FACTOID # 16: In the 2000 Presidential Election, Texas gave Ralph Nader the 3rd highest popular vote count of any US state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Gush Emunim
Main article: Israel
History of Israel
Zionism   Zionism timeline
Immigration   Immig. timeline
Herzl  · Sykes-Picot
Balfour Declaration  · Mandate
1947 UN Partition Plan
Independence  · Holiday
Land of Israel
Geography
Districts  · Cities  · Transport
Jerusalem  · Tel Aviv · Haifa
Economy
Science & Tech.  · Companies
Universities  · Entrepreneurs
Demographics  · Culture
Judaism;  · Israeli Arabs  · Kibbutz
Music  · Archaeology
Writers  · Famous Israelis
Laws  · Politics
Parties  · Elections  · Knesset
Prime Minister  · President
Law of Return  · Halakha
Foreign relations  · UN
Israeli Security Forces
Defense Forces  · Sayeret
Mossad  · Shin Bet  · Nuclear

YAMAM  · MAGAV  · MASHAZ Large Flag of Israel File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This article discusses the history of the modern State of Israel, from its inception in 1948 to the present. ... Zionism - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Timeline of Zionism in the modern era: 1861 - The Zion Society is formed in Frankfurt, Germany. ... Main article: State of Israel. ... Theodor Herzl Theodor Herzl (or Tivadar Herzl) (May 2, 1860 – July 3, 1904) was an Austrian Jewish journalist who became the founder of modern political Zionism. ... The Sykes-Picot Agreement of May 16, 1916 was a secret understanding between the governments of Britain and France defining their respective areas of post-World War I influence and control in the Middle East. ... The Balfour Declaration was a letter of November 2, 1917 from British Foreign Secretary Arthur James Balfour, to Lord Rothschild (Walter Rothschild, 2nd Baron Rothschild), a leader of the British Jewish community, for transmission to the Zionist Federation. ... The British Mandate of Palestine was a swathe of territory in the Middle East, formerly belonging to the Ottoman Empire, which the League of Nations entrusted to the United Kingdom to administer in the aftermath of World War I as a Mandate Territory. ... Map showing the UN Partition Plan. ... Flag of Israel Yom Haatzmaut (יום העצמאות yom hā-‘aṣmā’ūṯ), Israeli Independence Day, commemorates the declaration of independence of Israel in 1948. ... The Land of Israel (Hebrew: Eretz Yisrael) refers to the land making up the ancient Jewish Kingdoms of Israel and Judah. ... See related article: List of cities in Israel. ... Cities in Israel, by district: Northern District See also North District of Israel. ... Jerusalem (Hebrew: יְרוּשָׁלַיִם Yerushalayim; Arabic: القدس al-Quds; see also names of Jerusalem) is an ancient Middle Eastern city of key importance to the religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. ... Tel Aviv at night Dizengof Center Allenby Street Tel Aviv-Yafo (Hebrew תל אביב-יפו; Arabic تل ابيب-يافا Tal Abīb-Yāfā) is an Israeli city on the coast of the Mediterranean sea. ... For the Lebanese singer, see Haifa Wahbe Haifa (Hebrew חיפה; Arabic حيفا Ḥayfā) is the third-largest city in Israel, with a population close to 300,000. ... Israeli contributions to science and technology have been significant, even strangely out of proportion for a country of roughly six million with continuous security challenges. ... The top 10 Israeli companies by sales are: Teva Pharmaceutical, $4. ... There are eight official universities in Israel, listed below (followed by their English acronym, if commonly used): Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HUJI) Tel-Aviv University (TAU) University of Haifa Bar-Ilan University (BIU) Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) Technion - Israel Institute of Technology Weizmann Institute of Science Open... This is a list of prominent Israelis (including Arab citizens of Israel). ... This article discusses the demographics of Israel. ... The culture of Israel, also called Israeli culture, is inseparable from long history of Judaism and Jewish history which preceded it (i. ... The great majority of citizens in the State of Israel are Jewish; the great majority of Israeli Jews practice Judaism as their religion. ... Israeli Arabs, or 1948 Palestinians, are those Arabs who remained inside the borders of what would become Israel after 1948, when most Arabs fled the country in the 1948 Arab-Israeli War (see also Nakba). They make up roughly 20% of Israels population. ... A kibbutz קיבוץ (Hebrew, pl. ... Modern Israeli music is heavily influenced by its constituents, which include Palestinians (see Palestinian music) and Jewish immigrants (see Jewish music) from more than 120 countries around the world have brought their own musical traditions, making Israel a global melting pot. ... The archaeology of Israel is a national passion that also attracts considerable international interest on account of the regions Biblical links. ... Israeli literature is literature of the nation of Israel. ... This is a list of prominent Israelis (including Arab citizens of Israel). ... Basic Laws of Israel function as Israels uncodified constitution. The State of Israel has no formal constitution. ... Israels governmental system is based on several basic laws enacted by its unicameral parliament, the Knesset. ... Political parties in Israel lists political parties in Israel. ... Elections in Israel gives information on election and election results in Israel. ... The Knesset (כנסת, Hebrew for assembly) is the Parliament of Israel. ... The Prime Minister of Israel is the elected head of the Israeli government. ... President of the State of Israel is the head of state of Israel, but has a largely ceremonial, figurehead role with real power lying in the hands of the Prime Minister of Israel. ... The Law of Return is Israeli legislation that allows Jews to settle in the State of Israel and gain citizenship. ... Halakha (הלכה or Halakhah, Halacha, Halachah) is the collective corpus of Jewish law, custom and tradition regulating all aspects of behavior. ... Foreign relations of Israel deal with some of the following issues: In addition to seeking an end to hostilities with Arab forces, against which it has fought five wars since 1948, Israel has given high priority to gaining wide acceptance as a sovereign state with an important international role. ... Israel and the United Nations (as an organization) have had, since the states founding on 1948, very mixed relations. ... The Israel Security Forces (ISF) are several organizations collectively responsible for Israels security. ... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: צבא ההגנה לישראל Tsva Ha-Haganah Le-Yisrael ([Army] Force [for] the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels armed forces (army, air force and navy). ... Sayeret (Hebrew סיירת, pl. ... Ha-Mossad le-Modiin ule-Tafkidim Meyuhadim (Hebrew: המוסד למודיעין ולתפקידים מיוחדים, Institute for Intelligence and Special Tasks) is an Israeli intelligence agency, commonly referred to as Mossad. ... Shabak emblem Defender who shall not be seen The Shin Bet (in Hebrew, שבכ SHABAK an acronym of Sherut Bitahon Klali שירות ביטחון כללי), is the Internal General Security Service of Israel. ... Israel is very widely believed to possess a substantial arsenal of nuclear weapons and intermediate-range ballistic missiles to deliver them. ... The YAMAM ( יממ ) is the elite civilian counter terrorism unit of Israel. ... MAGAV (in Hebrew מגב ) is an acronym for Mishmar Ha-Gvul ( מישמר הגבול ), which in Hebrew means Frontier Guard. MAGAV is the combat branch of the Israeli Police and its composed from professional officers on payroll and field policemen redirected from the IDF (men at the age of 18... The MASHAZ המשמר האזרחי (Ha-Mishmar ha-Ezrachi) is the Israeli Civilian Guard. ...

Arab-Israeli conflict
1948 War  · 1949 Armistice
1956 War  · 1967 War
1970 War  · 1973 War
1978 War  · 1982 War
Arab League  · Camp David
Treaties with: Egypt / Jordan
Peace camp  · Peace proposals
Israeli-Palestinian conflict
Israeli-Palestinian timeline
First Intifada  · Second Intifada
Unilateral Disengagement
The Peace Process

Gush Emunim גוש אמונים (Hebrew: "Block [of the] faithful") was an Israeli political movement. The movement sprang out of the conquests of the Six-Day War in 1967, though it was not formally established as an organization until 1974, in the wake of the Yom Kippur War. It encouraged Jewish settlement of land they believe God has alloted for Jews. Israel and the Arab League states The Arab-Israeli conflict is a long-running conflict in the Middle East regarding the existence of the state of Israel and its relations with Arab states and with the Palestinian population (see Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The 1948 Arab-Israeli War, called the War of Independence (Hebrew: מלחמת העצמאות) by Israelis and al Nakba (Arabic: النكبة, the catastrophe) by Arabs, was the first in a series of wars in the Arab-Israeli conflict. ... The 1949 Armistice Agreements are a set of agreements signed during 1949 between Israel and its neighbors Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon and Syria. ... HM Ships Eagle, Bulwark, and Albion of the British Royal Navy. ... The 1967 Arab-Israeli War, also known as the Six-Day War or June War, was fought between Israel and its Arab neighbors Egypt, Jordan, and Syria. ... Attrition warfare is a strategic concept that to win a war, ones enemy must be worn down to the point of collapse by continuous losses in personnel and materiel. ... The Yom Kippur War (in Hebrew: Milchemet Yom HaKipurim, also known as the October War, the 1973 Arab-Israeli War, and the Ramadan War), was fought from October 6 (the day of Yom Kippur) to October 22 and 24, 1973, between Israel and a coalition of Egypt and Syria. ... Operation Litani was the official name of Israels 1978 invasion of Lebanon up to the Litani river. ... The 1982 Invasion of Lebanon, dubbed Operation Peace for Galilee, began June 6, 1982, when the Lebanon in response to the Abu Nidal organizations assassination attempt against Israels ambassador to the United Kingdom, Shlomo Argov. ... From the time it was established in March 1945, the Arab League took an active role in the Arab-Israeli conflict. ... Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin on September 17, 1978, following twelve days of secret negotiations at Camp David. ... The Israeli peace camp is a collection of political and non-political movements which desire to promote peace, mainly with the Arab neighbours of Israel (the Palestinians, Syria and Lebanon) and encourage co-existence with the Arab citizens of Israel. ... Geneva Accord October 20, 2003 Road Map for Peace April 30, 2003 The Peoples Voice July 27, 2002 Elon Peace Plan 2002 ... Israel and the Occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... This is a incomplete timeline of events in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The first Intifada was an uprising that took place from 1987 to 1991 or 1993 (see Intifada). ... The al-Aqsa Intifada is the wave of violence and political conflict that began in September 2000 between Palestinian Arabs and Israelis; it is also called the Second Intifada (see also First Intifada). ... Israels unilateral disengagement plan (also known as the disengagement plan, תוכנית ההינתקות) is a proposal by Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon to remove all permanent Israeli presence in the Gaza Strip and from what Israel refers to as northern Samaria (part of what is known as the West Bank... Despite the ongoing violence in the Middle East, there has since the 1970s been a parallel effort made to find terms upon which peace can be agreed. ... The Modern Hebrew language is a Semitic language of the Afro-Asiatic language family. ... The 1967 Arab-Israeli War, also known as the Six-Day War or June War, was fought between Israel and its Arab neighbors Egypt, Jordan, and Syria. ... 1967 was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... 1974 is a common year starting on Tuesday (click on link for calendar). ... The Yom Kippur War (in Hebrew: Milchemet Yom HaKipurim, also known as the October War, the 1973 Arab-Israeli War, and the Ramadan War), was fought from October 6 (the day of Yom Kippur) to October 22 and 24, 1973, between Israel and a coalition of Egypt and Syria. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... Israeli settlements are Jewish communities in areas under Israeli control as a result of the 1967 Six Day War. ...

Contents

Political affiliations

Gush Emunim was closely associated with, and highly influential in, the Mafdal - National Religious Party (NRP), the party which is identified with religious Zionism. These days they refer to themselves —and are referred to by the Israeli media as— Ne'emanei Eretz Yisrael נאמני ארץ ישראל (Hebrew: "Those who are loyal/faithful to the land of Israel"). The grammar in this article needs to be checked. ... The grammar in this article needs to be checked. ... The Religious Zionist Movement, or Religious Zionism is an ideology combining Zionism and Judaism, which offers Zionism based on the principles of Jewish religion and heritage. ...


History

In 1968, a group of future Gush Emunim members led by Rabbi Moshe Levinger began a squat in the middle of the West Bank town of Hebron. This squat, illegal under both international and Israeli law, was initially opposed by the Israeli government. However, it was eventually transformed into the settlement Kiryat Arba on the outskirts of Hebron. In 1974, following the shock of the Yom Kippur War, the organization was founded more formally, by students of the younger Rabbi Tzvi Yehuda Kook, who remained its leader until his death in 1981. 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... See Semicha for article about ordination of rabbis. ... The word squat has different meanings: The act of occupying a building without permission, as practiced by a squatter. ... (This article is about the place in the Middle East. ... Qiryat Arba or Kiryat Arba (קרית־ארבע Town of the Four [Giants] , Standard Hebrew Qiryat Arbaʿ, Tiberian Hebrew Qiryaṯ-ʾarbaʿ; KJV Bible Kirjath-arba) is an Israeli settlement adjoining the city of Hebron. ... 1974 is a common year starting on Tuesday (click on link for calendar). ... The Yom Kippur War (in Hebrew: Milchemet Yom HaKipurim, also known as the October War, the 1973 Arab-Israeli War, and the Ramadan War), was fought from October 6 (the day of Yom Kippur) to October 22 and 24, 1973, between Israel and a coalition of Egypt and Syria. ... Prophet of Greater Israel, his teachings inspired the modern religious settlement movement in the territories. ...


Gush Emunim activists commenced a series of publicity campaigns, including mass protests and dramatic, high-profile attempts at avoiding the Israeli security forces' roadblocks to establish settlements. These campaigns eventually succeeded in establishing a settlement in Sebastia.


Though initially opposed by Yitzhak Rabin's Labor Party government, the settlement was accepted de facto. It was later legalized by Prime Minister Menachem Begin's Likud government, in 1977. However, Gush Emunim came into conflict with the Likud over other matters, mainly the handing over of the Sinai Peninsula to Egypt as part of the Israel-Egypt Peace Treaty, and the demolition of all Jewish settlements in that area. Yitzhak Rabin Yitzhak Rabin (יצחק רבין) (March 1, 1922–November 4, 1995) was an Israeli politician and military general. ... Labour (העבודה HaAvoda) is an Israeli political party. ... Prime Minister Menachem Begin Menachem Begin (August 16, 1913 - March 9, 1992) became the 6th Prime Minister of Israel in May 1977. ... Likud party logo Likud or ליכוד literally means consolidation. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... Sinai Peninsula, Gulf of Suez (west), Gulf of Aqaba (east) from Space Shuttle STS-40 The Sinai Peninsula (in Arabic, Shibh Jazirat Sinaشبه جزيرة سيناء) is a triangle-shaped peninsula lying between the Mediterranean Sea (to the north) and Red Sea (to the south). ... The Israel-Egypt peace treaty was signed in Washington on March 26, 1979 as the first of the Camp David Accords (1978). ...


Gush Emunim was supported by many religious Zionists, as well as some secular Zionists - such as the famous poet Naomi Shemer. Naomi Shemer (1931-June 26, 2004) was one of Israels most important and prolific song writers, considered by some the First Lady of Israeli Song. Shemer wrote both words and lyrics to her own songs, composed music to words by others (such as the poet Rachel), and set Hebrew...


Ideology

Gush Emunim beliefs are based heavily on the teachings of Rabbi Abraham Kook and his son, Rabbi Tzvi Yehuda Kook. The two rabbis taught that secular Zionists, through their conquests of Eretz Israel, had unwittingly brought about the beginning of the "messianic age", which would end in the coming of the Jewish messiah. Gush Emunim supporters believe that the coming of the messiah can be hastened through Jewish settlement on land they believe God has alloted to the Jewish people as outlined in the Hebrew Bible. Abraham Isaac Kook (1864 - 1935) Known in Hebrew as הרב אברהם יצחק הכהן קוק HaRav Avraham Yitzchak HaCohen Kook, and by the acronym HaRaIyaH The first official Ashkenazi Israel), he established the foundation of the Chief Rabbinate of Israel, the Rabbanut, and Israels national rabbinical courts, Batei Din, that... Prophet of Greater Israel, his teachings inspired the modern religious settlement movement in the territories. ... The Land of Israel (Hebrew: Eretz Yisrael) refers to the land making up the ancient Jewish Kingdoms of Israel and Judah. ... The concept of the messiah in Judaism is briefly discussed in the Jewish eschatology entry. ... 11th century manuscript of the Hebrew Bible with Targum Hebrew Bible refers to the common portions of the Jewish and Christian canons. ...


Related articles

Israeli settlements are Jewish communities in areas under Israeli control as a result of the 1967 Six Day War. ... The grammar in this article needs to be checked. ... Moledet (Hebrew מולדת, literally homeland) is a small right-wing political party in Israel. ... Orthodox Judaism is one of the three major branches of Judaism. ... Prophet of Greater Israel, his teachings inspired the modern religious settlement movement in the territories. ...

Further reading

  • Jewish Fundamentalism in Israel by Israel Shahak and Norton Mezvinsky.

Israel Shahak (April 28, 1933 - July 2, 2001) was a Professor of Chemistry at Hebrew University in Jerusalem, and an outspoken critic of the Israeli government and of Israeli society in general. ...

External links

  • For the Land and the Lord: Jewish Fundamentalism in Israel (http://www.sas.upenn.edu/penncip/lustick/index.html) by Ian Lustick, 1988.
  • Gush Emunim (Orthodoxy Map) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gush_Emunim) by Eliezer Segal

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m