FACTOID # 1: Idaho produces more milk than Iowa, Indiana and Illinois combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Guru Nanak Dev
Part of a series on
Sikhism

Sikhism (IPA: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ), founded on the teachings of Guru Nanak Dev and nine successive gurus in fifteenth century Northern India, is the fifth-largest religion in the world. ... Image File history File links Khanda1. ...

History of Sikhism
Sikh beliefs
Sikh
The history of Sikhism is closely associated with the history of Punjab, the socio-political situation in medieval India, and the social structures and philosophies of Hinduism and Islam. ... // Ek Onkar There is only one God who has infinite qualities and names. ... Religions Sikhism Scriptures Guru Granth Sahib Languages English, Punjabi] A Sikh (English: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ) is an adherent to Sikhism. ...

The Sikh Gurus
Sikhism was established by ten Gurus, teachers or masters, over the period 1469 to 1708. ...

Sikh Bhagats
Sikh Bhagats refers to the Saints and holy men of various faiths whose teachings are included in the Sikh holy book the Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji. ...

Other Important People
This article list historic personalites who are important to the Sikh religion: Bhai Gurdas (1551-1637) is one of the most eminent literary personalities in the history of the Sikh religion. ...

Philosophy
Beliefs and principles
Underlying values
Prohibitions
Technique and methods
Other observations · Bani
The Sikh religious philosophy is covered in great detail in the Sri Guru Granth Sahib, the Sikh holy text. ... // There is only one God who has infinite qualities and names. ... The Sikhs must believe in the following values: Equality: All humans are equal before God – No discrimination is allowed on the basis of caste, race, sex, creed, origin, color, education, status, wealth, etc. ... There are a number of religious prohibitions in Sikhism and by the SGPC: Cutting Hair: Cutting hair is strictly forbidden in Sikhism. ... Naam: Or Naam Japo. ... The Golden Temple is the most important sacred shrine for Sikhs Sikhism comes from the word Sikh, which means a strong and able disciple. ... Bani is the term used by Sikhs to refer to various sections of the Holy Text that appears in their several Holy Books. ...

Sikh practices · List
The practice of the Sikh way of life has been laid out by the Gurus in simple, precise and practical manner. ...

Scripture
Guru Granth Sahib
Adi Granth · Dasam Granth
The principal Sikh scripture is the Adi Granth (First Scripture), more commonly called the Guru Granth Sahib. ... The Adi Sri Guru Granth Sahib (Punjabi: , ), or Guru Granth Sahib, is the holy book, or scriptures, of the Sikhs. ... Guru Granth Sahib (Granth is Punjabi for book, Sahib is Hindi meaning master, from Arabic, meaning companion, friend, owner, or master) or Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji or SGGS for short, is more than a holy book of the Sikhs. ... The Dasam Granth (Punjabi: , ) is a scripture of Sikhism, containing texts composed by 10th Sikh Guru, Guru Gobind Singh and his assembly of scholars. ...

Categories
Practices · History
Family of the Sikh Gurus
Gurdwara
Places · Politics

Articles on Sikhism
Portal: Sikhism
This list is of topics related to Sikhs and Sikhism. ...

This box: view  talk  edit

Contents

Guru Nanak Dev[1] (Punjabi: ਗੁਰੂ ਨਾਨਕ ਦੇਵ, Gurū Nānak Dēv) (20th October 1469, Nankana Sahib, Punjab, (now Pakistan) - 22 September 1539, Kartarpur, Punjab, India), was the founder of Sikhism, and the first of the ten Sikh Gurus. Punjabi redirects here. ... (Redirected from 20th October) October 20 is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 72 days remaining. ... Events July 26 - Battle of Edgecote Moor October 17 - Prince Ferdinand of Aragon wed princess Isabella of Castile. ... Nankana Sahib, also known as Raipur and Rai-Bhoi-di-Talwandi is a city in the state of Punjab in present-day Pakistan. ... This article is about the geographical region. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events May 30 - In Florida, Hernando de Soto lands at Tampa Bay with 600 soldiers with the goal to find gold. ... This article is about the geographical region. ... Sikhism (IPA: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ), founded on the teachings of Guru Nanak Dev and nine successive gurus in fifteenth century Northern India, is the fifth-largest religion in the world. ... Religions Sikhism Scriptures Guru Granth Sahib Languages English, Punjabi] A Sikh (English: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ) is an adherent to Sikhism. ... A guru (गुरू Sanskrit) is a Hindu religious teacher. ...


Birth and early life

Nanak was born 20 October 1469 into a Hindu Khatri family,[2] in the village of Rai Bhoi Ki Talwandi, now called Nankana Sahib (after the Guru), near Lahore, Pakistan.[3] Today, his birthplace is marked by Gurdwara Janam Asthan. is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events July 26 - Battle of Edgecote Moor October 17 - Prince Ferdinand of Aragon wed princess Isabella of Castile. ... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... Nankana Sahib, also known as Raipur and Rai-Bhoi-di-Talwandi is a city in the state of Punjab in present-day Pakistan. ...   (Urdu: لاہور, Punjabi: لہور, pronounced ) is the capital of the Punjab and is the second largest city in Pakistan after Karachi. ...


His father, Kalyan Das Bedi, also known as Mehta Kalu, was the patwari (accountant) of crop revenue for the village of Talwandi under the Muslim landlord of the village, Rai Bular, who was responsible for collecting taxes. Guru Nanak's mother was Tripta Devi and he had one older sister, Nanaki. The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... Category: ... Bebe Nanaki Ji (1464-1518) was the elder sister of Guru Nanak Dev Ji, the founder of Sikhism, and an important religious figure in her own right. ...

Gurdwara Nankana Sahib
Gurdwara Nankana Sahib

There earliest biographical sources on the life of Guru Nanak recognised today are the Janamsākhīs' (lit. life-accounts) and the vārs (expounding verse) of the scribe Bhai Gurdas. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2848 × 2132 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2848 × 2132 pixel, file size: 1. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Bhai Gurdas (1551-1636) was a Punjabi Sikh writer, historian, missionairy, and religious figure. ...


The most popular Janamsākhī are said to have been written by a close companion of the Guru' Bhai Bala' before Nanak died.[4] However, the writing style and language employed have left scholars such as Max Arthur Macauliffe certain that they were composed after his death.[5] Bhai Bala was a companion of the Sikh guru, Nanak. ... Max Arthur Macauliffe was a translator of Sikh religious writings. ...


Bhai Gurdas, purported scribe of the Gurū Granth, also wrote about Nanak's life in his vārs. Although these too were compiled some time after Guru Nanak's death, and are also less detailed than the Janamsākhīs, modern sikh ideologues tend to hold them in higher regard. Bhai Gurdas (1551-1636) was a Punjabi Sikh writer, historian, missionairy, and religious figure. ...


The Janamsākhīs recount in minute detail the circumstances of the birth of the guru. They claim that at his birth, an astrologer who came to write his horoscope insisted on seeing the child. On seeing the infant, he is said to have worshipped him with clasped hands. The astrologer then remarked that he regretted that he should never live to see young Guru Nanak as an adult.[citation needed] as well.[dubious ]


At the age of five years Nanak is said to have shown acute interest in spiritual and divine subjects. At age seven, his father Mehta Kalu enrolled him at the village school.[6] Notable lore reccounts that as a child Nanak astonished his teacher by describing the implicit symbolism of the first letter of the alphabet, which is almost straight stroke in Persian or Arabic, resembling the mathematical version of one and denotes unity or oneness of God[7]. Other childhood accounts refer to strange and miraculous events about Nanak such as a poisonous cobra being seen to shield the sleeping childs head from the harsh sunlight. For other uses, see Divinity (disambiguation) and Divine (disambiguation). ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Alif ﺍ is the first letter of the Arabic alphabet. ... Look up Persian in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ...


Marriage and family life

Nanak was married to one Sulakhni. His marriage took place with her in the town of Batala. The marriage party had come from the town of Sultanpur Lodhi. He had two sons from this marriage; Sri Chand and Lakhmi Chand. The former was a deeply spiritual person and founded a renunciate/ascetic subsect known today as Udasis. The younger son grew up to become immersed in worldly life. BATALA , Batala is a city and a municipal council in Gurdaspur district in the state Punjab of northwestern india. ... Sultanpur Lodhi is a city and a municipal council in Kapurthala district in the Indian state of Punjab. ... Baba Sri Chand (1494-1629[1]) was the first son of Guru Nanak, raised by his sister. ... Map of Satguru Nanak Dev Jis Journeys Guru Nanaks travel to many areas, going from the Punjab. ...


Teachings of Nanak

Nanak's teachings come down today foremostly in the Guru Granth, a vast collection of revelatory verses recorded in sloaks.


From these some common principles seem discernable. Firstly a supreme Godhead who although incomprehensible manifests in a variety of religious forms, the Singular 'Doer' and formless source of all forms. It is described as the industructable or timeless form. and in both impersonal and personal forms. Salvation or liberation depends on the grace ('nadir'- glance) of God alone and although outside the power of the individual, manifests through the individual whom is seen to be unceasing in their efforts. Religious awakening is compared to undergoing a living death.


Nanak describes the dangers of the self (haumai- 'I am') and calls upon devotees to engage in worship through Gods name and singing of Gods qualities, discarding doubt in the process. However such worship must be selfless (seva)- which could be said to be similar in principle to the nishkaam worhsip elaborated in the Bhagavad Gita. Gods name cleanses the individual to make such worship possible. This is related to the revelation that God is the Doer and without God there is no other. He warns that hypocrisy and falsehood are pervasive in humanity and that religous actions can also be in vain. However the practice of satsang is considered exalted. It may also be said that ascetic practices are disfavoured by Nanak who suggests remaining inwardly detached whilst living as a householder.


Through popular tradition, Nanaks teaching is understood to be practiced in three ways:

  • Naam Japna: Chanting the Holy Name and thus remembering God at all times (ceasless devotion to God)
  • Kirat Karō: Earning/making a living honestly, without exploitation or fraud
  • Vaṇḍ Chakkō: Sharing with others, helping those with less who are in need

Nanak put the greatest emphasis on the worship of True Name(naam japna). One should follow the direction of Awakened individuals rather then the mind (state of manmukh- being led by the mind)- the latter being perilous and leading only to frustration. Nām Japō (Punjabi: ), refers to the meditation, vocal singing of Hymns from the Sri Guru Granth Sahib or of the various Names of God, specially the chanting of the word Waheguru, which means Wonderful Lord. ... Kirat Karō is one of three primary pillars of Sikhism. ... In Sikhism Vaṇḍ Chakkō (Punjabi: ) is a technique and method which means share it as you consume it. ...


In the context of his times, reforms that occured in the wake of Nanaks teachings and the bhakti movement at large were- bhakti devotion was open to all castes, women were not to be marginalised from its institutions, and both Godhead and Devotion transcended any relgious consideration or divide, as God is immanent and not seperate from any individual.


Common errors today are to understand Nanak as a mere reformer or intellectual thinker. People tend to think of him as someone who attempted to reconcile hindu and muslim differences, and consequently as sikhism as a thoughtful and conscientious attempt to combine elements of hinduism and Islam. However a close study of even a few of his sloaks quickly dispel this false notion. Nanak spoke from direct understanding as an Awoken personality and not as a scholar, utilising the language of panjab at the time as a person of hindu background living in a highly islamicised state. He encouraged people to worship within their own traditions, but to keep the focus on Gods names rather than egotistic considerations.


Baburvani

Baburvani (Babur's song) -pronounced BaaburVaani - verses that refer to the moghul invasion of india that occured during Nanaks lifetime. The notable aspect of these verses is that we do not usually find such elaborated description to outside events in bhakti verses of many bhagats, despite this being such a tumultuous time in indian history. Baburs invasion brought with it bloodshed, plunder, destruction and massacres.


In this hymn Guru Nanak uses the metaphor of the marriage party, describing the march of Babur and his army of dogs, ravaging through beatiful Khorastan and coming to defile the jewel-like bride Hindustan (India). Ironic use of terms associated with marriage customs seem to be a subverison of the populist and widespread archetype of 'the beloved' that preoccupied north indian religous and artistic thought at the time.


Nanak puts this event up to the prospect of a merciful yet all-powerful God, describing powerfully yet with muted economy the state of events and how this related to questions of suffering and oppression, and the transcience of life.


Nanak and the bhakti movement

The Bhakti movement was an anti-establishment shift in the pysche of the native indian people, mirrored by the sufi movement amongst the muslim population. Far from being an ideology, the tone was set by a number of remarkable religious personalities from all manner of backgrounds and religious dispositions whose teachings became known far and wide. The emphasis was on devotion over and above philosphy, and God over and above thought and circumstances.


Nanak is understood outside of sikhism mainly in this framwork. His near comtempories in north india were personalities like Kabir, Ravidas and Naamdev, to name but a few. Yet one way in which Nanak stands is his extensive travels throughout india and beyond.


However Nanak is not viewed as a Bhagat by sikhs, rather these individuals exmply the uniqueness and astonoshing nature of the devotes' state. To Sikhs Nanak is a manifestation whereby god was revealed. Hence the title Guru. This explains his travel as stated in the previous paragraph. He moved from place to place in order to seek out the devoted, in answer to their religious yearning. As per the janamsakhis, Nanak mysteriously took up the religious form recognisable to different religious groups as he ventured into their different territories. So amongst the Shivaites in the south he became like a Shivaite, amongst the muslims in the west he seemed like a muslim holyman.


Last years of Nanak

As his end approached Nanak would frequently test the devotion of his sons and nearest followers and in doing demonstrate their state of mind to one another.


There were numerous such occasions and one devotee, Lehna, rose to emminence as he never faltered in his faith in Nanak. Later Nanak proclaimed Lehna as the successor Guru renaming him Angad, meaning limb or ones very own. Thus the Guru aspect of Nanaks body illuminated Angad, and so he became Nanak. In the Guru Granth this is described as having even a physical manifestation whereby Angad suddenly appeared to look like Nanak. For other uses, see Guru (disambiguation). ...


(To sikhs, although there are ten Gurus in body form, there was actaully only a Single Guru whose light moved from each sucessor to the next)


Nanaks body shortly after announced his death had arrived, and retreated to a tree whereby he sat in the lotus posture and the praan (life-force) was guided upwards and liberated form the body. The date is recorded at 22 September 1539. is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events May 30 - In Florida, Hernando de Soto lands at Tampa Bay with 600 soldiers with the goal to find gold. ...


See also

Sikhism Portal

Image File history File links Portal. ... The following figures are believed to have founded major beliefs or to have been the first codifiers or best known proponents of older known religion or traditions. ... Religions Sikhism Scriptures Guru Granth Sahib Languages English, Punjabi] A Sikh (English: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ) is an adherent to Sikhism. ... Hinduism and Sikhism, both dharmic religions from India, have had a complex relationship. ... Sikhism (IPA: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ), founded on the teachings of Guru Nanak Dev and nine successive gurus in fifteenth century Northern India, is the fifth-largest religion in the world. ... Map showing the prevalence of Abrahamic (purple) and Dharmic (yellow) religions in each country. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Nanak may be referred to by many names and titles such as Baba Nanak or Nanak Shah.
  2. ^ Macauliffe, Max Arthur [1909] (2004). The Sikh Religion - Its Gurus, Sacred Writings and Authors. India: Low Price Publications, 1. ISBN 81-86142-31-2. “The third day of the light-half of the month of Baisakh (April-May) in the year AD 1469, but, some historians believe that the Guru was born on April 15th, 1469 A.D.” . Generally thought to be the third day of Baisakh (or Vaisakh) of Vikram Samvat 1526.
  3. ^ Singh, Khushwant (2006). The Illustrated History of the Sikhs. India: Oxford University Press, 12-13. ISBN 0-19-567747-1.  Also, according to the Purātan Janamsākhī (the birth stories of Nanak).
  4. ^ [1]
  5. ^ Macauliffe, Max Arthur [1909] (2004). The Sikh Religion - Its Gurus, Sacred Writings and Authors. India: Low Price Publications, lxxix. ISBN 81-86142-31-2. 
  6. ^ Macauliffe, Max Arthur [1909] (2004). The Sikh Religion - Its Gurus, Sacred Writings and Authors. India: Low Price Publications, 2. ISBN 81-86142-31-2. 
  7. ^ Cunningham, Joseph Davey (1853). A History Of The Sikhs. London: John Murray, 37-38. 

Max Arthur Macauliffe was a translator of Sikh religious writings. ... Khushwant Singh , born on 2 February 1915 in Punjab (Hadali, now a part of Pakistan) is one of the most prominent novelists and journalists of India. ... Max Arthur Macauliffe was a translator of Sikh religious writings. ... Max Arthur Macauliffe was a translator of Sikh religious writings. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ...

Video

Audio

Image File history File links Sikh emblem. ... Sikhism (IPA: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ), founded on the teachings of Guru Nanak Dev and nine successive gurus in fifteenth century Northern India, is the fifth-largest religion in the world. ... This list is of topics related to Sikhs and Sikhism. ... Image File history File links Sikh emblem. ... Sikhism was established by ten Gurus, teachers or masters, over the period 1469 to 1708. ... Period in office   1539 - 1552 Predecessor   Guru Nanak Dev Founder of Sikhism Successor   Amar Das 3nd of the Eleven Gurus of Sikhism Religious career Ordination   07 September 1539 Previous post   Guru Personal Date of birth   31 March 1504 Place of birth   Muktsar, Punjab, (now India) Date of death   March 28... Guru Amar Das Guru Amar Das (Punjabi: ) (Born in Amritsar, Punjab, India on 5 May 1479 – 14 May 1574 Amritsar, Punjab, India) was the third of the Ten Gurus of Sikhism, and he became Guru on 26 March 1552 following in the footsteps of Guru Angad Dev, who died 29... For other uses, see Ram Dass (disambiguation). ... Guru Arjan, right, dictating the Adi Granth to Bhai Gurdas. ... Portrait of Guru Har Gobind Guru Har Gobind (Punjabi: ) also Sacha Padshah (ਸੱਚਾ ਪਾਦਸ਼ਾਹ True King) (1595–1644) was the sixth of the Ten Gurus of Sikhism and became Guru on 25 May 1606 following in the footsteps of his father Guru Arjan Dev. ... Guru Har Rai ji. ... Guru Har Krishan (Punjabi: ) (Born in Rupnagar, Punjab, India on 7 July 1656 as – 30 March 1664, Delhi, India) was the eighth of the Ten Gurus of Sikhism, and he became Guru on 7 October 1661 following in the footsteps of his father, Guru Har Rai. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Guru Gobind Singh (Punjabi: ) (22 December 1666 – 7 October 1708) He was born in Patna in India in 1666 and became the tenth Guru of the Sikhs on 11 November 1675, succeeding his father, Guru Tegh Bahadur who was killed by Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb. ... The Adi Sri Guru Granth Sahib (Punjabi: , ), or Guru Granth Sahib, is the holy book, or scriptures, of the Sikhs. ... Sikh Bhagats refers to the Saints and holy men of various faiths whose teachings are included in the Sikh holy book the Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji. ... The Sikh religious philosophy is covered in great detail in the Sri Guru Granth Sahib, the Sikh holy text. ... // There is only one God who has infinite qualities and names. ... The Sikhs must believe in the following values: Equality: All humans are equal before God – No discrimination is allowed on the basis of caste, race, sex, creed, origin, color, education, status, wealth, etc. ... There are a number of religious prohibitions in Sikhism and by the SGPC: Cutting Hair: Cutting hair is strictly forbidden in Sikhism. ... Naam: Or Naam Japo. ... The Golden Temple is the most important sacred shrine for Sikhs Sikhism comes from the word Sikh, which means a strong and able disciple. ... The Ardās (Punjabi: ) are the Sikh daily prayers. ... The Amrit Sanskar Ceremony Amrit Sanskar or Amrit Sanchar or the Amrit ceremony is the Sikh ceremony of initiation or baptism. ... Chardi Kala is an important expression used in Sikhism for a mind frame that a Sikh has to accept and practise. ... Dasvand means to donate 10% percent of ones harvest to the Gurdwara. ... The Five Ks, or panj kakaar/kakke, are five items of faith that baptised Khalsa Sikhs wear at all times at the command of the tenth Sikh Guru, Guru Gobind Singh who so ordered at the Baisakhi Amrit Sanchar in 1699. ... Kirat Karō is one of three primary pillars of Sikhism. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Nām Japō (Punjabi: ), refers to the meditation, vocal singing of Hymns from the Sri Guru Granth Sahib or of the various Names of God, specially the chanting of the word Waheguru, which means Wonderful Lord. ... The term Simran refers to the vocal repetition or recital of the God Names - Naam or of the Holy Text from the Two Granths of the Sikhs - the Sri Guru Granth Sahib and the Dasam Granth. ... The Three Pillars of Sikhism were formalised by Guru Nanak as: The Guru led the Sikhs directly to practise Simran and Naam Japna—meditation on God and reciting and chanting of God’s Name—Waheguru. ... In Sikhism Vaṇḍ Chakkō (Punjabi: ) is a technique and method which means share it as you consume it. ... The Adi Sri Guru Granth Sahib (Punjabi: , ), or Guru Granth Sahib, is the holy book, or scriptures, of the Sikhs. ... Guru Granth Sahib (Granth is Punjabi for book, Sahib is Hindi meaning master, from Arabic, meaning companion, friend, owner, or master) or Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji or SGGS for short, is more than a holy book of the Sikhs. ... The Dasam Granth (Punjabi: , ) is a scripture of Sikhism, containing texts composed by 10th Sikh Guru, Guru Gobind Singh and his assembly of scholars. ... The Sarbloh Granth (Punjabi: , ) is a collection of the tenth masters writings that recites the story of gods and demons. ... Bani is the term used by Sikhs to refer to various sections of the Holy Text that appears in their several Holy Books. ... Chaupai is the short name for the Sikh prayer or Gurbani whose full name is Kabiobach Bainti Chaupai. ... Jaap Sahib is the morning prayer of the Sikhs. ... Japji Sahib consists of the Mool Mantra as the beginning followed by 38 hymns and a final Salok at the end of this composition. ... Illuminated Adi Granth folio with nisan (Mool Mantar) of Guru Gobind Singh. ... Evening prayer of the Sikhs. ... Sukhmani Sahib is the name given to the set of hymns divided into 24 sections which appear in the Sri Guru Granth Sahib, the Sikh Holy Scriptures on page 262. ... This is a short hymn of 10 stanzas. ... The history of Sikhism is closely associated with the history of Punjab, the socio-political situation in medieval India, and the social structures and philosophies of Hinduism and Islam. ... Simple Ek Onkar Devanagari Aum Stylised Ek Onkar Ik Onkar (also , , , Ek Omkar, Ik Onkar and other variants) means one God and is a central tenet of Sikh religious philosophy. ... The Harimandir Sahib. ... For the Golden Pavilion Temple in Kyoto, Japan, see Kinkaku-ji. ... Khalsa (Punjabi: , literally Pure) refers to the collective body of all baptized Sikhs. ... The Khanda Sikh Khanda on Stamp designed by Stacey Zabolotney Issued By Canada Post in November 2000 . ... This section of Sikh Names and the Sikh Names List is material copyright of www. ... Satguru or Sadguru means true guru (Sanskrit सदगुरू sat=true), literally: true teacher. ... Waheguru (Punjabi: , or , ) means The Wonderful Lord in the Punjabi language. ... Bhagat Ramanand is considered a pioneer of the Bhakti movement in the Indian subcontinent. ... Sheikh Farid (Farid-ul-Din Masaud Shakar Ganj) c. ... Kabir (कबीर) (1440 - Indian Mystic who preached an ideal of seeing all of humanity as one. ... The first known use of the word Punjab is in the book Tarikh-e-Sher Shah (1580), which mentions the construction of a fort by Sher Khan of Punjab. The name is mentioned again in Ain-e-Akbari (part 1), written by Abul Fazal, who also mentions that the territory... For other uses, see Sardar (disambiguation). ... Takht (bed, seat, or podium) is the representative musical ensemble, the orchestra, of Arab music. ... Dastar Corp. ... Image File history File links Sikh emblem. ... Image File history File links Sikh emblem. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Guru Nanak Dev (5302 words)
ri Guru Nanak Dev ji was born in 1469 in Talwandi, a village in the Sheikhupura district, 65 kms.
Guru Nanak believed that while it is essential to elevate man internally, it is equally necessary to uplift the fallen and the downtrodden in actual life.
Guru Nanak directed him to be active as he had to fulfill his mission and organise a community inspired by his religious principles.
The Sikhism Home Page: Guru Nanak Dev (3092 words)
The founder of the Sikh religion, Guru Nanak was born on April 15, 1469 in the Western Punjab village of Talwandi.
Guru Nanak choose this medium to propagate his message because it was easily understood by the population of the time.
Thus Guru Angad was ordained as the successor to Guru Nanak.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m