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Encyclopedia > Hachiko

(Born 1923, died March 8, 1935)

The statue of Hachiko is a favorite meeting spot in Tokyo.
The statue of Hachiko is a favorite meeting spot in Tokyo.
Statue of Hachiko in Shibuya
Statue of Hachiko in Shibuya


Hachikō, sometimes known in Japanese as 忠犬ハチ公 (chūken hachikō, lit. 'faithful dog Hachiko'), was an Akita dog born in November 1923 in the city of Odate, Akita Prefecture. In 1924 he was brought to Tokyo by his owner, Eisaburo Ueno, a professor in the agriculture department at the University of Tokyo. During his owner's life, Hachiko saw him off from the front door and greeted him at the end of the day at the nearby Shibuya Station. Even after Ueno's death in May 1925, Hachiko returned every day to the station to wait for him, and did so for the next 11 years. Download high resolution version (568x750, 171 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (568x750, 171 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...   , literally Eastern capital) is the seat of the Japanese government and the Imperial Palace, the home of the Japanese Imperial Family, and the de facto[1] capital of Japan. ... Statue of Hachiko in Shibuya This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Statue of Hachiko in Shibuya This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Shibuya Crossing, with Shibuya 109 in the background Shibuya ) is one of the 23 special wards of Tokyo, Japan. ... The Akita or Akita Ken is a breed of large dog originating in Japan, named for Akita Prefecture, where it is thought to have originated. ... Categories: Cities in Akita Prefecture | Japan geography stubs ... Akita Prefecture ) is located in the Tōhoku Region of northern Japan. ...   , literally Eastern capital) is the seat of the Japanese government and the Imperial Palace, the home of the Japanese Imperial Family, and the de facto[1] capital of Japan. ... The University of Tokyo ), abbreviated as Todai ), is one of the leading research universities in Japan. ... Shibuya station platform The statue of Hachiko is a famous meeting place. ...


Affection between the professor and the dog was immediate. The professor named the pup "Hachi" and added "ko", a common term of endearment. For his part, Hachiko accompanied the professor everywhere he could. As he grew, Hachiko took on the traditional traits of an Akita; his ears stood upright, and his tail curled up and to the left. Professor Ueno reportedly took great pride in owning a purebred dog of a breed that had a history going back 30 centuries—especially as the number of purebred Akitas in Japan was dwindling at the time.


When the professor died, Mrs. Ueno closed the house and moved, giving Hachiko to some of her husband's relatives who lived several miles from the station. The Akita refused to stay with them. As soon as he was let out, he trotted back first to his old house, then to the train station to await his master. Ueno's gardener, Kikuzaburo Kobayashi, lived close to the station and took over Hachiko's care.


Hachiko's devotion to his lost master moved those around him, who nicknamed him "faithful dog", though some speculate that he kept returning because of the handouts he received from street vendors (upon his death, a necropsy revealed remnants of what were apparently yakitori skewers in his stomach). For the former Death Metal band called Autopsy, see Autopsy (band). ... Yakitori being cooked Yakitori (焼き鳥, やきとり), lit. ...


In the first years of his vigil, Hachiko was treated as little more than a tolerable nuisance at the train station. In 1928, a new station master came to Shibuya Station. He quickly grew very fond of him and allowed him free run of the facility. Hachiko still kept his schedule, but also was allowed to remain in the station throughout the day, sleeping in a storeroom set aside for him by the new station master.


That same year, another of Ueno's former students (who had become something of an expert on Akitas), saw the dog at the station and followed him to the Kobayashi home where he learned the history of Hachiko's life. Shortly after this meeting, the former student published a documented census of Akitas in Japan. His research found only 30 purebred Akitas remaining, including Hachiko from Shibuya Station.


Ueno's former student returned frequently to visit the dog and over the years published several articles about Hachiko's remarkable loyalty. In 1932 one of these articles, published in Tokyo's largest newspaper, threw the dog into the national spotlight. Hachiko became a sensation throughout the land. His faithfulness to his master's memory impressed the people of Japan as a spirit of family loyalty all should strive to achieve. Teachers and parents used Hachiko's vigil as an example for children to follow. A well-known Japanese artist rendered a sculpture of the dog, and throughout the country a new awareness of the Akita breed grew.   , literally Eastern capital) is the seat of the Japanese government and the Imperial Palace, the home of the Japanese Imperial Family, and the de facto[1] capital of Japan. ...


In April 1934, a bronze statue in his likeness was erected at Shibuya Station, and Hachiko himself was present at its unveiling. The statue was recycled for the war effort during World War II. After the war, Hachiko was hardly forgotten. In 1948 The Society for Recreating the Hachiko Statue commissioned Ando Takeshi, son of the original artist who had since died, to make a second statue. The new statue was erected in August 1948, which still stands and is an extremely popular meeting spot. In some way it could be a simile for the commitment of people and lovers meeting each other at Shibuya Hachikoguchi (Shibuya Hachiko exit). A similar statue stands in Hachiko's hometown, in front of Odate Station. In 2004, a new statue of Hachiko was erected on the original stone pedestal from Shibuya in front of the Akita Dog Museum in Odate. Combatants Allied Powers: United Kingdom France Soviet Union United States Republic of China and others Axis Powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Winston Churchill Charles de Gaulle Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Chiang Kai-Shek Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tojo Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33... Categories: Japan geography stubs | Geography of Japan | Train stations | Railway Stations of Japan ...


Hachiko died on March 8, 1935, of filariasis. His stuffed and mounted remains are kept at the National Science Museum in Ueno, Tokyo. March 8 is the 67th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (68th in leap years). ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... A taxidermied snow leopard. ... Shinobazu Pond and Bentendo Hall in early spring Tokyo National Museum Pagoda of Kaneiji, now in Ueno Zoo Rodins Gates of Hell in front of the National Museum of Western Art Ueno (上野) is a district in Tokyos Taitō Ward, best known as the home of Ueno Station...


When Helen Keller visited Japan in 1937, her interest in Hachiko's story subsequently resulted in her introducing the Akita breed to the United States. Helen Adams Keller (June 27, 1880 – June 1, 1968) was a deafblind American author, activist and lecturer. ...


Hachiko was the subject of the 1987 movie Hachiko Monogatari. He is also the subject of a 2004 children's book named "Hachiko: the story of a loyal dog", written by Pamela S. Turner and illustrated by Yan Nascimbene. 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


References in popular culture

  • In the tokusatsu film Gamera 3: Awakening of Irys, just before Gamera makes his appearance in Shibuya, fire and debris dramatically engulf the Hachiko statue.
  • Hachiko's statue was a location featured in Leg 11 of the Reality TV Series The Amazing Race 9 as the location of a clue.
  • Hachi is the default name of a pet dog for samurai characters in the Nethack computer game.
  • The main characters of SuperGALS! often hang out and meet at Hachi's statue.
  • In the manga and anime series Nana, one of the main characters is nicknamed Hachiko due to her "tagalong" sense of loyalty.
  • The statue of Hachiko is shown in the anime Omishi Magical Theater: Risky Safety.
  • In the Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game there is a set of dogs named Marron who are all one in the same bringing the same story of Hachiko but surviving time.

Futurama is an American animated sitcom created by Matt Groening (creator of The Simpsons) and David X. Cohen for the Fox Network. ... Jurassic Bark is the 61st episode of Futurama, airing November 17, 2002. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Shibuya Crossing, with Shibuya 109 in the background Shibuya ) is one of the 23 special wards of Tokyo, Japan. ... The Amazing Race 9 was the ninth installment of the popular American reality television show, The Amazing Race. ... The Amazing Race 9 was the ninth installment of the popular American reality television show, The Amazing Race. ... NetHack is a single-player roguelike computer game originally released in 1987. ... Gals! is a shōjo manga written by mangaka Mihona Fujii. ... Manga )   is the Japanese word for comics and print cartoons. ... The main cast of the anime Cowboy Bebop (1998) (L to R: Spike Spiegel, Jet Black, Ed Tivrusky, Faye Valentine, and Ein the dog) For the oleo-resin, see Animé (oleo-resin). ... NANA ) is a shōjo manga by mangaka Ai Yazawa, serialised in Cookie, published by Shueisha. ... My Life as a Teenage Robot is an American animated television series, produced by Frederator Studios for the Nickelodeon cable channel. ...

See also

Statue of Greyfriars Bobby in Edinburgh the statue is located at George IV st. ... This is a list of real dogs, see also the list of fictional dogs. ...

External links

  • Photos of Hachiko in Japan

  Results from FactBites:
 
Metropolis - Big in Japan: Hachiko (484 words)
Hachiko didn't accompany his master to his teaching job at the Imperial University (now known as Tokyo University), but when Professor Ueno returned every day at 3pm, the dog was always at the station waiting for him.
Hachiko went to Shibuya as always to meet his master, but 3 o'clock came and went, and the professor didn't arrive.
Some of Hachiko's bones are reportedly buried there, but in fact, Hachiko can still be seen, stuffed, in the National Science Museum northwest of Ueno station.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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