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Encyclopedia > Haggis
an uncooked small haggis
an uncooked small haggis

Haggis is a traditional Scottish dish. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1760x1168, 477 KB) uncooked small haggis. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1760x1168, 477 KB) uncooked small haggis. ... This article is about the country. ...


There are many recipes, most of which have in common the following ingredients: sheep's 'pluck' (heart, liver and lungs), minced with onion, oatmeal, suet, spices, and salt, mixed with stock, and traditionally boiled in the animal's stomach for approximately three hours. Species See text. ... Scrapple sandwich at the Delaware state fair Offal is the entrails and internal organs of a butchered animal. ... The heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ... For the bird, see Liver bird. ... Human respiratory system The lungs flank the heart and great vessels in the chest cavity. ... Mincing is a cooking technique in which food ingredients are finely divided. ... For other uses, see Onion (disambiguation). ... In the United States and Canada, oatmeal means any crushed oats, rolled oats, or cut oats used in recipes such as oatmeal cookies. ... Suet is raw beef or mutton fat, especially that found around the loins and kidneys. ... For other uses, see Spice (disambiguation). ... Edible salt is mostly sodium chloride (NaCl). ... Stock is a flavoured liquid. ... Boiling, a type of phase transition, is the rapid vaporization of a liquid, which typically occurs when a liquid is heated to its boiling point, the temperature at which the vapor pressure of the liquid is equal to the pressure exerted on the liquid by the surrounding atmospheric pressure. ... In anatomy, the stomach is a bean-shaped hollow muscular organ of the gastrointestinal tract involved in the second phase of digestion, following mastication. ...


Haggis somewhat resembles stuffed intestines (pig intestines otherwise known as chitterlings or the kokoretsi of traditional Greek cuisine), sausages and savoury puddings of which it is among the largest types. As the 2001 English edition of the Larousse Gastronomique puts it, "Although its description is not immediately appealing, haggis has an excellent nutty texture and delicious savoury flavour." (p592) In anatomy, the intestine is the segment of the alimentary canal extending from the stomach to the anus and, in humans and other mammals, consists of two segments, the small intestine and the large intestine. ... Chitlins in broth. ... Kokoretsti cooking on a spit Kokoretsi is a traditional Greek dish typically consumed at Easter, consisting mainly of seasoned lamb or goat offal. ... This article is about the prepared meat. ... Pudding can be prepared with a large variety of toppings such as fresh fruit and/or berries, and whipped cream Christmas pudding Dessert pudding Illustrations from Isabella Beetons Mrs Beetons Book of Household Management, 1861 Pudding most often refers to a dessert, but can also be a savory dish. ...


Most modern commercial haggis outside Scotland is prepared in a casing rather than an actual stomach. There are also meat-free recipes for vegetarians: these are designed to taste like the meat-based recipes. This article is about sausage casings. ... For animals adapted to eat primarily plants, sometimes referred to as vegetarian animals, see Herbivore. ...


It is often asserted (e.g., on the packaging of MacSween's haggis) that the dish is traditionally served with "neeps and tatties" (Scots: swede, yellow turnip or rutabaga and potatoes; these are boiled and mashed separately) and a "dram" (ie. a glass of Scotch whisky). However, it might perhaps be more accurate to describe this as the traditional main course of a Burns supper, since on other occasions haggis may be eaten with other accompaniments. Whisky sauce (made from thickened stock and Scotch whisky) has recently been developed as an elegant addition. This article is about the Anglic language of Scotland. ... Binomial name Mill. ... Binomial name Solanum tuberosum L. The potato (Solanum tuberosum) is a perennial plant of the Solanaceae, or nightshade, family, grown for its starchy tuber. ... Mashed potatoes. ... A Burns supper is a celebration of the life and poetry of the poet Robert Burns, author of many Scots poems including Auld Lang Syne, which is generally sung as a folk song at Hogmanay and other New Year celebrations around the world. ...

Contents

History and popularity

The haggis is frequently assumed to be Scottish in origin though there is little evidence for this. It has been speculated that the dish originates from the days of the old Scottish cattle drovers. When the men left the highlands to drive their cattle to market in Edinburgh the women would prepare rations for them to eat during the long journey down through the glens. They used the ingredients that were most readily available in their homes and conveniently packaged them in a sheep's stomach allowing for easy transportation during the journey. Other speculations have been based on Scottish slaughtering practices. When a Chieftain or Laird required an animal to be slaughtered for meat (whether sheep or cattle) the workmen were allowed to keep the offal as their share. Although those legends are widely accepted, there is one more that holds more truth to actual Scottish history. Haggis was "born of necessity, as a way to utilize the least expensive cuts of meat and the innards as well" (Andrew Zimmern). In fact, in times of famine people would eat whatever it was that they could get their hands on, which is how all those fascinating ingredients became a part of local tradition and a rite of passage for all Scots. Drovers road is the term used for an ancient route for the long distance driving of animals on the hoof to market in the British Isles[1] and some other world regions. ... Lowland-Highland divide Highland Sign with welcome in English and Gaelic The Scottish Highlands (A Ghàidhealtachd in Gaelic) include the rugged and mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... Look up Market in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... Look up glen in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Chief of the Name is the recognized head of a family or clan. ... Lordship redirects here. ... Scrapple sandwich at the Delaware state fair Offal is the entrails and internal organs of a butchered animal. ... On location for his show, Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern. ...


Another theory, put forward by food historian Clarissa Dickson Wright, is that haggis was invented as a way of cooking quick-spoiling offal near the site of a hunt, without the need to carry along an additional cooking vessel. The liver and kidneys could be grilled directly over a fire, but this treatment was unsuitable for the stomach, intestines, or lungs. Chopping up the lungs and stuffing the stomach with them and whatever fillers might have been on hand, then boiling the assembly — likely in a vessel made from the animal's hide — was one way to make sure these parts did not go to waste. (Dickson-Wright 12). Clarissa Dickson-Wright (born Clarissa Theresa Philomena Aileen Mary Josephine Agnes Elsie Trilby Louise Esmerelda Dickson-Wright in London on June 28, 1947) is a Scottish celebrity chef best known from her appearances with the late Jennifer Paterson in the BBC series Two Fat Ladies. ... Scrapple sandwich at the Delaware state fair Offal is the entrails and internal organs of a butchered animal. ... Grill or grills may refer to: In food: Grill (cooking), a device or surface used for cooking food, usually fueled by gas or charcoal. ... Rawhide is a hide or animal skin that has not been exposed to tanning and thus is much lighter in color than treated animal hides. ...


It should be noted that Dickson-Wright repudiates the assumption of a Scottish origin for haggis, claiming that it 'came to Scotland in a longboat [ie. from Scandinavia] even before Scotland was a single nation.' (quoted in Barham 2005:54) Whatever its historical origins, however, the haggis is now firmly established as a symbol of Scottishness, probably due in large part to its having been apostrophised in the most glowing terms by Scotland's national poet (see below).


One theory claims that the name "haggis" is derived from Norman French. Norman French was more guttural than normal French so that the "ch" of "hachis", i.e. chopped, was prononced as a "g" giving "haggis".


Modern usage

Recitation of the poem 'Address to a Haggis' by Robert Burns is an important part of the Burns supper.
Recitation of the poem 'Address to a Haggis' by Robert Burns is an important part of the Burns supper.

Haggis is traditionally served with the Burns supper on the week of January 25, when Scotland's national poet, Robert Burns, is commemorated. He wrote the poem Ode Tae a Haggis, which starts "Fair fa' your honest, sonsie face, Great chieftain o' the puddin-race!" During Burns's lifetime haggis was a popular dish for the poor, as it was very cheap, being made from leftover, otherwise thrown away, parts of a sheep (the most common livestock in Scotland), yet nourishing. Download high resolution version (464x808, 42 KB)Dr Bob Purdie addressing the haggis during Burns supper, St Columbas United Reformed Church, Oxford, 2004-01-24. ... Download high resolution version (464x808, 42 KB)Dr Bob Purdie addressing the haggis during Burns supper, St Columbas United Reformed Church, Oxford, 2004-01-24. ... For the chain gang fugitive and author from Georgia, see Robert Elliott Burns. ... A Burns supper is a celebration of the life and poetry of the poet Robert Burns, author of many Scots poems including Auld Lang Syne, which is generally sung as a folk song at Hogmanay and other New Year celebrations around the world. ... A Burns supper is a celebration of the life and poetry of the poet Robert Burns, author of many Scots poems including Auld Lang Syne, which is generally sung as a folk song at Hogmanay and other New Year celebrations around the world. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Many nations have adopted a poet who is perceived to represent the identity, beliefs and principles of their culture. ... For the chain gang fugitive and author from Georgia, see Robert Elliott Burns. ... A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows what he found. ...


Haggis is widely available in supermarkets in Scotland (and in some parts of England) all the year round, with cheaper brands normally packed in artificial casings, rather than stomachs, just as cheaper brands of sausages are no longer stuffed into animal intestines. Sometimes haggis is sold in tins, which can simply be microwaved or oven-baked. Some supermarket haggis is largely made from pig, rather than sheep, offal.


Haggis is one of several foods, such as pizza, that Scottish fish and chip shops serve deep fried in batter. Together with chips, this comprises a "haggis supper". A "haggis burger" is a patty of fried haggis served on a bun, and a "haggis bhaji" is another deep fried variant, available in some Indian restaurants in Glasgow. In August 2006, haggis was even used as a pizza topping in the restaurant of the Oak Tree Inn on the banks of Loch Lomond. Higher class restaurants sometimes serve chicken breast stuffed with haggis; haggis can also be used as a substitute for minced beef in various recipes. For other uses, see Pizza (disambiguation). ...


Since the 1960s various Scottish shops and manufacturers have created vegetarian haggis for those who do not eat meat. These substitute various pulses and vegetables for the meat in the dish. Since both the offal-based and the vegetarian haggis have wide variations in flavour depending on the recipe used, it would be difficult to demonstrate that the two varieties do or do not taste alike. Pulses are defined by the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO) as annual leguminous crops yielding from one to twelve grains or seeds of variable size, shape and color within a pod. ...


Drinks with haggis

As noted above, Scotch whisky is often asserted to be the traditional accompaniment for haggis, though this may simply be because both are traditionally served at a Burns supper. Warren Edwardes of Wine for Spice notes that haggis is spicy and therefore recommends refreshing semi-sparkling wines to drink with haggis with increasing level of sweetness depending in the spiciness of the haggis: whisky, with its high alcohol level, can exaggerate spice rather than complement it. [1]. Since fish and chip shops sell large amounts of haggis but do not typically serve alcohol, it can be assumed that haggis is frequently eaten in Scotland with the accompaniment of neither wine nor whisky, but with Irn-Bru, a long-established brand of soft drink popular in Scotland. Scotch whisky is whisky made in Scotland. ... A Burns supper is a celebration of the life and poetry of the poet Robert Burns, author of many Scots poems including Auld Lang Syne, which is generally sung as a folk song at Hogmanay and other New Year celebrations around the world. ... Frizzante is an Italian wine term for semi-sparkling wine (as opposed to Spumante, which is generally used for fully sparkling wines). ... For other uses, see Whisky (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Spice (disambiguation). ... Fish and chips in wrapping paper Fish and chips is deep-fried fish in batter with deep-fried potatoes, and is a popular take-away food. ... Irn Bru Irn Bru is the most popular caffeinated soft drink in Scotland. ...


Use outside Scotland

Haggis spread with oat cakes in the U.S.
Haggis spread with oat cakes in the U.S.

Because food safety laws in some countries outlaw some of the ingredients in haggis (for example, United States law forbids the sale of any animal's lungs for human consumption), expatriate Scots and Scots descendants overseas have been known to engage in 'haggis smuggling' to obtain true Scottish haggis. At least one American company produces haggis for the U.S. market. The Caledonian Kitchen, a Dallas, Texas,-based gourmet business, began producing both a Highland beef and vegetarian haggis commercially in 1999. In 2006, the company added a USDA lamb version of the product as well. Its haggis is in wide distribution throughout the U.S. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 767 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2276 × 1780 pixel, file size: 888 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 767 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2276 × 1780 pixel, file size: 888 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... For the band, see Expatriate (band). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Dallas redirects here. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Highland Cow Highland cattle ox Highland cattle are an ancient Scottish breed of cattle with long horns and shaggy pelts. ...


In 2007, the Scottish Haggis championship was won by a 22 year old Northern Irishman who had only been making the dish for three years. [2]


Entertainment

A haggis on a Robert Burns plate.
A haggis on a Robert Burns plate.
A fictional Wild Haggis, Haggis scoticus, next to a prepared specimen, as displayed at the Glasgow Kelvingrove Gallery.
A fictional Wild Haggis, Haggis scoticus, next to a prepared specimen, as displayed at the Glasgow Kelvingrove Gallery.

Haggis is an amusing subject for many people. Along with some other foods associated with a specific country or region (such as Australia's Vegemite, or Scandinavia's salmiakki), it's perceived to be loved in its home country and loathed by the rest of the world. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1943x1417, 549 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Haggis Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1943x1417, 549 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Haggis Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 275 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Haggis Wild Haggis Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 275 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Haggis Wild Haggis Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... A fictional Wild Haggis specimen, Haggis Scoticus, as displayed in the Glasgow Kelvingrove gallery, next to a prepared example. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum is Glasgows premier museum and art gallery and has one of Europes great civic art collections. ... Vegemite on toast. ... Two German brands of salmiakki. ...


Those who ask a Scotsman about it rarely get a straight answer. A common reply to the question "What is a haggis?" often goes along the following lines. "A haggis is a small four-legged Scottish Highland creature, which has the limbs on one side shorter than the other side. This means that it is well adapted to run around the hills at a steady altitude, without either ascending or descending. However a haggis can easily be caught by running around the hill in the opposite direction." (see Wild Haggis) Surprisingly, this humorous myth is believed by many tourists, and thus they are shocked — and possibly disappointed — to hear the truth. See also sidehill gouger. A fictional Wild Haggis specimen, Haggis Scoticus, as displayed in the Glasgow Kelvingrove gallery, next to a prepared example. ... Sidehill Gougers are creatures said to inhabit the Rocky Mountains of British Columbia and the southwestern sandhills of Saskatchewan. ...


Many tourists are also duped (or nearly duped) by Scottish pranksters attempting to lead them on a 'Wild Haggis Hunt'. The Scotsman newspaper's web site runs an annual Haggis Hunt [3]. Fools Errand redirects here. ... The Scotsmans offices in Edinburgh The Scotsman is a Scottish national newspaper, published in Edinburgh. ...


Haggis is also used in a sport called haggis hurling, throwing a haggis as far as possible. The present World Record for Haggis Hurling has been held by Alan Pettigrew for over 22 years. He threw a 1.5 lb Haggis an astonishing 180 feet, 10 inches on the island of Inchmurrin, Loch Lomond, in August 1984. Haggis hurling is a Scottish sport involving the hurling of a haggis as far as possible for distance and accuracy from atop a platform (usually a whisky barrel). ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... For other uses, see Loch Lomond (disambiguation). ...


Haggis juggling is an unusual competition that takes place at the Scottish Juggling Convention each year, with competitors competing for how long they can juggle three, four, or five large haggis. Juggling is a form of skillful, often artful, object manipulation. ... Juggling is a form of skillful, often artful, object manipulation. ...


'Haggis' is an uncommon surname, such as for the screen writer Paul Haggis, known for his work on Million Dollar Baby, Due South, Thirtysomething, and other film and television series. In names it may come from Old English, meaning 'a woodsman's hut', and a Lord Haggis rode on the third crusade with Richard the Lionheart. Paul Edward Haggis (born March 10, 1953 in London, Ontario) is an Academy Award-winning Canadian screenwriter, producer, film director, and a director/producer of television programs working in Hollywood. ... Million Dollar Baby is an Academy Award winning 2004 dramatic film directed by Clint Eastwood. ... Due South is an award winning Canadian television police drama created by Paul Haggis and produced by Alliance Communications (now part of Alliance Atlantis), first aired in 1994. ... Thirtysomething (1987 – 1991) was a ground-breaking and award-winning American television drama created by Marshall Herskovitz and Edward Zwick for United Artists Television. ... Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon[1], Old English: ) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... The Third Crusade (1189–1192), also known as the Kings Crusade, was an attempt by European leaders to reconquer the Holy Land from Saladin. ... Richard I (September 8, 1157 – April 6, 1199) was King of England from 1189 to 1199. ...


Following his victory in The Masters golf tournament in 1988, Scottish golfer Sandy Lyle chose to serve Haggis at the annual Champions Dinner before the 1989 Masters.[1] It is widely considered amongst Masters champions to be one of the most unpopular selections ever served at the event. The Masters is one of four Grand Slam golf tournaments. ... // Alexander Walter Barr Sandy Lyle, MBE (born February 9, 1958) is a Scottish golfer. ...


Haggis is also the stage name of comedian Tom Downs. A stage name, also called a screen name, is a pseudonym used by performers and entertainers such as actors, comedians, musicians, djs, clowns, and professional wrestlers. ...


Haggis has also been made fun of many times in film and television. In So I Married an Axe Murderer, Mike Myers's character says he believes that "most Scottish cuisine is based on a dare." So I Married an Axe Murderer is a 1993 film starring Mike Myers and Nancy Travis. ...


In Armageddon, during the NASA space readiness exam, one of the minor characters names haggis as his favorite type of food. He then proceeds to list all of the ingredients and how they are arranged. In closing, he turns to the NASA examiner and says, "That'll put some hair on your ass." For other films with this name, see Armageddon (disambiguation). ... The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) (IPA [ˈnæsə]) is an agency of the United States government, responsible for the nations public space program. ...


In Highlander, Connor MacLeod (Christopher Lambert) calls Ramírez (Sean Connery) a "stupid haggis" and then proceeds to explain its ingredients and preparation. Ramirez is disgusted by this description. Highlander is a 1986 film directed by Russell Mulcahy and based on a story by Gregory Widen. ... Connor MacLeod, also known as The Highlander, is the most important character from the fictional multiverse of Highlander movies, Highlander: The Series and Highlander: The Animated Series, portrayed by actor Christopher Lambert. ... Christopher Lambert (born March 29, 1957 as Christophe Guy Denis Lambert) is an American-born French actor. ... Ramírez is a character from the fictional universe of Highlander movies, portrayed by actor Sean Connery. ... Sir Thomas Sean Connery (born 25 August 1930) is a retired Scottish actor and producer who is perhaps best known as the first actor to portray James Bond in cinema, starring in seven Bond films. ...


In an episode of The Simpsons, Groundskeeper Willie is seen selling haggis at a completely empty booth. He calls out, "Get your haggis, right here! Chopped heart and lungs boiled in a wee sheep's stomach! Tastes as good as it sounds. Good for what ails ya!" Lisa the Beauty Queen is the 4th episode of The Simpsons fourth season. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Groundskeeper Willie (a. ...


In an episode of Samurai Jack, in which he helps his friend The Scotsman rescue his wife, Samurai Jack asked in the clan's lunch hall what is haggis. To this the entire clan shouted "Sheep's stomach stuffed with meat and barley!" Samurai Jack is an American animated television series created by animator Genndy Tartakovsky that aired on Cartoon Network from 2001 until 2004. ...


The Ren & Stimpy Show featured a Scottish character named Haggis McHaggis, voiced by Alan Young. Ren and Stimpy are the title characters of two cartoon TV series created by Canadian animator John Kricfalusi. ... For the football (soccer) player, see Allan Young. ...


The main character in the 2004 version of The Bard's Tale must fight a beast called a "Haggis Monster". The monster is made of discarded parts of animal carcasses that were buried in a ditch and then brought back to life by magic. Bards Tale may refer to: The Bards Tale game released by Interplay Productions/Electronic Arts in 1985. ...


In an episode of Earthworm Jim, when Jim's suit malfunctions from a loss of power, Jim and Peter Puppy hide in a restaurant that serves haggis. Peter is eating haggis and likes it. However, when he asks why no one ever comes to the restaurant, Jim tells him "Because haggis is made from the heart, lungs and liver of a sheep boiled in its own stomach," and he is immediately disgusted and traumatized. As a result, Peter's greatest fear is a Scottish chef and he now cannot eat haggis without getting sick, though he has been tricked into eating it on numerous occasions. In another episode, an evil clone of Peter is created, who is opposite of him and he loves haggis! Earthworm Jim is an animated television series which ran for 23 episodes in 2 seasons from 1995-1996 on the WB Network, based on a video game character created by Doug TenNapel for the 1994 video game Earthworm Jim. ...


One character in The Curse of Monkey Island is named Haggis McMutton. He states that it's just a nickname, and that his real name is Heart, Liver And Kidneys Boiled In The Stomach Of The Animal McMutton. When asked if his parents had been expecting a girl, he replies, "Aye." The Curse of Monkey Island (CMI) is an adventure game developed and published by LucasArts, and the third game in the Monkey Island computer game series. ... The great Haggis Mcmutton Haggis Mcmutton is a fictional character in the Monkey Island video game series, appearing in the third installment, Curse of Monkey Island. ...


For a time, the Celtic punk band Dropkick Murphys employed a bagpipe player, dressed on-stage in full Scottish regalia and going by the name of Spicy McHaggis. Celtic punk (also known as Paddybeat, Celtcore, Jig punk, or Rock and Reel) is a music genre typically associated with Irish punks or punks from the Irish diaspora; although other Celtic nationalities, such as Scottish, Manx and Welsh people are also represented. ... “DKM” redirects here. ...


Californian punk band NOFX has a song called Theme From a NOFX Album. In this song there's a line that goes "I'm Limo from Scotland/So give me haggis". (Limo is an old friend of the band) NOFX is an American punk rock band formed in Los Angeles, California (now based in San Francisco), in 1983. ...


There were 4,691 irradiated haggis in the cargo hold of the mining ship Red Dwarf. For the type of star, see Red dwarf. ...


Similar dishes

In some ways, the northeastern United States dish scrapple resembles haggis, however scrapple differs in the following ways: it uses pig offal instead of sheep offal and cornmeal instead of oatmeal; it is a meatloaf rather than a sausage; and it is baked instead of being boiled. As a result, the appearance and the flavour vary significantly. So the resemblance lies more in the fact that it is a combination of offal, grain and vegetables than in any specific ingredient or cooking style. A plate of scrapple Scrapple is a savory mush in which cornmeal and flour, often buckwheat flour, are simmered with pork scraps and trimmings, then formed into a loaf. ... For other uses, see Pig (disambiguation). ... Scrapple sandwich at the Delaware state fair Offal is the entrails and internal organs of a butchered animal. ... Cornmeal products include tortillas and taco shells. ... This article is about the meat dish. ... Baking is the technique of cooking food in an oven by dry heat applied evenly throughout the oven. ...


Other similar dishes include:

  • Bahur, Bulgarian sausage made from rice and pork liver and heart
  • Balkenbrij from the Netherlands
  • Bopis from the Philippines, made from pork minus the casing
  • Boudin, an Acadian/Cajun sausage made with pork offal and rice
  • Buchada from northeast of Brazil, in which goat's intestines are filled with pieces of liver, heart, blood, etc... cooked then served with white rice.
  • Camaïot, a Balearic Islands sausage related to sobrassada made from pork offal, coarsely minced, and boiled into pork skin from the leg
  • Chireta from Aragonese valleys of Sobrarbe and Ribagorza, and Girella from Catalan valley of Pallars, both made by boiling inside sheep intestines a mixture of rice and sheep offal, mainly lungs and heart
  • Drob from Romania, made from sheep's organs, mixed with spices and herbs and wrapped in the sheep's stomach (or rarely, in a thin dough), prepared especially for Easter
  • Ghammeh (aka kroush), from Lebanon, sheep stomach stuffed with rice, garlic, onions, pine nuts, minced lamb meat and spices, usually served with a soup that has similar ingredients to the fillings.
  • Hogs Pudding or Groats Pudding from Devon & Cornwall containing oats and spiced pork offal
  • Jaternica, from Slovakia. Very similar to Bulgarian Bahur, made with rice and mixed pork bowels.
  • Kaszanka from Poland, closely resembling haggis despite its very different ingredients of buckwheat and pig's blood
  • Kepeninė from Lithuania made from animal's (most frequently pig's) liver, lungs and some fat, all that stuffed into pig's large intestines.
  • Kishka, a traditional Ashkenazi Jewish kosher dish consisting of a mixture of meal,meat and spices stuffed in a beef intestine or a sewn pocket made of poultry neck skin
  • Knipp (Speise) from Bremen and Lower Saxony, north Germany. Made with any animal leftovers, spiced with salt, pepper and thickened with cereal. Served in either a sausage or in slices usually with fried potatoes and bacon. Tastes exactly the same as Scottish haggis.
  • Kraujiniai vėdarai from Lithuania, Samogitia made from pig's blood and wheet grains, stuffed into pig's large intestines.
  • Lungemos (Lungmush) Norway. Similar to haggis. Pork, Beef meat, Lung and Heart. Eaten with Lefse or potatoes, mashed or boiled
  • Montalayo from Mexico, which is prepared from sheep or goat offal in a manner very similar to haggis
  • Pölsa from Sweden, made from beef
  • Saumagen from Western Germany, made with pork
  • Slátur, an Icelandic cooked sheep's stomachs filled with blood, fat, and liver
  • Švargl in Croatia and Serbia, made from pork
  • Tlacenka, from the Czech Republic. Similar to haggis, but from pork.
  • Tripas from Portugal made from animal's entrails and is served with beans and rice.

Balkenbrij is a traditional Dutch style form of liverwurst. ... Boudin (pronounced BOO-danh, IPA ) describes a number of different types of sausage used in French, Creole and Cajun cuisine. ... The Acadians (French: Acadiens) are the descendants of the 17th-century French colonists who settled in Acadia (located on the northern portion of North Americas east coast). ... Cajuns are an ethnic group mainly living in Louisiana, consisting of the descendants of Acadian exiles and peoples of other ethnicities with whom the Acadians eventually intermarried on the semitropical frontier. ... Capital Palma de Mallorca Official language(s) Spanish and Catalan Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 17th  4,992 km²  1. ... Sobrassada is a raw, cured sausage from the Balearic Islands made with ground pork, paprika and salt and other spices. ... Chireta is an Aragonese type of haggis. ... Capital Zaragoza Official language(s) Spanish Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 4th  47,719 km²  9. ... Chireta is an Aragonese type of haggis. ... This article is about the Spanish autonomous community. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... Part of the seafront of Torquay, south Devon, at high tide Devon is a large county in South West England, bordered by Cornwall to the west, and Dorset and Somerset to the east. ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ... Kaszanka (also known as kiszka, krupnik or krupniok) is a traditional Polish blood sausage, made of blood and kasza, a typical Slavic buckwheat or groats. ... Binomial name Fagopyrum esculentum Moench Common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) is a plant in the genus Fagopyrum (sometimes merged into genus Polygonum) in the family Polygonaceae. ... Jewish kishke served with gravy Kishka or kishke (Polish: kiszka; Russian: кишка, kishka; Ukrainian: кишка, kyshka; Yiddish and Hebrew: קישקע, kishke), is a Slavic word meaning gut, or intestine, that lends its name to varieties of sausage or pudding. ... Ashkenazi Jews, also known as Ashkenazic Jews or Ashkenazim (אַשְׁכֲּנָזִי אַשְׁכֲּנָזִים Standard Hebrew, AÅ¡kanazi,AÅ¡kanazim, Tiberian Hebrew, ʾAÅ¡kănāzî, ʾAÅ¡kănāzîm, pronounced sing. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... The circled U indicates that this can of tuna is certified kosher by the Union of Orthodox Congregations. ... Etnographic regions of Lithuania. ... A piece of lefse topped with rakfisk and other foods Lefse is a traditional soft Norwegian flatbread made out of potato, milk or cream and flour, and cooked on a griddle. ... Binomial name Solanum tuberosum L. The potato (Solanum tuberosum) is a perennial plant of the Solanaceae, or nightshade, family, grown for its starchy tuber. ... Species See text. ... This article is about the domestic species. ... Scrapple sandwich at the Delaware state fair Offal is the entrails and internal organs of a butchered animal. ... Pölsa served with a fried egg and pickled beetroot Pölsa is a traditional Swedish dish, a type of hash similar to haggis and scrapple. ... Saumagen is a German dish popular in the Palatinate. ... Croatian dish from Slavonia, similar to Scottish haggis. ... Not to be confused with Republika Srpska. ... Machitos with beans Tripas, also known as Machitos, in Mexican cuisine are small intestines of farm animals that have been cleaned, boiled and grilled. ...

References

  1. ^ The Course. The Official Site of the Masters Tournament. Last accessed January 8, 2007.
  • Barham, Andrea (2005). The Pedant's Revolt: Why Most Things You Think Are Right Are Wrong. Michael O'Mara Books Ltd. ISBN 1-84317-132-5. 

Clarissa Dickson-Wright (born Clarissa Theresa Philomena Aileen Mary Josephine Agnes Elsie Trilby Louise Esmerelda Dickson-Wright in London on June 28, 1947) is a Scottish celebrity chef best known from her appearances with the late Jennifer Paterson in the BBC series Two Fat Ladies. ...

See also

Saumagen is a German dish popular in the Palatinate. ... Haggis McLeod is a juggler who has performed for years as half of the comedy street show duo Haggis and Charlie. ... Enter the Haggis is a Canadian world celtic rock band based in Toronto, Canada. ... For other uses, see Pumpkinhead (disambiguation). ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Haggis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1450 words)
Haggis is traditionally served with the Burns supper on January 25th, when Scotland's national poet, Robert Burns, is commemorated.
Haggis is widely available in supermarkets in Scotland (and in some parts of England) all the year round, and the cheaper brands are normally packed in artificial casings, rather than stomachs, just as the cheaper brands of sausages are no longer stuffed into animal intestines.
Haggis is also used in a sport called haggis hurling, throwing a haggis as far as possible.
Haggis - Facts, Information, and Encyclopedia Reference article (995 words)
Haggis is traditionally served with "neeps and tatties" which is mashed swede (rutabaga) and mashed potatoes - Scots generally refer to Swedish turnips as 'turnips' rather than 'swedes', hence "neeps".
Haggis is widely available in supermarkets in Scotland all the year round, and the cheaper brands are normally packed in artificial casings, rather than stomachs, just as the cheaper brands of sausages are no longer stuffed into animal intestines.
Haggis is also used in a sport called haggis hurling, involving throwing a haggis as far as possible.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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