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Encyclopedia > Haitian Creole language
Haitian Creole
Kreyòl ayisyen
Spoken in: Haiti, Bahamas, Canada, Cayman Islands, Dominican Republic, France, French Guiana, Guadeloupe, Martinique, Turks and Caicos Islands, United States
Total speakers: 12 million 
Ranking: 62
Language family: French Creole
 Haitian Creole
 
Official status
Official language of: Haiti
Regulated by: no official regulation
Language codes
ISO 639-1: ht
ISO 639-2: hat
ISO 639-3: hat

Haitian Creole (kreyòl ayisyen) is a creole language It is spoken in Haiti by about 8.5 million people (as of 2005), which is nearly the whole population. Via emigration, about 3.5 million speakers live in other countries, including Canada, the United States, and France, as well as many Caribbean nations, especially the Dominican Republic, Cuba, and the Bahamas. The factual accuracy of part of this article is disputed. ... Current distribution of Human Language Families Most languages are known to belong to language families. ... A French creole, more properly French-based creole language, is a creole language with substantial influence from the French language. ... ISO 639-1 is the first part of the ISO 639 international-standard language-code family. ... ISO 639-2:1998 Codes for the representation of names of languages — Part 2: Alpha-3 code Twenty-two of the languages have two three-letter codes: a code for bibliographic use (ISO 639-2/B) a code for terminological use (ISO 639-2/T). ... ISO 639-3 is in process of development as an international standard for language codes. ... For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words see here. ... Phonetics (from the Greek word φωνή, phone meaning sound, voice) is the study of sounds and the human voice. ... Because of technical limitations, some web browsers may not display some special characters in this article. ... This chart shows concisely the most common way in which the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is applied to represent the English language. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A creole language, or just creole, is a well-defined and stable language that originated from a non-trivial combination of two or more languages, typically with many distinctive features that are not inherited from either parent. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Immigration. ... West Indian redirects here. ...


There are linguistic influences from several West African languages, namely from Wolof, and some Gbe languages, notably Fon and Ewe/Anlo-Ewe. There are two dialects: Fablas and Plateau.  Western Africa (UN subregion)  Maghreb West Africa or Western Africa is the westernmost region of the African continent. ... Wolof is a language spoken in Senegal, the Gambia, and Mauritania, and it is the native language of the ethnic group of the Wolof people. ... The Gbe languages (pronounced ) form a cluster of about 20 related languages stretching across the area between eastern Ghana and western Nigeria. ... Fon (native name FÉ”ngbe) is part of the Gbe language cluster and belongs to the Kwa sub-family of the Niger-Congo languages. ... Ewe is a Kwa language spoken in Ghana and Togo by approximately three million people (Capo 1991). ... Anlo (IPA: Aŋlo) is a dialect of the Ewe language. ... A dialect (from the Greek word διάλεκτος, dialektos) is a variety of a language used by people from a particular geographic area. ... Fablas is a dialect of Haïtian Kréyòl. ... Plateau Haitian Creole is a dialect of Haitian Creole. ...


In part because of the efforts of Felix Morisseau-Leroy, since 1961 Haitian Creole has been recognized as an official language along with French, which had been the sole literary language of the country since its independence in 1804, and this status was upheld under the country's constitution of 1987. Its usage in literature is small but growing, with Morisseau being one of the first and most prolific examples. Many speakers are bilingual and speak both Haitian Creole and French. Many educators, writers and activists have emphasized pride and written literacy in Creole since the 1980s. There are newspapers, radio and television programs in this language. Félix Morisseau-Leroy or Moriso Lewa, March 13, 1912 - September 5, 1998, was a writer who worked, often exclusively, in Haitian Kreyol, the first significant writer to do so. ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ...

Contents

Usage outside of Haiti

Haitian Creole is used widely among Haitians who have relocated to other countries, particularly the United States and Canada. Some of the larger population centers include Montréal, Québec, where French is the official language, and parts of New York City, Boston and South Florida (Miami, Fort Lauderdale, and Palm Beach). Various public service announcements, school-parent communications, and other materials are produced in this language by government agencies. Miami-Dade County in Florida sends out paper communications in Haitian Creole in addition to English and Spanish. Announcements are posted in the Boston subway system in this language. HTN, a Miami-based television channel, is North America's only Creole-language television network. The Miami area also features over half a dozen Creole-language AM radio staitons. There is controversy as to whether or not Creole should be taught in Miami-Dade County Public Schools. Many argue Creole is a peasant language which is not important, while others argue it is important for children to know their native tongue. {{Canadian City/Disable Field={{{Disable Motto Link}}}}} Motto: Concordia Salus (Salvation through harmony) Ville de Montréal, Québec, Canada Location. ... During the 1960s, a terrorist group known as the Front de libération du Québec (FLQ) launched a decade of bombings, robberies and attacks on government offices. ... Nickname: Big Apple, Gotham, NYC Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1613  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1 Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino (D) Area    - City 232. ... The South Florida metropolitan area is an informal name for the Miami–Fort Lauderdale–Miami Beach[1] metropolitan area. ... Miami redirects here. ... Nickname: Venice of America Location of Fort Lauderdale in Broward County, Florida. ... Palm Beach County is a county located in the state of Florida. ... Miami-Dade County (formerly known as Dade County) is a county located in the southeastern part of the state of Florida. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) is a body politic and corporate, and a political subdivision of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts [1] formed in 1964 to finance and operate most bus, subway, commuter rail and ferry systems in the greater Boston, Massachusetts, USA area. ... Miami-Dade County Public Schools (M-DCPS) is a public school district serving Miami-Dade County, Florida. ...


The University of Kansas Lawrence has an Institute of Haitian studies, founded by Dr. Bryant Freeman where Haitian Creole, among other facets of Haiti are studied and researched. Dictionaries have been published, including a Haitian Creole-English dictionary more than 1,000 pages long. The University of Kansas (often referred to as KU) is an institution of higher learning located in Lawrence, Kansas. ... Dr. Bryant Freeman is a professor at the University of Kansas. ...


Additionally, the University of Massachusetts-Boston offers seminars and courses under the Creole Institute (http://www.ccde.umb.edu/summerinstitute/haitiancreole/) every year. More universities particularly in the United States have offered numerous classes in Haitian Creole.


Sounds and spellings

Haitian Creole has seven vowels as opposed to standard French's twelve. This is primarily due to the loss of front rounded vowels. In Creole, these French phonemes are usually merged with their unrounded counterpart. Hence, /y/ becomes /i/ and /ø/ becomes /e/.


French's uvular rhotic either becomes an alveolar trill (/r/), /w/, or is elided altogether, depending on the environment.


Being formed relatively recently, Haitian Creole orthography is mostly phonemic, and is similar to the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). The main differences are j = /ʒ/, y = /j/, è = /ɛ/, ou = /u/. Nasalization is indicated by a following n. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words see here. ...


Lexicon

Most of the lexicon is derived from French, with simplified pronuciation. Often, the French definite article was retained as part of the noun. Definite Article is the title of British comedian Eddie Izzards 1996 performance released on video and CD. The video/DVD and CD performances were both recorded on different nights at the Shaftesbury Theatre in London, England. ...


Sample

    
Creole IPA Origin English
bagay /bagaj/ (?)Fr. bagage, "baggage" "thing"
bannann /bãnãn/ Fr. banane, "banana" "plantain"
bekàn /bekan/ Fr. bécane /bekan/ "bicycle"
Bondye /bõdje/ Fr. Bon Dieu /bõdjø/ "God"
dèyè /dɛjɛ/ Fr. derrière /dɛʁjɛʁ/ "behind"
diri /diri/ Fr. du riz /dyʁi/ "rice"
fig /fig/ "banana"
kay /kaj/ (?)Fr. cahutte /kayt/ "house"
kiyèz, tchòk, poban /kijɛz, tʃɔk, pobã/ "hog banana" (*)
kle /kle/ Fr. clé /kle/, "key" "wrench" or "key"
kle kola /kle kola/ Fr. clé /kle/, "key" + Eng. "cola" "bottle opener"
konnflek /kõnflek/ (?)En. "corn flakes" "breakfast cereal"
kawoutchou /kawutʃu/ Fr. caoutchouc, "rubber" "tire"
lalin /lalin/ Fr. la lune /lalyn/ "moon"
makak /makak/ Fr. macaque /makak/ "monkey"
makomè /makomɛ/ "godmother" (#)
matant /matãt/ Fr. ma tante, "my aunt" "aunt"
moun /mun/ Bantu mountu- "person"
nimewo /nimewo/ Fr. numéro /nymeʁo/ "number"
ozetazini /ozetazini/ Fr. aux États-Unis /ozetazyni/ "the United States"
piman /pimã/ Fr. piment a very hot pepper
pann /pãn/ Fr. pendre "to hang"
pwa /pwa/ Fr. pois /pwa/, "pea" "bean"
chenèt /ʃenɛt/ "tooth gap" (^)
tonton /tõtõ/ "uncle"
vwazen /vwazɛ̃/ Fr. voisin /vwazɛ̃/ "neighbor"
zwazo /zwazo/ Fr. les oiseaux /lezwazo/ "birds"
zye /zje/ Fr. les yeux /lezjø/ "eyes"

(*) A banana which is short and fat, not a plantain and not a conventional banana; regionally called "hog banana" or "sugar banana" in English.
(#) The relationship shared between a child's mother and godmother.
(^) The gap between a person's two front teeth. The chile pepper, chili pepper, or chilli pepper, or simply chile, is the fruit of the plant Capsicum from the nightshade family, Solanaceae. ...

Nouns derived from trade marks

Many trade marks have become common nouns in Haitian Creole (as happened in English with "aspirin" and "kleenex", for example). The Bass Red Triangle, was the first trademark registered in Britain in 1876. ...

  • kòlgat (Colgate) — "toothpaste"
  • jilèt (Gillette) — "razor"
  • pampèz (Pampers) — "nappy" or (Am) "diaper"
  • kodak (Kodak) — "camera"
  • frejidaire (Frigidaire) - "refrigerator"
  • delco (Delco) - "generator"
  • igloo (Igloo) - "cooler"
  • chiklèt (Chiclet) - "gum"

Colgate-Palmolive Company (NYSE: CL) is a multinational corporation in the business of the provision of products such as soaps, detergents, and oral hygiene products such as toothpaste and toothbrushes. ... Global Gillette is a business unit of Procter & Gamble. ... Pampers is a brand of disposable diaper (or nappy) marketed by Procter & Gamble worldwide. ... English language spread in the United States. ... Eastman Kodak Company (NYSE: EK) is an American multinational public company producing photographic materials and equipment. ... Frigidaire is a major US appliance company owned by Electrolux. ... Charles Kettering, on a Time cover, 1933 Charles Franklin Kettering (August 29, 1876–November 24 or November 25, 1958), a. ... Igloo An igloo (Inuktitut iglu / ᐃᒡᓗ, house, plural: iglooit or igluit), translated sometimes as snowhouse, is a shelter constructed from blocks of snow, generally in the form of a dome. ... Binomial name Manilkara chicle (Pittier) Gilly Chicle is the gum from Manilkara chicle, a species of sapodilla tree. ...

The word nèg and the word blan

The term nèg strictly means a dark-skinned man and the word blan a white person, as in Gen yon nèg e gen yon blan. ("there is a black man and there is a white man"). However, nèg is generally used for any man, regardless of skin color (i.e. like "guy" or "dude" in American English). Blan is generally used for foreigner. It is not used to refer just to white foreigners, but foreigners of color as well.


Etymologically, the word nèg is derived from the French "nègre" and is cognate with the Spanish negro ("black", both the color and the people), and cognate with the English "negro". In Haitian Creole, however, nèg does not have pejorative connotations. Unlucky black cat. ... Cognate (Latin: cognatus co+gnatus, ie. ...


There are many other Haitian Creole terms for specific tones of skin, such as grimo, bren, wòz, mawon, etc. However, such labels are considered offensive by some Haïtians, because of their association with color discrimination and the Haitian class system.


Grammar

Haitian Creole grammar differs greatly from French and inflects much more simply: for example, verbs are not inflected for tense or person, and there is no grammatical gender — meaning that adjectives and articles are not inflected according to the noun. The same primary word order (SVO) is the same as French, but the variations on the verbs and adjectives are minuscule compared to the complex rules employed by French. In linguistics, grammatical gender is a morphological category associated with the expression of gender through inflection or agreement. ...


Many grammatical features, particularly pluralization of nouns and indication of possession, are indicated by appending certain suffixes (postpositions) like yo to the main word. There has been a debate going on for some years as what should be used to connect the suffixes to the word: the most popular alternatives are a dash, an apostrophe or a space. It makes matters more complicated when the "suffix" itself is shortened, perhaps making only one letter (such as m or w). A postposition is a type of adposition, a grammatical particle that expresses some sort of relationship between a noun phrase (its object) and another part of the sentence; an adpositional phrase functions as an adjective or adverb. ...


Pronouns

There are six pronouns, one pronoun for each person/number combination. There is no difference between direct and indirect. Some are obviously of French origin, others are not.

    
person/number Creole Short form French English
1/singular mwen m je, moi "I", "me"
2/singular ou (*) w tu, te, vous "you" (sing.)
3/singular li l il, elle, on "he", "she", "it"
1/plural nou n nous "we", "us"
2/plural nou or vou (@)   vous "you" (pl.)
3/plural yo y ils, elles, eux "they", "them"

(*)sometimes ou is written as w- in the sample phrases, w indicates ou.
(@) depending on the situation.

Plural of nouns

Nouns are pluralized by adding yo at the end.

liv yo - "books"
machin yo - "cars"

Possession

Possession is indicated by placing the possessor after the item possessed. This is similar to the French construction of chez moi or chez lui which are "my place" and "his place", respectively.

lajan li - "his/her money"
fanmi mwen or fanmi m - "my family"
kay yo - "their house" or "their houses"
papa ou or papa w - "your father"
chat Pyè - "Pierre's cat"
chèz Mari - "Marie's chair"
zanmi papa Jan - "Jean's father's friend"
papa vwazen zanmi nou - "our friend's neighbor's father"

Indefinite article

The language has an indefinite article yon, roughly corresponding to English "a/an" and French un/une. It is placed before the noun:

yon kouto - "a knife"
yon kravat - "a necktie"

Definite article

There is also a definite article, roughly corresponding to English "the" and French le/la. It is placed after the noun, and the sound varies by the last sound of the noun itself. If the last sound is an oral consonant and is preceded by an oral vowel, it becomes la: An oral consonant is a consonant sound in speech that is made by allowing air to escape from the mouth. ... An oral vowel is a vowel that is produced by air that escapes through the mouth only (as opposed to nasal vowels, in which air also goes out through the nose). ...

kravat la - "the tie"
liv la - "the book"
kay la - "the house"

If the last sound is an oral consonant and is preceded by a nasal vowel, it becomes lan: An oral consonant is a consonant sound in speech that is made by allowing air to escape from the mouth. ... A nasal vowel is a vowel that is produced with a lowering of the velum so that air escapes both through the mouth and the nose. ...

lanp lan - "the lamp"
ban lan - "the bench"

If the last sound is an oral vowel and is preceded by an oral consonant, it becomes a: An oral vowel is a vowel that is produced by air that escapes through the mouth only (as opposed to nasal vowels, in which air also goes out through the nose). ... An oral consonant is a consonant sound in speech that is made by allowing air to escape from the mouth. ...

kouto a - "the knife"
peyi a - "the country"

If the last sound is an oral vowel and is preceded by a nasal consonant, it becomes an: An oral vowel is a vowel that is produced by air that escapes through the mouth only (as opposed to nasal vowels, in which air also goes out through the nose). ... A nasal consonant is produced when the velum—that fleshy part of the palate near the back—is lowered, allowing air to escape freely through the nose. ...

fanmi an - "the family"
mi an - "the wall"

If the last sound is a nasal vowel, it becomes an: A nasal vowel is a vowel that is produced with a lowering of the velum so that air escapes both through the mouth and the nose. ...

chen an - "the dog"
pon an - "the bridge"

If the last sound is a nasal consonant, it becomes nan: A nasal consonant is produced when the velum—that fleshy part of the palate near the back—is lowered, allowing air to escape freely through the nose. ...

machin nan - "the car"
telefòn nan - "the telephone"
madanm nan - "the woman"

"This" and "that"

There is a single word sa that corresponds to French ce/ceci or ça, and English "this" and "that". As in English, it may be used as a demonstrative, except that it is placed after the noun it qualifies. It is often followed by a or yo (in order to mark number): // Demonstratives are deictic words (they depend on an external frame of reference) that indicate which entities a speaker refers to, and distinguishes those entities from others. ... A number is an abstract entity that represents a count or measurement. ...

jardin sa (a) bèl- "This garden is beautiful."

As in English, it may also be used as a pronoun, replacing a noun:

sa se zanmi mwen - "this is my friend"
sa se chen frè mwen - "this is my brother's dog"

Verbs

Many verbs in Haitian Creole are the same spoken words as the French infinitive, but they are spelled phonetically. As indicated above, there is no conjugation in the language; the verbs have one form only, and changes in tense are indicated by the use of tense markers. In grammar, the infinitive is the form of a verb that has no inflection to indicate person, number, mood or tense. ... Phonetics (from the Greek word phone = sound/voice) is the study of speech sounds (voice). ... Conjugation may refer to: Grammatical conjugation, the modification of runnign a verb from its basic form Latin conjugation, Spanish conjugation and The English verb, each with complex conjugation forms Marriage, relationship between two individuals In mathematics: Complex conjugation, the operation which multiplies the imaginary part of a complex number by...

Li ale travay le maten - "He goes to work in the morning."
Li dòmi le swa - "He sleeps in the evening."
Li li Bib la - "She reads the Bible."
Mwen fè manje - "I make food."
Nou toujou etidye - "We study all the time."

Copulas

The concept expressed in English by the verb "to be" is expressed in Haitian Creole by two words, se and ye. In linguistics, a copula is a word that is used to link the subject of a sentence with a predicate (a subject complement or an adverbial). ...


The verb se (pronounced as the English word "say") is used to link a subject with a predicate nominative:

Li se frè mwen - "he is my brother"
Mwen se doktè - "I am a doctor"
Sa se yon pyebwa mango - "That is a mango tree"
Nou se zanmi - "we are friends"

The subject sa or li can sometimes be omitted with se: See subject (grammar) for the linguistic definition of subject. ...

Se yon bon lide - "That is a good idea"
Se nouvo chemiz mwen - "This is my new shirt"

For the future tense, such as "I want to be", usually vin "to become" is used instead of se. It has been suggested that Future perfect tense be merged into this article or section. ...

L ap vin bel frè mwen - "He will be my brother-in-law"
Mwen vle vin yon doktè - "I want to become a doctor"
Sa ap vin yon pyebwa mango - "That will become a mango tree"
N ap vin zanmi - "We will be friends"

"Ye" also means "to be", but is placed exclusively at the end of the sentence, after the predicate and the subject (in that order): In mathematics, a predicate is a relation. ... See subject (grammar) for the linguistic definition of subject. ...

Ayisyen mwen ye = Mwen se Ayisyen - "I am Haitian"
Ki moun sa ye? - "Who is that?"
Kouman ou ye? - "How are you?"

The verb "to be" is not overt when followed by an adjective, that is, Haitian Creole has stative verbs. So, malad means "sick" and "to be sick": Wiktionary:Open - definition Open set (mathematics) Open (sport) - A type of competition in tennis and golf (among others) where entry is open to all qualifiers regardless of age. ... An adjective is a part of speech that modifies a noun or a pronoun, usually by describing it or making its meaning more specific. ... A stative verb is one which asserts that one of its arguments has a particular property (possibly in relation to its other arguments). ...

M gen yon zanmi malad - "I have sick friend."
Zanmi mwen malad. - "My friend is sick."

To have

The verb "to have" is genyen, often shortened to gen.

Mwen genyen lajan nan bank lan - "I have money in the bank".

There Is

The verb genyen (or gen) also means "there is/are"

Gen anpil Ayisyen nan Florid - "There are many Haitians in Florida".
Gen yon moun la - "There is someone here".
Pa gen moun la - "There is nobody here".

To know

There are three verbs which are often translated as "to know", but they mean different things. Konn or konnen means "to know" + a noun (cf. French connaître).

Èske ou konnen non li? - "Do you know his name?"

Konn or konnen also means "to know" + a fact (cf. French savoir).

M pa konnen kote li ye - "I don't know where he is." (note pa = negative)

The third word is always spelled konn. It means "to know how to" or "to have experience". This is similar to the "know" is used in the English phrase "know how to ride a bike": it denotes not only a knowledge of the actions, but also some experience with it.

Mwen konn fè manje - "I know how to cook" (lit. "I know how to make food")
Èske ou konn ale Ayiti? - "Have you been to Haïti?" (lit. "Do you know to go to Haiti?")
Li pa konn li fransè - "He can't read French" (lit. "He doesn't know how to read French.")

Another verb worth mentioning is . It comes from the French faire and is often translated as "do" or "make". It has a broad range of meanings, as it is one of the most common verbs used in idiomatic phrases. An idiom is an expression (i. ...

Kouman ou fè pale kreyòl? - "How did you learn to speak Haitian Creole?"
Mari konn fè mayi moulen. - "Marie knows how to make cornmeal."

To be able to

The verb kapab (or shortened to ka, kap' or 'kab) means "to be able to (do something)". It refers to both "capability" and "availability", very similar to the English "can".

Mwen ka ale demen - "I can go tomorrow."
Petèt m ka fè sa demen - "Maybe I can do that tomorrow."

Tense markers

There is no conjugation in Haitian Creole. In the present non-progressive tense, one just uses the basic verb form for stative verbs: Conjugation may refer to: Grammatical conjugation, the modification of runnign a verb from its basic form Latin conjugation, Spanish conjugation and The English verb, each with complex conjugation forms Marriage, relationship between two individuals In mathematics: Complex conjugation, the operation which multiplies the imaginary part of a complex number by... A stative verb is one which asserts that one of its arguments has a particular property (possibly in relation to its other arguments). ...

Mwen pale kreyòl - "I speak Haitian Creole"

Note that when the basic form of action verbs is used without any verb markers, it is generally understood as referring to the past: A verb is a part of speech that usually denotes action (bring, read), occurrence (decompose, glitter), or a state of being (exist, stand). Depending on the language, a verb may vary in form according to many factors, possibly including its tense, aspect, mood and voice. ...

mwen manje - "I ate"
ou manje - "you ate"
li manje - "he/she ate"
nou manje - "we ate"
yo manje - "they ate"

(Note that manje means both "food" and "to eat" -- m ap manje bon manje means "I am eating good food").


For other tenses, special "tense marker" words are placed before the verb. The basic ones are: Grammatical tense is a way languages express the time at which an event described by a sentence occurs. ...

te - simple past
tap (or t ap) - past progressive (a combination of te and ap, "was doing")
ap - present progressive (With ap and a, the pronouns nearly always take the short form (m ap, l ap, n ap, y ap, etc.))
a - future (some limitations on use)
pral - near or definite future (translates to "going to")
ta - conditional future (a combination of te and a, "will do")

Simple past or past perfect: This article is about the grammatical term. ... In English, and sometimes in other languages, the continuous or progressive aspect is an aspect that denotes an incomplete action in progress at a specific time. ... In English, and sometimes in other languages, the continuous or progressive aspect is an aspect that denotes an incomplete action in progress at a specific time. ... In linguistics and grammar, a pronoun is a pro-form that substitutes for a noun phrase. ... Look up Future in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Future in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the grammatical term. ... The pluperfect tense exists in most Indo-European languages, including English. ...

mwen te manje - "I ate" or "I had eaten"
ou te manje - "you ate" or "you had eaten"
li te manje - "he/she ate" or "he/she had eaten"
nou te manje - "we ate" or "we had eaten"
yo te manje - "they ate" or "they had eaten"

Past progressive: In English, and sometimes in other languages, the continuous or progressive aspect is an aspect that denotes an incomplete action in progress at a specific time. ...

mwen t ap manje - "I was eating"
ou t ap manje - "you were eating"
li t ap manje - "he/she was eating"
nou t ap manje - "we were eating"
yo t ap manje - "they were eating"

Present progressive: In English, and sometimes in other languages, the continuous or progressive aspect is an aspect that denotes an incomplete action in progress at a specific time. ...

m ap manje - "I am eating"
w ap manje - "you are eating"
l ap manje - "he/she is eating"
n ap manje - "we are eating"
y ap manje - "they are eating"

Note: For the present progressive ("I am eating now") it is customary, though not necessary, to add "right now": In English, and sometimes in other languages, the continuous or progressive aspect is an aspect that denotes an incomplete action in progress at a specific time. ...

M ap manje kounye a - "I am eating right now"

Near or definite future: Look up Future in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

mwen pral manje - "I am going to eat"
ou pral manje - "you am going to eat"
li pral manje - "he/she am going to eat"
nou pral manje - "we am going to eat"
yo pral manje - "they am going to eat"

Future: Look up Future in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

N a wè pita - "See you later" (lit. "We will see (each other) later)

Other examples:

Mwen te wè zanmi ou yè - "I saw your friend yesterday"
Nou te pale lontan - "We spoke for a long time"
Lè li te gen uit an... - "When he was eight years old..."
M a travay - "I will work"
M pral travay - "I'm going to work"
N a li l demen - "We'll read it tomorrow"
Nou pral li l demen - "We are going to read it tomorrow"
Mwen t ap mache e m wè yon chyen - "I was walking and I saw a dog"

Additional time-related markers:

fèk - recent past ("just")
sòt - similar to fèk

They are often used together:

Mwen fèk sòt antre kay la - "I just entered the house"

A verb mood marker is ta, corresponding to English "would" and equivalent to the French conditional tense: Mood may refer to: chese Grammatical mood Emotional mood This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ...

Yo ta renmen jwe - "They would like to play"
Mwen ta vini si mwen te gen yon machin - "I would come if I had a car"
Li ta bliye w si ou pa t la - "He/she would forget you if you weren't here"

Negating the verb

The word pa comes before a verb (and all tense markers) to negate it:

Woz pa vle ale - "Rose doesn't want to go"
Woz pa t vle ale - "Rose didn't want to go"

List of Haitian Creole words

  • yon anana - a pineapple (from Arawak, anana and now used in France ananas)
  • Anakaona - ? (from Arawak, anacaona, who was a Taino princess)
  • anpil - a lot, many (from Fr. "en pile", lit. in piles, in great amounts)
  • aprann - to learn
  • yon bannann - plantain
  • bat - to whup
  • yon batay - a fight, a battle
  • yon goumen - a fight (most popular)
  • batay - to fight, to battle
  • goumen - to fight
  • yon bebe - a baby
  • bonjou - good day / good morning
  • bonswa - good evening (bonswa is typically said after 12:00 noon)
  • boukousou - a type of bean
  • boul, balon - a ball
  • chadèk - grapefruit (from Fr. Chadèque or pamplemousse)
  • chante - to sing
  • yon chanson - a song
  • yon chan - a song, a chant
  • cheri - darling
  • cho - hot (also used as an adj. i.e. "Fi sa a cho anpil", She's really hot!)
  • doudou - sweetheart
  • dous - sweet
  • yon dous - a cookie (food)
  • enpe dlo - some water
  • yon fanmi - a family
  • - to make / to do
  • yon fèt - a party / a birthday
  • yon fig - a banana
  • fou - stove
  • fòl - crazy (a crazy person - yon moun fou (fòl))
  • gade - to look (at), to watch (to watch tv - gade tv)
  • garde - to guard
  • yon gardyen - a guardian
  • yon gardyen bu - a goal keeper
  • gato - a cake
  • gwayav - guava fruit
  • gwo - big; also, to be fat ("li gwo", he is fat)
  • enpe kafe - some coffee
  • kaka - feces
  • yon kann - a sugar cane
  • yon kenèp - Mamoncillo a.k.a. Spanish lime
  • kijan - how
  • kisa - what
  • kibò, kikote - where
  • kimoun - who
  • ki, ke - that (conj.)
  • kite mwen - leave me / leave me alone
  • kite mwen ale - let me go
  • yon kochon - a pig
  • yon kokoye - a coconut
  • konprann/komprann - to understand
  • kouman/kijan ou rele? - what is your name?
  • kòm - as
  • kòman/kijan - how
  • kounyèa - now ex: vini kounye a (come here now)
  • yon kowosòl/kosòl - Soursop a.k.a Corossol
  • yon kreyon - a pencil
  • yon kwafè - a barber
  • la - here / the
  • lant/lan - slow
  • lanse - to launch
  • yon lougawou - a werewolf, bad witch
  • yon mambo/manbo - a female witch
  • yon bòkò/ongan - a male witch
  • yon majisyen - a magician
  • yon machin - a car
  • yon makak - a monkey
  • yon manyòk - Cassava a.k.a. manioc
  • manje - to eat / food (both noun and verb)
  • enpe manje - some food
  • mèg - skinny
  • mèsi/mèrsi - thank you
  • yon moun - a person
  • kèk moun - some people (the indefinite article plural form)
  • move - bad (move moun - bad person)
  • move - fighty (a person that is ready to fight or beat someone up)
  • pale/parle - to talk / to speak
  • yon pánye - a basket
  • yon pitit - a child (a father or mother: my child)
  • yon pitit fi - a daughter
  • yon pitit gason - a son
  • yon pitit pitit - a grand child
  • pwa - bean
  • ki pèz ou (genyen)?- what is your weight?
  • peze - to press (press a button), to weigh (this weighs two liters)
  • yon pyebwa - tree (lit. wood foot, from Fr. pied de bois)
  • sa bon pou ou - that's what you get
  • yon sache/sachè - a bag
  • sa (è) bon pour ou - that's good for you
  • sa ka fèt / sa k ap fèt - how's it going?
  • sa k pase - what's up?
  • yon sirèt - a candy
  • tankou - like (conj.)
  • yon timoun - a kid ("little person")
  • yon granmoun - an adult
  • tonbe - to fall
  • toutouni - naked
  • yon vòlè - a thief
  • vòlè - to steal
  • yon vòl - a theft, a fly (ki vòl ou ape pran - what fly are you taking?)
  • pran vòl - to take off (an airplane)
  • yon avyon - an airplane
  • vole - to jump or fly
  • yon zaboka - Avocado
  • zobogit - to be skinny
  • yon zonbi/zombi - a ghost (from Africa, zombi)

Binomial name Melicoccus bijugatus P.Browne The Mamoncillo Melicoccus bijugatus, also known as the Quenepa, Chenet, Genip, Spanish Lime, or Kinnip, is a fruit-bearing tree in the soapberry family Sapindaceae, native to a wide area of the American tropics including Central America, Colombia and the Caribbean. ... Binomial name Annona muricata L. The Soursop, Guanábana or Corossol (Annona muricata) is a broadleaf flowering evergreen tree native to the Caribbean, Central and South America, from Brazil north to the West Indies. ... Binomial name Manihot esculenta Crantz The cassava or manioc (Manihot esculenta) is a woody shrub of the Euphorbiaceae (spurge family) that is extensively cultivated as an annual crop in tropical and subtropical regions for its edible starchy tuberous root, a major source of carbohydrate. ... Binomial name Persea americana Mill. ...

Numbers

  • zero - 0
  • yonn, en - 1
  • de, dez - 2
  • twa - 3
  • kat, katr - 4
  • senk - 5
  • sis - 6
  • sèt - 7
  • uit, ywit - 8
  • nèf - 9
  • dis - 10
  • onz - 11
  • douz - 12
  • trèz - 13
  • katòz - 14
  • kenz - 15
  • sèz - 16
  • disèt - 17
  • dizwit - 18
  • diznèf - 19
  • ven, vent - 20
  • venteyen, vent-yonn - 21
  • vennde, vent-dez - 22
  • venntwa, vent-twa - 23
  • ...etc.
  • trant - 30
  • tranteyen, trant-yonn - 31
  • trannde - 32
  • tranntwa - 33
  • ...etc.
  • karant - 40
  • karanteyen, karant-yonn - 41
  • karannde - 42
  • karanntwa - 43
  • ...etc.
  • senkant - 50
  • swasant - 60
  • swasenndis - 70
  • swasenteyonz- 71
  • swasenndouz- 72
  • swasenntrèz- 73
  • ...etc.
  • katreven, katrevent - 80
  • katrevendis, katreven-dis- 90
  • katrevenonz, katreven-onz- 91
  • katrevendouz- 92
  • katreventrèz- 93
  • ...etc.
  • san - 100
  • san en, san yonn - 101
  • san dis - 110
  • de san, dez san - 200
  • de san ven - 220
  • twa san - 300
  • kat san - 400
  • senk san - 500
  • si san - 600
  • sèt san - 700
  • ui(t) san - 800
  • nèf san - 900
  • nèf san katrevendisèt - 997
  • nèf san katrevendizuit - 998
  • nèf san katrevendiznèf - 999
  • mil - 1000
  • de mil - 2000
  • senk mil - 5000
  • di mil - 10 000
  • san mil - 100 000
  • 1 milyon - 1 000 000, 1 million
  • 1 bilyon - 1 000 000 000, 1 billion

See also

  • Copula: Haitian Creole
  • Swadesh list of Haitian Creole words

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

External links

Wikipedia
Haitian Creole language edition of Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Languages derived from French
see also French-based creole languages

In the Americas: Haitian Creole (kreyòl ayisyen)Michif • Lanc-Patuá
Antillean CreoleLouisiana Creole (kreyol lwiziyen)Chiac
In Africa: Seychellois Creole (Kreol)Mauritian Creole • Réunion Creole
In Asia: Tây Bồi Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1058x1058, 477 KB) aa Wikipedia logo, version 1058px square, no text Wikipedia logo by Nohat (concept by Paullusmagnus); compare Wikipedia File links The following pages link to this file: Arabic language Talk:Anarcho-capitalism Talk:Algorithm Talk:Anno Domini Talk:The... Wikipedia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ... A French creole, more properly French-based creole language, is a creole language with substantial influence from the French language. ... Michif (also Mitchif, Mechif, Michif-Cree, Métif, Métchif) is the language of the Métis people of Canada and the northern United States, who are the descendants of First Nations women (mainly Cree, Nakota and Ojibwe) and fur trade workers of European ancestry (mainly French Canadians). ... Lanc-Patuá is a creole language spoken in the state of Amapá in Brazil, primarily around the capital, Macapá. It is a French-based creole, spoken by immigrants from French Guiana and the Caribbean, and their descendants. ... Antillean Creole is a French-lexified creole language spoken primarily in the Lesser Antilles. ... Louisiana Creole French (Kreyol Lwiziyen) is a French-based creole spoken in Louisiana. ... The word chiac has two meanings, both of which refer to particular vocabulary, accent, sentence structures and idioms spoken by Acadian French inhabitants of south-east New Brunswick, Canada. ... Seychellois Creole, also known as Kreol, is the lingua franca of the Seychelles, as well as being an official language with English and French, unlike Mauritian Creole, which has no official status in Mauritius. ... Mauritian Creole is a creole language or dialect from Mauritius. ... Réunion Creole is a language spoken on Réunion Island. ... Tây Bồi, is a term used (sometimes pejoratively) to mean a type of verbal communication which consists of massacred French words mixed with Vietnamese words spoken by non French-educated Vietnamese, usually those who worked as servants in French households or milieus. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
creole language: Information from Answers.com (1445 words)
creole language (krēōl'), any language that began as a pidgin but was later adopted as the mother tongue by a people in place of the original mother tongue or tongues.
A creole language, or just creole, is a well-defined and stable language that originated from a non-trivial combination of two or more languages, typically with many distinctive features that are not inherited from either parent.
Another factor that may have contributed to the longtime neglect of creole languages is that they do not fit the "tree model" for the evolution of languages, which was adopted by linguists in the 19th century (possibly influenced by Darwinism) and is still the foundation of the comparative method.
Creole Translations (1564 words)
Creole is a language spoken by the entire population of Haiti (estimated at seven million people).
Unfortunately article 5 of the 1987 constitution proclaiming that Creole is the sole language uniting all Haitians and one of the two official languages of the country is not yet seriously implemented in government offices.
But this is not due to the Creole language itself, but to a long tradition of violation of human and constitutional rights of farmers, workers, ordinary people, women, children, poor people etc...
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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