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Encyclopedia > Gustavus Adolphus College
Gustavus Adolphus College
Old Main at Gustavus Adolphus College

Motto: E Caelo Nobis Vires (Latin, "Our Strength Comes From Heaven")[1]
Established: 1862
Type: Private liberal arts
Endowment: $96.5 million
President: James L. Peterson
Faculty: 170 full-time, 94% tenure-track faculty. 13:1 student/faculty ratio. Average class size 17.
Students: Approximately 2,700
Location: St. Peter, Minnesota, U.S.
Campus: 340 acres
Colors: Black and Gold
Nickname: "Golden Gusties"
Mascot: Gustavus Lion
Affiliations: MIAC, ELCA
Website: gustavus.edu

Gustavus Adolphus College is a private liberal arts college of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America in St. Peter, Minnesota. Gustavus Adolphus College: Old Main File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... This article is about 1862 . ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... St. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... The Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (MIAC) is an College Athletic Conference which competes in the NCAAs Division III. As the name implies, member schools are located in the state of Minnesota; also, all of the member schools are private, with all but two having a religious affiliation. ... The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) is a mainline Protestant denomination headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) is a mainline Protestant denomination headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. ... St. ...

Contents

History

The college was founded in Red Wing, Minnesota by Eric Norelius in 1862 and was originally named Minnesota Elementar Skola (Elementary School in Swedish). The school was moved to East Union, MN the following year.[citation needed] In 1865 on the 1,000th year anniversary of the death of St. Ansgar, "the Apostle of the North", the college was renamed and incorporated as St. Ansgar's Academy. In May 1873, the college was again renamed and reincorporated as Gustavus Adolphus Literary and Theological Institute in honor of King Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden. On October 16, 1876, it opened as Gustavus Adolphus College in its new location in St. Peter, Minnesota. Gustavus is the oldest of several Lutheran colleges in Minnesota. It was founded as a college of the Augustana Evangelical Lutheran Church. In 1962 it became a college of the Lutheran Church in America, when the Augustana Synod merged into that body. The Lutheran Church in American merged in 1988 to create the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. Red Wing is a city in Goodhue County, Minnesota, United States. ... Eric Norelius (26 October 1833 – 15 March 1916), Swedish-American clergyman and writer. ... Ansgar, etching by Hugo Hamilton (1830) Ansgar, Anskar or Oscar, (September 8?, 801 - February 3, 865) was an Archbishop of Hamburg-Bremen. ... The Lion of the North: Gustavus Adolphus at the famous turning point Battle of Breitenfield (1631) against the forces of the redoubtable Count Tilly. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) // January 31 - United States orders all Indigenous peoples in the United States to move onto reservations February 2 - The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs of Major League Baseball is formed. ... St. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... The Augustana Evangelical Lutheran Church (previously the Augustana Lutheran Synod) was a Lutheran church body in the United States that was one of the churches that merged into the Lutheran Church in America (LCA) in 1962. ... The Lutheran Church in America (LCA) was a U.S. Lutheran church body that existed from 1962 to 1987. ... The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) is a mainline Protestant denomination headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. ...


Academics

Gustavus consistently ranks highly among U.S. liberal arts colleges, currently placed among the best 100 national liberal arts colleges by U.S. News & World Report. Gustavus students choose from over 50 major subject areas, ranging from physics to religion to Scandinavian Studies. The College is lauded for its Writing Across the Curriculum program, which fosters strong writing skills in all academic disciplines. Since the 1980s Gustavus has had a chapter of Phi Beta Kappa, the oldest and most prestigious academic honor society in the United States. In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an academic honor society with the mission of fostering and recognizing excellence in the undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ...


Campus life

The vast majority of Gustavus' 2,700 students ("Gusties") live in residence at the College, in traditional dormitories, College-owned houses, and theme areas, such as the Carlson International Center and the Swedish House. Campus life is enhanced by the many musical ensembles which perform throughout the year, including the Gustavus Choir, Christ Chapel Choir, the Lucia Singers, the Gustavus Adolphus Symphony Orchestra, Gustavus Wind Orchestra, Jazz Band, etc. Theater is also a regular part of campus life and there are two art galleries on campus, the Hillstrom Museum of Art and the Schaefer Art Gallery.


While achieving off-campus status as a Junior or Senior is more difficult than living in an on-campus dormitory, many upperclassmen choose to live off-campus within the community of St. Peter. It is traditional for students to create names for their homes (The Mulberry Bush, Nassau, The Dime, The Hotel, The Zoo, The Cockpit, The Chandelier, etc...)


Campus

The Gustavus campus features state-of-the-art science facilities, several computer and language labs, and a large, new dining facility which has improved the cafeteria food from that endured by previous generations of students. The College's majestic Christ Chapel, which seats 1500 people, stands in the center of campus. Gustavus' first building in St. Peter, Old Main, originally housed the entire college. Major renovations to the building, such as the addition of an elevator, have recently been completed. The campus is well-landscaped with every tree indigenous to Minnesota in the Linnaeus Arboretum and it is further graced by a number of remarkable sculptures by the late, well-known, Minnesota sculptor, Paul Granlund — an alumnus of the College who for many years was sculptor-in-residence. Recently Gustavus announced that they will no longer require an ACT or SAT score for acceptance into the college. It is the first private college in Minnesota to no longer require either test. Christ Chapel at Gustavus Adolphus College Located in the center of Gustavus Adolphus College, Christ Chapel was constructed from March 2, 1959 to fall 1961. ... The Linnaeus Arboretum, on the campus of Gustavus Adolphus College in Saint Peter, Minnesota, USA, contains a number of botanical gardens and an arboretum. ... Paul T. Granlund Paul T. Granlund (October 6, 1925, Minneapolis, Minnesota - September 15, 2003, Mankato, Minnesota) was recognized worldwide as a premier sculptor. ...

The "Old Main" building was completed in 1876. The school was relocated from the town of East Union upon completion of this building.
The "Old Main" building was completed in 1876. The school was relocated from the town of East Union upon completion of this building.

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1488 × 1984 pixel, file size: 705 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Old Main at w:Gustavus Adolphus College, w:St. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1488 × 1984 pixel, file size: 705 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Old Main at w:Gustavus Adolphus College, w:St. ...

Notable alumni

Minnesotas Attorney Generals Territory Lorenzo A. Babcock 1849-1853 Lafayette Emmett 1853-1858 State Charles H. Berry 1858-1860 Gordon E. Cole 1860-1866 William J. Colville 1866-1868 Francis R. E. Cornell 1868-1874 George P. Wilson 1874-1880 Charles M. Start 1880-1881 William J. Hahn 1881... Senior Pastor Usually a title given to the Head Pastor or founder of a christian church. ... Chester Springs in Pennsylvania is a community 5 miles north of Exton, Pennsylvania. ... Eric Booty Butorac (born 22 May 1981 in Rochester, Minnesota) is an American tennis player. ... Joanell M. Dyrstad (b. ... This is a list of Lieutenant Governors of the U.S. state of Minnesota. ... Adolph Olson Eberhart (June 23, 1870–December 6, 1944) was born in Sweden and became an American politician. ... The Governor of Minnesota is the chief executive of the U.S. state of Minnesota, leading the states executive branch. ... Kurt Elling Kurt Elling (born November 2, 1967) is an American jazz vocalist. ... The National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences is known variously as NARAS or The Recording Academy. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... LBJ redirects here. ... Paul T. Granlund Paul T. Granlund (October 6, 1925, Minneapolis, Minnesota - September 15, 2003, Mankato, Minnesota) was recognized worldwide as a premier sculptor. ... Paul D. Hanson (born November 17, 1939) is a University Professor and archeologist. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... Steve Heitzeg (b. ... An Emmy Award. ... Born November 23, 1979, Wide Receiver Ryan Hoag was Mr. ... NFL redirects here. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Mr. ... League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1961–present) Western Conference (1961-1969) Central Division (1967-1969) National Football Conference (1970-present) NFC Central (1970-2001) NFC North (2002-present) Current uniform Team colors Purple, Gold, White Fight song Skol, Vikings Mascot Viktor the Viking, Ragnar Personnel Owner Zygi Wilf General... Bill Holm grew up in the small town of Minneota, MN and is a poet and writer. ... Craig Johnson may refer to: Craig Johnson (ice hockey player) Craig Johnston, former Australian football (soccer) player Craig Johnson, creator and maintainer of the LED Museum Category: ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America or ELCA is a mainline Protestant denomination headquarted in Chicago, Illinois. ... Margaret Anderson Kelliher is a Minnesota politician and a member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party. ... This is a list of Speakers of the Minnesota House of Representatives. ... Kevin Kling is a commentator for National Public Radio. ... Peter Krause as Nate Fisher on Six Feet Under Peter Krause (born 12 August 1965) is an American film and television actor. ... For the death metal band, see Six Feet Under (band). ... Dirty Sexy Money is an American television series created by Craig Wright, who also serves as executive producer alongside Greg Berlanti, Bryan Singer, Matthew Gross, Peter Horton and Josh Reims, with Melissa Berman producing. ... Harold R. LeVander (October 10, 1910–March 30, 1992) was an American politician. ... Yale redirects here. ... John Denver (December 31, 1943 â€“ October 12, 1997), born Henry John Deutschendorf, Jr. ... For the Civil War General of a similar name see James B. McPherson James M. McPherson (born October 11, 1936) is an American Civil War historian, and is the George Henry Davis 86 Professor Emeritus of United States History at Princeton University. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Battle Cry of Freedom is a song written in 1862 by American composer George F. Root (1825–1895) during the American Civil War. ... Allison Rosati on NBC 5 on June 23, 2006. ... Anchorman redirects here. ... WMAQ redirects here. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Patsy Sherman (1930- ) Patsy O’Connell Sherman (September 15, 1930 - ) is an American chemist. ... 3M Company (NYSE: MMM), formerly Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company until 2002, is an American corporation with a worldwide presence. ... Scotchgard is a 3M brand of products used to protect fabric, furniture, and carpets. ... Luther Wallace Youngdahl (May 29, 1896–June 21, 1978) was Minnesotas twenty-seventh governor who was determined to rid the state of its pernicious gambling problem and he began, during the first of his three terms, by outlawing slot machines. ... This article is about the city in Minnesota. ... Steven James Zahn (born November 13, 1967) is an American comedian and actor of both film and stage. ... Saving Silverman is a 2001 black comedy film, directed by Dennis Dugan. ... Youve Got Mail is an American romantic comedy released in 1998 by Warner Brothers. ... Strange Wilderness is a comedy film. ...

Distinctions

  • In the November issue of Men's Fitness magazine, Gustavus Adolphus College was ranked 6th in the 25 most fit colleges in the nation.
  • Gustavus Adolphus College was named on the list of "All Steinway Schools". There are only 66 schools on the list, and only 4 of those schools are in the state of Minnesota. To be considered for the Steinway designation, a school must first have at least 90 percent of its pianos be Steinways — which are completely handmade and can run upwards of $140,000 — or be of Steinway design.
  • In 2006, Gustavus Adolphus College was ranked 9th in the nation for Best College Food by The Princeton Review.
  • With over 50 percent of Gustavus Students studying abroad before they graduate and over 27 possible programs, Gustavus was ranked 4th in the nation for best baccalaureate institutions to study abroad at by The Chronicle of Higher Education in 2003
  • In 2007 the school was ranked as the 79th best liberal arts college in America by US News and World Report.
  • Gustavus is home to Perry, the Amorphophallus titanum (commonly known as the Corpse Flower), which bloomed on Saturday, May 12, 2007. This is one of the rarest flowers in the world, with only 50 recorded blooms in US history.
  • The 2003 Fiske Guide to Colleges named Gustavus one of 300 best American colleges and one of 43 Best Buys nationwide.
  • The National Review named Gustavus one of the 50 best liberal arts colleges in America.
  • “Small class size and superior faculty accessibility” earned Gustavus high praise in The Insider’s Guide to Colleges, along with its “close-knit campus community.”
  • The Peer Assistants Program, a group of peer educators, has been consistently named one of top network affiliates and chapters of the BACCHUS Network. The Director of the Peer Assistants program at Gustavus, Judy Douglas, has also been awarded the prestigious outstanding adviser award numerous times for her work with the Peer Assistants program.

Men’s Fitness is a men’s magazine published by American Media, Inc. ... Steinway & Sons is a piano maker, founded 1853 in New York City, with a second factory established 1880 in the city of Hamburg, Germany. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit American educational preparation company. ... The Chronicle of Higher Education is a newspaper that is a source of news, information, and jobs for college and university faculty and administration. ... Species Rafflesia arnoldi Rafflesia cantleyi Rafflesia gadutensis Rafflesia hasseltii Rafflesia keithii Rafflesia kerrii Rafflesia manillana Rafflesia micropylora Rafflesia patma Rafflesia pricei Rafflesia rochussenii Rafflesia schadenbergiana Rafflesia speciosa Rafflesia tengku-adlinii Rafflesia tuan-mudae Rafflesia is a genus of parasitic flowers. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... National Review (NR) is a biweekly magazine of political opinion, founded by author William F. Buckley, Jr. ... The BACCHUS Network was until recently known as the BACCHUS and GAMMA Peer Network. ...

Core values

The College's mission statement describes five core values:

  1. Excellence
  2. Community
  3. Justice
  4. Service
  5. Faith

This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... For other uses, see Community (disambiguation). ... This article is about the concept of justice. ... For other uses, see Faith (disambiguation). ...

Nobel Conference

Gustavus has been host to the annual Nobel Conference since the first conference in 1963. The conference has a focus on scientific topics such as "Medicine: Prescription for Tomorrow" (2006), "The Legacy of Einstein" (2005), "The Science of Aging" (2004), "The Nature of Nurture" (2002), "Virus: The Human Connection" (1998), and "The New Shape of Matter: Materials Challenge Science" (1995). The conference is open to the public and geared toward lay persons. The 2007 conference topic was "Heating Up: The Energy Debate" and took place October 2-3. The 2008 conference topic is "Who Were The First Humans." The first ongoing educational conference in the United States to have the official authorization of the Nobel Foundation in Stockholm, Sweden, the Nobel Conference at Gustavus Adolphus College, St. ... In religious organizations, the laity comprises all lay persons collectively. ...


The Nobel Conference is the first ongoing educational conference in the United States to have the official authorization of the Nobel Foundation in Stockholm, Sweden. This conference links a general audience with the world's foremost scholars and researchers in conversations centered on contemporary issues related to the natural and social sciences. The Nobel Foundation was created by Lord Alfred Nobel, the inventor of dynamite, to manage his estate and award prizes for academic achievement in several areas: physics, chemistry, medicine, literature, and peace. ...


The conference began in the early 1960's when College officials asked the Nobel Foundation for permission to name the new science building the Alfred Nobel Hall of Science as a memorial to the great Swedish inventor, Alfred Nobel. Permission was granted, and the facility's dedication ceremony in 1963 included officials from the Nobel Foundation as well as 26 Nobel Laureates. The Nobel Foundation was created by Lord Alfred Nobel, the inventor of dynamite, to manage his estate and award prizes for academic achievement in several areas: physics, chemistry, medicine, literature, and peace. ...   (October 21, 1833, Stockholm, Sweden—December 10, 1896, Sanremo, Italy) was a Swedish chemist, engineer, innovator, armaments manufacturer and the inventor of dynamite. ... Winners of the Nobel prize are scientists, writers and peacemakers who have been awarded in their field of endeavour, and who are known collectively as either Nobel laureates or Nobel Prize winners. ...


Following the 1963 Nobel Prize ceremonies in Stockholm, College representatives met with Nobel Foundation officials, asking them to endorse an annual science conference at the College and to allow use of the Nobel name to establish credibility and high standards. At the urging of several prominent Nobel laureates, the foundation granted the request., and the first conference was held at the College in January 1965.


The goal of the conference is to bring cutting-edge science issues to the attention of an audience of students and interested adults, and to engage the panelists and the audience in a discussion of the moral and societal impact of these issues. Another major goal of the conference is to attract world class speakers. Beginning with the help of an advisory committee composed of Nobel laureates such as Glenn Seaborg, Phillip Hench, and Sir John Eccles, the conferences have been consistently successful in attracting the world's foremost authorities as speakers. Fifty-nine Nobel laureates have served as speakers, five of whom were awarded the prize after speaking at our conferences. Glenn Theodore Seaborg (April 19, 1912 – February 25, 1999) was an American atomic scientist. ... Sir John Carew Eccles (January 27, 1903 - May 2, 1997) was an Australian neurophysiologist who won the 1963 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his work on the synapse. ... Winners of the Nobel prize are scientists, writers and peacemakers who have been awarded in their field of endeavour, and who are known collectively as either Nobel laureates or Nobel Prize winners. ...


Disasters

  • On January 8, 1970, the Auditorium was completely gutted by a fire.
  • On March 29, 1998, the College's campus was hit by a mile-wide F3 tornado that broke 80 percent of the windows, leveled nearly 2,000 trees, toppled the chapel's spire, and caused more than $50 million in damages. This event is considered to be one of the most expensive college disasters in history. Amazingly, there was only one death (not a Gustavus student), despite the tornado's widespread path; this is due, most likely, to the fact that most of the college was on spring break at the time of the tornado. Hundreds of volunteers worked extremely hard to get the campus back into a condition where the students could return after a three week hiatus. Still, students were forced to attend some classes in FEMA trailers as some on-campus buildings were too severely damaged.
Christ Chapel at Gustavus Adolphus College.
Christ Chapel at Gustavus Adolphus College.

is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ... 1Time from first tornado to last tornado 2Most severe tornado damage; see Fujita Scale The Comfrey - St. ... A chapel is a private church, usually small and often attached to a larger institution such as a college, a hospital, a palace, or a prison. ... A modern spire on the Lancaster University Chaplaincy Centre A spire is a tapering conical or pyramidal structure on the top of a building, particularly a church tower. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1488 × 1984 pixel, file size: 699 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Located in the center of w:Gustavus Adolphus College, w:Christ Chapel was constructed from March 2, 1959 to fall 1961. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1488 × 1984 pixel, file size: 699 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Located in the center of w:Gustavus Adolphus College, w:Christ Chapel was constructed from March 2, 1959 to fall 1961. ...

Attractions

Christ Chapel at Gustavus Adolphus College Located in the center of Gustavus Adolphus College, Christ Chapel was constructed from March 2, 1959 to fall 1961. ... The Ash Can Painters were remembered on this USPS stamp. ... The Linnaeus Arboretum, on the campus of Gustavus Adolphus College in Saint Peter, Minnesota, USA, contains a number of botanical gardens and an arboretum. ... Paul T. Granlund Paul T. Granlund (October 6, 1925, Minneapolis, Minnesota - September 15, 2003, Mankato, Minnesota) was recognized worldwide as a premier sculptor. ...

Athletics

Gustavus is a member of the MIAC and is well-known for excellence in both men's and women's tennis. Other key sports at the College are basketball, golf, and soccer. Gustavus has had two players drafted in the NFL Draft. They are Kurt Ploeger in the sixth round to the Dallas Cowboys in 1985, and Ryan Hoag in the seventh round to the Oakland Raiders in 2003. The school's team name is the Golden Gusties with their mascot a Lion given that Gustavus Adolphus was known as "The Lion of the North." Professional tennis player Eric Butorac has established himself on the tour as a doubles player. The Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (MIAC) is an College Athletic Conference which competes in the NCAAs Division III. As the name implies, member schools are located in the state of Minnesota; also, all of the member schools are private, with all but two having a religious affiliation. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... Soccer redirects here. ... The NFL Draft (officially the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting[1]) is an annual sports draft in which National Football League (NFL) teams take turns, through seven rounds[2], selecting amateur college American football players and other first-time eligible players. ... City Irving, Texas Other nicknames Americas Team, The Boys, The Pokes Team colors White, Silver, Silver-Green, Royal Blue, Navy Blue Head Coach Wade Phillips Owner Jerry Jones General manager Jerry Jones League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1960–present) Western Conference (1960) Eastern Conference (1961-1969) Capitol Division... Born November 23, 1979, Wide Receiver Ryan Hoag was Mr. ... City Oakland, California Other nicknames The Silver and Black Team colors Silver and Black Head Coach Lane Kiffin Owner Al Davis General manager Al Davis League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–1969) Western Division (1960–1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970–present) AFC West (1970...


Varsity sports

Mens

Womens

This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... The term cross-country, when used by itself, can refer to: Sports Cross-country running, a sport in which teams of runners compete to complete a course over open or rough terrain Cross-country skiing, a winter sport for skiing Fell running also known as hill running and mountain running... Look up Football in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the sport. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Nordic skiing is a winter sport that encompasses all types of skiing where the heel of the boot cannot be fixed to the ski. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Swimmer redirects here. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... This article is about the sport. ... The term cross-country, when used by itself, can refer to: Sports Cross-country running, a sport in which teams of runners compete to complete a course over open or rough terrain Cross-country skiing, a winter sport for skiing Fell running also known as hill running and mountain running... This article is about the sport. ... Gymnastics is a sport involving the performance of sequences of movements requiring physical strength, flexibility, balance, endurance, gracefulness, and kinesthetic awareness, and includes such skills as handsprings, handstands, split leaps, aerials and cartwheels. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Nordic skiing is a winter sport that encompasses all types of skiing where the heel of the boot cannot be fixed to the ski. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Softball is a team sport popular especially in the United States. ... Swimmer redirects here. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ...

Performance

The Gustavus soccer team finished second in the NCAA Division III national tournament in 2005 — lead in part by three-time all American Robert "Bobby" Kroog. Also, in 2003 the Gustavus men's basketball team finished second in the NCAA Division III national tournament in Salem, Virginia, losing by only 2 points. Recently, The Gustavus football team has had below average performance under coach Jay Schoenebeck. They were known for football in the middle part of the century thanks to long-time coach/AD Moose Malmquist. Conversely, Jon Carlson coached both the men's and women's swim teams to top 10 finishes at NCAA Division III Nationals. In 2008, the men's and women's teams finished first in the conference. In addition, the women's hockey team, coached by Mike Carroll, is consistently strong, and has placed third and fourth at the last two NCAA national tournaments. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... In sports, a coach or manager is an individual involved in the direction and instruction of the on-field operations of an athletic team or of individual athletes. ...


Campus media

Gustavus Adolphus College is home to five different media outlets which are represented on the campus media board.

  • The campus newspaper, The Gustavian Weekly is the oldest media outlet having first published in 1891. The publication which is entirely student written and produced features articles and opinions about events and issues on campus and beyond.
  • Firethorne is an arts and literary magazine that is published twice per year. Students are encouraged to submit short stories, poetry, creative nonfiction, photography, visual art, or other creative content.
  • KGSM is a radio station run entirely by students. The station is webcast only and recently upgraded its studio to improve the quality of its webstream and a digital audio workstation. The station hopes to include a weekly campus newscast among its collection of podcasts.
  • The third and newest campus media outlet is GAC TV. Started by an enterprising group of students looking to bring the power and versatility of television broadcasting to campus, GAC TV became an instant success when students started watching the weekly show before free on-campus films.
  • The Gustavian Yearbook publishes a yearbook for each class.

See also

  • Category:Gustavus Adolphus College alumni
  • Category:Lutheranism

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Minnesota's Private Colleges - Gustavus Adolphus College (1175 words)
Gustavus Adolphus College, a private, residential, church-related, liberal arts college of Swedish heritage, provides an undergraduate education of recognized excellence, uniting highly motivated teachers with promising students.
Gustavus provides an education that combines rigor and innovation, integrates the development of values with intellectual growth and makes apparent the connectedness of academic disciplines.
Gustavus encourages a mature understanding of the Christian faith, service to others, sensitivity to community, an international perspective, and work toward a peaceful and just world.
Profile for Gustavus Adolphus College - HigherEdJobs.com (660 words)
Founded in 1862, Gustavus Adolphus College is a private, co-educational, residential, church-related, liberal arts college that seeks to develop in its students a capacity and passion for life-long learning and to prepare them for fulfilling lives of leadership and service in society.
Gustavus highly values service as an objective of life and education, embraces the biblical notion that true leadership expresses itself in service to others, and affirms the classical ideal of a liberating education that frees one to serve God and humanity to the best of one's ability.
Gustavus is proud of its extraordinary rate of retention (averaging over 90 percent) as well as the fact that 79 percent of students who begin as freshman graduate in four years.
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