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Encyclopedia > Hail Mary
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This article is about a Christian prayer. For other meanings, see Hail Mary (disambiguation).

Hail Mary, Ave Maria or Angelic Salutation (from Latin Salutatio Angelica, meaning "The Angel's Greeting") is a traditional Catholic and Eastern Orthodox prayer calling for the intercession of Mary, the mother of Jesus. Hail Mary is a traditional Roman Catholic prayer or song. ... Ave Maria (Latin: Hail, Maria or Hail, Mary) may refer to: Hail Mary, a traditional Catholic and Eastern Orthodox prayer calling for the intercession of Mary, the mother of Jesus A musical rendition of the Ave Maria prayer by Gounod (set to Prelude #1 from Well-Tempered Clavier). ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... The term Orthodox Christianity may refer to: The Oriental Orthodox Churches: the Eastern Christian churches adhering to the teachings of only the first three Ecumenical Councils (plus the Second Council of Ephesus). ... For other uses, see Prayer (disambiguation). ... // Christianity In Christian practice, intercessory prayer is the act of one person praying for or on behalf of another person or situation. ... Virgin Mary redirects here. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ...


The prayer is also used in other denominations, especially of Catholic tradition, notably Anglo-Catholic members of the Anglican Communion, some Lutherans, and some Methodists. The terms Anglo-Catholic and Anglo-Catholicism describe people, groups, ideas, customs and practices within Anglicanism that emphasise continuity with Catholic tradition. ... Main article: Anglicanism The Anglican Communion is a world-wide affiliation of Anglican Churches. ... Lutheranism is a major branch of Protestant Christianity that identifies with the teachings of the sixteenth-century German reformer Martin Luther. ... For other uses, see Methodism (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Biblical source

The prayer incorporates two passages from Saint Luke's Gospel: "Hail, full of grace, the Lord is with thee, blessed art thou amongst women" (Luke 1:28) and "Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb" (Luke 1:42) The Gospel of Luke (literally, according to Luke; Greek, Κατά Λουκαν, Kata Loukan) is a synoptic Gospel, and the third and longest of the four canonical Gospels of the New Testament. ...


In mid-thirteenth-century Western Europe the prayer consisted only of these words with the single addition of the name "Mary" after the word "Hail", as is evident from the commentary of Saint Thomas Aquinas on the prayer.[1] Saint Thomas Aquinas, O.P.(also Thomas of Aquin, or Aquino; c. ...


The first of the two passages from Saint Luke's Gospel is the greeting of the Angel Gabriel to Mary. The word κεχαριτωμένη (kecharitomene), here translated as "full of grace" admits of various translations. Grammatically, the word is the feminine Present Perfect Passive Voice Participle of the verb "χαριτο-ω (charitoō)", which means "to show grace" and, in the passive voice, "to have grace shown one, to be highly favoured". The form of the verb is intensive, hence the translations "highly favoured" and "full of grace".[2] This article is about the archangel Gabriel. ... The present perfect tense is a perfect tense used to express action that has been completed with respect to the present. ... In grammar, voice is the relationship between the action or state expressed by a verb, and its arguments (subject, object, etc. ... In linguistics, a participle is a non-finite verb form that can be used in compound tenses or voices, or it can be used as a modifier. ...


The opening word of greeting, χαῖρε (chaire), here translated "Hail", literally has the meaning "Rejoice", "Be happy". This was the normal greeting in the language in which Saint Luke's Gospel is written and continues to be used in modern Greek. Accordingly, both "Hail" and "Rejoice" are possible English translations of the word.


Since the words χαῖρε and κεχαριτωμένη are etymologically connected (a favour is meant to make someone happy), some see in the juxtaposition of the two words a literary element of wordplay.


The text also appears in the account of the annunciation contained in the apocryphal Infancy Gospel of Matthew, at chapter 9. The Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew is a part of the New Testament apocrypha, and sometimes goes by the name of The Infancy Gospel of Matthew. ...


The prayer in Greek tradition

The Greek original [citation needed] Hail Mary appears in the prayer of the Eastern Orthodox Church in the form :Θεοτόκε Παρθένε, χαῖρε, κεχαριτωμένη Μαρία, ὁ Κύριος μετὰ σοῦ. εὐλογημένη σὺ ἐν γυναιξί, καὶ εὐλογημένος ὁ καρπὸς τῆς κοιλίας σου, ὅτι Σωτήρα ἔτεκες τῶν ψυχῶν ἡμῶν.[3] Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Coptic Orthodox Pope · Roman Catholic Pope Archbishop of Canterbury · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Faith...

Mother of God and Virgin, hail, Mary full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, for thou hast given birth to the Saviour of our souls.

To the Biblical texts this adds the opening invocation "Mother of God and Virgin", the name "Mary" and the concluding "for thou hast given birth to the Saviour of our souls".


The prayer in Western (Latin) tradition

After considering the use of similar words in Syriac, Greek and Latin in the sixth century, the article on the Hail Mary[4] in the Catholic Encyclopedia concludes that "there is little or no trace of the Hail Mary as an accepted devotional formula before about 1050", though a later pious tale attributed to Ildephonsus of Toledo (fl. 7th century) the use of the first part, namely the angel's greeting the Mary, without that of Elizabeth, as a prayer. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Saint Ildephonsus (d. ... For other uses, see Toledo (disambiguation). ... Floruit (or fl. ... The 7th century is the period from 601 - 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ...


As seen above, Saint Thomas Aquinas spoke of the name "Mary", indicating who was the "full of grace" person addressed, as the only word that had been added in the West even by the mid-thirteenth century to the Biblical verses of which the prayer was composed. But at about the same time the name "Jesus" was also added, to specify who was meant by the phrase "the fruit of thy womb".


The Western version of the prayer is thus not derived from the Greek version: even the earliest Western forms have no trace of the phrases "Mother of God and Virgin" and "for thou hast given birth to the Saviour of our souls", which are part of the Greek version.


To the greeting and praise of Mary of which the prayer thus consisted, a petition "Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners now and at the hour of our death. Amen." was commonly added around the time of the Council of Trent. The Council of Trent is the Nineteenth Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church. ...


The "Catechism of the Council of Trent" says that to the first part of the Hail Mary, by which "we render to God the highest praise and return Him most gracious thanks, because He has bestowed all His heavenly gifts on the most holy Virgin ... the Church of God has wisely added prayers and an invocation addressed to the most holy Mother of God ... we should earnestly implore her help and assistance; for that she possesses exalted merits with God, and that she is most desirous to assist us by her prayers, no one can doubt without impiety and wickedness."[5] The Catechism of the Council of Trent (or Roman Catechism) differs from other summaries of Christian doctrine for the instruction of the people in two points: it is primarily intended for priests having care of souls (ad parochos), and it enjoyed an authority within the Catholic Church equalled by no...


The current Latin version is thus as follows (accents are given for pronunciation only and do not occur in the Latin language):

Áve María, grátia pléna, Dóminus técum. Benedícta tu in muliéribus, et benedíctus frúctus véntris túi, Iésus.[6]
Sáncta María, Máter Déi, óra pro nóbis peccatóribus, nunc et in hóra mórtis nóstrae. Ámen.
Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.

For translations from the Latin into various languages, see Wikisource.


The prayer in Syriac Orthodox tradition

The Syriac Orthodox Church uses a version of the Hail Mary much closer to the current Western form than to the Greek version. The Syriac Orthodox Church is an autocephalous Oriental Orthodox church based in the Middle East with members spread throughout the world. ...


The prayer is said in the following manner:[7]

  • Leader: Hail Mary, full of grace,
  • People: Our Lord is with Thee. Blessed art Thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of Thy womb, our Lord, Jesus Christ. O Virgin Saint Mary, O Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at all times, and at the hour of our death. Amen.

Usage in the Eastern Orthodox Church

In the Eastern Orthodox Church, the prayer is very common in the Greek form indicated above, or in translations from it. Although it is not said quite as often as in the West, it is well known, oft-used, and appears in several canons of prayer. It is typically sung thrice at the end of Vespers during an All-Night Vigil, as well as occurring many times in the course of daily prayer. Vespers is the evening prayer service in the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox liturgies of the canonical hours. ... The All-Night Vigil (Russian: ), Opus 37, is an a cappella choral composition by Sergei Rachmaninoff, written and premiered in 1915. ...


The following are some of the translations used in the Eastern Orthodox Church.


Romanian

Născătoare de Dumnezeu şi Fecioară, bucură-te Marie
ceea ce eşti plină de har,
Domnul este cu tine.
Binecuvântată eşti tu între femei
şi binecuvântat este rodul pântecelui tău,
că L-ai născut pe
Mântuitorul sufletelor noastre.

Slavonic

There exist two variant versions in Church Slavonic: This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Богородице дѣво радѹйсѧ
ωбрадованнаѧ Марїе
Господь съ тобою
благословена ты въ женахъ,
и благословенъ плодъ чрева твоегω,
Якω родила еси Христа Спаса,
Избавителѧ дѹшамъ нашимъ.
Theotokos Virgin, rejoice, (or, Rejoice, O Virgin Theotokos)
Mary full of grace,
the Lord is with thee.
Blessed art thou among women,
and blessed is the fruit of thy womb,
for thou hast borne Christ the Saviour,
the Deliverer of our souls.
Богородице дѣво, радѹйсѧ,
Благодатнаѧ Марїе,
Господь съ тобою:
благословена Ты въ женахъ,
и благословенъ плодъ чрева Твоегω;
якω Спаса родила еси дѹшъ нашихъ.
Theotokos Virgin, rejoice, (or, Rejoice, O Virgin Theotokos)
Mary full of grace,
The Lord is with thee.
Blessed art thou among women,
and blessed is the fruit of thy womb,
for thou hast borne the Saviour of our souls

The first is the older, and remains in use by the Old Believers as well as those who follow the Ruthenian recension (among them the Ukrainian Greek-Catholic Church and the Ruthenian Catholic Church). The second appeared in 1656 under the liturgical reforms of Patriarch Nikon of Moscow, and is in use by the Russian Orthodox Church, the Serbian Orthodox Church, the Bulgarian Orthodox Church and the Ukrainian Orthodox Church). Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ... In the context of Russian Orthodox church history, the Old Believers (Russian: ) separated after 1666 - 1667 from the hierarchy of the Russian Orthodox Church as a protest against church reforms introduced by Patriarch Nikon. ... The Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church (UGCC), also known as the Ukrainian Catholic Church, is one of the successor Churches to the acceptance of Christianity by Grand Prince Vladimir the Great (Ukrainian Volodymyr) of Kiev (Kyiv), in 988. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Nikon (Russian: Ни́кон, Old Russian: Нїконъ), born Nikita Minin (Никита Минин; May 7, 1605 Valmanovo, Russia—August 17, 1681), was the seventh patriarch of the Russian Orthodox Church. ... The Russian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate (Russian: ), also known as the Orthodox Christian Church of Russia, is a body of Christians who are united under the Patriarch of Moscow, who in turn is in communion with the other patriarchs and primates of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... Flag of the Serbian Orthodox Church Unknown flag, seen offten in public. ... The Bulgarian Orthodox Church (Bulgarian: , Bylgarska pravoslavna cyrkva) is an autocephalous Eastern Orthodox Church with some 6. ... Ukrainian Orthodox Church may refer to: Ukrainian Autocephalous Orthodox Church Ukrainian Orthodox Church - Kiev Patriarchate Ukrainian Orthodox Church (Moscow Patriarchate) Ukrainian Orthodox Church of Canada Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the USA Autonomous Ukrainian Orthodox Church in America Orthodox Christianity History of Christianity in Ukraine History of Christianity in Lala Land...


Usage in the Roman Catholic Church

The Hail Mary is the essential element of the Rosary, a prayer method in use especially among Latin Rite (Western) Catholics, and that appears in the East only among Latinised Ukrainian and Maronite Catholics. It consists of four sets of five Mysteries. These meditate upon events of Jesus' life during his childhood (Joyful Mysteries), public ministry (Luminous, i.e. light-giving, Mysteries), Passion (Sorrowful Mysteries), and from his Resurrection onwards (Glorious Mysteries). Each of these Mysteries is prayed as a decade (a unit of ten), consisting of one Our Father (Pater Noster or The Lord's Prayer), ten Hail Marys, and one 'Glory Be' (Gloria Patri) (Doxology). Our Lady of Lourdes - Mary appearing at Lourdes with Rosary beads. ... The Latin Rite is one of the 23 sui iuris particular Churches within the Catholic Church. ... The Eastern Catholic Churches are autonomous particular Churches in full communion with the Pope of Rome. ... Glory Be to the Father, also known as Gloria Patri, is a doxology, a short hymn of praise to God in various Christian liturgies. ... A doxology (from the Greek doxa, glory + logos, word or speaking) is a short hymn of praise to God in various Christian worship services, often added to the end of canticles, psalms, and hymns. ...


The Hail Mary is also the central part of the Angelus, a devotion generally recited thrice daily by many Catholics, as well as some Anglicans and Lutherans. The Angelus is a devotion in memory of the Incarnation. ...


Anglican use of the Hail Mary

Anglo-Catholics also employ the Hail Mary in devotion in ways similar to Roman Catholics.


It is reported that one church or two uses this variation:

"Hail Mary, full of grace, our Lord is with you;
Blessed are you among women
and blessed is the fruit of your womb, Jesus;
Son of Mary, Son of the living God,
have mercy upon us,
now, and at the hour of our death. Amen."[8]

Musical settings

The Hail Mary or Ave Maria in Latin has been set to music numerous times. Among the most famous settings is the version by Charles Gounod (1859), adding melody and words to Johann Sebastian Bach's first prelude from the Well-Tempered Clavier. Antonín Dvořák's version was composed in 1877. Another setting of Ave Maria was written by Giuseppe Verdi for his 1887 opera Otello. Russian composer César Cui, who was raised Roman Catholic, set the text at least three times: as the "Ave Maria," op. 34, for 1 or 2 women's voices with piano or harmonium (1886), and as part of two of his operas: Le Flibustier (premiered 1894) and Mateo Falcone (1907). Settings also exist by Mozart, Byrd, Elgar, Verdi, Saint-Saens, Rossini and Perosi as well as numerous versions by less well-known composers, such as J.B. Tresch. Charles Gounod. ... “Bach” redirects here. ... Title-page of Das wohltemperirte Clavier A flat major (As-dur) fugue from the second part of Das wohltemperirte Clavier (manuscript) The Well-Tempered Clavier (in the original German: Das wohltemperierte Clavier[1]) is a collection of solo keyboard music composed by Johann Sebastian Bach. ... Antonín Leopold Dvořák ( ; September 8, 1841 – May 1, 1904) was a Czech composer of Romantic music, who employed the idioms and melodies of the folk music of his native Bohemiaand Moravia in symphonic, oratorial, chamber and operatic works. ... “Verdi” redirects here. ... For the Rossini opera, see Otello (Rossini) or for the eurobeat artist see Gianni Coraini. ... César Antonovich Cui (Russian: , Tsezar Antonovič Kjui) (January 6, 1835 (Old Style)-March 13, 1918) was a Russian of French and Lithuanian descent. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Le Flibustier is a lyric comedy in three acts, composed by César Cui during 1888-1889. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Mateo Falcone (Матео Фальконе in Cyrillic; Mateo Falkone in transliteration) is one-act opera composed by César Cui during 1906-1907. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ... The surname Byrd may refer to: William Byrd (1540–1623), English composer William Byrd I (1652-1704), member of colonial Virginias House of Burgesses William Byrd II (1674-1744), founder of Richmond, Virginia Mary Willing Byrd (1740-1814), second wife of Colonel William Byrd III William Byrd III (1752... Edward Elgar Sir Edward William Elgar, Bt OM GCVO (June 2, 1857 – February 23, 1934) was a British composer, born in the small Worcestershire village of Broadheath to William Elgar, a piano tuner and music dealer, and his wife Ann. ... VERDI is an acronym for the Italian unification movement, named after the composer Giuseppe Verdi (ardent supporter of the movement) VERDI stands for Vittorio Emmanuelle, Re D Italia (Victor Emmanuel, King of Italy) Categories: Historical stubs ... Charles Camille Saint-Saëns (IPA: [ʃaʁl. ... Gioacchino Antonio Rossini (February 29, 1792 — November 13, 1868) was an Italian musical composer who wrote more than 30 operas as well as sacred music and chamber music. ... DON LORENZO PEROSI Monsignor Lorenzo Perosi was without question the most important composer of sacred music during the turn of the last century, and one of the greatest Catholic composers of all time. ... J. B. Tresch was a composer of choral works, although only a very limited repertoire survives today. ...


In Slavonic, the text was also a popular subject for setting to music by Eastern European composers. These include Rachmaninov, Stravinsky, Bortniansky and several others. Sergei Vasilievich Rachmaninoff, also Sergey Rachmaninov or Serge Rakhmaninov (Серге́й Васи́льевич Рахма́нинов), (April 1, 1873 – March 28, 1943) was a Russian composer, pianist... Igor Fyodorovitch Stravinsky () (June 17, 1882 – April 6, 1971) was a composer of modern classical music. ... Dmytro Stepanovich Bortniansky (Ukrainian: Дмитро Степанович Бортнянський, or Dmitry Bortnyansky, 1751–1825) was a Ukrainian composer in Imperial Russia. ...


This text was also very often set by composers in the Renaissance, including Jacques Arcadelt, Josquin Desprez, Orlando di Lasso, and Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina. Before the Council of Trent there were actually different versions of the text, so the earlier composers in the period sometimes set versions of the text different from the ones shown above. Josquin Desprez, for example, himself set more than one version of the Ave Maria. Here is an example of a text set by Josquin which begins with the first six words above, but continues with a poem in rhymed couplets: Renaissance music is European music written during the Renaissance, approximately 1400 to 1600. ... Jacques Arcadelt (also Jacob Arcadelt) (1504 or 1505 – October 14, 1568) was a Franco-Flemish composer of the middle to late Renaissance, principally of madrigals and chansons. ... Josquin Des Prez Josquin Des Prez (diminutive of Joseph; latinized Josquinus Pratensis) (c. ... Orlande de Lassus, a. ... Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (between 3 February 1525 and 2 February 1526[1] - 2 February 1594) was an Italian composer of the Renaissance. ... The Council of Trent is the Nineteenth Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Josquin Des Prez Josquin Des Prez (diminutive of Joseph; latinized Josquinus Pratensis) (c. ... This article is about the art form. ... A rhyme is a repetition of identical or similar terminal sounds in two or more different words (i. ... For the Angel episode, see Couplet (Angel episode). ...

Ave Maria, gratia plena, Dominus tecum, Virgo serena.
Ave cuius conceptio,
solemni plena gaudio,
celestia, terrestria,
nova replet letitia.
Ave cuius nativitas,
nostra fuit solemnitas,
ut lucifer lux oriens
verum solem preveniens.
Ave pia humilitas,
sine viro fecunditas,
cuius annunciatio
nostra fuit salvatio.
Ave vera virginitas,
immaculata castitas,
cuius purificatio
nostra fuit purgatio.
Ave preclara omnibus
angelicis virtutibus,
cuius fuit assumptio
nostra glorificatio.
O Mater Dei, memento mei. Amen.



Franz Schubert's Ellens dritter Gesang (D839, Op 52 no 6, 1825) is often misidentified as "Schubert's Ave Maria" because it opens with the greeting "Ave Maria" ("Hail Mary"), even though it is not a setting of the traditional Ave Maria prayer. The original text of Schubert's song is from Sir Walter Scott's The Lady of the Lake and was translated into German by Adam Storck. Adding to the confusion, the traditional Ave Maria prayer is often sung to Schubert's melody of Ellens dritter Gesang; and in Walt Disney's Fantasia, the tune is used with yet another text beginning with the phrase. Franz Schubert Franz Peter Schubert (January 31, 1797 – November 19, 1828) was an Austrian composer. ... Ellens dritter Gesang (Ellens Gesang III, D839, Op 52 no 6, 1825), Ellens third song in English, composed by Franz Schubert in 1825, is one of Schuberts most popular works, although some misconceptions exist regarding its provenance. ... For the first Premier of Saskatchewan see Thomas Walter Scott Sir Walter Scott (August 14, 1771 - September 21, 1832) was a prolific Scottish historical novelist and poet popular throughout Europe. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... Fantasia is a 1940 motion picture, produced by Walt Disney and first released on November 13, 1940 in the United States. ...


References

  1. ^ Saint Thomas Aquinas on the Hail Mary
  2. ^ To render the meaning of the Greek intensive verb, the early Latin translators of the New Testament, who had no corresponding verb in their language, felt the need to use the phrase "gratia plena" (full of grace).
  3. ^ text, with chanting
  4. ^ Thurston, Herbert (1910), "Hail Mary", The Catholic Encyclopedia, vol. VII, New York: Robert Appleton Company, <http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/07110b.htm>. Retrieved on 2007-09-19
  5. ^ The Catechism of the Council of Trent, Part IV
  6. ^ With Pope John XXIII's edition of the Roman Missal, the use of the letter J in printing Latin was dropped even in liturgical books, which had preserved that usage long after it ceased in the printing of ordinary Latin texts, including documents of the Holy See.
  7. ^ Qawmo (For prayers of all canonical hours)
  8. ^ Gabner, John J. (1995), The Anglican Rosary, Pittsburgh, PA: Episcopalian.org, <http://www.episcopalian.org/grace/anglican_rosary.htm>. Retrieved on 2007-09-19

For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... The Catholic Encyclopedia is an English-language encyclopedia published in 1913 by the Roman Catholic Church, designed to give authoritative information on the entire cycle of Catholic interests, action and doctrine. Starting in 1993, the encyclopedia (now in the public domain) was placed on the Internet through a world-wide... Pope John XXIII (Latin: ; Italian: Giovanni XXIII), born Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli (November 25, 1881 – June 3, 1963), was elected as the 261st Pope of the Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City on October 28, 1958. ... The Roman Missal (Missale Romanum) is the liturgical book that contains the texts and rubrics for the celebration of the Latin rite of Mass. ...

See also

Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ... The following Prayers to Mary are Catholic prayers to Mary, the mother of Jesus. ... Saint Mary and Saint Mary the Virgin both redirect here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Prayer beads are traditionally used to keep count of the repetitions of prayers, chants or devotions. ... -1... Apparition of The Virgin to St Bernard by Filippino Lippi (1486) Oil on panel, 210 x 195 cm Church of Badia, Florence Marian apparitions are events in which the Virgin Mary is purported to have supernaturally appeared to one or more persons, typically Catholics, in various settings. ... A Virgin Mary shrine is a shrine marking an apparition or other miracle ascribed to the Blessed Virgin Mary. ... Our Lady of Lourdes - Mary appearing at Lourdes with Rosary beads. ... A Hail Mary pass or Hail Mary play in American football is a forward pass made in desperation, with only a very small chance of success. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Hail Mary: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (1136 words)
It begins with the greetings spoken to Mary by the Archangel Gabriel and by her cousin Elizabeth in the Gospel of Luke: “Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee.
Hail Mary (from the Latin Ave Maria (Salutatio Angelica), is a traditional Catholic and Orthodox prayer calling for the intercession of Mary, the mother of Jesus.
The Hail Mary is the essential element of the Rosary, a prayer method practiced primarily by Catholics, comprised of 4 sets of 5 Mysteries meditating upon the incarnation, life, death and resurrection of Jesus.
Hail Mary Prayer lyrics and origins (339 words)
Hail Mary is one of the oldest and most popular of the Catholic Marian prayers - Prayers to Mary, the mother of Jesus.
The Virgin Mary, or Madonna is portrayed in a variety of recurring symbolic themes throughout religious documents and illustrations in the Middle Ages.
The second half of the Hail Mary prayer "Holy Mary..." was added at sometime during the 16th century.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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