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Encyclopedia > Gwendolyn B. Bennett

Gwendolyn B. Bennett (July 8, 1902May 30, 1981) was an African American writer who contributed greatly to the Harlem Renaissance. She is chiefly remembered for her column "The Ebony Flute" in the periodical Opportunity, which chronicled cultural advancements in Harlem. Though often overlooked, she herself made considerable accomplishments in poetry and prose. She is perhaps best known for her short story, "Wedding Day", which was published in the sole issue of Fire, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, and Wallace Thurman's radical 1926 periodical. July 8 is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 176 days remaining. ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... May 30 is the 150th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (151st in leap years). ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... The Harlem Renaissance was a flowering of African American art, literature, music and culture in the United States led primarily by the African American community based in Harlem, New York City after World War I. Literary historians and academics have yet to reach a consensus as to when the period... Harlem is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan, long known as a major black cultural and business center. ... Langston Hughes (February 1, 1902 – May 22, 1967) was an American poet, novelist, playwright, short story writer, and newspaper columnist. ... Zora Neale Hurston (January 7, 1891 – January 28, 1960) was an American folklorist and author during the time of the Harlem Renaissance, best known for the novel Their Eyes Were Watching God. ... Wallace Thurman (1902-1934) was an African American novelist during the Harlem Renaissance. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ...

Contents

Early Life and Work

Gwendolyn B. Bennett was born July 8, 1902 in Giddings, Texas to Joshua and Maime Bennett. She spent her early childhood in Wadsworth, Nevada on the Paiute Indian Reservation. Her parents taught in the Indian Service for the Bureau of Indian Affairs. In 1906, when Bennett was two years old, her family moved to Washington D.C. so Joshua could study law and Maime could train to be a beautician. The move eventually led to her parent's divorce when Bennett was seven years old. Maime gained custody of Bennett, however, her father kidnapped her and they lived in hiding, along with her stepmother, Marechal Neil, along the East Coast and Pennsylvania. Her father eventually them to New York where she attended Brooklyn's Girls' High from 1918 till 1921. While attending Girls' High, Bennett was awarded first place in a school wide art contest, and was the first African American to join the literary and drama societies. Her high school play was written by Gwendolyn and also featured her as an actress. She also wrote both the class graduation speech and the words to the graduation song. Wadsworth is a census-designated place located in Washoe County, Nevada. ... The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) is an agency of the federal government of the United States within the Department of the Interior charged with the administration and management of 55. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Cosmetology is the treatment of skin, hair and nails and includes, but is not limited to, manicures, pedicures, application of artificial nails, special occasion hairstyling, shampooing hair, cosmetic application, body hair removal, chemical hair relaxers or straighteners, permanent waves, coloring and highlighting of hair, and hair extensions or wig treatments. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Literature is literally an acquaintance with letters as in the first sense given in the Oxford English Dictionary (from the Latin littera meaning an individual written character (letter)). The term has, however, generally come to identify a collection of texts. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ...


After her graduation in 1921, she began to take art classes at Columbia University and the Pratt Institute. In her undergraduate studies, Bennett's poem "Heritage" was published in Crisis in November, 1923 and also in December of the same year, her poem Heritage was included in Opportunity, a magazine published by the National Urban League. She graduated from both institutes in 1924 and in June of that year, started teaching design, watercolor and crafts at Howard University. She graduated from Pratt Institute in 1924 and was hired as an Assistant Professor of Art at Howard University. An scholarship enabling her to study abroad in Paris, at Sorbonne, was awarded to Bennett during December, 1924 Bennett then continued her fine arts education at Academic Julian and Ecole du Pantheon in Paris. During her studies in Paris, She worked with a variety of materials, including watercolor, oil, woodcuts, pen and ink, and batik which was the beginning of her career as a graphic artist. Most of her pieces from this period of her life were destroyed, however, in 1926 during a fire at her stepmother's home. 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Columbia University is a private university whose main campus lies in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of the Borough of Manhattan in New York City. ... Pratt Institute is a specialized, private college in New York City with campuses in Manhattan and Brooklyn. ... 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... June is the sixth month of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with a length of 30 days. ... Design, usually considered in the context of the applied arts, engineering, architecture, and other such creative endeavours, is used as both a noun and a verb. ... Watercolor is a painting technique making use of water-soluble pigments that are either transparent or opaque and are formulated with gum to bond the pigment to the paper. ... Arts and crafts comprise a whole host of activities and hobbies that are related to making things with ones own hands and skill. ... Howard University is a historically black university in Washington, D.C. Howard was established in 1867 by congressional order and named after Oliver O. Howard. ... Pratt Institute is a specialized, private college in New York City with campuses in Manhattan and Brooklyn. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Howard University is a historically black university in Washington, D.C. Howard was established in 1867 by congressional order and named after Oliver O. Howard. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country France Région ÃŽle-de-France Département Paris (75) Subdivisions 20 arrondissements Mayor Bertrand Delanoë  (PS) (since 2001) City Statistics Land... The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The Sorbonne today, from the same point of view The Sorbonne is frequently used in ordinary parlance as synonymous with the faculty of theology of Paris or the University of Paris in its entirety. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Fine art is a term used to refer to fields traditionally considered to be artistic. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country France Région ÃŽle-de-France Département Paris (75) Subdivisions 20 arrondissements Mayor Bertrand Delanoë  (PS) (since 2001) City Statistics Land... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country France Région ÃŽle-de-France Département Paris (75) Subdivisions 20 arrondissements Mayor Bertrand Delanoë  (PS) (since 2001) City Statistics Land... Watercolor is a painting technique making use of water-soluble pigments that are either transparent or opaque and are formulated with gum to bond the pigment to the paper. ... Natural olive oil Synthetic motor oil Oil, in a general sense, is a chemical compound that is not miscible with water, and is in a liquid state at ambient temperatures. ... A woodcut is a method of printing in which an image is carved into the surface of a piece of wood, with the printing parts remaining level with the surface while the non-printing parts are removed, typically with chisels. ... A ballpoint pen A pen is a writing instrument which applies ink to a surface, paper. ... An ink is a liquid containing various pigments and/or dyes used for colouring a surface to render an image or text. ... A batik painting depicting two Indian women. ... Graphic design is the applied art of arranging image and text to communicate a message. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ...


When Bennett left Paris in 1926, she headed back to New York to become the assistant to the editor for Opportunity. During her time employed at Opportunity, she received the Alfred C. Barnes Foundation fellowship for her work. Later during the same year she returned to Howard University to once again teach fine arts. She remained the assistant to the editor at Opportunity and was given the chance to publish her own article to discuss literary and fine arts. She titled her column The Ebony Flute and used it to distribute news about the many creative thinkers that were involved with the Harlem Renaissance. In 1926, She was also a co-founder of the literary journal [[Fire!!]]. She reviewed many writers' works and gave criticism on a regular basis through Opportunity and Fire!! City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country France Région ÃŽle-de-France Département Paris (75) Subdivisions 20 arrondissements Mayor Bertrand Delanoë  (PS) (since 2001) City Statistics Land... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Howard University is a historically black university in Washington, D.C. Howard was established in 1867 by congressional order and named after Oliver O. Howard. ... Fine art is a term used to refer to fields traditionally considered to be artistic. ... Literature is literally an acquaintance with letters as in the first sense given in the Oxford English Dictionary (from the Latin littera meaning an individual written character (letter)). The term has, however, generally come to identify a collection of texts. ... Fine art is a term used to refer to fields traditionally considered to be artistic. ... The Harlem Renaissance was a flowering of African American art, literature, music and culture in the United States led primarily by the African American community based in Harlem, New York City after World War I. Literary historians and academics have yet to reach a consensus as to when the period... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Literature is literally an acquaintance with letters as in the first sense given in the Oxford English Dictionary (from the Latin littera meaning an individual written character (letter)). The term has, however, generally come to identify a collection of texts. ...


Harlem

Gwendolyn B. Bennett was one of the most famous people to participate in the 1920's Black American arts movement, which is also more commonly known as the Harlem Renaissance. Many of issues that plagued the African American community is evident in her works. Her African heritage is a main theme in her poetry. Her works reflected the shared themes and motifs of the Harlem Renaissance. Racial pride, rediscovery of Africa, recognition of African music and dance were common themes in Gwendolyn's and other writers' works. 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... Harlem is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan, long known as a major black cultural and business center. ... Raphael was famous for depicting illustrious figures of the Classical past with the features of his Renaissance contemporaries. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... World map showing location of Africa A satellite composite image of Africa Africa is the worlds second_largest continent in both area and population, after Asia. ... The Harlem Renaissance was a flowering of African American art, literature, music and culture in the United States led primarily by the African American community based in Harlem, New York City after World War I. Literary historians and academics have yet to reach a consensus as to when the period... Marcus Garvey, black nationalist and champion of the back-to-Africa movement. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa. ... Africa is a large and diverse continent, consisting of dozens of countries, hundreds of languages and thousands of races, tribes and ethnic groups. ... Dance (from Old French dancier, perhaps from Frankish) generally refers to human movement either used as a form of expression or presented in a social, spiritual or performance setting. ...


Her column, The Ebony Flute, was Bennett's link to the Harlem cultural and social life. She used it to her advantage to network with other poets and to spread the news of the Renaissance. She would feature other writers' work and discuss them in her column. Although, Bennett never published a collection of her own works and poetry, she was a strong influence on the Harlem Renaissance by giving the African American community racial pride and Africa. She also created a romantic vision of being African through romantic lyric. Harlem is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan, long known as a major black cultural and business center. ... The word culture, from the Latin colo, -ere, with its root meaning to cultivate, generally refers to patterns of human activity and the symbolic structures that give such activity significance. ... // The Unobservable Although the term social is a crucial category in social science and often used in public discourse, its meaning is often vague, suggesting that it is a fuzzy concept. ... Poets are authors of poems. ... Raphael was famous for depicting illustrious figures of the Classical past with the features of his Renaissance contemporaries. ... The Chinese poem Quatrain on Heavenly Mountain by Emperor Gaozong (Song Dynasty) Poetry (from the Greek , poiesis, making or creating) is a form of art in which language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or in lieu of, its ostensible meaning. ... Harlem is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan, long known as a major black cultural and business center. ... Raphael was famous for depicting illustrious figures of the Classical past with the features of his Renaissance contemporaries. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Marcus Garvey, black nationalist and champion of the back-to-Africa movement. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa. ... World map showing location of Africa A satellite composite image of Africa Africa is the worlds second_largest continent in both area and population, after Asia. ... Romantic and romanticism have a number of uses: Titles: Romantic (song) by Karyn White. ... Lyric can have a number of meanings. ...


Harlem Circles

During 1923 to 1931, Bennett started a support group that provided a warm, supportive place for the young writers of Harlem that provided sustained association with their peers. Included in this group was Langston Hughes Countee Cullen, Eric Walrond, Helene Johnson, Wallace Thurman, Richard Bruce Nugent, Aaron Douglas, Alta Douglass, Rudolph Fisher and Zora Neale Hurston. The group was designed to motivate these young writers to support and encourage each other and were also, in turn, encouraged to aspire to the levels of more established scholars such as Charles S. Johnson, Alain Locke, W.E.B. Du Bois, Jessie Fauset, and James Weldon Johnson. Gwendolyn once said in a 1979 interview that, "nothing like this particular life in which you saw the same group of people over and over again. You were always glad to see them. You always had an exciting time when you were with them." This Harlem circle that Gwendolyn developed helped her sustain her steady connection with the Renaissance in New York throughout a period of her life. 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... Harlem is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan, long known as a major black cultural and business center. ... Langston Hughes (February 1, 1902 – May 22, 1967) was an American poet, novelist, playwright, short story writer, and newspaper columnist. ... Countee Cullen, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1941 Countee Cullen (May 30, 1903–January 9, 1946) was an American poet, one of the finest of the Harlem Renaissance. ... Helen Johnson, who was better known as Helene Johnson (1906-1995) was an African American poet during the Harlem Renaissance. ... Wallace Thurman (1902-1934) was an African American novelist during the Harlem Renaissance. ... Richard Bruce Nugent (known professionally as Richard Bruce)(July 2, 1906 - May 27, 1987) was an important figure, albeit a fleeting one, in the Harlem Renaissance. ... Power Plant, Harlem by Aaron Douglas. ... Rudolph Fisher (1897 - 1934) was an African-American writer His first published work, City of Refuge, appeared in Atlantic Monthly of February 1925. ... Zora Neale Hurston (January 7, 1891 – January 28, 1960) was an American folklorist and author during the time of the Harlem Renaissance, best known for the novel Their Eyes Were Watching God. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion . If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ... Alain LeRoy Locke (1886-1954) was born on September 13, 1886, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania He was an American educator, writer, and philosopher, and is best remembered as a leader and chief interpreter of the Harlem Renaissance. ... W. E. B. Du Bois in 1904 William Edward Burghardt Du Bois (pronounced ) (February 23, 1868 – August 27, 1963) was an American civil rights activist, leader, sociologist, educator, historian, writer, editor, poet, scholar, and socialist. ... Jessie Redmon Fausset (April 27, 1882 - April 20, 1961) was an African American editor, poet, essayist and novelist. ... James Weldon Johnson, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1932 James Weldon Johnson (June 17, 1871 - June 26, 1938) was a leading African American author, poet, early civil rights activist, and prominent figure in the Harlem Renaissance. ... For the Smashing Pumpkins song, see 1979 (song). ... Harlem is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan, long known as a major black cultural and business center. ... Raphael was famous for depicting illustrious figures of the Classical past with the features of his Renaissance contemporaries. ... Official language(s) None Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  Ranked 27th  - Total 54,520 sq mi (141,205 km²)  - Width 285 miles (455 km)  - Length 330 miles (530 km)  - % water 13. ...


Criticism

Her work during this period of her life was very highly praised by her fellow writers in Harlem. A very well-known playwright, Theodore Ward, declared that Bennett's work was one of the "most promising of the poets out of the Harlem Renaissance" and also called Bennett a "dynamic figure... noted for her depth and understanding." Very high praises for an African American writer during this period of time. J. Mason Brewer, an African American storyteller, called Bennett a "nationally known artist and poetess." Since Mason was also a native Texan, he further stated that as a result of Bennett's Texas birthplace, "Texans feel that they have a claim on her and that the beautiful and poignant lyrics she writes resulted partially from the impression of her early Texas surroundings". Bennett was a breath of Texan airs breezing through the halls of the Harlem Renaissance. Harlem is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan, long known as a major black cultural and business center. ... Harlem is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan, long known as a major black cultural and business center. ... Raphael was famous for depicting illustrious figures of the Classical past with the features of his Renaissance contemporaries. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Texas is the gayest motherfucking state out there they can suck my big black balls. ... TexAns is a name of a band that Tools Maynard James Keenan previously sang for. ... Texas is the gayest motherfucking state out there they can suck my big black balls. ... The Harlem Renaissance was a flowering of African American art, literature, music and culture in the United States led primarily by the African American community based in Harlem, New York City after World War I. Literary historians and academics have yet to reach a consensus as to when the period...


Later Life and Harlem Influence

Bennett moved further away from Harlem when she married Dr. Alfred Joseph Jackson in 1927 and moved to Eustis, Florida. Jackson died in 1936 and Bennett moved back to New York. In 1940, Bennett became involved in an interracial marriage with Richard Crosscup which was not socially acceptable at Bennett's time. Harlem was Bennett's passion however and during the late 1930's and the 1940's she remained in the arts and also served as a member of the Harlem Artists Guild in 1935. The Harlem Community Arts Center was under her leadership from 1939 to 1944. During this time, Bennett was also active on the board of the Negro Playwright's Guild and very involved with the development of the George Washington Carver Community School. Harlem is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan, long known as a major black cultural and business center. ... 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Eustis may refer to: Eustis, Florida Eustis, Nebraska Eustis, Maine This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Official language(s) None Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  Ranked 27th  - Total 54,520 sq mi (141,205 km²)  - Width 285 miles (455 km)  - Length 330 miles (530 km)  - % water 13. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... Harlem is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan, long known as a major black cultural and business center. ... Events and trends Technology Jet engine invented Science Nuclear fission discovered by Otto Hahn, Lise Meitner and Fritz Strassmann Pluto, the ninth planet from the Sun, is discovered by Clyde Tombaugh British biologist Arthur Tansley coins term ecosystem War, peace and politics Socialists proclaim The death of Capitalism Rise to... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1944 calendar). ...


Bennett quietly faded from the public eye during the late 1940's but she remained close to the hub of busy Harlem in New York and her fellow writers. She began working for the Consumer's Union during the later years of her life. Her retirement occurred in 1968 and moved with her husband, Crosscut, to Kutztown, Pennsylvania where they opened an antique shop. Her husband died in 1980, due to heart failure, and Bennett died on May 30, 1981 at the Reading County Hospital. Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... Harlem is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan, long known as a major black cultural and business center. ... Official language(s) None Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  Ranked 27th  - Total 54,520 sq mi (141,205 km²)  - Width 285 miles (455 km)  - Length 330 miles (530 km)  - % water 13. ... Though anyone who creates a written work may be called a writer, the term is usually reserved for those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Kutztown is a borough located in Berks County, Pennsylvania. ... Official language(s) None Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 160 miles (255 km)  - Length 280 miles (455 km)  - % water 2. ... Interior of an antique shop. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... May 30 is the 150th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (151st in leap years). ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Writings

Short Stories

  • 1926 — Wedding Day Fire!
  • 1927 — Tokens Ebony & Topaz

Look up token in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Nonfiction

  • 1926-1928 — "The Ebony Flute" (column) Opportunity
  • 1924 — "The Future of the Negro in Art" Howard University Record (Dec)
  • 1925 — "Negros: Inherent Craftsmen" Howard University Record (Feb)
  • 1928 — "The American Negro Paints" Southern Workman (Jan)
  • 1934 — "I go to Camp" Opportunity (Aug)
  • 1934 — "Never the Twain Must Meet" Opportunity (Mar)
  • 1935 — "Rounding the Century: Story of the Colored Orphan Asylum & Association for the Benefit of Colored Children in New York City" Crisis (June)
  • 1937 — "The Harlem Artists Guild" Art Front (May)

Poetry

  • 1923 — "Heritage" Opportunity (Dec)
  • 1923 — "Nocturne" Crisis (Nov)
  • 1924 — "To Usward" Crisis (May) and Opportunity (May)
  • 1924 — "Wind" Opportunity (Nov)
  • 1925 — "On a Birthday" Opportunity (Sept)
  • 1925 — "Pugation" Opportunity (Feb)
  • 1926 — "Song" Palms (Oct)
  • 1926 — "Street Lamps in Early Spring" Opportunity (May)
  • 1926 — "Lines Written At the Grave of Alexandre Dumas" Opportunity (July)
  • 1926 — "Moon Tonight" Gypsy (Oct)
  • 1926 — "Hatred" Opportunity (June)
  • 1926 — "Dear Things" Palms (Oct)
  • 1926 — "Dirge" Palms (Oct)
  • 1934 — "Epitaph" Opportunity (Mar)

Her work is featured in numerous anthologies of the period, including the following: Heritage can refer to: Cultural heritage Cultural traditions Heritage tourism Inheritance Kinship and descent Natural heritage A novel in the BBC Books series See also English Heritage UNESCO World Heritage Site This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... A nocturne (from the French for nocturnal) is usually a musical composition that is inspired by, or evocative of, the night. ... Wind is the rough horizontal movement of air (as opposed to an air current) caused by uneven heating of the Earths surface. ... A song is a relatively short musical composition for the human voice (commonly accompanied by other musical instruments), which features words (lyrics). ... For the emotion Hatred please see Hate Hatred (Nenavist) is a Soviet film of 1975 directed by Samvel Gasparov. ... A dirge is a somber song expressing mourning or grief, such as would be appropriate for performance at a funeral. ... An epitaph ( literally: on the gravestone in ancient Greek) is text honoring the deceased, most commonly inscribed on a tombstone or plaque. ...

Countee Cullen, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1941 Countee Cullen (May 30, 1903–January 9, 1946) was an American poet, one of the finest of the Harlem Renaissance. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Alain LeRoy Locke (1886-1954) was born on September 13, 1886, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania He was an American educator, writer, and philosopher, and is best remembered as a leader and chief interpreter of the Harlem Renaissance. ... The New Negro is a book written by Alain Locke in 1925 about what the new negro is. ... 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ...

Reference

Caroling Dusk: An Anthology of Verse by Negro Poets. Ed. Countee Cullen: New York:Harper, 1927. Countee Cullen, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1941 Countee Cullen (May 30, 1903–January 9, 1946) was an American poet, one of the finest of the Harlem Renaissance. ... Official language(s) None Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  Ranked 27th  - Total 54,520 sq mi (141,205 km²)  - Width 285 miles (455 km)  - Length 330 miles (530 km)  - % water 13. ...


Chaney, Michael A. "Traveling Harlem's Europe: Vagabondage from Slave Narratives to Gwendolyn Bennett's 'Wedding Day' and Claude McKay's Banjo." Journal of Narrative Theory, 32:1 (2002): 52-76.


Ebony and Topaz: A Collectanea. Ed. Charles S. Johnson. New York: Opportunity, National Urban League, 1927. 140-150.


Govan, Sandra Y. "A Blend of Voices: Composite Narrative Strategies in Biographical Reconstuction." Recovered Writers/Recovered Texts. Ed. Dolan Hubbard. Knoxville, TN: U of Tennessee P. 1997. 90-104.


Govan Sandra Y. "After the Renaissance: Gwendolyn Bennett and the WPA years." MAWA-Review 3:2 (Dec 1988): 27-31.


Govan, Sandra Y. "Kindred Spirits and Sympathetic Souls: Langston Hughes and Gwendolyn Bennett in the Renaissance." Langston Hughes: The Man, His Art and His Continuing Influence. Ed James C. Trotman. New York, NY Garland Press, 1995. 75-85.


Gwendolyn, Bennetta Bennett. Encyclopedia of African-American Culture and History. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1996.


Hine, Darlene Clark, ed. Black Women in America. New York: Carlson Pres, 1993.


Hoffman, Lenore. "The Diaries of Gwendolyn Bennett." Women Studies Quarterly 17.3-4 9[1989]:66.


Jones, Gwendolyn S. "Gwendolyn Bennett ([1902]-[1981])." African American Authors, [1745]-[1945]: A BioBibliographical Critical Sourcebook. Ed. Emmanuel S. Nelson. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 2000. 18-23


Shockley, Ann Allen, Afro-American Women Writers 1746-1933: An Anthology and Critical Guide, New Haven, Connecticut: Meridian Books, 1989. ISBN 0-452-00981-2


External links


 
 

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