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Encyclopedia > Haifa
Haifa

View from Carmel across the Shrine of the Báb, city of Haifa and Haifa Bay

Emblem of Haifa
Hebrew חֵיפָה
Arabic حَيْفَا
Government City
District Haifa
Population 266,300 (city)
1,039,000 (metropolitan area)
Jurisdiction 63,666 dunams (63.7 km²)
Mayor Yona Yahav
Website www.haifa.muni.il/cultures/en-US
Haifa, its district and metropolitan area's location within Israel
Haifa, its district and metropolitan area's location within Israel

Haifa (Hebrew: חֵיפָהefa ; Arabic: حَيْفَاḤayfā [1]) is the largest city in Northern Israel, and the third-largest city in the country, with a population of about 266,300.[2][3] The city is a seaport located on Israel's Mediterranean coastline in the Bay of Haifa covering 63.7 square kilometres (24.6 sq mi). It is located about 90 kilometres (56 mi) north of Tel Aviv and is the major regional center of the north of Israel. The city is governed by the Haifa Municipality, headed by mayor Yona Yahav. Image File history File links Haifa_coa. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Arabic redirects here. ... Jerusalem Tel Aviv-Jaffa Haifa Rishon LeZion Ashdod Beersheba Petah Tikva Netanya Holon Bnei Brak Bat Yam Ramat Gan Ashkelon Rehovot The following list of cities in Israel is based on the current index of the Israel Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS). ... Map of the districts of Israel Population density by geographic region, sub-district and district (thicker border indicates higher tier). ... Haifa District surrounding the city of Haifa in Israel, is one of six districts and includes the following towns and cities: Baqa al-Gharbiyye באקה אל-גרביה Hadera חדרה Haifa חיפה Nesher נשר Or Aqiva אור עקיבא Qiryat Atta קריית אתא Qiryat Bialik קריית ביאליק Qiryat Motzkin קריית מוצקין Qiryat Yam קריית ים Tirat Karmel טירת הכרמל Umm al-Fahm אום אל-פאחם Zikhron Yaaqov זכרון יעקב See also Districts of Israel... A dunam or dönüm, dunum, donum is a unit of area. ... Yona Yahav is an Israeli lawyer who served in the 14th Knesset and on the boards of several political, business and civic organizations. ... Haifa may refer to: Haifa, an Israeli port city Haifa Wehbe, a Lebanese singer Haifa Street, in Baghdad, Iraq Category: ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Arabic redirects here. ... Image File history File links ArHaifa. ... The Port of Haifa is the main Israeli international seaport. ... The Israeli Coastal Plain (Hebrew: , Mishor HaHof) is a name to the flat and low-lying narrow strip around the Mediterranean Sea. ... Haifa Bay Haifa Bay is a small bay along the Mediterranean coast of Northern Israel. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ... Yona Yahav is an Israeli lawyer who served in the 14th Knesset and on the boards of several political, business and civic organizations. ...


Haifa has a long history dating back to Biblical times. Built on the slopes of the historic Mount Carmel, the city was known in the 3rd century CE as a dye making center. Over time, it has fallen under the rule of the Byzantines, Arabs, Crusaders, Ottomans, Egyptians, and the British and today is home to a mixed population of Jews and Arabs, as well as to the Bahá'í World Centre.[4] The city also has a restored German Colony built by Templers who arrived here in 1868. Mount Carmel is a coastal mountain in Israel overlooking the Mediterranean Sea. ... Byzantine redirects here. ... For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... The Baháí Arc from the International Archives building Shrine of the Báb and its associated terraces at the Baháí World Centre Shrine of the Báb The Baháí World Centre is the name given to the administrative centre of the Baháí Faith. ... The German Colony in Haifa was built by the Tempelgesellschaft, it was established in 1868 and was the first colony to be established by the Templers in the Holy Land. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Temple Society. ...


The city has two world-class academic institutions, the University of Haifa and the Technion, and now plays an important role in Israel's hi-tech industry with a number of hi-tech parks, including the oldest and largest in the country.[5] Traditionally, however, the city was an industrial center based around the port and oil refinery, the towers of which long symbolised the city. The University of Haifa (אוניברסיטת חיפה) is a university in Haifa, Israel. ... The Technion - Israel Institute of Technology (הטכניון - מכון טכנולוגי לישראל) is a university in Haifa, Israel. ... Israel has a diversified economy with substantial government ownership and a rapidly developing high-tech sector. ...

Contents

Etymology

Some say that the city's official romanization Haifa and common English pronunciation /ˈhaɪ.fə/ is based on the Arabic name Ḥayfā, although the Standard Hebrew name is Ḥefa. The local Hebrew pronunciation is /xei.ˈfa/. In fact, the origin of the name Haifa is unclear. According to historian Alex Carmel, it may come from the Hebrew verb root חפה (hafa), meaning 'to cover or hide', i.e. Mount Carmel covers Haifa.[6] Others see resemblance to the Hebrew word חוֹף (hof), meaning beach, or חוֹף יָפֶה (hof yafe), meaning beautiful beach.[7] Some Christians believe that the town was named after the high priest Caiaphas, or Saint Peter (Keiphah [in Aramaic]).[6] Languages can be romanized in a variety of ways, as shown here with Mandarin Chinese In linguistics, romanization (or Latinization, also spelled romanisation or Latinisation) is the representation of a word or language with the Roman (Latin) alphabet, or a system for doing so, where the original word or language... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Look up pronunciation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Yhosef Bar Kayafa (Hebrew יְהוֹסֵף בַּר קַיָּפָא, ), also known as Caiaphas (Greek Καϊάφας) in the New Testament, was the Jewish high priest to whom Jesus was taken after his arrest in the garden of Gethsemane, and who played a part in Jesus trial before the Roman Governor, Pontius Pilate. ... St Peter redirects here. ... Aramaic is a Semitic language with a four-thousand year history. ...


Another possible origin of the name came from the Arabic word حفَّ ("haffa") which means "beach", or the word حيفة meaning the "suburb" or "side of the city". The closest term in pronunciation and writing is حيفاء which is an adjective used to describe places which have rare rain.[8] Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ...


History

View across Haifa towards Haifa Bay as seen in 1898
View across Haifa towards Haifa Bay as seen in 1898
Haifa in 1915
Haifa in 1915
Modern view across Haifa Bay from Mt. Carmel as seen at night
Modern view across Haifa Bay from Mt. Carmel as seen at night
The German Colony of Haifa
The German Colony of Haifa
An apartment building in Haifa following a rocket attack in July 2006
The Sail Tower, an example of modern architecture in Haifa
The Sail Tower, an example of modern architecture in Haifa

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 485 pixelsFull resolution (818 × 496 pixels, file size: 71 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is in the public domain because the Israeli Copyright law of 1911 section 21, (essentially the United Kingdom Copyright Act of 1911 as it... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 485 pixelsFull resolution (818 × 496 pixels, file size: 71 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is in the public domain because the Israeli Copyright law of 1911 section 21, (essentially the United Kingdom Copyright Act of 1911 as it... A view of Mount Carmel in 1894 University of Haifa atop Mount Carmel in 1996 For other uses, see Mount Carmel (disambiguation). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Haifa_apartment_building_after_attack_July_17_2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Haifa_apartment_building_after_attack_July_17_2006. ...

Early history

It is unclear when Haifa was first established by the Canaanites, although it is mentioned in Talmudic literature around the 3rd century CE, as a small town with a Jewish community.[9][10] It was described as being near the town of Shikmona, the main Jewish town in the area at that time and a center for making the traditional Tekhelet dye used for Jewish Priests' temple cloth. The archaeological site of Shikmona lies southwest of the modern Bat Galim neighborhood.[11] Furthermore, Mount Carmel and the Kishon River are also mentioned in the Bible.[12][13] Mount Carmel is riddled with caves, one of which near Haifa is traditionally known as the "Cave of Elijah", and considered by many Jews to have been the home of the Jewish biblical Prophet Elijah and his apprentice, Elisha.[12] Furthermore, the highest peak of the Mount Carmel range is named El-Muhrrakah, an Arabic term meaning the burning, named on account of the belief that this was the exact spot of Elijah's biblical confrontation with hundreds of priests of a Baal; the Baal in question was probably Melqart.[14] This article is about the land called Canaan. ... The first page of the Talmud, in the standard Vilna edition. ... Shikmona is an ancient mound situated near the seacoast on the southern entrance to the modern city of Haifa, Israel. ... Tzitzit or tzitzis (Ashkenazi) (Hebrew: Biblical ×¦×™×¦×ª Modern ×¦×™×¦×™×ª) are fringes or tassels worn by observant Jews on the corners of four-cornered garments, including the tallit (prayer shawl). ... Cohen (disambiguation) Position of the kohens hands and fingers during the Priestly Blessing A kohen (or cohen, Hebrew כּהן, priest, pl. ... Kishon River is a river in Israel that flows into the Mediterranean Sea at the city of Haifa. ... Elijah, 1638, by José de Ribera This article is about the prophet in the Hebrew Bible. ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... For other uses, see Baal (disambiguation). ... Melqart (less accurately Melkart, Melkarth or Melgart (Greek disposed of the letter Q (Qoppa), replacing it with additional use of K (Kappa) and G (Gamma)), Akkadian Milqartu, was the tutelary god of the Phoenician city of Tyre, as Eshmun protected Sidon. ...


There are disputes over the exact location of early Haifa with many researchers believing that the name ‘Haifa’ is identical to a settlement of which the remains are found in an area that extends from the present-day Rambam Hospital to the Jewish Cemetery in Yafo Street.[15] The residents of this time were largely thought to have been involved in various coastal industries, including fishing and agriculture as well as acting as a port welcoming groups of people who eventually settled in the city.[15] Before the Persians came to the area in 600 CE, the population of Haifa is thought to have been very spread across the area.[15] For other uses, see Port (disambiguation). ... The Persians of Iran (officially named Persia by West until 1935 while still referred to as Persia by some) are an Iranian people who speak Persian (locally named Fârsi by native speakers) and often refer to themselves as ethnic Iranians as well. ...


Byzantine and Crusader rule

Under Byzantine rule, Haifa continued to flourish, although never grew to great importance due to its proximity to Acre.[16] The Byzantine ruled the settlement until the 7th century, when the city was conquered – first by the Persians, and then by the Arabs. In 1100, it was conquered again by the crusaders, after a fierce battle with its Jewish and Muslim inhabitants.[6] Under crusader rule, the city was a part of the Principality of Galilee until the Muslim Mameluks captured it in 1265.[17] Byzantine redirects here. ... For other uses, see Akko (disambiguation). ... The Sassanid Empire in the time of Shapur I; the conquest of Cappadocia was temporary Official language Pahlavi (Middle Persian) Dominant Religion Zoroastrianism Capital Ctesiphon Sovereigns Shahanshah of the Iran (Eranshahr) First Ruler Ardashir I Last Ruler Yazdegerd III Establishment 224 AD Dissolution 651 AD Part of the History of... A caliphate (from the Arabic خلافة or khilāfah), is the Islamic form of government representing the political unity and leadership of the Muslim world. ... Combatants Christendom, Catholicism West European Christians, Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia Seljuks, Arabs and other Muslims The First Crusade was launched in 1095 by Pope Urban II with the dual goals of liberating the sacred city of Jerusalem and the Holy Land from Muslims and freeing the Eastern Christians from Muslim... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... The Principality of Galilee was one of the four major seigneuries of the crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem, according to 13th-century commentator John of Ibelin. ... An Ottoman Mamluk, from 1810 Mamluks (or Mameluks) (the Arabic word usually translates as owned, singular: مملوك plural: مماليك) comprised slave soldiers used by the Muslim Caliphs and the Ottoman Empire, and who on more than one occasion seized power for themselves. ...


The Carmelites were founded at, and named after, Mount Carmel, in the 12th century.[18] Since that time, at the peak of the Mount near Haifa, there has historically been a building that has variously been a mosque, monastery, and hospital; in the 19th century it was reconstructed as a Carmelite monastery, and a cave located there, which functions as the monastery's crypt, was treated as having once been Elijah's cave.[19] The Order of Our Lady of Mt. ... The Masjid al-Haram in Mecca as it exists today A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... This article concerns the buildings occupied by monastics. ... For the town in the Republic of Ireland, see Hospital, County Limerick. ... Crypt is also a commonly used name of water trumpets, aquatic plants. ...


Mameluke, Ottoman and Egyptian control

In 1265, the army of Baibars the Mameluke captured Haifa, destroying its fortifications, which were recently rebuilt by King Louis of France, as well as the majority of the city's homes in order to prevent the return of Christian groups from Europe from re-invading.[17] As such, for much of their rule, the city was desolate for much of the Mameluke period of governance between the 13th and 16th centuries.[20] Information from this period is very scarce.[20] al-Malik al-Zahir Rukn al-Din Baibars al-Bunduqdari (also spelled Baybars) (Arabic: ) was a Mamluk Sultan of Egypt and Syria. ... An Ottoman Mamluk, from 1810 Mamluks (or Mameluks) (the Arabic word usually translates as owned, singular: مملوك plural: مماليك) comprised slave soldiers used by the Muslim Caliphs and the Ottoman Empire, and who on more than one occasion seized power for themselves. ... King Louis can refer to a number of monarchs in history: A number of kings named Louis I A number of kings named Louis II A number of kings named Louis III A number of kings named Louis IV A number of kings named Louis V You may also be... An Ottoman Mamluk, from 1810 Mamluks (or Mameluks) (the Arabic word usually translates as owned, singular: مملوك plural: مماليك) comprised slave soldiers used by the Muslim Caliphs and the Ottoman Empire, and who on more than one occasion seized power for themselves. ...


In 1761 Dhaher al-Omar, Bedouin ruler of Acre and Galilee, destroyed and rebuilt the town in a new location, surrounding it with a wall.[20] This event is marked as the beginning of the town's modern era. After El-Omar's death in 1775, the town remained under Ottoman rule until 1918, except for two brief periods: in 1799, Napoleon Bonaparte conquered Haifa as part of his unsuccessful campaign to conquer Palestine and Syria, but withdrew in the same year; and between 1831 and 1840, the Egyptian viceroy Mehemet Ali governed, after his son Ibrahim Pasha wrested control from the Ottomans.[21][22] A Bedouin man in Sinai Peninsula Bedouin, (from the Arabic (), pl. ... The Old City of Akko in the 19th or early 20th century, looking south-west from atop the Land Wall Promenade, the open space now a parking lot. ... For other uses, see Galilee (disambiguation). ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... Bonaparte as general Napoleon Bonaparte ( 15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution and was the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from November 11, 1799 to May 18, 1804, then as Emperor of the French (Empereur des Français... A 2003 satellite image of the region. ... See Mehemet Ali (Turkey) for the Turkish foreign minister and regent. ... Ibrahim Pasha (Arabic: ابراهيم باشا) ‎ (1789 – 10 November 1848), a 19th century general of Egypt. ...


In the years following the Egyptian occupation, Haifa grew in population and importance while Acre suffered a decline. The arrival of the German Templers in 1868, who settled in what is now known as the German Colony of Haifa, was a turning point in Haifa's development.[22] The Templers built and operated a steam-based power station, opened factories and inaugurated carriage service to Acre, Nazareth and Tiberias, playing a key role in modernizing the city.[23] For other uses, see Akko (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Temple Society. ... The German Colony in Haifa was built by the Tempelgesellschaft, it was established in 1868 and was the first colony to be established by the Templers in the Holy Land. ... For other uses, see Akko (disambiguation). ... Hebrew (Natzrat or Natzeret) Arabic الناصرة (an-Nāṣira) Government City District North Population 64,800[1] Metropolitan Area: 185,000 (2006) Jurisdiction 14 200 dunams (14. ... Hebrew טבריה (Standard) Teverya Arabic طبرية Government City District North Population 39 900 (a) Jurisdiction 10 000 dunams (10 km²) Tiberias (British English: ; American English: ; Hebrew: , Tverya; Arabic: , abariyyah) is a town on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee, Lower Galilee, Israel. ...


Under the British Mandate

At the beginning of the 20th Century, Haifa had emerged as an industrial port city and growing population center, reflected by the establishment of facilities like the Hejaz railway and the Technion.[22] At that time, the Haifa District (which included a number of Arab locales surrounding the city of Haifa itself) was home to approximately 20,000 inhabitants, comprising 82% Muslim Arab, 14% Christian Arabs, and 4% Jewish residents. Jewish population increased steadily with immigration primarily from Europe, so that by 1945 the population had shifted to 33% Muslim, 20% Christian and 47% Jewish.[24] In 1947 its population was estimated to consist of 41,000 Muslims, 74,230 Jews and 29,910 Christians.[25] The Christian community was composed mostly of Greek Orthodox Church (Arab Orthodox). al Hejaz Station in Damascus, starting point of the railroad The 1050mm gauge Hejaz Railway (also Hedjaz, etc. ... Haifa District surrounding the city of Haifa in Israel, is one of six districts and includes the following towns and cities: Baqa al-Gharbiyye באקה אל-גרביה Hadera חדרה Haifa חיפה Nesher נשר Or Aqiva אור עקיבא Qiryat Atta קריית אתא Qiryat Bialik קריית ביאליק Qiryat Motzkin קריית מוצקין Qiryat Yam קריית ים Tirat Karmel טירת הכרמל Umm al-Fahm אום אל-פאחם Zikhron Yaaqov זכרון יעקב See also Districts of Israel... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... Greek Orthodox Church (Greek: HellÄ“northódoxÄ“ EkklÄ“sía) can refer to any of several hierarchical churches within the larger group of mutually recognizing Eastern Orthodox churches. ... The Arab Orthodox are Arabic language speaking Greek Orthodox Christians who have resided in Palestine, Jordan and Israel since the Byzantine era. ...


It was in the late 19th century that the area rose to importance in the Bahá'í Faith as the remains of the Báb were moved to Acre and on, in 1909, to Haifa where a special tomb was erected for this purpose by `Abdu'l-Bahá, on Mount Carmel. Haifa remains an important site of worship, pilgrimage and administration for the members of the religion. The Bahá'í World Centre (comprising the Shrine of the Báb, terraced gardens and administrative buildings) are all on Mount Carmel's northern slope. The location of the Bahá'í holy places in Haifa has its roots to the imprisonment of the religion's founder, Bahá'u'lláh, near Haifa by the Ottoman Empire during the Ottoman Empire's rule over Palestine.[26] The Bahá'í holy places are also the most visited tourist attraction of the city.[27] This article is about the generally recognized global religious community. ... Shrine of the Báb in Haifa, Israel. ... This article is about the unit of measurement. ... The Shrine of the Báb and its Terraces, 2003. ... The Baháí Arc from the International Archives building Shrine of the Báb and its associated terraces at the Baháí World Centre Shrine of the Báb The Baháí World Centre is the name given to the administrative centre of the Baháí Faith. ... Shrine of the Báb The Shrine of the Báb is the location where the Bábs remains have been laid to rest. ... The Shrine of the Báb and its Terraces, 2003. ... Haifa Bay from atop Mt. ... A view of Mount Carmel in 1894 University of Haifa atop Mount Carmel in 1996 For other uses, see Mount Carmel (disambiguation). ... Shrine of Baháulláh Baháulláh (ba-haa-ol-laa Arabic: Glory of God) (November 12, 1817 – May 29, 1892), born Mírzá usayn-`Alí Nuri (Persian: ), was the founder of the Baháí Faith. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... A 2003 satellite image of the region. ...


Haifa is in the northernmost reach of the coastal plain designated as Jewish territory in the 1947 UN Partition Plan dividing mandatory Palestine, and was not excepted to the violence following that plan and culminating in the 1948 Arab-Israeli War. On December 30, 1947 members of the Jewish militant group Irgun hurled two bombs into a crowd of Arabs who were waiting for construction jobs outside the gates of the Consolidated Refineries in Haifa, killing 6 and injuring 42, whereupon 2,000 Arab employees rioted and killed 39 Jewish employees in what has become known as the Haifa Oil Refinery massacre.[28] Jewish forces retaliated by raiding the Arab village of Balad al-Shaykh on December 31, 1947. Jewish forces deemed control of Haifa a critical objective in the ensuing 1948 Arab-Israeli War, as it was the major industrial and oil refinery port in Palestine.[28] The British withdrew from Haifa on April 21, 1948. The city was captured on April 23, 1948 by the Carmeli Brigade of the Haganah who were ordered into action by Mordechai Maklef at 10:30 am on April 21 following three months of unsuccessful attacks by Arab forces.[28] The Israeli Coastal Plain (Hebrew: , Mishor HaHof) is a name to the flat and low-lying narrow strip around the Mediterranean Sea. ... On 29 November 1947 the United Nations Partition Plan for Palestine or United Nations General Assembly Resolution 181, a plan to resolve the Arab-Israeli conflict in the British Mandate of Palestine, was approved by the United Nations General Assembly. ... Flag The approximate borders of the British Mandate circa 1922. ... Combatants  Israel Haganah Irgun Lehi Palmach Foreign Volunteers Egypt, Syria, Transjordan,  Lebanon, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Yemen[2], Holy War Army, Arab Liberation Army Commanders Yaakov Dori, Yigael Yadin John Bagot Glubb, Abd al-Qadir al-Husayni, Hasan Salama, Fawzi Al-Qawuqji, Ahmed Ali al-Mwawi Strength  Israel: 29,677 initially... Combatants  Israel Haganah Irgun Lehi Palmach Foreign Volunteers Egypt, Syria, Transjordan,  Lebanon, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Yemen[2], Holy War Army, Arab Liberation Army Commanders Yaakov Dori, Yigael Yadin John Bagot Glubb, Abd al-Qadir al-Husayni, Hasan Salama, Fawzi Al-Qawuqji, Ahmed Ali al-Mwawi Strength  Israel: 29,677 initially... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Irgun emblem. ... The Haifa Oil Refinery Massacre occurred on December 30, 1947, just after the 1947 UN Partition Plan for Palestine. ... Balad al-Shaykh, was an Arab village in Palestine, now part of the Israeli town of Nesher. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants  Israel Haganah Irgun Lehi Palmach Foreign Volunteers Egypt, Syria, Transjordan,  Lebanon, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Yemen[2], Holy War Army, Arab Liberation Army Commanders Yaakov Dori, Yigael Yadin John Bagot Glubb, Abd al-Qadir al-Husayni, Hasan Salama, Fawzi Al-Qawuqji, Ahmed Ali al-Mwawi Strength  Israel: 29,677 initially... View of Shell Oil Refinery in Martinez, California. ... A 2003 satellite image of the region. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Haifa was one of the primary objectives of Plan Dalet in the 1948 Arab-Israeli war. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Haganah (Hebrew: Defense, ×”×’× ×”) was a Zionist para-military organization in Palestine during the British mandate of Palestine from 1920 to 1948. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Modern Haifa

Today, Haifa has a population of about 266,300 people. 90% of the population are predominantly Israeli-Jews and a few "others". The latter group consists of Israelis without religious classification, mostly immigrants from the former Soviet Union, from mixed-marriage families of Jewish origin. According to the Israeli Central Bureau of Statistics, Israeli-Arabs constitute 9% of Haifa's population, the majority living in Wadi Nisnas, Abbas and Khalisa neighborhoods.[29] The Israel Central Bureau of Statistics (הלשכה המרכזית לסטטיסטיקה), often abbreviated to CBS, is the Israeli government bureau commissioned with producing statistics to help better understand Israel. ... Arab citizens of Israel, Arabs of Israel or Arab population of Israel are terms used by Israeli authorities and Israeli Hebrew-speaking media to refer to non-Jewish Arabs who are citizens of the State of Israel. ... Khalisa, Palermo Al-Khalisa the districts Arabic name, meaning the purest was centre of the city of Balharm (Palermo) conquered by the Normans during a battle early in 1072. ...


Following the Israeli War of Independence, the city recovered relatively quickly due to the city’s role as gateway for immigration. Thousands of immigrants were absorbed into the neighborhoods which were previously Arab, before new housing projects containing mostly blocks of flats, were built. These new neighborhoods include Kiryat Hayim, a municipal housing project, western Kiryat Hayim and Ramot Remez, Ramat Shaul and Kiryat Sprintzak, and Kiryat Eliezer. Furthermore, educational and public institutions were expanded and created including the Bnei Zion Hospital and the Central Synagogue. In 1953, a master plan was created for transportation programme and the future architectural layout of the city.[22] The 1948 Arab-Israeli War, called the War of Independence by Israelis and al Nakba the catastrophe by Arabs, was the first in a series of wars in the Arab-Israeli conflict. ...


In 1959, Haifa saw large social and community discomfort with riots taking place in the neighborhood Wadi Salib. These formerly Arabic neighborhoods were subsequently demolished as people were moved to newer neighborhoods and replaced by modern, more functional ones.[22] In the early 1970s, Haifa's population reached 200,000 and consultation about expanding the city began taking place with new neighborhoods and streets being constructed in the 1980s and 1990s. The mass immigration to Israel from the former Soviet Union increased the population of Haifa by 35,000.[22] Wadi Salib is a neighbourhood in Haifa, Israel, between Hadar HaKarmel and Qiryat Rabin. ...


Haifa was hit by 93 Hezbollah rockets during the 2006 Israel-Lebanon conflict killing eleven civilians in the city, and leading to half of the city's population fleeing after the first week of the war.[30] Israeli photo of Hezbollah 220mm rocket launcher Hezbollahs rocket force possesses 20,000 rockets and is Hezbollahs main attack weapon in the 2006 Israel-Lebanon conflict, having fired some 3,970 rockets into Israel from southern Lebanon, killing at least 42 civilians and 12 soldiers (as of August... Combatants Hezbollah Amal LCP  Israel Commanders Hassan Nasrallah (Secretary General of Hezbollah) Imad Mughniyeh (Commander of Hezbollahs armed wing)[5] Dan Halutz (CoS) Moshe Kaplinsky[12] Udi Adam (Regional) Strength 600-1,000 active fighters 3,000-10,000 reservists[6] 30,000 ground troops (plus IAF & ISC)[13...


Demographics

City of Haifa
Population by year[31][32]
1800 1,000
1840 2,000
1880 6,000
1914 20,000
1922 24,600
1947 145,140
1961 183,021
1972 219,559
1983 225,775
1995 255,914
2005 267,800

Haifa is Israel's third-largest city with a population of 266,300, consisting of 103,000 households.[2] The population is divided between religions with 82% Jewish, 4% Muslim, and 14% Christian (both Arab and non-Arab). The greatest origin of immigrants to Haifa is from the former Soviet Union since 1989, who now make up 25% of the city's population. Despite this influx of immigrants, however, Haifa has seen a steady population decline, especially since 2001, and it is unclear what will happen to this in the future, with some arguing that the population will continue to decline, while others feel that, due to the performance of the hi-tech industry in the city, the negative immigration trend will end, or even be reversed in the future. Haifa has an ageing population compared to Tel Aviv and Jerusalem as younger people have moved away from the city for education and jobs in the central part of the country, and young families have migrated out to bedroom communities in the vicinity of Haifa. The changing demographics of the city are also affecting its religious split. In general, the Jewish residents of the city are ageing and the younger ones leaving, while the number of Christians and Muslims is growing.[33] In 2006, 27% of the Arab population was age 0-14 compared to 17% in the Jewish and other population groups. This trend continues with 27% of Arabs aged 15-29, and 23% 30-44. The population of Jewish and other groups in these age groups are 22% and 18% respectively. 19% of the city's Jewish and other population is between 45 and 59 compared to 14% in the Arab population. This trend continues with 14% of Jews and others aged 60-74 and 10% over age 75, in comparison to 7% and just 2% respectively in the Arab population.[31] The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ... Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ...


Many see Haifa as a model for coexistence in Israel as the relationships between the Arab and Jewish, and Muslim and Christian groups in Haifa are for the most part good. The local government is not influenced by the large-scale political divides between the groups in daily management of the city, for example. Despite the continued existence of distinctly Arab neighborhoods in Haifa, increasingly, wealthier Arabs are moving into affluent, Jewish neighborhoods.[33]


By national standards, Haifa's Jewish population is relatively secular. In 2006, 2.9% of the Jews in the city were ultra-religious, compared to 7.5% on a national scale.[31] 5.0% were classed as religious versus 9.8% nationally, and 6.7% were traditional but religious compared to 13.8% nationally, whilst 19.0% were traditional but not religious versus 25.1% nationally.[31] Haifa makes up for this with a non-religious secular percentage of 66.6% versus the national average of 43.7%.[31]


Geography

An aerial view of Haifa Bay and the city

Haifa is situated on the Israeli Mediterranean Coastal Plain, the historic land bridge between Europe, Africa, and Asia.[34] Located on Mount Carmel around Haifa Bay, the city is split over three tiers.[35] The lowest is the center of commerce and industry including the Port of Haifa.[35] The middle level is on the slopes of Mount Carmel and consists of older residential neighborhoods, while the upper level consists of modern neighborhoods looking over the lower tiers.[35] From here views can be had across the Western Galilee region of Israel towards Rosh HaNikra and the Lebanese border.[35] Haifa is about 90 kilometers (55.9 mi) north of the city of Tel Aviv, and has a large number of beaches on the Mediterranean.[36] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Israeli Coastal Plain (Hebrew: , Mishor HaHof) is a name to the flat and low-lying narrow strip around the Mediterranean Sea. ... Via Maris is an ancient trading route dating from the Early Bronze Age which linked Egypt with the northern empires of Syria, Anatolia and Mesopotamia - modern day Iran, Iraq, Turkey and Syria. ... A view of Mount Carmel in 1894 University of Haifa atop Mount Carmel in 1996 For other uses, see Mount Carmel (disambiguation). ... Haifa Bay Haifa Bay is a small bay along the Mediterranean coast of Northern Israel. ... The Port of Haifa is the main Israeli international seaport. ... Galilee (Hebrew hagalil הגליל, Arabic al-jaleel الجليل), meaning circuit, is a large area overlappping with much of the North District of Israel. ... Rosh Hanikra (also Rosh Haniqra; Hebrew: ) is a kibbutz in the Mateh Asher Regional Council in Israel. ... Blue Line can refer to: Blue line (ice hockey) - In ice hockey, the line between center ice and each teams zone. ... Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ...


Climate

Haifa has a mediterranean climate with hot, humid summers and cool, rainy winters (Köppen climate classification Csa).[37] Spring arrives in March when temperatures begin to increase. By late May, the temperature has warmed up considerably to herald warm summer days. The average temperature in summer is 26 °C (79 °F) and in winter, 12 °C (54 °F). Snow is rare in Haifa, but temperatures around 6 °C (43 °F) can sometimes occur, usually in the early morning. Humidity tends to be high all year round, and rain usually occurs between October and April. Annual precipitation is approximately 524 millimeters (21 in).  Areas with Mediterranean climate A Mediterranean climate is a climate that resembles the climate of the lands in the Mediterranean Basin. ... Updated Köppen-Geiger climate map[1] The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. ... Spring is one of the four temperate seasons. ...

Weather averages for Haifa Bay
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 18.0 (64.4) 17.9 (64.2) 21.1 (67.0) 25.3 (77.5) 25.4 (77.7) 28.5 (83.3) 31.5 (88.7) 31.1 (88.0) 30.3 (86.5) 26.9 (80.4) 23.5 (74.3) 20.8 (69.4)
Average low °C (°F) 10.7 (51.3) 10.5 (50.9) 12.3 (54.2) 15.2 (59.4) 17.4 (63.3) 21.8 (71.2) 24.3 (75.7) 25.6 (78.1) 22.9 (73.2) NA 15.3 (59.5) 12.7 (54.9)
Precipitation mm (inches) 175 (6.9) 109 (4.3) 41 (1.6) 25 (1.0) 5 (0.2) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 3 (0.1) 25 (1.0) 94 (3.7) 185 (7.3) 524.0
Source: Temperature - Israel Central Bureau of Statistics[38][39]
Source #2: Precipitation - BBC News[40]

Israel Central Bureau of Statistics (הלשכה המרכזית לסטטיסטיקה) is a state organization for the creation and maintenance of numeric data related to populations vis-à-vis the ethnic makeup of Israel and its cities. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ...

Neighborhoods

A restored templer building in Haifa
A restored templer building in Haifa
The Bat Galim neighborhood on the lowest tier of the city
The Bat Galim neighborhood on the lowest tier of the city
The IEC Tower, Haifa's tallest building
The IEC Tower, Haifa's tallest building
Main article: Neighborhoods of Haifa

Haifa is made up of a large number of neighborhoods that have developed over time throughout its history. As a general rule of thumb, the older neighborhoods are on the second tier of Mount Carmel and the newer ones on the third tier, although there are neighborhoods on the lowest level, perhaps most notably the German Colony, which has recently been restored.[35] Haifa is a diverse city with Arab and Jewish population groups who live in neighborhoods across the city. Whilst there are general divisions between neighborhoods of these two groups, there is an increasing trend for wealthy Arabs to move into affluent, Jewish neighborhoods.[33] The German Colony in Haifa was built by the Tempelgesellschaft, it was established in 1868 and was the first colony to be established by the Templers in the Holy Land. ... For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ...


Recently, residential construction has been concentrated around a number of neighborhoods in the city; Qiryat Hayyim and Qiryat Shemu'el, which between 2002 and 2004, saw approximately 75,000 sq m. of new residential construction, Carmel, which saw approximately 70,000 sq m, and Ramot Nawe Sha'anan also with approximately 70,000 sq m.[41] The greatest concentrations of non-residential construction were in the Lower Town, where construction began on 90,000 sq m of non-residential space, in Haifa Bay where construction began on approximately 72,000 sq m over the period, and Ramot Nawe Sha'anan with 54,000 sq m.[41] In 2004, 80% of construction in the city was private, with the remaining 20% publically initiated.[41]


As of 2005, Haifa had 110,194 dwellings, the greatest numbers of which are in the Carmel neighborhoods (19,553), the Hadar neighborhoods (18,473), and the Western Haifa neighborhoods (17,700).[41] The largest single neighborhoods in terms of residential units are Central and Western Carmel with 8,941, Bat Gallim and Qiryat Eliezer in Western Haifa with 8,661, and Shikmona Beach in Western Haifa with 8,538 units.[41]


Neighborhoods in the city each possess individual architectural and demographic characteristics. Near the Bay, the Hadar neighborhood which is the commercial center of the city and the home to some of the older neighborhoods.[42] Also at this level is the German Colony, which was constructed in the late nineteenth century, and is the first example of urban planning in Israel. Today, it has a largely Arab Christian population. Most of the city's Arab population live in three neighborhoods, however, Khalisa, Abbas and Wadi Nisnas.[43] Neve Sha'anan is by contrast, a neighborhood located on the second tier of Mount Carmel, home to a largely observant Jewish population as well as a sizeable Russian immigrant population. Founded in the 1920s almost all single-story houses here have been replaced with 4-story apartment buildings. Furthermore, Israel’s only Ahmadi Muslim community is based in Haifa’s Kababir neighborhood.[43] Beta Centauri (β Cen / β Centauri), also known as Hadar or Agena, is the second brightest star in the constellation Centaurus and the eleventh brightest star in the nighttime sky. ... Neve Shaanan (; Hebrew: ) is a vast neighborhood in Haifa, Israel which extends from the lower inclines of Mount Carmel, to midway across its slopes. ... Orthodox Judaism is the formulation of Judaism that adheres to a relatively strict interpretation and application of the laws and ethics first canonised in the Talmudic texts (Oral Torah) and as subsequently developed and applied by the later authorities known as the Gaonim, Rishonim, and Acharonim. ... This article is about the Ahmadiyya branch of Islam founded by Mirza Ghulam Ahmad. ... A mixed neighbourhood of Jews and Ahmedi arabs in Haifa. ...


The Eshkol Tower at the University of Haifa was the tallest building in Israel outside Tel Aviv when it was completed in 1978 at 102 metres (335 ft). It was the largest university building in Asia until 1989 when it was surpassed, although it remained the tallest building in the city until 2002, when it was surpassed by the Sail Tower. With a total height of 137 metres (449 ft), this building remains the tallest building in the city to date, although with a floor height of 113 metres (371 ft), it was surpassed in this respect in 2003 by the IEC Tower at 130 metres (427 ft).[44][45] The University of Haifa (אוניברסיטת חיפה) is a university in Haifa, Israel. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ...


Economy

The towers at Haifa Refinery
The towers at Haifa Refinery
Microsoft R&D facilities in Haifa
Microsoft R&D facilities in Haifa
The Louis Promenade at the top of Mount Carmel
The Louis Promenade at the top of Mount Carmel

The phrase "Haifa works, Jerusalem prays, and Tel Aviv plays" refers to the working nature of the city of Haifa.[46] The industrial region of Haifa is north of the city, near the Kishon River. Haifa is home to one of the two oil refineries in Israel (the other located in Ashdod). The Haifa refinery is capable of processing about 9 million tons (66 million barrels) of crude oil a year and is the center of a wide array of petrochemical industries in and around Haifa.[47] Its twin 80-meter high cooling towers, built in the 1930s, have long symbolized the city of Haifa, and were the tallest buildings built in the British Mandate period.[48] Each year, the refinery processes 66 million barrels of crude oil.[49] Kishon River is a river in Israel that flows into the Mediterranean Sea at the city of Haifa. ... View of the Shell/Valero Martinez oil refinery An oil refinery is an industrial process plant where crude oil is processed and refined into useful petroleum products. ... Hebrew Founded in 1956 Government City (from 1968) District South Population 204,400 (2005) Jurisdiction 60,000 dunams (60 km²) Mayor Zvi Zilker Ashdod (Hebrew: ‎; Arabic: , Isdud), located in the Southern District of Israel towards the south of the Israeli Coastal Plain, is a city of over 200,000 people... Pumpjack pumping an oil well near Sarnia, Ontario Petroleum (from Greek petra – rock and elaion – oil or Latin oleum – oil ) or crude oil is a thick, dark brown or greenish liquid. ... Petrochemicals are chemical products made from raw materials of petroleum (hydrocarbon) origin. ...


Mat'am (short for Merkaz Ta'asiya UMeida - Scientific Industries Center), the largest and oldest business park in Israel, is at the southern entrance to the city, hosting manufacturing and R&D facilities for a large number of Israeli and international hi-tech companies, such as Intel, IBM, Microsoft, Motorola, Google, Elbit, Zoran, Philips, and Amdocs.[50] The campus of the University of Haifa is also home to IBM Haifa Labs.[51] A business park in Santa Barbara County, California A business park or business estate is an area of land in which many office buildings are grouped together. ... The phrase research and development (also R and D or, more often, R&D), according to the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development, refers to creative work undertaken on a systematic basis in order to increase the stock of knowledge, including knowledge of man, culture and society, and the use... Intel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC, SEHK: 4335), founded in 1968 as Integrated Electronics Corporation, is an American multinational corporation that is best known for designing and manufacturing microprocessors and specialized integrated circuits. ... The IBM Haifa Labs include the Haifa Research Lab (HRL), the Haifa Development Lab (HDL), and the Haifa Software Lab (HSL) in Rehovot. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... Motorola Inc. ... This article is about the corporation. ... Elbit Systems Ltd. ... The Zoran Corporation (NASDAQ:ZRAN) was founded in 1983 by Dr. Levy Gerzberg, with focus on DSP technology. ... Philips HQ in Amsterdam Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. (Royal Philips Electronics N.V.), usually known as Philips, (Euronext: PHIA, NYSE: PHG) is one of the largest electronics companies in the world, founded and headquartered in the Netherlands. ... Amdocs NYSE: DOX, headquarters in St. ... The University of Haifa (אוניברסיטת חיפה) is a university in Haifa, Israel. ... The IBM Haifa Labs include the Haifa Research Lab (HRL), the Haifa Development Lab (HDL), and the Haifa Software Lab (HSL) in Rehovot. ...


The Port of Haifa is the leader in passenger traffic among Israeli ports, and is also a major cargo harbor, although deregulation has seen its dominance challenged by the port of Ashdod.[52] The Port of Haifa is the main Israeli international seaport. ... The State of Israel (Hebrew: מְדִינַת יִשְׂרָאֵל, transliteration: ; Arabic: دَوْلَةْ اِسْرَائِيل, transliteration: ) is a country in the Middle East on the eastern edge of the Mediterranean Sea. ... For other uses, see Harbor (disambiguation). ... Port of Ashdod Cargo at the port The Port of Ashdod is Israels main cargo port, processing approximately 60% of Israeli marine cargo. ...


Haifa has a wide variety of malls and shopping centers, the largest being Hutsot Hamifratz, Horev Center Mall, Panorama Center, Castra Center, Colony Center (Lev HaMoshava), Hanevi'im Tower Mall, Kenyon Haifa, Lev Hamifratz Mall and Grand Kenyon.[53]


Tourism

Due to its location on the Mediterranean and importance as the cultural capital of the north of Israel, Haifa is popular with tourists. The city has many museums and cultural centers, perhaps the most notable of which is the Bahá'í World Centre, as well as restored quarters, historic sites, and beaches. The area around the city also has a number of tourist attractions. The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... The Baháí Arc from the International Archives building Shrine of the Báb and its associated terraces at the Baháí World Centre Shrine of the Báb The Baháí World Centre is the name given to the administrative centre of the Baháí Faith. ...


As of 2005, Haifa had 13 hotels offering 1,462 rooms.[54] Furthermore, the city has 17 kilometres (11 mi) of beaches, 5 kilometres (3 mi) of which are organised, and on much of which watersports are offered.[55] Haifa's main tourist attraction is the Bahá'í World Centre, with the golden Shrine of the Báb and the surrounding gardens. Between 2005 and 2006, 86,037 visited this attraction.[54] The restored German Colony, founded by the Templers, is at the bottom of the Bahai Gardens and is popular with tourists, offering a wide range of restaurants. Furthermore, many tourists visit the Stella Maris and the Carmelite monastery.[56] The Baháí Arc from the International Archives building Shrine of the Báb and its associated terraces at the Baháí World Centre Shrine of the Báb The Baháí World Centre is the name given to the administrative centre of the Baháí Faith. ... Shrine of the Báb The Shrine of the Báb is the location where the Bábs remains have been laid to rest. ... The German Colony of Jerusalem was one of several German Colonies built in the Holy Land at the second half of the 19th century. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Temple Society. ... Stella Maris (Latin for Star of the Sea) is a title of the Virgin Mary. ... Origin and early history Carmelites (in Latin Ordo fratrum Beatæ Virginis Mariæ de monte Carmelo) is the name of a Roman Catholic order founded in the 12th century by a certain Berthold (d. ... This article concerns the buildings occupied by monastics. ...


The Haifa area also has a number of attractions popular with tourists. The artist's village of Ein Hod where more than 90 artists and craftsmen have studios and exhibitions.[57] The Mount Carmel national park contains caves where Neanderthal and early Homo Sapiens remains were found, and was also the location of biblical events such as Elijah's confrontation with the Ba'al prophets, and where now another Carmelite monastery is located. The Carmel is also a popular hiking area.[58] Ein Hod is a village at the south of Mount Carmel, south-east of Haifa in north-Israel. ... A view of Mount Carmel in 1894 University of Haifa atop Mount Carmel in 1996 For other uses, see Mount Carmel (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Neanderthal (disambiguation). ... Homo sapiens (Latin: wise man) is the scientific name for the human species. ... Elijah, 1638, by José de Ribera This article is about the prophet in the Hebrew Bible. ... Baal (בַּעַל / בָּעַל, Standard Hebrew Báʿal, Tiberian Hebrew Báʿal / Báʿal) is a northwest Semitic word signifying The Lord, master, owner (male), husband cognate with Akkadian Bēl of the same meanings. ...


In a 2007 report commissioned by the Haifa Municipality, Ernst & Young suggested that in order for Haifa to become a more major tourist attraction, more hotels should be constructed, a ferry line between Haifa, Acre and Caesarea should begin, the western anchorage in the port should be developed as a central recreation and entertainment area, the airport should be expanded into an international airport, and the city should become a major port for cruise ships.[59] Ernst & Young is one of the largest professional services firms in the world, and one of the Big Four auditors, along with PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu (Deloitte) and KPMG. Ernst & Young is a global organization consisting of many member firms. ... This article is about the unit of measurement. ... Caesarea is the name of several Roman cities and towns, including: Caesarea Antiochia, properly Antioch in Pisidia, near modern Yalvaç, Turkey Caesarea Mazaca in Cappadocia, modern Kayseri, Turkey Caesarea Palaestina: modern Caesarea, in Israel Caesarea Philippi in the Golan Heights Iol Caesarea: modern Cherchell, in Algeria Caesarea Magna or Caesara...


Arts and culture

The Tikotim Museum of Japanese Art
The Tikotim Museum of Japanese Art
National Museum of Science, Technology and Space in Haifa
National Museum of Science, Technology and Space in Haifa

Despite its image as a port and industrial city, Haifa is the cultural hub of northern Israel. During the 1950s, mayor Abba Hushi made a special effort to encourage authors and poets to move to the city, and founded the Haifa Theatre, a repertory theater, the first municipal theater founded in the country.[60] Other theaters in the city include the Krieger Centre for the Performing Arts and the Rappaport Art and Culture Center.[60] Furthermore, the Congress Center is a large tourist, commercial and leisure centre which hosts exhibitions and large scale concerts and events.[61] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 644 KB) Summary The National Museum of Science, Technology and Space (Daniel and Matilda Recanati Center) in Haifa, Israel. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 644 KB) Summary The National Museum of Science, Technology and Space (Daniel and Matilda Recanati Center) in Haifa, Israel. ... Abba Hushi was born in 1898 in Turkah (today in the Ukraine) as Abba Shneler to a Jewish family. ... The Haifa Theatre (Hebrew: תיאטרון חיפה) is the municipal theater company of the city of Haifa, Israel and the first municipal theatre founded in that country. ...


The New Haifa Symphony Orchestra was established in 1950 and is the focus for classical music of the north of the country, with more than 5,000 subscribers, and in 2004, 49,000 people watched their concerts.[62][55] Furthermore, the Haifa Cinematheque, founded in 1975, hosts the annual Haifa International Film Festival during the intermediate days of the Sukkot holiday. The city has 29 cinema halls.[55] Haifa's newspaper is Yediot Haifa,[63] and Radio Haifa operates from the city.[64] Logo of the 22nd Haifa International Film Festival The Haifa International Film Festival is held each year during the holiday of Sukkot on the ridge of Mount Carmel overlooking the Mediterranean Sea. ... Sukkot (Hebrew:  ; booths. ...


Museums

Haifa has more than a dozen museums.[65][55] The most popular museum is the National Museum of Science, Technology, and Space, which in 2004 received almost 150,000 visitors. The museum is located in an old Technion building in the Hadar neighborhood.[66] The Haifa Museum of Art displays modern and classical artwork as well as information on the historic background of Haifa,[67] while the Tikotin Museum of Japanese Art which is the only museum in the Middle East dedicated entirely to displaying and conserving Japanese art works.[68] Other museums in Haifa include the Museum of Prehistory, the National Maritime Museum and Haifa City Museum, the Hecht Museum, the Dagon Archeological Museum, the Railway Museum, the Clandestine Immigration and Navy Museum, the Israeli Oil Industry Museum, and Chagall Artists' House.[55] As part of his campaign to bring culture to Haifa, Mayor Abba Hushi provided the artist Mane-Katz with a building on Mount Carmel to house his collection of Judaica, which is now a museum.[69] Beta Centauri (β Cen / β Centauri), also known as Hadar or Agena, is the second brightest star in the constellation Centaurus and the eleventh brightest star in the nighttime sky. ... The Haifa Museum established in 1949, houses the Museum of Ancient Art, which specializes in archeological finds discovered in Israel and the Mediterranean basin and the Museum of Modern Art. ... The Tikotin Museum of Japanese Art, which stands on Mount Carmel, is devoted entirely to displaying and conserving Japanese art works, and is the only one of its kind in the Middle East. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Israel Railway Museum is the national railway museum of Israel, located in Haifa. ... Emmanuel Mané-Katz, מאנה‏ כץ‏ ,1894-1962, born Mane Leyzerovich Kats, was a Jewish painter born in Kremenchug, Ukraine. ... For a discussion of Jews as an ethnicity or ethnic group see the article on Jew. ...


Sports

Kiryat Eliezer stadium, Haifa
Kiryat Eliezer stadium, Haifa

Haifa has eight football (soccer) clubs, two of which, Maccabi Haifa, Hapoel Haifa are in the major leagues in Israel. Other clubs include Beitar Haifa, Akhva Haifa, Hapoel Spartak Haifa, Sportek Haifa, Bnei Kababir and Hapoel Neve Sha'anan.[70] Maccabi Haifa has won 10 championships, 5 cups and 3 League cups.[71][72][73] Both Hapoel and Maccabi Haifa operate football schools in Haifa suburbs and other villages (including Arab and Druze villages) in the northern part of Israel. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixels, file size: 1. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Maccabi Haifa Football Club (Hebrew: מועדון הכדורגל מכבי חיפה, Moadon HaKaduregel Maccabi Haifa) is an Israeli football club and one of the leading football clubs in the country. ... hapoel haifa is a city football team in the midnorthern part of israel. ... Neve Shaanan (‎, literally, tranquil abode) can refer to: Neve Shaanan (Haifa) - a large neighborhood in Haifa, Israel Neve Shaanan (Jerusalem) - a neighborhood in Jerusalem, Israel Neve Shaanan (Tel Aviv) - a neighborhood in Tel Aviv, Israel Categories: | ... For Ligat haAl basketball, see Ligat Winner. ... The State Cup (Hebrew: גביע המדינה) is the second most important tournament in Israeli football after the championship. ... The Toto Cup גביע הטוטו is the minor cup competition in Israeli football, but nevertheless carries the highest annual prize. ...


Haifa also has basketball, volleyball, tennis, and handball clubs, while surfing, kite surfing and sailing clubs operate on the beaches near Bat Galim offer clubs. In 1996, the city hosted the World Windsurfing Championship.[49] The Haifa Tennis Club, near the southwest entrance to the city, is one of the largest in Israel.[74] This article is about the sport. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Handball player leaps towards the goal prior to throwing the ball, while the goalkeeper extends himself trying to stop it. ... For other uses, see Surfing (disambiguation). ... Kiteboarders use inflatable kites tethered to harnesses to glide through water and air. ... For either of the songs named Sailing, see Sailing (song). ... A windsurfer with modern gear tilts the rig and carves the board to perform a planing jibe (downwind turn) close to shore in Maui, Hawaii. ...


The main stadiums in Haifa are the 14,000-seat Kiryat Eliezer Stadium and Thomas D'Alesandro Stadium. In addition, the Romema Basketball Arena seats 2,000 and the Neve Sha'anan Athletic Stadium seats 1,000. A UEFA-approved stadium to seat 30,000 is planned for south-west Haifa, due to be completed in 2009.[75] Qiryat Eliezer is a multi-use stadium in Haifa, Israel. ... The Thomas DAlesandro Stadium, more commonly known as Kiryat Haim, is a multi-use stadium in Kiryat Haim, Israel. ... The Union Européenne de Football Association or Union of European Football Associations in English, almost always referred to by the acronym UEFA (pronounced (you-AY-fuh) or (oo-Ay-fuh) or ), is the administrative and controlling body for European football. ...


Government

The Courts Hall of Haifa
The Courts Hall of Haifa

As an industrial port city, Haifa has traditionally been a Labor party stronghold. The strong presence of dock workers and trade unions earned it the nickname 'Red Haifa.' In addition, many prominent Arabs in the Israeli Communist Party, among them Tawfik Toubi, Emile Habibi, Zahi Karkabi, Bulus Farah and Emili Toma, were all from Haifa. In recent years, there has been a drift toward the center.[76][77][78] This was best signified by, in the 2006 legislative elections, the Kadima party receiving about 28.9% of the votes in Haifa, and Labor lagging behind with 16.9%.[79] The Israeli Labor Party (‎, Mifleget HaAvoda HaYisraelit), generally known in Israel as Avoda (‎) is a center-left political party in Israel. ... Emile Habibi (August, 1921 - May 3, 1996) was a Palestinian-Israeli writer and politician. ... The Elections for the 17th Knesset were held in Israel on 28 March 2006, following an agreement between the Prime Minister, Ariel Sharon, and the new Leader of the Israel Labour Party, Amir Peretz. ... Kadima (Hebrew: קדימה, Forward) is a political party in Israel. ...


Before 1948, Haifa's Municipality was fairly unique as it developed cooperation between the mixed Arab and Jewish community in the city, with representatives of both groups involved in the city's management. Under mayor al-Haj, between 1920 and 1927, the city council had six Arab and two Jewish representatives, with the city run as a mixed municipality with overall Arab control. The city changed towards more of a mixed society under mayor Hasan Bey Shukri's second term (1927–40) in which cooperation between Jews and Arabs in the running of the city was encouraged. Whilst the two groups were treated differently in terms of needs, with Arabs coming before Jews, greater coexistence was fostered. The major change in the leadership of the city occurred in 1940, when the first Jewish mayor of the city, Shabtai Levy, was elected. Instantly, the Jews in the city were no longer treated behind the Arabs. Levy's two deputies were Arab (one Muslim, the other Christian), with the remainder of the council made up of four Jews and six Arabs.[80] Shabtai Levy (right) and Israel Rokeach watching a water-polo match between the Haifa and Tel Aviv teams, 1945 Shabtai Levy (1876-1956) was the first Jewish mayor of Haifa. ...


Today, Haifa is governed by its 12th city council, headed by the mayor Yona Yahav. The results of municipal elections decide on the makeup of the council, similarly to the Knesset elections. The city council is the legislative council in the city, and has the authority to pass auxiliary laws.[81] The 12th council, which was elected in 2003, has 31 members, with the liberal Shinui-Greens ticket holding the most seats (6), and Likud coming second with 5.[82] Many of the decisions passed by the city council are results of recommendation made by the various municipal committees, which are committees where non-municipal organs meet with representatives from the city council. Some committees are spontaneous, but some are mandatory, such as the security committee, tender committee and financial committee.[83] Yona Yahav is an Israeli lawyer who served in the 14th Knesset and on the boards of several political, business and civic organizations. ... Type Unicameral Speaker of the Knesset Dalia Itzik, Kadima since May 4, 2006 Deputy Speaker Majalli Wahabi, Kadima since May 4, 2006 Members 120 Political groups Kadima Labour-Meimad Shas Likud Last elections March 28, 2006 Meeting place Knesset, Jerusalem, Israel Web site www. ... Shinui (שינוי) (original full name: Tenua le-Shinui ve Yozma and then to Shinui-Mifleget ha-Merkaz) is a Zionist, secular and anti-clerical, free market liberal party in Israel. ... The Greens (Hebrew: הירוקים, HaYerukim) is a political party in Israel. ... Likud (Hebrew: ליכוד, literally means consolidation) is a centre-right political party in Israel. ...


Mayors of Haifa

  • Najib Effendi al-Yasin (1873–77)
  • Ahmad Effendi Jalabi (1878–81)
  • Mustafa Bey al-Salih (1881–84)
  • Mustafa Pasha al-Khalil (1885–1903)
  • Jamil Sadiq (1904–10)
  • Rif'at al-Salah (1910–11)
  • Ibrahim al-Khalil (1911–13)
  • Abd al-Rahman al-Haj (1920–27)
  • Hasan Bey Shukri (1914–20, 1927–40)

Shabtai Levy (right) and Israel Rokeach watching a water-polo match between the Haifa and Tel Aviv teams, 1945 Shabtai Levy (1876-1956) was the first Jewish mayor of Haifa. ... Abba Hushi was born in 1898 in Turkah (today in the Ukraine) as Abba Shneler to a Jewish family. ... Moshe Flimann (1905-1973) served as the mayor of Haifa from 1969 to 1973. ... Yosef Almogi was the mayor of Haifa from 1974 — 1975. ... Yeruham Zeisel (1909-1987) was the mayor of Haifa from 1975 to 1978. ... Arie Gurel was mayor of Haifa from 1978 to 1993. ... Amram Mitzna is an Israeli politician who served as the mayor of Haifa from 1993 to 2003. ... Yona Yahav is an Israeli lawyer who served in the 14th Knesset and on the boards of several political, business and civic organizations. ...

Medical facilities

The Rambam Medican Center, Haifa
The Rambam Medican Center, Haifa

Between Haifa's medical facilities there are approximately 4,000 beds in hospitals across the city. The city's largest hospital is the government-operated Rambam Medical Center which has approximately 900 beds, and had approximately 78,000 admissions in 2004. The municipal Bnai Zion Hospital and health-service run Carmel Hospital each have approximately 400 beds and had 35,000 admissions in 2004. Other hospitals in the city include the Italian Hospital, a mission, and three private hospitals the Elisha Hospital with about 100 beds, and the Horev Medical Center and Ramat Marpe with 36 and 18 beds respectively. In the city's three largest hospitals, Rambam, Bnai Zion, and Carmel, the average length of stay was approximately four days. In 2004, the Rambam and Bnai Zion hospitals had bed occupancies of 96% and 94% respectively, whilst the Carmel hospital had occupancy of 104%. In 2005, Magen David Adom had 48,103 operational dispatches with approximately 180 a day. About 1,500 of these were false alarms. MDA intensive care units saw 16,097 dispatches over the same period.[84] Furthermore, Haifa has 20 family health centers.[84] In 2004, there were a total of 177,478 hospital admissions.[84] The Magen David Adom emblem The Magen David Adom (Hebrew: ‎) is Israels national emergency medical, disaster, ambulance and blood bank service. ...


Rambam Medical Center was in the direct line of fire during the Second Lebanon War in 2006 and was forced to take special precautions to protect its patients.[85] Whole wings of the hospital were moved to large underground shelters.[86] Combatants Hezbollah Amal LCP Islamic Courts Union[4]  Israel Commanders Hassan Nasrallah (Secretary General of Hezbollah), veteran Fatah operative Imad Mughniyeh[5] Dan Halutz (CoS), Moshe Kaplinsky[13], Udi Adam (Regional) Strength 600-1,000 active fighters (of 3,000 - 5,000 available and 10,000 reservists) [6] 30,000...


Education

The Technion is called "Israel's MIT"
The Technion is called "Israel's MIT"
The Rabin Building at Haifa University
The Rabin Building at Haifa University

Haifa is home to two internationally acclaimed universities and several colleges. The University of Haifa, founded in 1963, is at the top of Mt. Carmel. The campus was designed by the architect of Brasilia and United Nations Headquarters in New York, Oscar Niemeyer. More buildings have been added since then. The top floor of the 30-story Eshkol Tower provides a panoramic view of northern Israel. The Hecht Museum, with important archeology and art collections, is on the campus of Haifa University. The Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, described as Israel's MIT, was founded in 1924. It has 18 faculties and 42 research institutes. The original building is now home to the Israel National Museum of Science, Technology, and Space. The first technological high school in Israel, Basmat, was established in Haifa in 1933.[87] The Technion - Israel Institute of Technology (הטכניון - מכון טכנולוגי לישראל) is a university in Haifa, Israel. ... “MIT” redirects here. ... The University of Haifa (אוניברסיטת חיפה) is a university in Haifa, Israel. ... Bras lia is the capital city of Brazil and is located in the center of the country in a federal district created in the state of Goi s. ... This article is about the physical offices of the United Nations in New York. ... This article is about the state. ... Oscar Niemeyer Oscar Niemeyer Soares Filho (born December 15, 1907) is a Brazilian architect who is considered one of the most important names in international modern architecture. ... // The Reuben and Edith Hecht Museum at the University of Haifa was inaugurated in 1984. ... Computer Science Faculty Building Architecture and Town Planning Faculty building The Technion – Israel Institute of Technology (Hebrew: ‎; commonly abbreviated as Technion IIT) is a university in Haifa, Israel, founded 1924. ... “MIT” redirects here. ... The museum facade The MadaTech Israel National Museum of Science, Technology, and Space is a science and technology museum in the city of Haifa, Israel. ...


Haifa is also home to several academic colleges. Two teaching colleges, the Gordon College of Education and Sha'anan Religious Teachers' College, operate from the city, and design colleges include the WIZO Design Academy and Tiltan College of Design. The Michlala Leminhal College of Management and Open University of Israel both have branches in Haifa. The city also has a nursing college and the P.E.T Practical Engineering School.[88] Gordon College of Education was established in Haifa in 1953 merging the Teacher’s Seminary of the Labor Movement with the Teacher’s Seminary of the well-known Reali School of Haifa. ... The Womens International Zionist Organization, is a non-party international movement dedicated to the advancement of the status of women, welfare of all sectors of Israeli society and encouragement of Jewish education in Israel and the Diaspora. It was founded in 1920. ... Open University of Israel Campus in Raanana Image:OpenUniversityzomet. ...


As of the 2006–07 education year, Haifa had 70 primary schools, 23 intermediate schools, 23 general secondary schools, 8 vocational secondary schools, and 5 comprehensive secondary schools. There were 5,133 pupils in municipal kindergartens, 20,081 in primary schools, 7,911 in intermediate schools, 8,072 in general secondary schools, 2,646 in vocational secondary schools, and 2,068 in comprehensive secondary schools. 86% of students were in Hebrew education with 14% in Arabic education. 5% were in special education.[88]


As of 2004, Haifa had 16 municipal libraries stocking 367,323 books, lending on average 23,279 books per month. In this year, there were 14,012 members of libraries.[55]


Transportation

The Carmelit, Israel's only subway
The Carmelit, Israel's only subway
The Port of Haifa
The Port of Haifa

Transportation is good both within Haifa and between Haifa and other cities in Israel and internationally. Buses run throughout the city, and Haifa is the home to Israel's only subway system. The Carmelit (Hebrew: כרמלית‎) is actually a funicular, running from downtown Paris Square to Gan HaEm (Mother's Park) on Mount Carmel.[89] With a single track, six stations and two trains, it is listed in the Guinness World Records as the world's shortest metro line. Furthermore, the Stella Maris gondola lift cable car, consists of six cabins and connects Bat Galim on the coast to the Stella Maris observation deck and monastery atop Mount Carmel; although mainly for tourism purposes.[90] Proposals have also been made for a light rail between Haifa and Nazareth although it is unclear if these will ever materialise.[91] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Carmelit is a subway (underground metro) in Haifa, Israel. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Angels Flight, Los Angeles, California with gantlet track configuration Duquesne Incline, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania with full length parallel tracks The Gütschbahn in Lucerne, Switzerland – from an 1893 guidebook A funicular, also called funicular railway, inclined railway, inclined plane, or, in the United Kingdom, a cliff railway, is a system of... A view of Mount Carmel in 1894 University of Haifa atop Mount Carmel in 1996 For other uses, see Mount Carmel (disambiguation). ... Guinness World Records 2008 edition. ... Tochal gondola lift carry tourists and skiers to Tochal mountain,Tehran, Iran. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ... Hebrew (Natzrat or Natzeret) Arabic الناصرة (an-Nāṣira) Government City District North Population 64,800[1] Metropolitan Area: 185,000 (2006) Jurisdiction 14 200 dunams (14. ...


Haifa is the only city in Israel where buses operate on Shabbat.[92] The bus stations, from the south northwards, are Hof HaCarmel, Bat Galim, and Merkazit HaMifratz. All these stations are served by Egged city, suburban, and intercity buses. In 2006, Haifa implemented a trial network of neighborhood mini-buses – named "Shchunatit" run by Egged.[93] In 2008, Haifa and the Krayot will be linked by the Metronit, a Phileas concept bus rapid transit system.[94] Haifa has six Israel Railways stations on the Nahariya-Tel Aviv main line railway that runs along the Gulf of Haifa. From south to north, these stations are Haifa Hof HaCarmel, Haifa Bat Galim, Haifa Merkaz (Central), Lev HaMifratz, Hutzot HaMifratz, and Kiryat Haim. A seventh stop is in the northern suburb Kiryat Motzkin. The railway stations also serve a metropolitan line with seven stops, called the Parvarit.[95] For other uses, see Sabbath. ... Haifa Hof HaCarmel Central Bus Station is the main bus station in Haifa, Israel, replacing the Haifa Bat Galim Central Bus Station. ... The Haifa Bat Galim Central Bus Station was until January 1, 2002 the only central bus station in Haifa, Israel. ... HaMifratz Central Bus Station is the main bus station of the Haifa Bay (Mifratz Haifa) region which is the Eastern part of the Haifa metropolitan area. ... Egged A bendy city bus in Israel. ... Egged may refer to a bus cooperative. ... Buses similar to those in Haifa The Metronit (Hebrew: ), pronounced Metro-neet, is a new above-ground bus rapid transit/light rail system in Haifa, Israel. ... This article is about high-capacity bus transit systems. ... Israel Railways Logo Israel Railways (Hebrew: רכבת ישראל Rakévet Yisraél) is Israels government-owned national railway company and is responsible for all inter-city and suburban railway passenger and freight traffic in the country. ... See: Station (telecommunication) Radio station Television station Station (network) Primary station Control station Slave station Station (Australian ranch) (the Australian equivalent of the North American Ranch) Public transport railway station or train station metro station (underground or elevated ) bus station Ground station Space station Gas station Power station (see Battersea... Nahariyya (נהריה; unofficially also spelled Nahariya or Naharia) is a city in the North District in Israel. ... Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ... The Gulf of Haifa (also called Haifa Bay) is a small bay along the Mediterranean coast of Northern Israel. ... Hof HaCarmel Railway Station (‎, Taḥanat HaRakevet Ḥof HaCarmel) is an Israel Railways passenger station serving the city of Haifa. ... The Bat Galim railway station entrance Haifa Bat Galim Railway Station (‎, Taḥanat HaRakevet Ḥefa Bat Gailm) is an Israel Railways passenger station serving the city of Haifa. ... Lev HaMifratz Railway Station Lev HaMifratz Railway Station (Hebrew: , Tachanat HaRakevet Lev HaMifratz) is an Israel Railways passenger station in Haifa, Israel, serving Lev Hamifratz Mall (Hebrew: , Heart of the Bay Mall), one of Haifas largest malls, and the surrounding Haifa-Bay industrial zone just north of Haifa. ... Hutzot HaMifratz Railway Station (Hebrew: , Taḥanat HaRakevet Ḥutzot HaMifratz) is an Israel Railways passenger station serving Hutzof HaMifratz Mall (Hebrew: , Steets of the Bay Mall), Israels largest open-air mall, and the surrounding Haifa-Bay industrial zone just north of Haifa. ... Kiryat Haim Railway Station (Hebrew: ‎, Takhanat HaRakevet Kiryat Haim) is an Israel Railways passenger station serving the town of Kiryat Haim (administratively a neighborhood of Haifa) and the surrounding Kerayot region. ... Kiryat Motzkin Railway Station (Hebrew: ‎, Takhanat HaRakevet Kiryat Motzkin) is an Israel Railways passenger station serving the city of Kiryat Motzkin and the surrounding Kerayot region. ... Qiryat Motzkin (קרית מוצקין; unofficially also spelled Kiryat Motzkin) is a city in the Haifa District in Israel. ...


Travel between Haifa and the rest of the country is also possible by road with Highway 2, the main highway along the coastal plain, beginning at Tel Aviv and ending at Haifa.[92] Furthermore, Highway 4 runs along the coast to the north of Haifa, as well as south, inland from Highway 2.[92] In the past, traffic travelling along Highway 2 to the north of Haifa would have to pass through the downtown area of the city, however, the Carmel Tunnels, currently under construction will re-route this traffic through tunnels under Mount Carmel, cutting down on congestion in the down-town area of the city.[96] Haifa Airport serves domestic flights to Tel Aviv and Eilat as well as international charters to Cyprus.[97] There are currently plans to expand services from Haifa. Cruise ships previously operated from Haifa port to Greece and Cyrpus.[92] Highway 2 (Hebrew: , Kvish 2) is an Israeli highway located on the coastal plain of the Mediterranean Sea. ... Highway 4 (Hebrew: , Kvish 4) is an Israeli highway that runs along Israels entire coastal plain of the Mediterranean Sea, its rout is from the Erez Border Crossing with the Gaza Strip to Rosh Hanikra border crossing with Lebanon. ... The Carmel Tunnels are a set of road tunnels currently under construction in and around Haifa, Israel. ... Haifa International Airport (IATA Airport Code: HFA) is an Israeli airport located in Haifa. ... Hebrew אילת Founded in 1951 Government City (from 1959) District South Population 55,000 (2006) Jurisdiction 80,000 dunams (80 km²) Mayor Meir Yitzhak Halevi North Beach, Eilat, from southwest. ... The Port of Haifa is the main Israeli international seaport. ...


In the future, Haifa is planned to be connected to Beit She'an and Amman in Jordan by the reconstructed Jezreel Valley railway, with a possible extension to Nazareth.[98] Map of the Decapolis showing the location of Bet Shean (here called by its Greek name, Scythopolis) Bet Shean (Hebrew בית שאן unofficially also spelled Beit Shean, Beth Shean; Arabic بيسان Baysān) is a city in the North District in Israel. ... For other meanings, see Amman (disambiguation) and Ammann. ... Hebrew (Natzrat or Natzeret) Arabic الناصرة (an-Nāṣira) Government City District North Population 64,800[1] Metropolitan Area: 185,000 (2006) Jurisdiction 14 200 dunams (14. ...


Sister cities

Haifa has sister city agreements with the following cities:[99]

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... City flag Coat of arms Motto: By her great deeds, the city of Massilia shines The Old Port of Marseille Location Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Coordinates Administration Country Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Bouches-du-Rhône (13) Subdivisions 16 arrondissements (in 8 secteurs) Intercommunality Urban... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... The London Borough of Hackney is a London Borough in the east end of London and part of inner London. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Philippines. ... For other meanings of the word, see Manila (disambiguation). ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Denmark. ... View of Aalborg railroad station from J.F. Kennedys Square, 2004 Aalborg (help· info) is a municipality (Danish, kommune) in North Jutland County on the Jutland peninsula in northern Denmark. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Africa. ... Nickname: Motto: Spes Bona (Latin for Good Hope) Location of the City of Cape Town in Western Cape Province Coordinates: , Country Province Municipality City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality Founded 1652 Government [1]  - Type City council  - Mayor Helen Zille  - City manager Achmat Ebrahim Area  - Total 2,499 km² (964. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... This article is about the city in Germany. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ... For other uses, see Antwerp (disambiguation). ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Mainz is a city in Germany and the capital of the German federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Düsseldorf (IPA: ) is the capital city of the German Federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia and one of the economic and cultural centres of Germany and western Europe. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Argentina. ... Rosario is the largest city in the province of Santa Fe, Argentina. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ukraine. ... The ODESSA, which stands for the German phrase Organisation der ehemaligen SS-Angehörigen, which phrase in turn translates as “Organization of Former Members of the SS,” is the name commonly given to an international Nazi network alleged to have been set up towards the end of World War II... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... For other uses, see Shanghai (disambiguation). ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Cyprus. ... District Limassol Government  - Mayor Andreas Christou Population (2004)  - City 201. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Fort Lauderdale, known as the Venice of America, is a city located in Broward County, Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... The cathedral Mariendom at night. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Mannheim is a city in Germany. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... This article is about a city in the United Kingdom. ...

See also

  • List of famous people from Haifa

References

  1. ^ Many Hebrew speakers, however, particularly those who come from Haifa, refer to the city by its Arab pronunciation.
  2. ^ a b Haifa. Jewish Agency. Retrieved on 2007-05-05.
  3. ^ Population of Localities numbering above 1,000 residents and other rural population on 31/12/2007 (pdf). Israel Central Bureau of Statistics (2007-12-31). Retrieved on 2008-04-05.
  4. ^ History of Haifa. Retrieved on 2008-04-11.
  5. ^ GavYam. Gav-Yam.co.il. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  6. ^ a b c Carmel, Alex (2002). The History of Haifa Under Turkish Rule, 4th Edition, Haifa: Pardes, 14. ISBN 965-7171-05-9.  (translated from Hebrew)
  7. ^ Winter, Dave. Israel Handbook: With the Palestinian Authority Areas. Footprint Travel Guides, 560. 
  8. ^ Ben Omar Al-Shirazi, Fairuz Abadi (2007). Al-Qamoos Al-Moheet. Dar Al-Ma'arifa. ISBN 995385002X. 
  9. ^ The History and Culture of the Canaanites and Phoenicians. Retrieved on 2008-04-09.
  10. ^ Haifa. Jewish Virtual Library. Retrieved on 2008-01-20.
  11. ^ Two Tombstones from Zoar in the Hecht Museum Collection (PDF). Haifa University. Retrieved on 2008-01-25.
  12. ^ a b 1 Kings 19:9
  13. ^ Kishon. HighBeam Encyclopedia (Colombia Encyclopedia). Retrieved on 2008-03-20.
  14. ^ Peake's commentary on the Bible
  15. ^ a b c Old Haifa. Tour-Haifa.co.il. Retrieved on 2008-01-20.
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  17. ^ a b Haifa in the Middle Ages. Tour-Haifa.co.il. Retrieved on 2008-02-15.
  18. ^ ORIGINS OF THE CARMELITES. Carmelite.org.uk. Retrieved on 2008-03-20.
  19. ^ Stella Maris Lighthouse, Church and Carmelite Monastery. Frommers. Retrieved on 2008-04-11.
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  44. ^ Eshkol Tower, Haifa. Emporis. Retrieved on 2008-02-17.
  45. ^ The Sail Tower, Haifa. Emporis. Retrieved on 2008-02-17.
  46. ^ "Tel Aviv: "Haifa works, Jerusalem prays, and Tel Aviv plays"", Daily Telegraph. Retrieved on 2008-03-23. 
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  62. ^ Haifa Symphony. Haifa Symphony. Retrieved on 2008-01-20.
  63. ^ Israel Newspapers. Abyznewslinks.com. Retrieved on 2008-01-27.
  64. ^ Radio Broadcasting Stations. Radiostationworld.com. Retrieved on 2008-01-26.
  65. ^ Haifa Museums. Get2Israel.com. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  66. ^ Museum of Science, Technology, and Space. IlMuseums.com. Retrieved on 2008-03-21.
  67. ^ Haifa Museum of Art. IlMuseums.com. Retrieved on 2008-03-21.
  68. ^ Tikotin Museum of Japanese Art. IlMuseums.com. Retrieved on 2008-03-21.
  69. ^ The Mane Katz Museum. Tour-Haifa.co.il. Retrieved on 2008-01-25.
  70. ^ Israeli soccer clubs. Retrieved on 2008-04-11.
  71. ^ List of Champions. Retrieved on 2008-04-11.
  72. ^ List of Toto Cups. Retrieved on 2008-04-11.
  73. ^ State Cup Winners. Retrieved on 2008-04-11.
  74. ^ Israel. ic-tennis.org.
  75. ^ Future Stadiums. World Stadiums. Retrieved on 2008-02-17.
  76. ^ Haifa through the looking glass. Le Monde Diplomatique (2005-12-13). Retrieved on 2008-01-23.
  77. ^ 'Red Haifa' in revolt against Labor. Highbeam Research - Originally from Jerusalem Post (1999-02-01). Retrieved on 2008-01-23.
  78. ^ Stephen Schwartz (2006-07-26). "The Mysteries of Safed, The Banners of Haifa,". Islampluralism.org. Retrieved on 2008-01-23.
  79. ^ "Haifa 2006 election results", Yedioth Ahronoth. Retrieved on 2008-01-23. (Hebrew) 
  80. ^ Daniel Monterescu, Dan Rabinowitz. Mixed Towns, Trapped Communities: Historical Narratives, Spatial Dynamics. Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., 113-132. 
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  85. ^ Berg, Raffi. "Haifa hospital in the firing line", BBC News, 2006-07-20. 
  86. ^ Raved, Ahiya. "Haifa hospital goes underground", Ynetnews, 2006-08-07. Retrieved on 2008-02-18. 
  87. ^ "The closing of a dream come true", Haaretz. Retrieved on 2008-01-25. 
  88. ^ a b Education (PDF). Haifa Statistical Yearbook 2007. Haifa Municipality (2007-06-01). Retrieved on 2008-02-14.
  89. ^ The Carmelit. Tour-Haifa.co.il. Retrieved on 2008-02-19.
  90. ^ Haifa. Weizmann Institute. Retrieved on 2008-02-22.
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The Jewish Agency for Israel also known as The Jewish Agency (or sochnut in Hebrew), was previously called the Jewish Agency for Palestine (during the British Mandate of Palestine) is an Israeli organisation that advocates for Israel and is composed mainly, but not entirely, of Jewish people. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Israel Central Bureau of Statistics (הלשכה המרכזית לסטטיסטיקה) is a state organization for the creation and maintenance of numeric data related to populations vis-à-vis the ethnic makeup of Israel and its cities. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Jewish Virtual Library is an online encyclopedia published by the American-Israeli Cooperative Enterprise (AICE), notable for its strong pro-Israel views. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Haifa (אוניברסיטת חיפה) is a university in Haifa, Israel. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Haifa (אוניברסיטת חיפה) is a university in Haifa, Israel. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Israel Central Bureau of Statistics (הלשכה המרכזית לסטטיסטיקה) is a state organization for the creation and maintenance of numeric data related to populations vis-à-vis the ethnic makeup of Israel and its cities. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Israel Central Bureau of Statistics (הלשכה המרכזית לסטטיסטיקה) is a state organization for the creation and maintenance of numeric data related to populations vis-à-vis the ethnic makeup of Israel and its cities. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Israel Central Bureau of Statistics (הלשכה המרכזית לסטטיסטיקה) is a state organization for the creation and maintenance of numeric data related to populations vis-à-vis the ethnic makeup of Israel and its cities. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Jerusalem Post is an Israeli newspaper in the English language. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Yedioth Ahronoth (Hebrew: ידיעות אחרונות, meaning latest news) is a major daily Israeli newspaper, written in Hebrew. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Haaretz (Hebrew: (help· info), The Land) is an Israeli newspaper, founded in 1919. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Weizmann Institute of Science (מכון ויצמן למדע) is an institute of higher learning and research in Rehovot, Israel. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Frommers is an editor that creates many popular travel and tourism books. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Jerusalem Post is an Israeli newspaper in the English language. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 160th day of the year (161st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Transportation Minister of Israel (currently styled as the Minister of Transportation and Road Safety (‎, Sar HaTakhbura veHaBetikhut BeDerekhim)) is the government minister at the head of the Transportation Ministry in Israel. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Carmel, Alex (2002). The History of Haifa Under Turkish Rule, 4th Edition, Haifa: Pardes. ISBN 965-7171-05-9.  (in Hebrew)
  • Shiller, Eli & Ben-Artzi, Yossi (1985). Haifa and its sites. Jerusalem: Ariel.  (in Hebrew)
  • Benny Morris, Birth of the Palestinian Refugee Problem
  • Seth J. Frantzman The Strength of Weakness: The Arab Christians in Mandatory Palestine, unpublished M.A thesis, Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Haifa

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City and universities

  • Haifa Municipality
  • University of Haifa
  • Technion – Israel Institute of Technology

Bahá'í

  • Bahá'í World Centre, Haifa
  • Photos of the Bahá'í Gardens in Haifa
  • More photos of the Bahá'í Gardens
  • Photos – The Baha'i Gardens in Haifa: the Shrine of the Bab Terraces & Gardens

Monastery

  • Our Lady of Mount Carmel Monastery, Haifa, Israel

Travel

  • The Carmelit subway and map of Haifa
  • Wikitravel: Haifa
  • Haifa city – the complete guide to haifa
  • Photo gallery of tourist sites of Haifa

Coordinates: 32°49′N, 34°59′E Haifa District surrounding the city of Haifa in Israel, is one of six districts and includes the following towns and cities: Baqa al-Gharbiyye באקה אל-גרביה Hadera חדרה Haifa חיפה Nesher נשר Or Aqiva אור עקיבא Qiryat Atta קריית אתא Qiryat Bialik קריית ביאליק Qiryat Motzkin קריית מוצקין Qiryat Yam קריית ים Tirat Karmel טירת הכרמל Umm al-Fahm אום אל-פאחם Zikhron Yaaqov זכרון יעקב See also Districts of Israel... A City council (‎) is the official designation of a city within Israels system of local government. ... Hebrew באקה-גת Arabic باقة جتّ Government City District Haifa Population 31,000 (2005) Jurisdiction 18,100 dunams (18. ... Carmel City (Hebrew: Ir HaKarmel) is a city in the Haifa District of Israel, located around Mount Carmel. ... Haderas Great Synagogue Hadera (Hebrew: חדרה) is a city in the Haifa District between Tel Aviv and Haifa in Israel. ... Qiryat Atta (קרית אתא; unofficially also spelled Kiryat Ata) is a city in the Haifa District in Israel. ... Hebrew קִרְייַת בְּיַאלִיק Arabic كريات بياليك Name Meaning Bialik Town Founded in 1934 Government City District Haifa Population 36,700 (2005) Jurisdiction 8,178 dunams (8 km²) Mayor Rafi Wertheim Website http://www. ... Qiryat Motzkin (קרית מוצקין; unofficially also spelled Kiryat Motzkin) is a city in the Haifa District in Israel. ... Kiryat Yam (; Hebrew: ‎) is a small city/suburb in Israel, located 12km north of Haifa in the Haifa District (its name is literally Sea Suburb). It is part of a cluster of small cities informally known as HaQerayot. ... Nesher (נשר) is a city in the Haifa District in Israel. ... Or Aqiva (אור עקיבא; unofficially also spelled Or Akiva) is a city in the Haifa District in Israel. ... Tirat Carmel, or Tirat Ha-Carmel (Hebrew: ), is a city in the Haifa District in Israel. ... Umm al-Fahm (Arabic أم الفحم, Hebrew אום אל-פחם) is a city in the Haifa District in Israel. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (262x727, 43 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Haifa Qiryat Yam Umm al-Fahm Or Aqiva Hadera Nesher Qiryat Atta Qiryat Bialik Qiryat Motzkin Zikhron Ya... In Israel, a local council is a locality similar to a city in structure and way of life, that has not yet achieved a status of a city, which requires a minimum number of residents, among other things. ... Arara (Arabic: , Hebrew: ) is an Israeli Arab local council in the Wadi Ara region in the Haifa District. ... Basma or West Bartaa (Arabic:بسم)is an Israeli-Arab local council located on the Green Line adjacent to the Palestinian town of Bartaa located in the Seam Zone. ... Binyamina-Givat Ada is a town (local council) in the Haifa District of Israel. ... Jisr az-Zarqa (Arabic: ‎, Hebrew: lit. ... Kafr Qara or Kafr Qari (Arabic: , Hebrew: ) is an Israeli-Arab local council located in Israels Haifa District 22mi southeast of the city of Haifa. ... Pardes Hanna-Karkur (Hebrew: פרדס ×—× ×”-כרכור) is a town (local council) in the Haifa District of Israel. ... Fureidis or Freidis is an Israeli Arab local council in the Haifa District. ... Kiryat Tivon (Hebrew:קריית טבעון, officially also spelled Qiryat Tivon) is a local council in the Haifa District of Israel. ... Zikhron Yaaqov (זִכְרוֹן יַעֲקֹב ; unofficially also spelled Zichron Yaakov) (meaning Jacobs memorial) is a city in Israel, near Haifa, part of the Haifa District. ... The Israeli Ministry of Interior recognizes three types of local government in Israel: cities, regional councils, and local councils. ... Hof Hacarmel Regional Council (Hebrew: מועצה אזורית חוף הכרמל) serves a large area, from Tirat Hacarmel in the north to Caesarea in the south. ... Offices of the Menashe Regional Council The Menashe Regional Council (Hebrew: ) is a regional council near the city of Hadera, on Israels north-central coastal plain in the southern Haifa District. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Haifa - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1590 words)
Haifa is first mentioned in Talmudic literature around the 3rd century CE, as a small town near Shikmona, the main Jewish town in the area at that time.
Haifa is located in the northernmost reach of the Coastal Plain designated as Jewish territory in the 1947 UN Partition Plan dividing mandatory Palestine.
Haifa was a favourite monastic spot for the Carmelites in the 12th century; a 19th century monastery, Stella Maris, was rebuilt at Carmel's head.
University of Haifa - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (446 words)
The University of Haifa (אוניברסיטת חיפה) is a university in Haifa, Israel.
Beyond the objective of a first-rate higher education, the University of Haifa aims to provide equal educational opportunities to all sectors of the society, and in particular to encourage mutual understanding and cooperation between the Jewish and Arab populations on and off campus.
The University of Haifa was founded in 1963 by the mayor of the city of Haifa Abba Hushi, under the academic auspices of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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