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Encyclopedia > Gulden (historical denomination)

The Gulden originated as a gold coin (hence the name) but has been a common name for a silver or base metal coin for some centuries. The name has often been interchangeable with Florin. Florin may be any of these modern coins: Netherlands Antilles florin. ...

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Netherlands

The Gulden (known in English as the Guilder) was the unit of currency in the Netherlands until the introduction of the Euro. The gulden (sometimes guilder in English), represented by the symbol Æ’, was the name of the currency used in the Netherlands from the 15th century until 1999, when it was replaced by the euro (coins and notes were not introduced until 2002). ... Guilder is the English name for the Dutch Gulden. ...


Austria-Hungary

With the introduction of the Conventionsthaler in 1754, the Gulden was defined as half a Conventionsthaler, equivalent to 1/20 of a Cologne mark of silver and subdivided into 60 Kreuzer. The Gulden became the standard unit of account in Austria and remained so until 1892. The Conventionstaler was a standard silver coin of the Holy Roman Empire. ... The Cologne mark was a unit of weight equivalent to 233. ... Berner Kreuzer von 1776 The Kreuzer was a silver coin and unit of currency existing in the Southern German states prior to the unification of Germany in 1870, and in Austria. ...


In 1857, the Vereinsthaler was introduced across Germany and Austria-Hungary, with a silver content of 16 2/3 grams. This was slightly less than 1.5 times the silver content of the Gulden. Consequently, Austria-Hungary adopted a new standard for the Gulden, containing 2/3 as much silver as the Vereinsthaler. This involved a 4.76% debasement of the currency. Austria-Hungary also decimalized at the same time, resulting in a new currency system of 100 Kreuzer = 1 Gulden, 1½ Gulden = 1 Vereinsthaler. The name Gulden was used on German language banknotes, whilst the name Florin was used on Austrian coins and Forint was used in Hungarian. The Vereinsthaler (union thaler) was a standard silver coin used in most German states and the Austro-Hungarian Empire in the years prior to German unification. ... The gram or gramme, symbol g, is a unit of mass. ... Austria issued a coin called a Florin from 1857 until 1892. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ...


The Austro-Hungarian Gulden was replaced by the Krone in 1892 at a rate of 2 Krone = 1 Gulden. The Austro-Hungarian Empire adopted the gold standard in 1892 when the new currency of the Krone (Crown, also known in Hungarian and other imperial languages as the Koruna) of 100 hellers was introduced. ...

Preceded by:
Conventionsthaler
Austrian currency
1754-1892
Succeeded by:
krone

The Conventionstaler was a standard silver coin of the Holy Roman Empire. ... 1754 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1892 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Austro-Hungarian Empire adopted the gold standard in 1892 when the new currency of the Krone (Crown, also known in Hungarian and other imperial languages as the Koruna) of 100 hellers was introduced. ...

Germany

In southern Germany, a second system was adopted, a short period of time after the introduction of the Conventionsthaler, using the Kreuzer Landmünze. These were worth 1/144 of a Conventionsthaler (5/6 of a Conventionskreuzer), leading to a Gulden of 60 Kreuzer Landmünze which was worth 5/12 of a Conventionsthaler. This Gulden (equivalent to 1/24 of a Cologne mark of silver) was used for accounting in southern German states but was not issued as a coin.


In 1837, the southern states of Germany formed a currency union. They adopted as the unit of account the Gulden of 60 Kreuzer, slightly debased to 1/24½ of a Cologne mark of silver. This allowed an exchange rate with the Prussian Thaler of 1 3/4 Gulden to the Thaler. Coins were issued in denominations of half Gulden, one Gulden, one Thaler and two Thaler (also denominated as 3 1/2 gulden), together with smaller pieces. The national name Prussia (in Prussian: Prusa, German: Preußen, Polish: Prusy, Lithuanian Prusai, Latin: Prussia or Borussia) was used by a wide variety of political factions during the 2nd millennium. ... Examples of German and Austrian thalers compared to a US quarter piece The Thaler was a silver coin used throughout Europe for almost four hundred years. ...


In 1857, the Vereinsthaler was introduced with a silver content fractionally smaller than the Prussian standard. This led to a change of design for the Thaler coins of southern Germany, but no changes were made to the other denominations. The Vereinsthaler (union thaler) was a standard silver coin used in most German states and the Austro-Hungarian Empire in the years prior to German unification. ...


The southern German Gulden was withdrawn following German unification and decimalization. One mark was equal to 35 kreuzer.

Preceded by:
Conventionsthaler
German currency
1754-1873
Succeeded by:
German gold mark

The Conventionstaler was a standard silver coin of the Holy Roman Empire. ... 1754 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1873 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calaber). ... German 20 Mark banknote from 1914 (www. ...

External links

  • Gulden in the Swiss Historical Encyclopedia (in German; also available in French and Italian).

  Results from FactBites:
 
BIGpedia - Guilder - Encyclopedia and Dictionary Online (389 words)
The guilder (Dutch gulden), represented by the symbol ƒ, was the name of the currency used in the Netherlands from the 15th century until 1999, when it was replaced by the euro (coins and notes were not introduced until 2002).
In Hungary, the guilder was named the forint after the city of Florence, and it was used from the old times through today: it is still the currency in Hungary, but only until around 2010, when it is expected to be replaced by the euro.
At the time of withdrawal, all but the 50 and 250 gulden notes had been issued in a new revision that was the same colour as the older, long-serving notes but with a mostly abstract pattern, featuring a different bird for each denomination.
Perspectives in Numismatics - Medieval European Coinage (7525 words)
This is unfortunate since medieval coins provide the collector with an intellectual challenge not found in the modern issues, not to mention their intrinsic historical interest, their distinctive art forms, and their reflections of coinage patterns during the period when the western world, as we know it, was developing.
After all, one collects this series for its intellectual challenge, its historical value, and for a sense of romance, not as a means of a quick buck at the next auction.
Coin denominations were much the same as elsewhere, the denar or pfennig paralleling the denier, and the groschen similar to the gros.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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