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Encyclopedia > Guy Gardner (comics)
Green Lantern


Guy Gardner as seen in Green Lantern Rebirth #2.
Art by Ethan Van Sciver. Image File history File links Mergefrom. ... The many incarnations of the DC Comics superhero Green Lantern have had many alternate versions of themselves. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Guy_gardner_rebirth. ... Cover to Green Lantern: Rebirth #5 as drawn by Van Sciver. ...

Publisher DC Comics
First appearance Green Lantern (vol. 2) # 59
(March 1968)
Created by John Broome
Gil Kane
Characteristics
Alter ego Guy Gardner
Species Human/Vuldarian, from Earth
Team
affiliations
Green Lantern Corps
Justice League
Notable aliases Warrior
Abilities Power Ring

Guy Gardner is a fictional character, a comic book superhero published by DC Comics. He is a core member of the Green Lantern family of characters, and for a time (late 1980s and early 1990s) was also a significant member of the Justice League family of characters. He was created by John Broome and Gil Kane (who patterned him after actor Martin Milner [1]) in Green Lantern #59 (March 1968), although the character was changed significantly in the 1980s by Steve Englehart and Keith Giffen who turned him into a boorish, jingoistic parody of an ultra-macho "red-blooded American male." This remains the character's most recognized interpretation to date. The character was not named after the astronaut but after fan Guy H. Lillian III and writer Gardner Fox[1]. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... John Broome (aka: pen names John Osgood and Edgar Ray Meritt) was a writer-contributor to DC Comics. ... Showcase #22 (Oct. ... This article is about modern humans. ... Vuldarians are a fictional alien race from the DC Comics Universe. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... The fictional Green Lantern Corps is an intergalactic police force featured in DC Comics, particularly series featuring the superhero Green Lantern, Earth’s member of the group. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... The three of the four (Alan Scotts Starheart powered ring exlcuded) known variants of the power ring Zamaron (magenta), Oan (green), and Qwardian (yellow). ... Alice, a fictional character based on a real character from the work of Lewis Carroll. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... John Broome (aka: pen names John Osgood and Edgar Ray Meritt) was a writer-contributor to DC Comics. ... Showcase #22 (Oct. ... Martin Sam Milner (born December 28, 1931 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American actor best known for his performances in two popular television series, Adam-12 and Route 66. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... Steve Englehart (born April 22, 1947, Indianapolis, Indiana) is an American comic book writer best known for his work for Marvel Comics and DC Comics, particularly in the 1970s. ... Keith Ian Giffen (born November 30, 1952) is an American artist, writer, and penciller of comic books. ... Ten Thousand Miles From Tip to Tip, an 1898 political cartoon depicting the extension of the United States dominion Jingoism is chauvinistic patriotism, usually associated with a War Hawk political stance. ... Guy Gardner (born January 6, 1948) is a United States astronaut. ... Guy H. Lillian III is a science fiction fanzine publisher notable for having been twice nominated for a Hugo Award as best fan writer and having had a row of 8 nominations (without winning; which though hardly unique in the field of Hugo Awards, clearly makes him notable) for best... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. ...


Out of the current 7200 Green Lanterns, Guy is Lantern Number One of the Green Lantern Honor Guard. His sector designation is 2814.3, though he is currently on detached service.

Contents

Character biography

Early life

Gardner's roots lie in Baltimore, where he was raised by his parents, Roland ("Rolly") Gardner and Peggy Gardner. Rolly was an abusive alcoholic who beat Gardner repeatedly. Gardner worked very hard in school to try to win his father's approval, yet all his achievements were dismissed out of hand. Instead, Rolly lavished attention and compliments upon Gardner's older brother Mace, who, it seemed to Gardner, could do no wrong in their father's eyes. Gardner's only escape at this time was General Glory comic books, even modeling his bowl haircut on Glory's sidekick, Ernie. Flag Seal Nickname: Monument City, Charm City, Mob Town, B-more Motto: Get In On It (formerly The City That Reads and The Greatest City in America; BELIEVE is not the official motto but rather a specific campaign) Location Location of Baltimore in Maryland Coordinates , Government Country State County United... Abuser redirects here. ... King Alcohol and his Prime Minister circa 1820 Alcoholism is the consumption of or preoccupation with alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the alcoholics normal personal, family, social, or work life. ... General Glory is the name of two DC Comics characters. ...


During his mid-teens, Gardner finally decided that nothing he ever did was going to be good enough to win his father's affection, and as a young boy became a juvenile delinquent. Gardner was straightened out from his downward spiral by his older brother, who had become a police officer. Mace's pressure and advice knocked some sense into Gardner, and Gardner then went to college, working his way through to support himself, and emerging from Michigan University with bachelor's degrees in education and psychology. One of his closest friends at U of M was John Henry Irons. During his time at Michigan University, he also became a nationally renowned football hero, but had to abandon that career due to injuries. Juvenile delinquency refers to criminal acts performed by juveniles. ... John Henry Irons is the third hero known as Steel, a fictional superhero in the DC Universe. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ...


After college, Gardner worked as a social welfare caseworker, dealing with prison inmates and their rehabilitation. He abandoned this line of work, however, fearing it brought out his innate more aggressive nature. Moving on, he became a teacher for children with disabilities. ...


Green Lantern Corps

Guy Gardner's first appearance in Green Lantern #59 (March, 1968).
Guy Gardner's first appearance in Green Lantern #59 (March, 1968).

When the alien Green Lantern Abin Sur crash landed on Earth after being mortally wounded by the villain Legion, he commanded his power ring to find a man honest and fearless enough to pass his power on to. The ring found two suitable candidates: Guy Gardner and Hal Jordan. Because Jordan was the closer of the two at the time (mostly due to a time-traveling Booster Gold convincing Guy to visit his dying father), he was chosen over Gardner as the one to receive the ring. Gardner was relegated to backup status should anything happen to Jordan. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (400x602, 68 KB) Summary Guy Gardners first appearance in Green Lantern #59 from March, 1968. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (400x602, 68 KB) Summary Guy Gardners first appearance in Green Lantern #59 from March, 1968. ... Abin Sur is a fictional character and a superhero from the DC Comics universe. ... Legion is a fictional supervillain in the DC Comics universe. ... A fictional artifact used in DC comic books See Green Lantern Corps All Green Lanterns wield a power ring that can generate a variety of effects and energy constructs, powered purely by the user thinking about it. ... Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... Booster Gold is a fictional character, a superhero in publications from DC Comics. ...


Jordan later became aware of Guy's status as his backup, and went out of his way to set up a chance meeting with Gardner and the two became friends, with Gardner originally naive to Jordan's secret identity, but eventually assisting Jordan during his adventures.


During an earthquake, Gardner was seriously injured in his capacity as a physical education teacher, hit by a bus while attempting to rescue one of his students. Gardner surprised everyone, however, by recuperating from this debilitating injury, which was credited greatly to his already excellent physical fitness level.


Eventually Gardner was trapped in the Phantom Zone after Hal Jordan's Green Lantern Power Battery exploded in his face during a period where Gardner was acting as his backup. Jordan, believing Guy dead, began a relationship with Guy's then girlfriend Kari Limbo, who herself turned to Jordan for consolation. Eventually, this relationship went as far as a wedding, which Guy managed to interrupt by somehow contacting Kari telepathically. This alerted both Superman and Jordan to his whereabouts. The Phantom Zone is a fictional prison dimension featured in the Superman comic books and related media. ...


Unfortunately, the explosion, subsequent torture at the hands of residents of the Phantom Zone, and witnessing his friend Hal Jordan steal his girlfriend had caused Gardner's already fragile mind to twist even further, Gardner was rescued from the Phantom Zone, but suffered brain damage and was rendered comatose for a number of years. As a result, the Guardians instead recruited John Stewart to be Jordan's new backup Lantern. Brain damage or brain injury is the destruction or degeneration of brain cells. ... For other uses, see Coma (disambiguation). ... The Guardians of the Universe are fictional characters in the DC Comics universe. ... John Stewart is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC Universe, and a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps. ...

"The last true Green Lantern." Drawn by Kevin Maguire.

Several years later, during the Crisis on Infinite Earths, the Guardians of the Universe split into two factions over how to confront the Crisis. A minority faction of six Guardians decided to emulate their former brethren, the Controllers by recruiting a Green Lantern to directly attack and destroy the forces of the anti-matter universe. For unknown reasons, they chose Gardner as their Green Lantern. Gardner was revived by the renegade Guardians, given a power ring not tied to the Central Power Battery on Oa, and given a mission to recruit and command the deadliest most powerful criminals in the universe to launch a strike against the home base of the Anti-Monitor. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... The Defenders, as drawn by Maguire Kevin Maguire (born 1960) is an American comic book artist and penciller, best known for his work on the Justice League series in the late 1980s for DC Comics. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... The Guardians of the Universe are fictional characters in the DC Comics universe. ... The Controllers are a fictional extraterrestrial race existing in the DC Universe. ... Antimatter is matter that is composed of the antiparticles of those that constitute normal matter. ... For other uses, see Universe (disambiguation). ... The Anti-Monitor is a fictional comic book supervillain, the antagonist of the 1985 DC Comics miniseries Crisis on Infinite Earths. ...


Guy believed himself to be "the last true Green Lantern" and the superior of all other GLs, particularly Jordan.


Gardner's brain damage manifested itself in the form of an arrogant, violent, unstable, and often childish new personality. Five of the six renegade Guardians were slain by a wave of anti-matter. (the sixth eventually reconciled with the rest of the Guardians) In the meantime, Gardner succeeded in his task of recruiting powerful villains, his new personality frightening even Hector Hammond and The Shark into obedience. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Shark is the name of 3 DC Comics characters. ...


The mission failed, however, after both Hal Jordan and John Stewart had stopped Gardner from finishing his mission, which would have made things worse and ultimately ended up in the universe being destroyed.


Following the Crisis Guy was placed under the care of the Guardian turned mortal, Appa Ali Apsa (who later went on to become the Mad Guardian) for training and to temper his mind. Guy, believing himself to be the last true Green Lantern, resented this, and frequently escaped to Earth to cause trouble for the Green Lanterns there. After the Guardians' departure from Oa, Guy was one of the last Green Lanterns remaining with a working power ring. Eventually Hal Jordan took responsibility for Guy, and Guy was free to do as he pleased on Earth. Appa Ali Apsa is a fictional character from DC Comics. ...

Guy Gardner, Justice League member.
Guy Gardner, Justice League member.

During his tenure as Earth's Green Lantern, Gardner became a founding member of the Justice League International after the original JLA disbanded during the DC Universe-wide crossover, Legends. In a famous sequence, Gardner challenged Batman's position as League chairman; Stating he didn't need his power ring to deal with Batman, he removed his ring and prepared to strike, however Batman, annoyed by Gardner's taunts, quickly punched him in the face and knocked him out with a single blow. This became a long standing joke and method of controlling Gardner's ego, as all his Justice League teammates were more than happy to use it against him when necessary. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 394 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (526 × 800 pixel, file size: 135 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The team of the 1980s Justice League revamp. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 394 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (526 × 800 pixel, file size: 135 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The team of the 1980s Justice League revamp. ... Built in the 1987 company-wide crossover limited series, Legends, this new Justice League was given a less America-centric mandate than before, and was dubbed the Justice League International (or JLI for short). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... Legends was a six issue comic book limited series published in 1986-1987 by DC Comics, which had plot threads running through several other DC comic titles, crossing over into them (each individual crossover/tie-in had a Legends Chapter # header on the cover). ... A fictional artifact used in DC comic books See Green Lantern Corps All Green Lanterns wield a power ring that can generate a variety of effects and energy constructs, powered purely by the user thinking about it. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ...


A recurring joke involved Gardner trying to assume the leadership of the Justice League only to be passed over in favor of another character. His longtime rivalry with Hal Jordan is also a recurrent theme. Gardner's subsequent annoyance with Batman has also spilled over into a general, ultimately good natured, Green Lantern/Batman feud. Gardner will go out of his way to deride and ridicule Batman, even mooning him from space. Mooning is the act of displaying ones bare buttocks by removing clothing, e. ...


During his Justice League tenure, Gardner's personality would fluctuate greatly as a result of a blow to the head, and for a while he became the polar opposite of his normal self: kind, loving, generous, boyishly innocent, and politically correct to a fault. It became a running gag with the writers; one sequence shows him hitting his head on the underside of a table, regaining his old persona, and then hitting his head a second time as he stands up and reverting back again. He also started an on-again, off-again relationship with the superheroine Ice, their dates being some of the most memorable of the series. The relationship presumably ended with her death at the hands of the Overmaster. It is shown in his own series that Guy had actually taken the time to learn some rudimentary Norwegian. Political correctness is the alteration of language to redress real or alleged injustices and discrimination or to avoid offense. ... Ice (Tora Olafsdotter) is a fictional character, a superheroine in publications from DC Comics. ... Overmaster is the name of a DC Comics supervillain. ...


Guy Gardner Reborn

Guy Gardner with his yellow power ring.
Guy Gardner with his yellow power ring.

Eventually, forced to forfeit his Green Lantern ring after a grudge fight with Jordan, Gardner set out on a quest to regain his power and identity. After tricking Lobo into assisting him, they first invaded Qward, then with the armies of Qward to Oa, where Gardner acquired the yellow power ring of Sinestro from Oa's Crypt of the Green Lantern Corps (Guy Gardner Reborn #1–3), and his own comic series began with him using that ring. The yellow ring didn't use a battery to recharge, instead needing to be used against Green Lanterns' power rings to restore its power, which Gardner discovered by accident when a member of the Corps fought him while his ring was powerless. Image File history File links Guy_gardner_1. ... Image File history File links Guy_gardner_1. ... Lobo is a DC Comics antihero. ... Qward is a fictional world existing within an antimatter universe that is part of the DC Comics universe. ... Sinestro is a fictional alien supervillain in the DC Comics Universe. ...


As the yellow ring of Sinestro spoke Sinestro's native language (Korugarian) Gardner was unable to communicate with the ring, which was a recurring joke in the series, though it seemed to somehow understand him, translating alien languages into English.


Unfortunately for Gardner, the finicky ring frequently cut out on him when he needed it, forcing him to rely on his mind to get out of scrapes. During this period, Guy managed to stop a mysterious alien hive mind known as the draal from taking over the Green Lantern corps by creating clones of various members. Unfortunately, the process of cloning him forced him to relive his life. Gardner managed to taint this process by planting false memories into the clone. Strangely, after this process was complete, Gardner's personality seemed more subdued and evidence of his original personality came through. Guy ended up stopping the clone, but had only worn the yellow ring for a short while before it was destroyed and absorbed by Hal Jordan, who had become infected by the entity known as Parallax, during the Emerald Twilight storyline. Parallax is a fictional character, a supervillain from DC Comics. ... Emerald Twilight is the name for the story that was detailed in Green Lantern Vol. ...


In the JLA Classified-based miniseries "I Can't Believe It's Not The Justice League", Guy assisted the Super Buddies and was revealed to have kept his yellow ring which created some difficulties, due to the conflict with Gardner having no ring in Green Lantern: Rebirth. The Justice League of America, featuring the Flash, Superman, Aquaman, Batman, Wonder Woman, the Martian Manhunter, and Green Lantern. ... The Super Buddies are a team of comic book superheroes in the DC Comics universe who appeared in the six-issue Formerly Known as the Justice League miniseries in 2003, and its 2005 sequel, I Cant Believe Its Not the Justice League (published in JLA Classified). ...


Warrior years

When Hal Jordan, under the influence of Parallax, destroyed the Green Lantern Corps and becomes Parallax, Guy Gardner led a group of heroes to Oa to find out what had happened. In battling Parallax, Guy Gardner's ring is destroyed and he was forced to find an alternate means to acquire power. Parallax is a fictional character, a supervillain from DC Comics. ...


On Earth, Ganthet first came to Guy Gardner to offer him the last Green Lantern power ring. When Gardner refused, Ganthet decided to entrust it to Kyle Rayner. (Green Lantern: Secret Files & Origins #1) Ganthet is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ...

Warrior: the last Vuldarian.

On an expedition to the Amazon with a rich entrepreneur, Gardner finds a chalice in a cave. He drinks from it, and becomes Warrior. Gardner discovers that his past was not what he thought it was. He is apparently the descendant of a space-traveling race called the Vuldarians. This discovery eventually leads him to discover new powers within himself. These powers allow him to resume his role as a superhero. He also establishes a superhero theme bar called Warrior's as both a source of income and a base between his adventures. Image File history File linksMetadata Guy_gardner_warrior_44. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Guy_gardner_warrior_44. ... Map of the Amazon rainforest ecoregions as delineated by the WWF. Yellow line encloses the Amazon rainforest. ... Chalice For other uses, see Chalice A chalice (from Latin calix, cup) is a goblet intended to hold drink. ... Vuldarians are a fictional alien race from the DC Comics Universe. ...


His early days as Warrior saw him struggling with his newfound powers. He had difficulty changing his body into any weapon, and his transformations often caused him pain. After a breakdown that led to a confrontation with Superman and Supergirl, with some soul-searching help from his supposed ancestor, Gardner was finally able to use his new powers to form most non-energy-based weapon from his body, as well as absorb some forms of energy and redirect them through his various 'weapons'. Another ability, his capability to use the knowledge of warriors from across space and time, was rarely used and mostly forgotten. Matrix is the name of two female superheroes published by DC Comics. ...


It is during this time that Gardner fought against Dementor, also claimed to be a product of Vuldarian breeding. Dementor's father had raped a Vuldarian woman. Dementor was eventually sent to Hell, where he eventually revealed that he was the one responsible for Gardner's constant personality shifts (in a sense, retconning Gardner's history, explaining why his personality changed drastically over the years). In the last issues he finally dealt with his "family", as well as revealing another side of his Vuldarian powers, the ability to heal mortal wounds. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


After the "Warrior" series was cancelled, Gardner continued to appear in the DC Universe; most notably as a recurring character in the Green Lantern book during Kyle Rayner's run. It was thought he was killed during the Our Worlds At War crossover. However, he was later discovered to be trapped in a pocket of Hell in General Zod's country of Pokolistan. After freeing himself, his Warrior powers were apparently enhanced. He declared it his job to do less ethical things heroes like Superman couldn't. However, this new direction was short lived. Cover to JLA: Our Worlds at War #1. ... For other uses, see Hell (disambiguation). ... General Zod is a fictional comic book supervillain who is an enemy of Superman. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ...


Return to the Corps

Guy Gardner, being recalled to Oa to help rebuild the Green Lantern Corps.
Guy Gardner, being recalled to Oa to help rebuild the Green Lantern Corps.

During the 2005 miniseries Green Lantern: Rebirth, Gardner's Vuldarian DNA is strangely overwritten by his human DNA when Parallax possesses Gardner and several Green Lanterns. Hal Jordan's ring splits in two and Gardner's ring is restored to him. Eventually, Parallax is defeated by the combined effort of all five active Green Lanterns, including Gardner. The Guardians then select Gardner as one of the senior officers of the new Green Lantern Corps. Image File history File links GL_guy_bg. ... Image File history File links GL_guy_bg. ... A miniseries (sometimes mini-series), in a serial storytelling medium, is a production which tells a story in a limited number of episodes. ... The structure of part of a DNA double helix Deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, is a nucleic acid molecule that contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms. ... Parallax is a fictional character, a supervillain from DC Comics. ...


In the 2005–2006 miniseries Green Lantern Corps: Recharge (written by Dave Gibbons), the Guardians assign Gardner to be one of the Corps' three main instructors, along with Kilowog and Kyle Rayner. The trio is responsible for the training of the new Corps, to which the Guardians intend to name 7,200 members. Gardner is not at all appreciative of his new role, and when he complains to the Guardians, they tell him that success in training new recruits could lead to him being given a new position. Dave Gibbons (born April 14, 1949) is a British writer and artist of comics. ... Kilowog is a fictional superhero from DC Comics, and a member of the Green Lantern Corps. ...


Gardner plays a significant role in defeating the Spider Guild attack on Oa in the 2005–2006 miniseries Green Lantern Corps: Recharge. Discovering that trainee Soranik Natu has disappeared into the forbidden Vega star system, which the Guardians' pact with the Psions of Vega forbids Green Lanterns from entering, Gardner and Kyle Rayner lead a rescue mission in direct violation of Oan policy. Once there, the Lanterns discover the Spider Guild Nest and determine that its next target is the Oan sun. Returning just as the attack commences, Gardner gathers the frightened trainee Green Lanterns and rallies them with a speech that impresses even his long time rival, Hal Jordan. Gardner's performance in repelling the attack results in his promotion to Lantern #1 of the Green Lantern Honor Guard, a position of authority over other Lanterns. In this new role, Gardner is expected to "think outside the box" and "do the jobs other Lanterns can't", a function well-suited to his irascible personality. Soranik Natu is a fictional character, a superhero who is an extraterrestrial from the planet Korugar and a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps. ... Psions are a fictional alien species in the pages of DC Comics. ...


In his new role as Lantern #1, Guy leads the Corps in the defense of Oa against Superboy-Prime, creating a wall of energy to slow the rampaging teen and calling a "code 54", authorizing the use of extreme force. Guy supervises the final capture and imprisonment of Superboy-Prime, locking him in a red Sun-Eater provided by Donna Troy and organizing a constant watch of fifty Lanterns to keep him imprisoned. Superboy-Prime is a fictional character, a superhero turned supervillain in the DC Universe. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Donna Troy is a fictional character, a superheroine in the DC Universe. ...

Guy Gardner enjoying shore leave.
Guy Gardner enjoying shore leave.

After serving for one year following the assaults of Superboy-Prime and the Spider Guild, then assisting lantern Soranik Natu on a dangerous mission, Guy was finally granted shore leave. (Though he is infrequently seen on Earth in the 52 weekly limited series, it should be assumed he has sneaked away from the Guardian's watch) Unfortunately, his relaxation was cut short when he was tracked down by Bolphunga the Unrelenting and forced to defend himself without the aid of his ring. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (535x771, 269 KB) The cover to Green Lantern Corps #4 by Dave Gibbons and Moose Baumann. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (535x771, 269 KB) The cover to Green Lantern Corps #4 by Dave Gibbons and Moose Baumann. ... Superboy-Prime is a fictional character, a superhero turned supervillain in the DC Universe. ... Soranik Natu is a fictional character, a superhero who is an extraterrestrial from the planet Korugar and a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps. ... 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ...


Around the same time, Guy assisted Hal Jordan on an unsanctioned mission to the Manhunter homeworld, Biot. Through Hal and Guy's efforts, several long-lost lanterns (including Arisia, Chaselon, Jack T. Chance, Graf Toren, Hannu, KE'Haan, Laira, and Boodikka) were freed from imprisonment by the Cyborg Superman. Upon returning from the mission, Guy was punished by the Guardians and forced to endure one month as one of the fifty Lanterns on "Prime Duty." This entails guarding Superboy-Prime's special cell with "...no reading, no eating, no talking, no ring messaging, no Sudoku, no yelling, no chewing gum... and no drinking." While on guard, Guy's ring will even take care of his necessary sustenance and waste removal. Lanterns of the Honor Guard, like Guy, are allowed to break the rules three times before expulsion. Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... Arisia is a fictional character featured in comic books published by DC Comics. ... The Green Lantern Corps has at least 7200 members, two per sector (previously 3600, one per sector) however more than two per sector can happen (i. ... Jack T. Chance is a fictional character featured in comic books published by DC Comics he is a Green Lantern from the world of Garnet also known as Hellhole. ... Graf Toren is a fictional character featured in comic books published by DC Comics. ... The Green Lantern Corps has at least 7200 members, two per sector (previously 3600, one per sector) however more than two per sector can happen (i. ... KeHaan was a Green Lantern from the world Varva. ... A Green Lantern from the world of Jayd History Laira was trained and recruited by her father to take over his role as a soldier of the Guardians of the Universe. ... Boodikka is a fictional character featured in comic books published by DC Comics. ... |caption=Cover to Superman (vol. ... This article is about the logic puzzle. ...


According to Green Lantern writer Geoff Johns in a recent Newsarama interview, Prime won't be escaping under Guy's watch. "Not at all. That’s ridiculous. Anyone who’s read Guy Gardner for the last two years in Green Lantern or in [Green Lantern] Corps knows that he’s a much better, stronger character than that. And even in the old Giffen stuff, he would probably break some rules, taunt the other heroes, and drink a beer or two, but he wouldn’t be that much of an idiot. He was never that much of an idiot, and certainly not with what I’m doing with him, or with what Dave Gibbons is doing with him in Corps. He has his moments, and he’s a really fun character, but he’s definitely not going to be a moron. His role is not DCU Moron. His role is DCU Shitkicker."[2] Johns has also likened Gardner to Denis Leary. Geoff Johns (born 25 January 1973 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American comic book writer, best known for his work for DC Comics. ... Newsarama. ... Denis Leary (born Denis Colin Leary on August 18, 1957) is a Golden Globe and Emmy Award-nominated American actor, comedian, writer and director. ...


After this, Guy was briefly part of the Corps' black-ops division. Dubbed "The Corpse", members foresake their rings for stealthier powers provided by the Guardians. Guy took part in one mission as part of this secretive unit. He was tasked with locating Von Daggle, a Durlan who was formerly in charge of the Corpse. Gardner relayed a message from the Guardians, informing Daggle that he was reinstated. From there, Daggle took command of Gardner, leading him to the homeworld of the Dominators, a race of superscientists with a grudge against Earth. Together, they defeated a super-evolved Dominator, though the Corpse's use of lethal force did not sit well with Guy. Gardner informed Daggle that he couldn't be a part of his crew and Daggle wiped his memory, musing that "humans never make the cut." The fictional Green Lantern Corps is an intergalactic police force featured in DC Comics, particularly series featuring the superhero Green Lantern, Earth’s member of the group. ... The Durlans are a fictional race of shapeshifting beings from the planet Durla, as depicted in DC Comics. ... In the DC Universe, the Dominators are a fictional alien race. ...


Sinestro Corps War

In the storyline Sinestro Corps War, Superboy-Prime and Cyborg Superman escape imprisonment when the Sinestro Corps attacks Oa, killing the guards on Prime Duty. Guy, along with fellow Green Lanterns Hal Jordan and John Stewart are captured by Parallax during battle and brought to Qward. Guy and John Stewart are then held prisoner by Lyssa Drak who forces them to relive tragedies in their lives. Hal manages to defeat Lyssa and free Guy and John from their nightmare. In the skirmish following their escape. Parallax nearly breaks Gardner's neck. Meanwhile, the Lost Lanterns recover Ion from the leader of the Sinestro Corps, the Anti-Monitor. Guy, Hal, and John then return to the positive matter universe, only to find Earth under siege by a truly massive and fast-approaching battalion of Sinestro corpsmen. The Sinestro Corps War is an ongoing comic book storyline across DC Comics Green Lantern and Green Lantern Corps titles. ... The Sinestro Corps is a group of fictional characters, a villainous analogue to the Green Lantern Corps in the DC Universe led by the supervillain Sinestro. ... Parallax is a fictional character, a supervillain from DC Comics. ... John Stewart is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC Universe, and a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps. ... Lyssa Drak is a fictional alien supervillain in the DC Comics Universe. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... The Anti-Monitor is a fictional comic book supervillain, the antagonist of the 1985 DC Comics miniseries Crisis on Infinite Earths. ...


As the Sinestro Corps' attack gets underway, the Cyborg Superman and Superboy-Prime attack Superman, while Hal confronts Parallax just before he's about to kill Hal's family. In an attempt to free Kyle from the Parallax entity, John orders Guy to retrieve the painting Kyle mentioned just before his abduction. When Guy's flying over Mt. Rushmore on the way to pick up the painting, the Sinestro Corps ambushes him. Seconds later the Green Lantern Corps arrives for backup, their power rings now allowing them to utilize lethal force against the Sinestro corpsmen effectively saving Guy. Guy continues his mission and presents the painting to Parallax. Hal is able to use the painting and their combined willpower to help Kyle overcome his fears and expell Parallax. Parallax, now in his original insectoid form, is captured by former Guardians Ganthet and Sayd. Realizing the incredible strength of will displayed by each of earth's GLs, Parallax is split into four pieces and imprisoned within the power batteries of Hal, John, Guy, and Kyle. It's seen that each lantern is distinctive to its bearer and that Guy's lantern proudly sports a decal of his alma mater, University of Michigan. Ganthet gives Kyle a new power ring and asks him to become a Green Lantern again, to which he happily agrees. The story is ongoing. The faces of (left to right) George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln Air Force One flying over Mount Rushmore. ... Sayd is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ...


Powers and abilities

Power rings

Main article: Power ring (weapon)

Guy Gardner was trained to use a Green Lantern power ring, which is only limited by the user's will power. He later acquired Sinestro's Qwardian power ring, which was later revealed to be based on the bearer's control of fear. He used both for basic Lantern abilities including constructs, flight, and energy projection. In Green Lantern: Rebirth #6 it is mentioned that Guy Gardner's ring is constantly sparking with energy, as if unable to contain the power of his will. The three of the four (Alan Scotts Starheart powered ring exlcuded) known variants of the power ring Zamaron (magenta), Oan (green), and Qwardian (yellow). ... The three of the four (Alan Scotts Starheart powered ring exlcuded) known variants of the power ring Zamaron (magenta), Oan (green), and Qwardian (yellow). ...


Vuldarian powers

Guy's Vuldarian powers included limited shape-shifting abilities in which he could create weapons out of his body. At first, these transformations caused him pain and he was unable to shrink from his 7-foot height. During the return of Parallax, he suffered a meta-human power discharge and his Vuldarian abilities went into recession. Coincidentally, when he awoke he was near Hal Jordan's power ring which has the ability to duplicate itself. Gardner once more had a power ring, and following the return of the Guardians of the Universe, he was once again a Green Lantern.


Green Lantern (Tangent Comics)

Guy became the caretaker of this mystical artifact that survived the effects of the Infinite Crisis after it was discovered on New Earth by Kyle Rayner. It has the power to temporarily awaken the dead and has also served as a dimensional gateway. Tangent Comics was a DC Comics imprint created in 1997-1998, developed from ideas created by Dan Jurgens. ... Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ...


Other media

Matthew Settle as Capt. ... Keith Ian Giffen (born November 30, 1952) is an American artist, writer, and penciller of comic books. ... Justice League of America is an unsuccessful TV-pilot based on the characters of The Justice League. ... ... M*A*S*H is an American television series developed by Larry Gelbart, inspired by the 1968 novel M*A*S*H: A Novel About Three Army Doctors by Richard Hooker (penname for H. Richard Hornberger) and its sequels, but primarily by the 1970 film MASH, and influenced by the... This article contains a trivia section. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... Duck Dodgers was an American animated television series based on the classic cartoon short Duck Dodgers in the 24½th Century produced by Warner Bros. ...

Other Version

Main article: Alternate versions of Green Lantern

The many incarnations of the DC Comics superhero Green Lantern have had many alternate versions of themselves. ...

External links

References

  1. ^ http://www.silverbulletcomicbooks.com/bobro/102552572329705.htm
  2. ^ http://forum.newsarama.com/showthread.php?t=85371

  Results from FactBites:
 
Guy Gardner (5454 words)
Kari fainted at the alter, she was overcome by visions of Guy Gardner being blasted apart by the exploding battery.
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Gardner was one of many superheroes affected by the public's growing mistrust of their superhuman protectors.
Guy Gardner (comics) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2065 words)
However during an earthquake, Gardner is seriously injured in the disaster and the Guardians recruit John Stewart to be Jordan's new backup Lantern.
During his JL years, Gardner once again suffers a personality change as a result of a bump on the head, and for a while becomes a polar opposite of his normal self: kind, loving, generous, boyishly innocent, and politically correct to a fault.
Gardner is not at all appreciative of his new role, and when he complains to the Guardians, they tell him that success in training new recruits could lead to him being given a new position.
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