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Encyclopedia > Guy de Maupassant
Guy de Maupassant

Born August 5, 1850(1850-08-05)
Died June 6, 1893 (aged 42)
Occupation Novelist, short story writer, poet
Nationality French
Genres Naturalism, Realism
French literature
By category
French literary history

Medieval
16th century · 17th century
18th century · 19th century
20th century · Contemporary Image File history File links GDMaupassant. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about work. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... This article is in need of attention. ... A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... Naturalism is a movement in theater, film, and literature that seeks to replicate a believable everyday reality, as opposed to such movements as Romanticism or Surrealism, in which subjects may receive highly symbolic, idealistic, or even supernatural treatment. ... Look up realism, realist, realistic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Balzac redirects here. ... Gustave Flaubert Gustave Flaubert (December 12, 1821 – May 8, 1880) was a French writer who is counted among the greatest Western novelists. ... Portrait of Hippolyte Taine on French postage stamp of 1966 Hippolyte Adolphe Taine (April 21, 1828 - March 5, 1893) was a French critic and historian. ... Émile Zola (IPA: ) (2 April 1840 – 29 September 1902) was an influential French writer, the most important example of the literary school of naturalism, and a major figure in the political liberalization of France and in the exoneration of the falsely accused and convicted Army officer Alfred Dreyfus. ... Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (Russian: , IPA: ) was a Russian short story writer and playwright. ... Not to be confused with Oh Henry!. O. Henry is the pen name of American writer William Sydney Porter (September 11, 1862 – June 5, 1910). ... For other uses of this name, see Henry James (disambiguation). ... This article is about the author. ... William Somerset Maugham, CH (January 25, 1874 – December 16, 1965) was an English playwright, novelist, and short story writer. ... French literature is, generally speaking, literature written in the French language, particularly by citizens of France; it may also refer to literature written by people living in France who speak other traditional non-French languages. ... Medieval French literature is, for the purpose of this article, literature written in Oïl languages (including Old French and early Middle French) during the period from the eleventh century to the end of the fifteenth century. ... French Renaissance literature is, for the purpose of this article, literature written in French (Middle French) from the French invasion of Italy in 1494 to 1600, or roughly the period from the reign of Charles VIII of France to the ascension of Henri IV of France to the throne. ... Louis XIV King of France and Navarre By Hyacinthe Rigaud (1701) French literature of the 17th century spans the reigns of Henry IV of France, the Regency of Marie de Medici, Louis XIII of France, the Regency of Anne of Austria (and the civil war called the Fronde) and the... French literature of the 18th century spans the period from the death of Louis XIV of France, through the Régence (during the minority of Louis XV) and the reigns of Louis XV of France and Louis XVI of France to the start of the French Revolution. ... French literature of the nineteenth century is, for the purpose of this article, literature written in French from (roughly) 1799 to 1900. ... French literature of the twentieth century is, for the purpose of this article, literature written in French from (roughly) 1895 to 1990. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...

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Short story writers Chronological list of French language authors (regardless of nationality), by date of birth. ...

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Henri René Albert Guy de Maupassant (pronounced [gidəmopasɑ̃]) (5 August 18506 July 1893) was a popular 19th-century French writer. He is one of the fathers of the modern short story. As a protégé of Flaubert, his short stories are characterized by their economy of style and their efficient effortless dénouement. He also wrote six short novels. A number of his stories often denote the futility of war and the innocent civilians who, caught, emerge changed - many are set during the Franco-Prussian War of the 1870s. is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Gustave Flaubert Gustave Flaubert (December 12, 1821 – May 8, 1880) was a French writer who is counted among the greatest Western novelists. ... In literature, a dénouement (IPA: ) consists of a series of events that follow a dramatic or narratives climax, thus serving as the conclusion of the story. ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... Combatants Second French Empire North German Confederation allied with South German states (later German Empire) Commanders Napoleon III François Achille Bazaine Patrice de Mac-Mahon, duc de Magenta Otto von Bismarck Helmuth von Moltke the Elder Strength 400,000 at wars beginning 1,200,000 Casualties 150,000...

Contents

Biography

Maupassant was most likely born at the Château de Miromesnil, near Dieppe in the Seine-Inférieure (now Seine-Maritime) department. The Maupassants were an old Lorraine family who had settled in Normandy in the middle of the 18th century. In 1846 his father had married Laure Le Poittevin. With her brother Alfred, she had been the playmate of the novelist Gustave Flaubert, who was destined to have a guiding influence on her son's life. She was a woman of no common literary accomplishments, very fond of the classics, especially Shakespeare. After separating from her husband, Le Poittevin kept her two sons, the elder Guy and younger Hervé. A château ( French for castle; plural châteaux) is a manor house or residence of the lord of the manor or a country house of gentry, usually French, with or without fortifications. ... Dieppe is a town and commune in the Seine-Maritime département of Haute-Normandie (eastern Normandy), France. ... Seine-Maritime is a French département in Normandy. ... Seine-Maritime is a French département in Normandy. ... Lorraine coat of arms location of the Lorraine province Lorraine (French: Lorraine; German: Lothringen) is a historical area in present-day northeast France. ... For other uses, see Normandy (disambiguation). ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Gustave Flaubert Gustave Flaubert (December 12, 1821 – May 8, 1880) was a French writer who is counted among the greatest Western novelists. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Until the age of thirteen, Guy happily lived with his mother at Étretat, in the Villa des Verguies, where between the sea and the luxuriant countryside, he grew very fond of fishing and outdoor activities; he went fishing with the fishermen off the coast and spoke Norman with the peasants. At the age of 14 he ate roast monkey with Algernon Charles Swinburne, the famous poet. He was deeply devoted to his mother. As he entered junior high school, he met the great author Gustave Flaubert. Cliff and natural arch in Étretat Étretat is a commune of the Seine-Maritime département in France. ... Norman is a Romance language and one of the Oïl languages. ... Algernon Swinburne, detail of his portrait by Rossetti Algernon Charles Swinburne (April 5, 1837 – April 10, 1909) was a Victorian era English poet. ... Gustave Flaubert Gustave Flaubert (December 12, 1821 – May 8, 1880) was a French writer who is counted among the greatest Western novelists. ...


He first entered a seminary at Yvetot, but deliberately got himself expelled. From his early education he retained a marked hostility to religion. Then he was sent to the Rouen Lycée, where he proved a good scholar indulging in poetry and taking a prominent part in theatricals. For the Ecuadorian artist, see Manuel Rendón Seminario. ... Yvetot is a town and commune of the Seine-Maritime département. ... In France, secondary education is divided into two schools: the collège (IPA: ) (somewhat comparable to U.S. junior high school) for the first four years directly following primary school; the lycée (IPA: ) (comparable to a U.S. high school) for the next three years. ...


The Franco-Prussian War broke out soon after his graduation from college in 1870; he enlisted as a volunteer and fought bravely. Combatants Second French Empire North German Confederation allied with South German states (later German Empire) Commanders Napoleon III François Achille Bazaine Patrice de Mac-Mahon, duc de Magenta Otto von Bismarck Helmuth von Moltke the Elder Strength 400,000 at wars beginning 1,200,000 Casualties 150,000... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


After the war, in 1871, he left Normandy and came to Paris where he spent ten years as a clerk in the Navy Department. During these ten tedious years his only recreation and relaxation was canoeing on the Seine on Sundays and holidays. 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the capital of France. ... This article is about the river in France. ...


Gustave Flaubert took him under his protection and acted as a kind of literary guardian to him, guiding his debut in journalism and literature. At Flaubert's home he met Émile Zola and the Russian novelist Ivan Turgenev, as well as many of the protagonists of the realist and naturalist schools. He wrote a considerable amount of verse and short plays. Gustave Flaubert Gustave Flaubert (December 12, 1821 – May 8, 1880) was a French writer who is counted among the greatest Western novelists. ... Émile Zola (IPA: ) (2 April 1840 – 29 September 1902) was an influential French writer, the most important example of the literary school of naturalism, and a major figure in the political liberalization of France and in the exoneration of the falsely accused and convicted Army officer Alfred Dreyfus. ... Ivan Turgenev, photo by Félix Nadar (1820-1910) “Turgenev” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Realism (disambiguation). ... Naturalism is a movement in theater, film, and literature that seeks to replicate a believable everyday reality, as opposed to such movements as Romanticism or Surrealism, in which subjects may receive highly symbolic, idealistic, or even supernatural treatment. ...


In 1878 he was transferred to the Ministry of Public Instruction and became a contributing editor of several leading newspapers such as Le Figaro, Gil Blas, Le Gaulois and l'Echo de Paris. He devoted his spare time to writing novels and short stories. 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Le Figaro (English: ) is one of the leading French morning daily newspapers. ... Le Gaulois was a French daily newspaper, founded in 1868 by Edmond Tarbe and Henri de Pene. ...


In 1880 he published his first masterpiece, "Boule de Suif", which met with an instant and tremendous success. Flaubert characterized it as "a masterpiece that will endure." This was Maupassant's first piece of short fiction set during the Franco-Prussian War, and was followed by short stories such as "Deux Amis," "Mother Savage," and "Mademoiselle Fifi." Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Boule de Suif is a short story by the late-19th century French writer Guy de Maupassant. ... Combatants Second French Empire North German Confederation allied with South German states (later German Empire) Commanders Napoleon III François Achille Bazaine Patrice de Mac-Mahon, duc de Magenta Otto von Bismarck Helmuth von Moltke the Elder Strength 400,000 at wars beginning 1,200,000 Casualties 150,000... Deux Amis or Two Friends is a short story by French author Guy de Maupassant, published in 1882. ... Mademoiselle Fifi can refer to: Mademoiselle Fifi (book) - by Guy de Maupassant Mademoiselle Fifi (Cui) - an opera by César Cui Mademoiselle Fifi (film) - a 1944 film This is a disambiguation page—a list of articles associated with the same title. ...


The decade from 1880 to 1891 was the most fertile period of Maupassant's life. Made famous by his first short story, he worked methodically and produced two or sometimes four volumes annually. He combined talent and practical business sense, which made him wealthy. Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


In 1881 he published his first volume of short stories under the title of La Maison Tellier; it reached its twelfth edition within two years; in 1883 he finished his first novel, Une Vie (translated into English as A Woman's Life), 25,000 copies of which were sold in less than a year. In his novels, he concentrated all his observations scattered in his short stories. His second novel Bel-Ami, which came out in 1885, had thirty-seven printings in four months. Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Bel Ami, published in 1885, was French author Guy de Maupassants second novel. ... Year 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


His editor, Havard, commissioned him to write new masterpieces and Maupassant continued to produce them without the slightest apparent effort. At this time he wrote what many consider to be his greatest novel, Pierre et Jean. Pierre et Jean is a naturalist (or psycho-realist) work, written by Guy de Maupassant in 1887. ...


With a natural aversion to society, he loved retirement, solitude, and meditation. He traveled extensively in Algeria, Italy, England, Brittany, Sicily, Auvergne, and from each voyage he brought back a new volume. He cruised on his private yacht "Bel-Ami," named after his earlier novel. This feverish life did not prevent him from making friends among the literary celebrities of his day: Alexandre Dumas, fils had a paternal affection for him; at Aix-les-Bains he met Hippolyte Taine and fell under the spell of the philosopher-historian. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the historical kingdom, duchy and French province, as well as one of the Celtic nations. ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Auvergne coat of arms Auvergne (Occitan: Auvèrnhe/Auvèrnha) was the name of an historically independent county in the center of France, as well as later a province of France. ... Alexandre Dumas, fils (July 27, 1824 – November 27, 1895) was the son of Alexandre Dumas, père, who followed in his fathers footsteps becoming a celebrated author and playwright. ... Aix-les-Bains is a spa town of eastern France, near the Lac du Bourget, and 9 m. ... Portrait of Hippolyte Taine on French postage stamp of 1966 Hippolyte Adolphe Taine (April 21, 1828 - March 5, 1893) was a French critic and historian. ...


Flaubert continued to act as his literary godfather. His friendship with the Goncourts was of short duration; his frank and practical nature reacted against the ambience of gossip, scandal, duplicity, and invidious criticism that the two brothers had created around them in the guise of an 18th-century style salon. Edmond de Goncourt (May 26, 1822 – July 16, 1896), writer, critic, book publisher and the founder of the Académie Goncourt. ...


Maupassant was but one of a fair number of 19th-century Parisians who did not care for the Eiffel tower; indeed, he often ate lunch in the restaurant at its base, not out of any preference for the food, but because it was only there that he could avoid seeing its otherwise unavoidable profile.[1] Moreover, he and forty-six other Parisian literary and artistic notables attached their names to letter of protest, ornate as it was irate, against the tower's construction to the then-Minister of Public Works.[2] The Eiffel Tower (French: , ) is an iron tower built on the Champ de Mars beside the Seine River in Paris. ... For other uses, see Restaurant (disambiguation). ...


In his later years he developed a constant desire for solitude, an obsession for self-preservation, and a fear of death and crazed paranoia of persecution, that came from the syphilis he had contracted in his early days. He was considered insane in 1891 and died two years later, a month short of his 43rd birthday, on July 6, 1893. Syphilis is a curable sexually transmitted disease caused by the Treponema pallidum spirochete. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Guy De Maupassant penned his own epitaph: "I have coveted everything and taken pleasure in nothing."


Guy de Maupassant is buried in the Cimetière du Montparnasse, Paris. The Cimetière du Montparnasse is a famous cemetery in the Montparnasse quarter of Paris, France. ... This article is about the capital of France. ...


Significance

Maupassant is one of the fathers of the modern short story. He delighted in clever plotting, and served as a model for Somerset Maugham and O. Henry in this respect. His stories about real or fake jewels ("La Parure", "Les Bijoux") are imitated with a twist by Maugham ("Mr Know-All", "A String of Beads") and Henry James. W. Somerset Maugham as photographed in 1934 by Carl Van Vechten. ... Not to be confused with Oh Henry!. O. Henry is the pen name of American writer William Sydney Porter (September 11, 1862 – June 5, 1910). ... The Necklace or The Diamond Necklace (French: La Parure) is a short story by Guy de Maupassant, first published in 1884 in the French newspaper Le Gaulois. ... For other uses of this name, see Henry James (disambiguation). ...


Taking his cue from Balzac, Maupassant wrote comfortably in both the high-Realist and fantastic modes; stories and novels such as "L'Héritage" and Bel-Ami aim to recreate Third Republic France in a realistic way, whereas many of the short stories (notably "Le Horla", cited as an inspiration for H. P. Lovecraft's "The Call of Cthulhu", and "Qui sait?") describe apparently supernatural phenomena. Honoré de Balzac Honoré de Balzac (May 20, 1799 - August 18, 1850), was a French novelist. ... Realism in the visual arts and literature is the depiction of subjects as they appear in everyday life, without embellishment or interpretation. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... Motto Liberté, égalité, fraternité (Liberty, equality, brotherhood) Anthem La Marseillaise The French Third Republic, pre-World War I Capital Paris Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism, protestantism and judaism official religions (until 1905), None (from 1905 until 1940) (Law on the separation of Church and State of 1905) Government Republic... The Horla (Le Horla) is a horror short story by French writer Guy de Maupassant. ... This article is about the author. ... Cthulhu with the insane city Rlyeh in the background. ...


The supernatural in Maupassant, however, is often implicitly a symptom of the protagonists' troubled minds; Maupassant was fascinated by the burgeoning discipline of psychiatry, and attended the public lectures of Jean-Martin Charcot between 1885 and 1886 (see Pierre Bayard, Maupassant, juste avant Freud (Paris: Minuit, 1998). This interest is reflected in his fiction. An MRI scan of a human brain and head. ... Categories: People stubs | French physicians | 1825 births | 1893 deaths | History of medicine ...


Bibliography

Novels

  • Une vie (1883)
  • Bel-Ami (1885)
  • Mont-Oriol (1887)
  • Pierre et Jean (1888)
  • Fort comme la mort (1889)
  • Notre Coeur (1890)

Bel Ami, published in 1885, was French author Guy de Maupassants second novel. ... Pierre et Jean is a naturalist (or psycho-realist) work, written by Guy de Maupassant in 1887. ...

Short story collections

  • "Les Soirées de Médan" (with Zola, Huysmans et al. Contains Boule de Suif" by Maupassant) (1880)
  • "La Maison Tellier" (1881)
  • "Mademoiselle Fifi" (1882)
  • "Contes de la bécasse" (1883)
  • "Miss Harriet" (1884)
  • "Les Soeurs Rondoli" (1884)
  • "Clair de lune" (1884) (contains "Les Bijoux")
  • "Yvette" (1884)
  • "Toine" (1885)
  • "Contes du jour et de la nuit" (1885) (contains "La Parure" or "The Necklace")
  • "Monsieur Parent" (1886)
  • "La petite Roque" (1886)
  • "Le Horla" (1887)
  • "Le Rosier de Madame Husson" (1888)
  • "La Main gauche" (1889)
  • "L'Inutile Beauté" (1890)

Les Soirées de Médan (Evenings at Médan) is a collection of six short stories by six different writers associated with Naturalism, first published in 1880. ... Boule de Suif is a short story by the late-19th century French writer Guy de Maupassant. ... La Maison Tellier may refer to: La Maison Tellier, a novel by Guy de Maupassant, published in 1881. ... Clair de Lune (Moonlight in French) is the name of various works in various fields of the arts. ... Les Bijoux is a Korean manhwa that is written by Jo Eun-Ha and illustrated by Park Sang-Sun. ... Yvette is a river in Île-de-France (France). ... The Necklace or The Diamond Necklace (original title: La Parure) is a short story by Guy de Maupassant, first published in 1884 in the French newspaper Le Gaulois. ... The Horla (Le Horla) is a horror short story by French writer Guy de Maupassant. ...

Travel writing

  • "Au soleil" (1884)
  • "Sur l'eau" (1888)
  • "La Vie errante" (1890)

Poetry

  • "Des Vers" (1880)

References

  1. ^ Barthes, Roland. The Eiffel Tower and Other Mythologies. Tr. Howard, Richard. Berkeley:University of California Press. ISBN 978-0520209824. Page 1.
  2. ^ Harriss, Joseph. The Tallest Tower. Unlimited Publishing LLC, 2004. ISBN 1588321029. Pages 15, 16.

External links

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Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Guy de Maupassant - MSN Encarta (810 words)
Soon Maupassant was a member of the naturalist group, and his story “Boule de suif” (“Ball of Fat”) was published in their Les Soirées de Médan (The Parties at Medan, 1880), a collection of stories about the Franco-Prussian War.
Maupassant became an overnight celebrity and soon was surpassed only by Zola as the best-selling author in France.
Thus in “Boule de suif,” a prostitute and the middle-class travelers who accompany her in a coach are caught by invading Prussians.
Guy de Maupassant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1103 words)
Maupassant was born at the Château de Miromesnil, near Dieppe in the Seine-Maritime department.
Until he was thirteen years old Guy lived with his mother at Étretat, in the Villa des Verguies, where between the sea and the luxuriant countryside, he grew very fond of nature and outdoor sports; he went fishing with the fishermen off the coast and spoke Norman with the peasants.
Guy de Maupassant is buried in the Cimetière du Montparnasse, Paris.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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