousin of Hal Jordan.

Look up deathbed in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Coast City was a fictional city that appeared in stories published by DC Comics. ... Air-Wave is the name of used by several superheroes in the DC Universe. ...

Trivia

  • After helping the Corps defeat Krona and Nekron, Hal Jordan is offered "The Crimson Mantle of Command, symbol of those who would become Corps Leader!" Jordan declines the honor, on the grounds that he is "no different than any other ring-slinger" who did "what any GL would have done given the chance!" Whether the rank and offer still stand remains to be seen.

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Krona may refer to: The Swedish krona currency The Icelandic króna currency The Faroese króna currency Similar named currencies from other countries: Czech koruna, Danish krone, Estonian kroon, Norwegian krone and Slovak koruna An alien villain in DC Comics, see Krona (comics). ... Nekron, Lord of the Unliving is a fictional character, an extra-dimensional villain in the DC Comics universe. ...

Other versions

Main article: Alternate versions of Green Lantern

The many incarnations of the DC Comics superhero Green Lantern have had many alternate versions of themselves. ...

Other media

Main article: Green Lantern in other media

Hal Jordan made his first cartoon appearance in 1967 in an eponymously-titled segment of The Superman/Aquaman Hour of Adventure cartoon by Filmation. In it, he fought evil with the aid of a blue-skinned, pointed-eared sidekick Kairo, Hal's Venusian Helper. In these cartoons, Hal Jordan was voiced by Gerald Mohr. The DC Comics superhero Green Lantern (alter ego: Hal Jordan) has appeared in numerous media over the years. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Title card from The New Adventures of Superman Title card from Aquaman The Superman/Aquaman Hour of Adventure was a Filmation animated series that aired on CBS from 1967 to 1968. ... The first Filmation logo. ... Kairo (sometimes spelled Cairo or Kyro) was Hal Jordans alien sidekick featured in The Superman/Aquaman Hour of Adventure created by Hanna-Barbera in 1967. ... Gerald Mohr (June 11, 1914 - November 9, 1968) was a film actor who appeared in over sixty films and guest starring in dozens of television programs. ...


Green Lantern was featured as a 'guest hero' in The All-New Super Friends Hour. Unfortunately, his powers were consistently misrepresented, including the introduction of a "Lantern Jet" (it could be "materalized by his power ring"), which he used to fly -- ignoring the fact that the power ring granted him that ability. Also, whenever Green Lantern would use his ring to create something, such as a life raft or a double-bladed transport helicopter, the final product would often be shown with its appropriate colors, instead of the same green as the power beam. The All-New Super Friends Hour is an American animated television series about a team of superheroes which ran from 1977 to 1978. ...


Hal Jordan and his archnemesis Sinestro were also regulars in Challenge of the SuperFriends which aired 1978-1979. One notable episode featured a re-telling of Hal's origin in which the dying Abin Sur passes on his ring. The character would continue brought back for the subsequent Super Friends: The Legendary Super Powers Show and The Super Powers Team: Galactic Guardians shows. Michael Rye voiced the character for all three shows. Challenge Of The Super Friends is an American animated television series about a team of superheroes which ran from 1978 to 1979. ... The year 1978 in television involved some significant events. ... See also: 1978 in television, other events of 1979, 1980 in television, and the list of years in television. For the United States network television schedule, please see 1979-80 United States network television schedule. ...


Around the same time, a two part mini-series of live-action films featuring The Justice League and their villains The Legion of Doom was produced under the title Legends of the Superheroes. It featured Howard Murphy as Hal Jordan. The Legion Of Doom The Road Warriors with Paul Ellering. ... Barbara Joyce as the Huntress from Legends of the Superheroes. ...


As part of its promotional material for Zero Hour, DC Comics produced a video that was distributed to comics retailers. It featured an unnamed actor portraying Jordan in his Parallax identity. Zero Hour: Crisis in Time was a 1994 comic book miniseries and crossover storyline that ran in DC Comics. ...


The Superman: The Animated Series episode "In Brightest Day," depicts a version of Green Lantern combining elements of both Hal Jordan and Kyle Rayner. While physically resembling Jordan and possessing his ultra confident alpha-male personality, the character is called Kyle Rayner and works as an artist at The Daily Planet in Metropolis. The episode shows Rayner receiving his ring, the dying Abin Sur and fighting renegade Green Lantern Sinestro in a power ring duel. During a fight with Sinestro on an Air Force base, Kyle is smacked into a fighter jet bearing the name "Col. Hal Jordan." Superman: The Animated Series is the unofficial title given to Warner Bros. ... The Daily Planet is a fictional broadsheet newspaper that appears in Superman stories published by DC Comics. ...

Hal Jordan in Justice League Unlimited.

The subsequent Justice League cartoon also included a Green Lantern that incorporated elements from Hal Jordan, this time into John Stewart. In addition to Hal's military background, several Hal Jordan stories and villains were used for the cartoon's version of John Stewart, most notably Hal's girlfriend, Star Sapphire. Though the series was able to win fans over to John Stewart, there was some controversy over Jordan not being used as the primary Green Lantern. Image File history File linksMetadata Animated-HalJordan. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Animated-HalJordan. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Star Sapphire is the name of several female supervillains in DC Comics, all connected in origin. ...


In the Justice League Unlimited episode "The Once and Future Thing, Part II: Time Warped" Hal Jordan appears when time becomes fluid and John Stewart is changed into Hal, or rather is replaced by Hal. He introduces himself as "Hal Jordan. Another timeshift, I'm up to speed, carry on." Later as the assembled heroes close in on the time-warping villain responsible, Hal reverts back to John. Hal was voiced by Adam Baldwin in this episode. Jordan is not seen again after this. Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... JL title logo for seasons 1-2. ... John Stewart is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC Universe, and a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps. ... Adam Baldwin (born February 27, 1962) is an American actor. ...

Hal Jordan in The Batman.

In the fourth season finale of The Batman, "The Joining", the Justice League was introduced. Hal Jordan was included among its members, in a non-speaking cameo. He and the other members of the League will play a role in the show's fifth season. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... A season finale (British English last in the series) is the final episode of a season of a television program. ... The Batman is an American animated television series produced by Warner Bros. ... The Joining, Part Two is the fifty second episode of the television series The Batman. ...

Hal Jordan in Duck Dodgers

Hal Jordan also appeared in a 2003 episode of the Duck Dodgers animated series entitled The Green Loontern, in which Duck Dodgers is mistakenly given a Green Lantern uniform by his dry cleaners. Donning it, he meets the Corps and fights Sinestro before meeting Hal (voiced by Kevin Smith), who is wearing Dodgers' too-small uniform. Image File history File links Duck_dodgers_Hal_Jordan. ... Image File history File links Duck_dodgers_Hal_Jordan. ... The year 2003 in television involved some significant events. ... Duck Dodgers was an American animated television series based on the classic cartoon short Duck Dodgers in the 24½th Century produced by Warner Bros. ... Sinestro is a fictional character, an alien supervillain in the DC Comics Universe. ... For other persons named Kevin Smith, see Kevin Smith (disambiguation). ...


In episode "A Hero Sits Next Door" of comedy show Family Guy, the 1970s Superfriends are pictured including a man in a green and black outfit with Hal Jordan's trademark hairstyle indicating he was the Green Lantern the artists based their Green Lantern on. “A Hero Sits Next Door” is an episode of Family Guy from season one. ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ...


Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic also features a scientist on the underwater Manaan base named "Caal Jordan" who died in an attack by insane Selkath. This could be a reference to Hal Jordan not just because of the name but also he created a sound emitter which could be seen as the "power ring." This article is about the city of Kotor. ...


Hal Jordan is an unlockable character on Justice League Heroes. Justice League Heroes is a console game released in the fourth quarter of 2006 across 3 different platforms. ...


Hal Jordan will be one of the main characters featured in Justice League: The New Frontier. He will be voiced by David Boreanaz, while Carol Ferris will be voiced by Brooke Shields David Paul Boreanaz (born May 16, 1969) is an American film and television actor. ... Brooke Christa Camille Shields[1] (born May 31, 1965) is an American actress and supermodel. ...


Hal Jordan will be the main character in Greg Berlanti's upcoming live action Green Lantern movie. Greg Berlanti (born May 24, 1972) is an American television writer and producer. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ...


The chorus of Donovan's song, "Sunshine Superman" mentions Green Lantern in the line "Superman or Green Lantern ain't got nothin' on me." For other uses, see Donovan (disambiguation). ...


Bibliography

Ongoing Series

Hal Jordan first appeared in Showcase #22-24 (September 1959 – February 1960, DC Comics). After that, he was given his own series. Over the years it has been renamed, canceled, and rebooted several times. His “core” series have been: In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... Showcase has been the title of several anthology series published by DC Comics. ...

  • Green Lantern Vol. II #1-75 (July 1960 – March 1970, DC Comics). Renamed following issue #75.
  • Green Lantern/Green Arrow #76-89 (April 1970 – May 1972, DC Comics). Cancelled following issue #89.
  • Flash #217-246 (August 1972 – January 1977, DC Comics). Hal’s stories were a backup feature which stopped following his own title’s return.
  • Green Lantern/Green Arrow #90-122 (August 1976November 1979, DC Comics). Renamed following issue #122.
  • Green Lantern Vol. II #123-200 (December 1979May 1986, DC Comics). Renamed following issue #200.
  • Green Lantern Corps #201-224 (June 1986 – May 1988, DC Comics). Cancelled following issue #224.
  • Action Comics Weekly #601-635 (24 May 1988 – 17 January 1989, DC Comics). Hal’s stories were one of several characters featured in the series. Cancelled following issue #635.
  • Green Lantern Special # 1 (1988). Tying in with the stories from Action Comics Weekly.
  • Green Lantern Special # 2 (1989). Concluding the story plots from Action Comics Weekly, after the anthology series' cancellation.
  • Green Lantern Vol. III #1-50 (June 1990March 1994, DC Comics). Following issue #50, the character Kyle Rayner took over this series.
  • The Spectre Vol. IV #1-27 (March 2001May 2003, DC Comics). Hal Jordan's adventures as the Wrath of God. Cancelled following issue #27.
  • Green Lantern Vol. IV #1-present (July 2005 – present, DC Comics). Currently written by Geoff Johns with various artists.

For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... The Flash. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... For the song by The Smashing Pumpkins, see 1979 (song). ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The fictional Green Lantern Corps is an intergalactic police force featured in DC Comics, particularly series featuring the superhero Green Lantern, Earth’s member of the group. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on a Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cover of Action Comics #1, which featured the debut of Superman. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on a Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1989 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... 1990 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... The Spectre is a fictional cosmic entity and superhero who has appeared in numerous comic books published by DC Comics. ... March 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December March 3 - A U.S. Air Force Materials Command C-23 Sherpa transport crashes during stormy weather in the U.S. state of Georgia, killing 21. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for May, 2003. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... Ongoing events • 2005 Atlantic and Pacific hurricanes • 2005 Maharashtra floods • 2005 Gujarat Flood • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Gomery Comm. ... Geoff Johns (born 25 January 1973 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American comic book writer, best known for his work for DC Comics. ...

Team Series

Hal Jordan was a founding member of the Justice League of America, which first appeared in Brave and the Bold #28-30 (February 1960 – July 1960, DC Comics). For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... The Brave and the Bold was a DC Comics superhero comic book which was published from August 1955 to July 1983. ...

For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... 1982 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... 1984 is a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Justice League Europe was a DC Comics book run that was a spin-off of Justice League International (which was renamed Justice League America at the time). ... 1992 was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: February - Iraq disarmament crisis: British and U.S. forces carry out bombing raids attempting to disable Iraqs air defense network. ... March 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December March 3 - A U.S. Air Force Materials Command C-23 Sherpa transport crashes during stormy weather in the U.S. state of Georgia, killing 21. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: June 2004 in sports Deaths in June • 28 Anthony Buckeridge • 26 Naomi Shemer • 26 Yash Johar • 22 Bob Bemer • 22 Thomas Gold • 22 Francisco Ortiz Franco • 16 Thanom Kittikachorn • 10 Ray Charles • 5 Ronald Reagan... August 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: August 2004 in sports Deaths in August 2004 • 30 Fred Whipple • 26 Laura Branigan • 24 Elisabeth Kübler-Ross • 18 Elmer Bernstein • 15 Amarsinh Chaudhary • 14 CzesÅ‚aw MiÅ‚osz • 13 Julia Child • 8... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2003. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → // February 29, 2004 Jean-Bertrand Aristide resigns as president of Haiti and flees the country for the Central African Republic. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... November 1999 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December November 5 - United States v. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in August August 31: Michael Sheard August 26: Lord Fitt August 24: Jack Slipper August 24: Maurice Cowling August 24: Dr. Tom Pashby August 23: Brock Peters August 22: Lord Lane August 21: Robert Moog August... January 2006 : ← - January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad accuses European nations of trying to complete the Holocaust by creating a Jewish camp Israel in the Middle East. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... October 2006 is the tenth month of that year and has yet to occur. ...

References

  • Daniels, Les DC Comics: Sixty Years of the World’s Favorite Comic Book Heroes. Boston, MA: Bulfinch, 1995. ISBN 0-8212-2076-4
  • O'Neil, Dennis "Introduction by Dennis O'Neil". Green Lantern/Green Arrow Volume One. Ed. Robert Greenberger. New York, NY: DC Comics, 2000. ISBN 1-4012-0224-1
  • Giordano, Dick "Introduction by Dick Giordano". Green Lantern/Green Arrow: More Hard-Traveling Heroes. Ed. Robert Greenberger. New York, NY: DC Comics, 1993. ISBN 1-56389-086-0
  • Lawrence, Christopher "Neal Adams". Wizard. Sept. 2003.
  • Casey, Todd "Green Mile". Wizard. Nov. 2004.

Les Daniels (born 1943) is an American writer of historical horror fiction. ... Dennis Denny ONeil is a comic book writer and editor, principally for Marvel Comics and DC Comics in the 1970s, 80s, and 90s, and Group Editor for the Batman family of books until his retirement. ... Richard Joseph Dick Giordano (born July 20, 1932) is an American comic book artist and editor best known for introducing Charlton Comics Action Heroes stable of superheroes, and serving as editor of then industry-leader DC Comics. ...

External links

  • Official Green Lantern (Hal Jordan) Website
  • Alan Kistler's profile on Green Lantern
  • GEOFF JOHNS - AMON SUR, AND EVERYTHING GREEN LANTERN
  • Green Lantern's (Hal Jordan's) origin @ dccomics.com
  • The Silver Age Green Lantern, a critical study
  • Bio at the Unofficial Green Lantern Corps Webpage

See also

  • Kristogar Velo

  Results from FactBites:
 
Hal Jordan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5253 words)
Hal Jordan is a DC Comics superhero, the Silver Age Green Lantern, and arguably the most famous hero to bear that name.
Hal Jordan also appeared in a 2003 episode of the Duck Dodgers animated series entitled The Green Loontern, in which Duck Dodgers is mistakenly given a Green Lantern uniform by his dry cleaners.
Hal Jordan was a founding member of the Justice League of America, which first appeared in Brave and the Bold #28-30 (February 1960 – July 1960, DC Comics).
Green Lantern - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5490 words)
Jordan's creation was motivated by a desire to make him more of a science fiction hero, editor Julius Schwartz having been a longtime SF fan and literary agent who saw pop-culture tastes turning in that direction.
Jordan eventually returned as Green Lantern, and in the 2004/2005 miniseries Green Lantern: Rebirth, he was cleared of the crimes committed as Parallax when it was revealed to be the result of the Yellow Impurity, a cosmic fear parasite that had possessed him.
Hal Jordan appeared briefly in a two-part episode of Justice League Unlimited in which the time-traveling villain Chronos caused the timeline to become unstable, with characters changing or disappearing as their history was altered.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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