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Encyclopedia > Guinness World Records
Guinness World Records 2008 edition.

Guinness World Records, known until 2000 as The Guinness Book of Records (and in previous U.S. editions The Guinness Book of World Records), is a reference book published annually, containing an internationally recognized collection of world records, both human achievements and the extreme of the natural world. The book itself holds a world record, as the best-selling copyrighted series.[1] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... A reference work is a compendium of information, usually of a specific type, compiled in a book for ease of reference. ... A world record is the best performance in a certain discipline, usually a sports event. ...

Contents

Origins

On 10 November 1951, Sir Hugh Beaver, then the managing director of the Guinness Brewery, went on a shooting party in North Slob, by the River Slaney in County Wexford, Ireland. He became involved in an argument: which was the fastest game bird in Europe, the golden plover or the grouse? That evening at Castlebridge House, he realized that it was impossible to confirm in reference books whether or not the golden plover was Europe's fastest game bird.[2] is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Hugh Eyre Campbell Beaver KBE (born 1890 in Johannesburg, South Africa, died London in 1967) was a British engineer, industrialist, and founder of the Guinness Book of Records // Biography Educated at Wellington College, Berkshire after which he spent two years in the Indian Police force from 1910. ... St. ... Wexford Harbour is the natural harbour at the mouth of the River Slaney. ... The Slaney is a river in the southeast of Ireland. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Wexford Code: WX Area: 2,352 km² Population (2006) 131,615 Website: www. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Pluvialis apricaria (Linnaeus, 1758) The Eurasian Golden Plover, Pluvialis apricaria, is a largish plover. ... Genera Tetrao Lagopus Falcipennis Centrocercus Bonasa Dendrapagus Tympanuchus Grouse are from the order Galliformes which inhabit temperate and subarctic regions of the northern hemisphere. ...


Beaver thought that there must be numerous other questions debated nightly in the 81,400 pubs in Britain and Ireland, but there was no book with which to settle arguments about records. He realized then that a book supplying the answers to this sort of question might prove popular.


Beaver’s idea became reality when Guinness employee Christopher Chataway recommended student twins Norris and Ross McWhirter, who had been running a fact-finding agency in London. The brothers were commissioned to compile what became The Guinness Book of Records in August 1954. One thousand copies were printed and given away.[3] Sir Christopher John Chataway (born January 31, 1931) was a champion athlete, pioneering television news broadcaster, and a Conservative politician. ... Norris Dewar McWhirter, CBE (August 12, 1925 – April 19, 2004) was a writer, political activist, co-founder of the Freedom Association, and a television presenter. ... Alan Ross McWhirter (12 August 1925 - 27 November 1975), known as Ross McWhirter, was, with his twin brother, Norris McWhirter, co-founder of the Guinness Book of Records. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


After founding the Guinness Book of Records at 107 Fleet Street, the first 198-page edition was bound on 27 August 1955 and went to the top of the British best seller lists by Christmas. "It was a marketing give away—it wasn't supposed to be a money maker," said Beaver. The following year it launched in the U.S., and it sold 70,000 copies. Fleet Street in 2005 Fleet Street is a famous street in London, England, named after the River Fleet. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ...


After the book became a surprise hit, many further editions were printed, eventually settling into a pattern of one revision a year, published in October to coincide with Christmas sales. The McWhirters continued to publish it and related books for many years. Ross was assassinated by the Provisional Irish Republican Army in 1975. Both brothers had an encyclopedic memory — on the TV series Record Breakers, based upon the book, they would take questions posed by children in the audience on various world records, and would usually be able to give the correct answer. Following McWhirter's assassination, the feature was called "Norris on the Spot". Assassin and Assassins redirect here. ... The Provisional Irish Republican Army (Irish: Óglaigh na hÉireann) (IRA; also referred to as the PIRA, the Provos, or by some of its supporters as the Army or the RA.[2]) is an Irish Republican, left wing[3] paramilitary organisation that, until the Belfast Agreement, sought to end Northern... ÆÀÉRecord Breakers was a British Guinness Book of Records themed childrens TV show, originally presented by Roy Castle with twin brothers Norris McWhirter and Ross McWhirter. ... Alan Ross McWhirter (12 August 1925 - 27 November 1975), known as Ross McWhirter, was, with his twin brother, Norris McWhirter, co-founder of the Guinness Book of Records. ...


Evolution

Some world record attempts are more unusual than others: Suresh Joachim, minutes away from breaking the ironing world record at 55 hours and 5 minutes, at Shoppers World, Brampton.
Some world record attempts are more unusual than others: Suresh Joachim, minutes away from breaking the ironing world record at 55 hours and 5 minutes, at Shoppers World, Brampton.

Recent editions have focused on record feats by human competitors. Competitions range from obvious ones such as weightlifting to the more entertaining such as longest egg-throwing distance or the number of hot dogs that can be consumed in ten minutes - although eating contest and beer and alcohol consumption entries are no longer accepted, possibly for fear of litigation. Besides records about competitions, it contains such facts as the heaviest tumor, the most poisonous plant, the shortest river (Roe River), the longest-running drama (Guiding Light), the longest serving members of a drama series (William Roache for Coronation Street in the UK, Kate Ritchie and Ray Meagher for Home and Away in Australia), the world's most successful salesman (Joe Girard), the most successful reality television musical group (Girls Aloud), and the only brother and sister to have solo number one singles in UK chart history (Daniel and Natasha Bedingfield). Many records also relate to the youngest person who achieved something, such as the youngest person to visit all nations of the world, being Maurizio Giuliano.[4] ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 351 KB) Summary Suresh Joachim at Shoppers World mall in Brampton, setting the ironing world record. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 351 KB) Summary Suresh Joachim at Shoppers World mall in Brampton, setting the ironing world record. ... Suresh Joachim, minutes away from breaking the ironing world record at 55 hours and 5 minutes, at Shoppers World Brampton. ... An iron Ironing or smoothing is the work of using a heated tool to remove wrinkles from washed clothes. ... Over 30 years old, Shoppers World, Brampton was at one point in the 1970s Canadas top selling mall, per square foot. ... This article is about modern humans. ... A weightlifter about to jerk 180 kg[1] Weightlifting is a sport in which competitors attempt to lift heavy weights mounted on steel bars called barbells, the execution of which is a combination of power, flexibility, technique, mental and physical strength. ... In most birds and reptiles, an egg (Latin ovum) is the zygote, resulting from fertilization of the ovum. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... Sonya Thomas and Tim Janus at the 2005 Midway Slots Crabcake Eating Competition Competitive eating involves the consumption of large quantities of food in a short time period – typically 15 minutes or less. ... Drinking games are games which involve the drinking of beer or other alcoholic beverages. ... A lawsuit is a civil action brought before a court in order to recover a right, obtain damages for an injury, obtain an injunction to prevent an injury, or obtain a declaratory judgment to prevent future legal disputes. ... For malignant tumors specifically, see cancer. ... For other uses, see River (disambiguation). ... The Roe River runs between Giant Springs and the Missouri River near Great Falls, Montana. ... Guiding Light (known as The Guiding Light prior to 1975, GL) is an American television program credited by the Guinness Book of World Records as being the longest-running soap opera in production and the longest running drama in television history. ... William Bill Roache MBE, Hon D.Litt (born April 25, 1932 in Ilkeston, Derbyshire) is an English television actor, who plays the part of Ken Barlow in the long-running soap opera, Coronation Street. ... Coronation Street is an award winning British soap opera. ... Kate Ritchie (born August 14, 1978 in Goulburn, New South Wales[1]) is a Gold Logie Award winning Australian actress who is best known for her portrayal of Sally Fletcher on the television soap opera Home and Away. ... Ray Meagher (born July 4, 1944) is an Australian actor on the television series Home and Away. ... Home and Away (commonly abbreviated to H&A) is a soap opera that has been produced in Sydney by the Seven Network since July 1987. ... Joseph Samuel Gerard a. ... Reality television is a genre of television programming which presents purportedly unscripted dramatic or humorous situations, documents actual events, and features ordinary people instead of professional actors. ... Girls Aloud are a Smash Hits Poll Winners, TMF Award winning and BRIT Award nominated British girl group who found fame after winning the ITV1 talent show Popstars: The Rivals in 2002 on which they were created. ... Daniel John Bedingfield (born December 3, 1979) is a New Zealand born singer songwriter currently based in the UK. He is the brother of pop singer Natasha Bedingfield. ... Natasha Anne Bedingfield (born 26 November 1981) is an English singer and songwriter who debuted in the 1980s as a member of the Christian dance/electronic group The DNA Algorithm with her siblings Daniel Bedingfield and Nikola Rachelle. ... Maurizio Giuliano is a social scientist with a background in academia and media. ...


Each edition contains a selection of the large set of records in the Guinness database, and the criteria for that choice have changed over the years.


The ousting of Norris McWhirter from his consulting role in 1995 and the subsequent decision by Diageo plc to sell the Guinness World Records brand have shifted it from a text-heavy reference book to a highly-illustrated, colourful product.


These changes have done no harm to its commercial success: the Guinness Book of Records is the world's most sold copyrighted book, thus earning it an entry within its own pages. A number of spin-off books and television series have also been produced. Again the emphasis in these shows has been on spectacular, entertaining stunts, rather than any aspiration to inform or educate. The Guinness World Record brand is now owned by HIT Entertainment. Not to be confused with copywriting. ... A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ... The new HIT Entertainment logo, introduced in June 2006. ...

Madonna is the most successful female recording artist in the music history and she is the highest earning female singer of all time, according to the 2007 Guinness Book of Records.
Madonna is the most successful female recording artist in the music history and she is the highest earning female singer of all time, according to the 2007 Guinness Book of Records.[5]

Guinness World Records do not monitor the category of 'Person with the most records' as this changes too frequently, and records that once existed may now have been 'rested' and therefore this would not be a fair category. Image File history File links Madonnact. ... Image File history File links Madonnact. ... This article is about the American entertainer. ...


In 2005, Guinness designated 9 November as International Guinness World Records Day to encourage breaking of world records; it was described as "phenomenally successful". The 2006 version was dubbed as, "the world’s biggest international event" with an estimated 100,000 people participating in over 10 countries. The promotion has earned Guinness a whopping 2,244 all-new valid records in 12 months, which is a 173% increase over the previous year.[6] is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 2006, Michael Jackson visited the Guinness World Records office in London to collect 7 Official Records Certificates related to his successful career as a vocalist and song writer.[7] Michael Joseph Jackson (August 29, 1958), commonly known as MJ as well as the King of Pop, is an American musician, entertainer, and pop icon whose successful career and controversial personal life have been a part of pop culture for the last three decades. ...


On 9 January 2007, Guinness announced it was working with AskMeNow to offer mobile access to the Guinness World Records databases. The company has been collaborating with the UK-based firm Texperts for several years already, and it offers both companies exclusive access to their database. is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... AskMeNow is an Irvine, California based mobile search company that launched in the United States in late 2005. ... Texperts, previously known as 82ASK, is a is a mobile find SMS service that allows users to text a question to a team of research experts who provide individually tailored, relevant answers their mobile. ...


Ethical issues

Steven Petrosino, drinking 500 ml beer in 0.4 seconds in June 1977. Guinness accepted only the record for one litre, but later dropped all beer and alcohol records from their compendium in 1991.
Steven Petrosino, drinking 500 ml beer in 0.4 seconds in June 1977.[8][9] Guinness accepted only the record for one litre, but later dropped all beer and alcohol records from their compendium in 1991.

Several world records that were once included in the book have been removed for ethical reasons. By publishing world records in a category, the book may encourage others to try to beat that record, even at the expense of their own health and safety. For example, following publication of a "heaviest cat" record, many cat owners overfed their pets beyond the bounds of what was healthy,[citation needed] so entries such as these were removed. The Guinness Book also dropped records within their "eating and drinking records" section of Human Achievements in 1991 over concerns that potential competitors could do harm to themselves and expose the publisher to potential litigation. These changes included the removal of all liquor, wine and beer drinking records, along with other unusual records for consuming such unlikely things as bicycles and trees.[10] Image File history File links Guinness_Beer_Record. ... Image File history File links Guinness_Beer_Record. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Binomial name Felis catus Linnaeus, 1758 Synonyms Felis lybica invalid junior synonym The cat (or domestic cat, house cat) is a small carnivorous mammal. ... It has been suggested that civil trial be merged into this article or section. ... Spirits redirects here. ... For other uses, see Wine (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ...


Other records, such as sword swallowing, were closed to further entry as the current holders had performed beyond what are considered safe human tolerance levels. There have been cases where closed records have been reopened. For example, the sword swallowing record was listed as closed in 1990 Guinness Book of World Records, but the Guinness World Records Primetime TV show, which started in 1998, accepted three sword swallowing challenges. Sword swallowing is a dangerous performance art, in which the performer inserts a sword into his mouth and down his esophagus towards his stomach. ... Description: This TV series was based on the Guinness Book of World Records, and aired on the FOX television network from July 1998 to October 2001. ...


Chain letters are also not allowed. "Guinness World Records does not accept any records relating to chain letters, sent by post or e-mail. If you receive a letter or an e-mail, which may promise to publish the names of all those who send it on, please destroy it, it is a hoax. No matter if it says that Guinness World Records and the postal service are involved, they are not."[11]


Museums

Guinness Museum in Hollywood.
Guinness Museum in Hollywood.

In recent years the Guinness company has permitted the franchising of small museums with displays based on the book, all currently (as of 2005) located in towns popular with tourists: Tokyo, Surfers Paradise, Copenhagen, San Francisco, San Antonio, Niagara Falls, Hollywood, Atlantic City, Myrtle Beach, South Carolina and Gatlinburg, Tennessee. While some displays are dramatic, like the statues of the world's tallest and shortest people, or videos of records being broken, much of the information is presented simply with text and photos. Image File history File links 6764_Guinness. ... Image File history File links 6764_Guinness. ... Franchising (from the French for honesty or freedom[1]) is a method of doing business wherein a franchisor licenses trademarks and tried and proven methods of doing business to a franchisee in exchange for a recurring payment, and usually a percentage piece of gross sales or gross profits as well... The Louvre Museum in Paris, one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... Surfers Paradise by day during Schoolies week, in Cavill Mall. ... For other uses, see Copenhagen (disambiguation). ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Texas Coordinates: Counties Bexar County Government  - Mayor Phil Hardberger Area  - City  412. ... Skyline of Niagara Falls, Canada, as seen from Niagara Falls State Park across the river. ... “Hollywood” redirects here. ... Alternate meanings: See Atlantic City (disambiguation) Atlantic City is a city located in USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 40,517. ... Myrtle Beach is a city and in Horry County, South Carolina, United States. ... Gatlinburg is a city in Sevier County, Tennessee, with a total population of 3,828, as of the 2000 U.S. census. ...


See also

Ashrita Furman, born September 16, 1954 in Brooklyn, New York, is the holder of 32 records in the Guinness Book of Records, including being the individual with the most current Guinness World Records [1]. Furman first entered into the Guinness book by doing 27,000 Jumping Jacks in 1979. ... Queens is geographically the largest of the five boroughs of New York City in the United States, and the most ethnically diverse county in the U.S. It is coterminous with Queens County in the State of New York and is located on western Long Island. ... For the TV series, see Ripleys Believe It or Not (TV series). ...

References

  1. ^ Watson, Bruce. (August 2005). "World's Unlikeliest Bestseller". Smithsonian, pp. 76–81.
  2. ^ Early history of Guinness World Records - page 2
  3. ^ History of Guinness Book of Records. Retrieved on 2007-04-29.
  4. ^ ABC News: European sets world travel record.
  5. ^ Queen of Pop Madonna crowned highest earning female singer on earth Daily Mail, 2006-09-28
  6. ^ Records Shatter Across the Globe in Honor of Guinness World Records Day 2006. Retrieved on 2007-04-29.
  7. ^ http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/mediazone/pdfs/entertainment/061114_michael_jackson.pdf/
  8. ^ World Speed Beer Drinking Record. Retrieved on 2007-04-29.
  9. ^ Video clip. Retrieved on 2007-04-29.
  10. ^ Guinness Book of World Records 1990 edition, p. 464
  11. ^ http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/member/faqs.aspx

2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in August August 31: Michael Sheard August 26: Lord Fitt August 24: Jack Slipper August 24: Maurice Cowling August 24: Dr. Tom Pashby August 23: Brock Peters August 22: Lord Lane August 21: Robert Moog August... Smithsonian is a monthly magazine published by the Smithsonian Institution of the United States in Washington, DC External link Smithsonian webpage Categories: Smithsonian Institution | United States magazines | Stub ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Daily Mail is a British newspaper and the oldest tabloid, first published in 1896. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Guinness World Records - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1289 words)
Guinness World Records, known until 2000 as The Guinness Book of Records (and in previous U.S. editions, The Guinness Book of World Records) is a reference book published annually, containing an internationally recognized collection of world records, both human achievements and the extreme of the natural world.
In other cases, Guinness accepts the claim of the Apple iMac as having the shortest computer instruction manual (there are others that are similar), and the Khardung La [1] as being the highest motorable road.
Other records, such as sword swallowing, were closed to further entry as the current holders have performed beyond what are considered safe human tolerance levels.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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