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Encyclopedia > Gwydion

In Welsh mythology, Gwydion is a magician appearing prominently in the Fourth branch of the Mabinogi and the ancient poem Cad Goddeu. He is the brother of Gilfaethwy and Arianrhod, and the nephew of Math ap Mathonwy. In the Mabinogion he is called the son of the goddess Don, making it likely he is an euhemerized god or demi-god. Welsh mythology, the remnants of the mythology of the pre-Christian Britons, has come down to us in much altered form in medieval Welsh manuscripts such as the Red Book of Hergest, the White Book of Rhydderch, the Book of Aneirin and the Book of Taliesin. ... The term magician can refer to a practitioner of either paranormal magic or illusionism. ... The Four Branches of the Mabinogi are the best known tales from the medieval Welsh Mabinogion. ... Cad Goddeu (Welsh: The Battle of the Trees) is a sixth-century Welsh poem from the Book of Taliesin. ... In Welsh mythology, Gilfaethwy was a son of the goddess Don. ... In Welsh mythology, Arianrhod (silver wheel) was a daughter of Beli and Don. ... In Welsh mythology, Math ap Mathonwy was a king who needed to rest his feet in the lap of a virgin unless he was at war, or wanted to be. ... Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture. ... Dôn was a Welsh mother goddess, equivalent of the Irish Danu. ...


Mythological exploits

In the Fourth Branch of the Mabinogi, Gwydion helps his brother Gilfaethwy rape Goewin, Math's foot-holder. To this end he steals Pryderi of Dyfed's pigs, thus forcing Math away to fight a war (Math only took his feet from his foot-holder's lap to go to battle). Gwydion and Gilfaethwy sneak back to Math's court where Gilfaethwy forceably sleeps with Goewin. When Math hears of this, he turns his nephews into a series of mated pairs of animals; Gwydion becomes a stag for a year, then a sow and finally a wolf. Gilfaethwy becomes a hind deer, a boar and a she-wolf. Each year they produce an offspring which is sent to Math; after three years Math releases his nephews from their punishment. In Welsh mythology, Gilfaethwy was a son of the goddess Don. ... In Welsh mythology, Goewin was Math ap Mathonwys foot-holder; she was raped by Gilfaethwy. ... In Welsh mythology, Math ap Mathonwy was a king who needed to rest his feet in the lap of a virgin unless he was at war, or wanted to be. ... In Welsh mythology, King Pryderi of Dyfed was the son of Pwyll and Rhiannon. ... Dyfed was one of the ancient kingdoms (or principalities) of Wales prior to the Norman Conquest. ... Species Sus barbatus Sus bucculentus Sus cebifrons Sus celebensis Sus domesticus Sus heureni Sus philippensis Sus salvanius Sus scrofa Sus timoriensis Sus verrucosus Pigs are ungulates native to Eurasia collectively grouped under the genus Sus within the Suidae family. ... Genera About 15 in 4 subfamilies. ... Species Sus barbatus Sus bucculentus Sus cebifrons Sus celebensis Sus domesticus Sus heureni Sus philippensis Sus salvanius Sus scrofa Sus timoriensis Sus verrucosus Pigs are ungulates native to Eurasia collectively grouped under the genus Sus within the Suidae family. ... Wolf Wolf Man Mount Wolf Wolf Prizes Wolf Spider Wolf 424 Wolf 359 Wolf Point Wolf-herring Frank Wolf Friedrich Wolf Friedrich August Wolf Hugo Wolf Johannes Wolf Julius Wolf Max Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf Maximilian Wolf Rudolf Wolf Thomas Wolf As Name Wolf Breidenbach Wolf Hirshorn Other The call... Subfamilies Capreolinae Cervinae Hydropotinae Muntiacinae A deer is a ruminant mammal belonging to the family Cervidae. ... Binomial name Sus scrofa Linnaeus, 1758 Young piglets feeding The Wild Boar (Sus scrofa) is the wild ancestor of the domestic pig. ...


In the search for a new foot-holder, who must be a virgin, Math tests Gwydion's sister Arianrhod. The test reveals that Arianrhod is not a virgin however, when she immediately gives birth to two children after stepping over a magic stick. One of these children is born a formless blob and leaps into the sea, but on the other Arianrhod places three curses (see the Irish geas) upon him: the child will never have a name unless she herself names him, he cannot carry weapons unless she had arms him (neither of these things does she intend to do), and he cannot marry any human woman. In effect she had denied her child three major aspects of humanity, but Gwydion puts his nephew in a box and raises him. When the boy is old enough Gwydion takes him incognito to see Arianrhod, who declares he is a "bright lion with a sure hand" or in some versions "fair-haired skillful hand" when she sees him drop a wren with a single stone. Gwydion reveals the child is her son and that she has unknowingly supplied him with a name; from then on he goes by Lleu Llaw Gyffes, "bright lion with a sure hand". Arianrhod is similarly tricked into supplying her son with weapons. The third curse proves harder to overcome, so Gwydion and Math use magic to create a wife for Lleu out of flowers, named Blodeuwedd (flower woman). Blodeuwedd proves unfaithful and with her lover, Goronwy, attempts to slay Lleu. Lleu does not die but transforms into a wounded eagle, and Gwydion tracks him to the forest and heals him. Gwydion then turns Blodeuwedd into an owl, and Lleu himself kills Goronwy. In Roman times, Vestal Virgins were strictly celibate or they were punished by death. ... In Welsh mythology, Arianrhod (silver wheel) was a daughter of Beli and Don. ... Look up Curse in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A geas (also geis), has two interpretations in Irish mythology and folklore. ... Genera Donacobius Campylorhynchus Odontorchilus Salpinctes Catherpes Hylorchilus Cinnycerthia Thryomanes Ferminia Troglodytes Cistothorus Uropsila Thryorchilus Thryothorus Henicorhina Microcerculus Cyphorhinus Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes) Stamp FR 345 of Postverk Føroya, Faroe Islands Issued: 22 February 1999 Artist: Astrid Andreasen The true wrens are members of a mainly New World passerine bird family... In Welsh mythology, Lleu Llaw Gyffes (sometimes called Llew Llaw Gyffes) is a character appearing in the fourth of the Four Branches of the Mabinogion, the tale of Math fab Mathonwy. ... In Welsh mythology, Blodeuwedd is the later name of Blodeuedd, a woman made from flowers by Math and Gwydion. ... In Welsh mythology, Goronwy was the lover of Blodeuwedd, the wife of Llew Llaw Gyffes. ... Genera Eagles are large birds of prey, who inhabit mainly the Old World, with only two species (Bald Eagle and Golden Eagle) in North America, a few in South America and three (White-bellied Sea Eagle, Little Eagle and Wedge-tailed Eagle) in Australia. ...


Gwydion also appears in the 6th century poem Cad Goddeu (The Battle of the Trees), found in the Book of Taliesin. There he wins a battle against Bran the Blessed by animating an army of trees and guessing Bran's name. This Buddhist stela from China, Northern Wei period, was built in the early 6th century. ... Cad Goddeu (Welsh: The Battle of the Trees) is a sixth-century Welsh poem from the Book of Taliesin. ... Book of Taliesin (Welsh: Llyfr Taliesin) is one of the most famous Welsh manuscripts. ... Bran the Blessed, also known as Bran Vendigaid, Bendigeidfran or Branovices, is a giant and king of Britain in Welsh mythology. ...


Etymology of the name

This theonym appears to be derived from Proto-Celtic *Weidī-kondos meaning "masculine knowing sense" (cf. [1] [2] [3]). Following accepted sound laws elucidating systematic diachronic phonological sound change in Celtic proto-linguistics (cf. [4] [5] [6] [7]), the Romano-British form of this Proto-Celtic theonym is likely to have been *Vēdīcondos. Theonym is essentially classical Greek for the name of a god. ... The Proto-Celtic language, also called Common Celtic, is the putative ancestor of all the known Celtic languages. ... Sound change or phonetic change is a historical process of language change consisting in the replacement of one speech sound or, more generally, one phonetic feature by another in a given phonological environment. ... Diachronic study is the study of the development of a language over a period of time. ... Phonology (Greek phone = voice/sound and logos = word/speech) is a subfield of grammar (see also linguistics). ... Sound change or phonetic change is a historical process of language change consisting in the replacement of one speech sound or, more generally, one phonetic feature by another in a given phonological environment. ... The Celtic languages are the languages descended from Proto-Celtic, or Common Celtic, spoken by ancient and modern Celts alike. ... Historical linguistics (also diachronic linguistics or comparative linguistics) is primarily the study of the ways in which languages change over time, by means of examining languages which are recognizably related through similarities such as vocabulary, word formation, and syntax, as well as the surviving records of ancient languages. ... The term Romano-British describes the romanised culture of Britannia under the rule of the Roman Empire, when Roman and Christian culture had extensively entered into the life of the native Brythonic and Pictish peoples of Britain. ...


Gwydion in modern fiction

Lloyd Alexander's Chronicles of Prydain, a series of fantasy novels inspired by Welsh myths, features a character named Gwydion, based somewhat on the Gwydion of myth, but markedly different in terms of moral character. In the Chronicles of Prydain, Prince Gwydion is a member of the Sons of Don, Prydain's ruling house, and King Math's war leader. It is never stated if he is the son of High King Math, but he takes the throne when the High King dies. Gwydion meets Taran when the Assisstant Pig-Keeper chases after Hen Wen. The two travel together until they are separated at Spiral Castle. Gywdion defeats the Horned King by shouted his real name, leads the attempt to gain the Black Cauldron and helps Taran, Fflewdurr Fflam, Gurgi and Prince Rhun rescue Elionwy from Achren. It is Gwydion who leads an assault on Annuvin by the sea shortly after he becomes High King. In the books, Prince Gwydion is an expert tracker, forester and warrior. Book cover of The High King Lloyd Chudley Alexander (born January 30, 1924) is the author of a number of fantasy books for children and adolescents, as well as several adult novels. ... The Chronicles of Prydain is a five volume series of childrens fantasy novels by Lloyd Alexander. ... // For other meanings see Fantasy (disambiguation) Fantasy is a genre of art that uses magic and other supernatural forms as a primary element of plot, theme, or setting. ...


He also appears in Phillip Mann's alternate history series A Land Fit for Heroes, Robert Carter's "The Language of Stones" series, has a short appearance in American Gods by Neil Gaiman and is the ancestor to the main character in Jenny Nimmo's Snow Spider Trilogy. Alternate history (fiction) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Neil Gaiman (November 2004) Neil Richard Gaiman () (born November 10, 1960, Portchester, Hampshire) is an English Jewish author of numerous science fiction and fantasy works, including many graphic novels. ... Jenny Nimmo is the author of the popular Charlie Bone/ Children of the Red King childrens fantasy series of books. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Gwydion - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (724 words)
In Welsh mythology, Gwydion is a magician appearing prominently in the Fourth branch of the Mabinogi and the ancient poem Cad Goddeu.
When the boy is old enough Gwydion takes him incognito to see Arianrhod, who declares he is a "bright lion with a sure hand" or in some versions "fair-haired skillful hand" when she sees him drop a wren with a single stone.
Gwydion reveals the child is her son and that she has unknowingly supplied him with a name; from then on he goes by Lleu Llaw Gyffes, "bright lion with a sure hand".
Gwydion (250 words)
In Celtic mythology, Gwydion was a son of Beli and Danu.
Gwydion was, for one year each, a stag[?], sow and wolf.
Gwydion raised his nephew, who was born a blob.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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