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Encyclopedia > Guinness
Guinness logo
"Guinness is Good for You" Irish language advertisement. (Reformed Irish orthography: Is fearr thú Guinness)
"Guinness is Good for You"
Irish language advertisement. (Reformed Irish orthography: Is fearr thú Guinness)

Guinness (pronounced /ˈyɪnɪs/) is a popular dry stout that originated in Arthur Guinness's brewery at St. James's Gate in Dublin, Ireland. The beer is based on the porter style that originated in London in the early 18th century. It is one of the most successful beer brands in the world, being exported worldwide. The distinctive feature in the flavour is the roasted barley which remains unfermented. For many years a portion of the beer was aged to give a sharp lactic flavour, but Guinness has refused to confirm if this still occurs. The thick creamy head is the result of the beer being mixed with nitrogen when being served. It is extremely popular with the Irish and, in spite of a decline in consumption over recent years, is the best-selling alcoholic drink of all time in Ireland,[1][2] where Guinness & Co. makes almost €2 billion annually. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about the modern Goidelic language. ... This article is about the modern Goidelic language. ... Irish orthography has a reputation as being very difficult to learn and bearing only a tenuous relationship to the pronunciation. ... Guinness may refer to: Guinness — a beer Diageo — parent company of Guinness (formerly called Guinness plc) St. ... Arthur Guinness Arthur Guinness (September 24, 1725 – January 23, 1803) was an Irish brewer and the founder of the Guinness Brewery business and family. ... St. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ... Porter is a beer with a dark colour. ... For other uses, see Barley (disambiguation). ... General Name, symbol, number nitrogen, N, 7 Chemical series nonmetals Group, period, block 15, 2, p Appearance colorless gas Standard atomic weight 14. ...


The parent company has been headquartered in London since 1932 and was later merged with Grand Metropolitan plc and developed into a multi-national alcohol conglomerate named Diageo. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Diageo plc (LSE: DGE, NYSE: DEO) is the largest multinational beer, wine and spirits company in the world. ...

Contents

Composition

Guinness stout is made from water, barley malt, barley, hops, and brewer's yeast. A portion of the barley is flaked (i.e. steamed and rolled) and roasted to give Guinness its dark colour and characteristic taste. It is pasteurised and filtered. Despite its reputation as a "meal in a glass", Guinness only contains 198 calories (838 kilojoules) per imperial pint (20 fl oz UK) (1460 kJ/l),[citation needed] fewer than an equal-sized serving of skimmed milk or orange juice and most other non-light beers. Bottles of Imperial Stout Stout and porter are dark beers made using roasted malts or roast barley. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... For other uses, see Barley (disambiguation). ... Hop umbel (branched floral structure resembling nested-inverted umbrellas) in a Hallertau hop yard Hops are a flower used primarily as a flavouring and stability agent in beer, as well as in herbal medicine. ... Brewers yeast (also known as brewers yeast or brewing yeast) can mean any live yeast used in brewing. ... ... Typical filtered beer Filtered beer is beer which has been cleaned of significant contact with yeast. ... A calorie refers to a unit of energy. ... The joule (IPA: or ) (symbol: J) is the SI unit of energy. ... The pint is an English unit of volume or capacity in the imperial system and United States customary units, equivalent in each system to one half of a quart, and one eighth of a gallon. ... The litre or liter (see spelling differences) is a unit of volume. ... ... For other uses, see Orange juice (disambiguation). ...


Draught Guinness and its canned counterpart contain nitrogen (N2) as well as carbon dioxide. Nitrogen is less soluble than carbon dioxide, which allows the beer to be put under high pressure without making it fizzy. The high pressure of dissolved gas is required to enable very small bubbles to be formed by forcing the draught beer through fine holes in a plate in the tap, which causes the characteristic "surge" (the widget in cans and bottles achieves the same effect). The perceived smoothness of draught Guinness is due to its low level of carbon dioxide and the creaminess of the head caused by the very fine bubbles that arise from the use of nitrogen and the dispensing method described above. "Original Extra Stout" contains only carbon dioxide, causing a more acidic taste. Draught beer keg fonts at the Delirium Café in Brussels Draught beer (also known as draught beer or draught beer or even draught beer) has several related though slightly different understandings. ... General Name, symbol, number nitrogen, N, 7 Chemical series nonmetals Group, period, block 15, 2, p Appearance colorless gas Standard atomic weight 14. ... Carbon dioxide (chemical formula: ) is a chemical compound composed of two oxygen atoms covalently bonded to a single carbon atom. ... Guinness floating widget The original widget was patented in the UK by Guinness. ...


Contemporary Guinness Draught and Extra Stout are weaker than they were in the 19th century, when they had an original gravity of over 1.070. Foreign Extra Stout and Special Export Stout, with abv over 7%, are perhaps closest to the original in character.[3] Original gravity (OG) usually refers to the density of wort, unfermented beer, usually expressed as a ratio to the density of water (thus for instance 1. ...


Although Guinness may appear to be black, it is officially a very dark shade of ruby.[4]


History

Sign at the Market Street entrance
Sign at the Market Street entrance
Crane Street Gate
Crane Street Gate

Arthur Guinness started brewing ales initially in Leixlip, then at the St. James's Gate Brewery, Dublin, Ireland from 1759. He signed a 9,000 year lease at £45 per annum for the unused brewery.[5] Ten years later in 1769 Guinness exported their product for the first time, when six and a half barrels were shipped to England. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 667 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 667 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixels Full resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 375 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixels Full resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 375 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Arthur Guinness Arthur Guinness (September 24, 1725 – January 23, 1803) was an Irish brewer and the founder of the Guinness Brewery business and family. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference O003360 Statistics Province: Leinster County: Elevation: 46 m Population (2002)  - Town:  - Rural:   15,016  15,154 Website: kildare. ... St. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ...


Although sometimes believed to have originated the stout style of beer, the first use of the word stout in relation to beer was in a letter in the Egerton Manuscript dated 1677, almost 50 years before Arthur Guinness was born. The first Guinness beers to use the term were Single Stout and Double Stout in the 1840s.[6]


Guinness brewed their last porter in 1974. Porter is a beer with a dark colour. ...


Guinness Stout is also brewed under licence internationally in several countries, including Nigeria[7] and Indonesia.[8] The unfermented but hopped Guinness wort extract (the essence) is shipped from Dublin and blended with beer brewed locally.


The Guinness brewery in Park Royal, London closed in 2005. The production of all Guinness sold in the UK was switched to St. James's Gate Brewery Dublin. Park Royal is an industrial part of northwest London, partly within the London Borough of Ealing (W5) and mostly within the London Borough of Brent (NW10). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... St. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ...


The breweries pioneered several quality control efforts. The brewery hired the statistician William Sealy Gosset in 1899, who achieved lasting fame under the pseudonym "Student" for techniques developed for Guinness, particularly Student's t-distribution and the even more commonly known Student's t-test. William Sealy Gosset, 1876-1937 William Sealy Gosset (June 13, 1876–October 16, 1937) was an English chemist and statistician, best known by his pen name Student and for his work on Students t-distribution. ... In probability and statistics, the t-distribution or Students t-distribution is a probability distribution that arises in the problem of estimating the mean of a normally distributed population when the sample size is small. ... A t-test is any statistical hypothesis test in which the test statistic has a Students t distribution if the null hypothesis is true. ...


Controversy over proposed sale of St James' Gate

The Sunday Independent reported on 17 June 2007 that Diageo intends closing the historic St James Gate plant in Dublin and moving to a greenfield site on the outskirts of the city.[9] This news caused some controversy when it was announced. The following day, the Irish Daily Mail ran a follow up story with a double page spread complete with images and a history of the plant since 1759. Initially, Diageo said that talk of a move was pure speculation but in the face of mounting speculation in the wake of the Sunday Independent article, the company confirmed that it is undertaking a "significant review of its operations". This review is largely due to the efforts of the company's ongoing drive to reduce the environmental impact of brewing at the St James Gate plant.[10] On 23 November 2007, an article appeared in the Evening Herald, a Dublin newspaper, stating that Dublin City Council, in the best interests of the city of Dublin, had put forward a motion to prevent planning permission ever being granted for development of the site thus making it very difficult for Diageo to sell off the site for residential development. The Sunday Independent is a broadsheet Sunday newspaper published in the Republic of Ireland by Independent News and Media plc. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Irish Daily Mail is a tabloid newspaper published in the Republic of Ireland by Associated Newspapers. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Evening Herald is a tabloid evening newspaper published in Dublin, Ireland by Independent News & Media. ... Dublin City Council (Comhairle Cathrach Bhaile Átha Cliath in Irish) refers to two different entities. ...


Guinness and health

Studies claim that Guinness can be beneficial to the heart. Researchers found that antioxidant compounds in Guinness, similar to those found in certain fruits and vegetables, are responsible for health benefits because they slow down the deposit of harmful cholesterol on the artery walls.[11]


Guinness ran an advertising campaign in the 1920s which stemmed from market research - when people told the company that they felt good after their pint, the slogan was born – "Guinness is Good for You". Guinness was told to stop using the slogan decades ago – and the firm still makes no health claims for the drink. Diageo, the company that now manufactures Guinness, said: "We never make any medical claims for our drinks." The company now runs advertisements that call for "responsible drinking".[12]


Some vegetarians consider Guinness as unsuitable for a vegetarian diet, as the production process involves the use of isinglass, made from fish. It is used as a fining agent for settling out suspended matter in the vat.[13] The isinglass is retained in the floor of the vat but it is possible that minute quantities might be carried over into the beer.[14] Vegetarian cuisine is cookery of food that meets vegetarian principles. ... Isinglass is a substance obtained from the swimbladders of fish (especially Beluga sturgeon), used mainly for the clarification of wine and beer. ...


Varieties

Guinness Original/Extra Stout
Guinness Original/Extra Stout
Guinness Draught
Guinness Draught

Guinness stout is available in a number of variants and strengths, which include: Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x1024, 202 KB)It looks like coke, but it tastes like ass. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x1024, 202 KB)It looks like coke, but it tastes like ass. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 137 KB)A Classic Pint of Guinness Draught. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 137 KB)A Classic Pint of Guinness Draught. ...

  • Guinness Draught, sold in kegs and widget cans and bottles—4.1 to 4.3% alcohol by volume (abv); the Extra Cold is served through a super cooler at 3.5°C (38.3°F).[15]
  • Guinness Original/Extra Stout—4.2 or 4.3% abv (Ireland, UK, mainland Europe), 4.8% abv (Namibia/Southern Africa), 5% abv (Canada) and 6% abv (United States, Australia, Japan);
  • Guinness Foreign Extra Stout, is a 7.5% abv version sold in Europe, Africa, the Caribbean and Asia. The basis is an unfermented but hopped Guinness wort extract shipped from Dublin, which is added to local ingredients and brewed locally. The strength can vary, for example, it is sold at 5% abv in China, 6.5% abv in Jamaica and East Africa, and 8% abv in Singapore.[16][17] In Nigeria a proportion of sorghum is used. Foreign Extra Stout is blended with a small amount of intentionally soured beer.[18]
  • Guinness Special Export Stout, sold in Belgium and The Netherlands—8% abv;
  • Guinness Bitter, an English-style bitter beer—4.4% abv;
  • Guinness Extra Smooth, a smoother stout sold in Ghana, Cameroon and Nigeria—5.5% abv;
  • Malta Guinness, a non-alcoholic sweet drink, produced in Nigeria and exported to the UK and Malaysia;
  • Guinness Mid-Strength, a low-alcohol stout being test-marketed in Limerick, Ireland from March 2006[19] and Dublin from May 2007[20]— 2.8% abv;
  • Guinness Red, brewed in exactly the same way as Guinness except that the barley is only lightly roasted so that it produces a lighter, slightly fruitier red ale, began test-marketing in Great Britain in February 2007—4.2% abv.[21]
  • In October 2005, Guinness introduced the Brewhouse Series — a limited-edition collection of draught stouts available for roughly six months each. The first stout in the series was Brew 39, which was released in Dublin from late 2005 until early 2006. It had the same alcohol content (ABV) as Guinness Draught, used the same gas mix and settled in the same way, but had a slightly different taste. Many found it to be lighter in taste, somewhat closer to Beamish stout than standard Irish Guinness.[citation needed]
  • In May 2006, the second in the Brewhouse Series was introduced, named Toucan Brew after the famous Guinness toucan seen in many advertisements for the stout. This beer had a crisper taste with a slightly sweet aftertaste due to its triple-hopped brewing process.
  • The third of the series—North Star—was released in October 2006 and availability was extended into late 2007 at which point it gradually disappeared from bars. Three million pints of North Star were sold in the latter half of 2007.[22] Despite an announcement in June 2007 that the fourth Brewhouse stout would be launched in October that year,[23] no new beer appeared and, at the end of 2007, the Brewhouse series appeared to have been quietly cancelled.
  • In March 2006, Guinness introduced the "surger" in Great Britain. The surger is a plate-like electrical device meant for the home. It sends ultrasonic waves through a Guinness-filled pint glass to recreate the beer's "surge and settle" effect. The device works in conjunction with special cans of surger-ready Guinness. Guinness tried out a primitive version of this system in 1977 in New York. The idea was abandoned until 2003, when it began testing the surger in Japanese bars, most of which are too small to accommodate traditional keg-and-tap systems. Since then, the surger has been introduced to bars in Paris, but there is no intention of making it available to the French public. Surgers are also in use in Athens, Greece. The surger for the USA market was announced on November 14, 2007; plans are to make the unit available to bars only.[24]
  • Withdrawn Guinness variants include Guinness's Brite Lager, Guinness's Brite Ale, Guinness Light, Guinness XXX Extra Strong Stout, Guinness Cream Stout, Guinness Gold, Guinness Pilsner, Guinness Breó (A slightly citrusy wheat beer), Guinness Shandy and Guinness Special Light.
  • For a short time in the late 1990s, Guinness produced the "St James's Gate" range of craft-style beers, available in a small number of Dublin pubs. The beers were: Pilsner Gold, Wicked Red Ale, Wildcat Wheat Beer and Dark Angel Lager.
  • A brewing byproduct of Guinness, Guinness Yeast Extract (GYE), was produced until the 1950s.

Draught beer keg fonts at the Delirium Café in Brussels Draught beer (also known as draught beer or draught beer or even draught beer) has several related though slightly different understandings. ... Guinness floating widget The original widget was patented in the UK by Guinness. ... Alcohol by volume (ABV) is an indication of how much alcohol (expressed as a percentage) is included in an alcoholic beverage. ... Species About 30 species, see text Sorghum is a genus of numerous species of grasses, some of which are raised for grain and many of which are utilised as fodder plants either cultivated or as part of pasture. ... For other uses, see Limerick (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... A kind of Stout beer brewed by the Beamish Brewery in Cork, Ireland. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... A GYE advertisement from the 1940s Guinness Yeast Extract, commonly known by its initials GYE, was a popular Irish savoury spread, made from yeast extract. ...

Pouring and serving

"Tulip" shaped glass.
"Tulip" shaped glass.

What Diageo calls the "perfect pint" of Draught Guinness is the product of a lengthy "double pour", which according to the company should take 119.5 seconds.[25] Guinness has promoted this wait with advertising campaigns such as "good things come to those who wait". Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2160x3840, 4363 KB) Description: Pint glass with beer; bottle opener and beer bottle in background Photographer: User:Justinc File links The following pages link to this file: Pint glass Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2160x3840, 4363 KB) Description: Pint glass with beer; bottle opener and beer bottle in background Photographer: User:Justinc File links The following pages link to this file: Pint glass Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Draught beer keg fonts at the Delirium Café in Brussels Draught beer (also known as draught beer or draught beer or even draught beer) has several related though slightly different understandings. ... The closing shot of the noitulovE spot, featuring the campaigns slogan over a product shot of three pints of Guinness stout. ...


Ideally a pint of Guinness should be served in a slightly tulip shaped pint glass as opposed to the taller European tulip glass or 'Nonic' glass which contains a ridge approx 3/4 of the way up the glass. On the way to the tap, the beer is passed through a chiller and is forced through a five-hole disc restrictor plate in the end of the tap, which increases the fluid pressure and friction, forcing the creation of small bubbles which form a creamy head. The glass is then rested until the initial pour settles, and the remainder of the glass is then filled with a slow pour until the head forms a slight dome over the top of the glass.[26] Some bartenders also draw a simple design, using the flow of Guinness from the head of the tap, such as a shamrock in the head during the slow pour. A pint glass is a drinking vessel holding a British pint (568ml; ≈1. ... The foam on top of beer is called a head. ... For the song by Dave Matthews Band, see Bartender (song). ... The Shamrock Oxalis acetosella as The Shamrock The shamrock, an unofficial symbol of Ireland and Boston, Massachusetts, is a three-leafed old white clover, sometimes (rarely nowadays) Trifolium repens (white clover, known in Irish as seamair bhán) but more usually today Trifolium dubium (lesser clover, Irish: seamair bhuí). However...


This tradition comes from when Guinness was served from the cask, and initially older beer was poured into a glass until it was 3/4 full, then left to stand. When ordered by the customer, the glass was topped up from younger, gassier beer, producing the traditional head. As the beer is no longer blended from different ages of beer, the double pour is no longer required for the mixing of beers but is still maintained as it produces a better pint as the head does not over fill the glass and need to be discarded.


Sinking bubbles

A long time subject of bar conversations is the Guinness cascade, where the gas bubbles appear to travel downwards in a pint glass of Guinness.[27]


The effect is attributed to drag; bubbles that touch the walls of a glass are slowed in their travel upwards. Bubbles in the centre of the glass are, however, free to rise to the surface, and thus form a rising column of bubbles. The rising bubbles create a current by the entrainment of the surrounding fluid. As beer rises in the center, the beer near the outside of the glass falls. This downward flow pushes the bubbles near the glass towards the bottom. Although the effect occurs in any liquid, it is particularly noticeable in any dark nitrogen stout, as the drink combines dark-coloured liquid and light-coloured bubbles.[28][29] A current, in a river or stream, is the flow of water influenced by gravity as the water moves downhill to reduce its potential energy. ... Entrainment is the movement of one fluid by another. ...


Advertising

One of the toucan posters from 1936 by John Gilroy.
One of the toucan posters from 1936 by John Gilroy.
World War II era advertisement.
World War II era advertisement.

Guinness uses the harp of Brian Boru as its trademark. This harp from approximately the 14th century, which is on view at Trinity College, Dublin, has been a symbol of Ireland since the reign of Henry VIII (16th century). Guinness adopted the harp as a logo in 1862; however, it faces left instead of right, as in the Irish coat of arms. Image File history File links Guinness_Toucan-ad. ... Image File history File links Guinness_Toucan-ad. ... For other uses, see Toucan (disambiguation). ... John Gilroy was born in Whitley Bay on the 30th of May 1898. ... Image File history File links MyGoodnessMyGuiness. ... Image File history File links MyGoodnessMyGuiness. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Coat of arms of Ireland is blazoned as azure a harp or, stringed argent - a gold harp with silver strings on a St. ... “(TM)” redirects here. ... For other institutions named Trinity College, see Trinity College. ... Henry VIII redirects here. ... This article or section should include material from logo design, discuss it at Talk:Logo design A logotype, commonly known as a logo, is the graphic element of a trademark or brand, which is set in a special typeface/font, or arranged in a particular, but legible, way. ...


Guinness has a long history of marketing campaigns, from award-winning television commercials to beer mats and posters. Alcohol advertising is the promotion of alcoholic beverages by alcohol producers through a variety of media. ...


Guinness's iconic stature is partly due to its advertising. The most notable and recognisable series of adverts was created by Benson's advertising, primarily drawn by the artist John Gilroy, in the 1930s and '40s. Benson created posters that included phrases such as "Guinness for Strength", "Lovely Day for a Guinness", "Guinness Makes You Strong," "My Goodness My Guinness," (or, alternatively, "My Goodness, My Christmas, It's Guinness!") and most famously, "Guinness is Good For You". The posters featured Gilroy's distinctive artwork and more often than not featured animals such as a kangaroo, ostrich, seal, lion, and notably a toucan, which has become as much a symbol of Guinness as the harp. (An advertisement from the 1940s ran with the following jingle: "Toucans in their nests agree/Guinness is good for you/Try some today and see/What one or toucan do.") Dorothy L. Sayers, then a copywriter at Benson's, also worked on the campaign; a biography of Sayers notes that she created a sketch of the toucan and wrote several of the adverts in question. Guinness advertising paraphernalia, notably the pastiche booklets illustrated by Ronald Ferns, attracts high prices on the collectible market.[30] John Gilroy was born in Whitley Bay on the 30th of May 1898. ... Species Macropus rufus Macropus giganteus Macropus fuliginosus Macropus antilopinus A kangaroo is a marsupial from the family Macropodidae (macropods, meaning large foot). In common use the term is used to describe the largest species from this family, the Red Kangaroo, the Antilopine Kangaroo, and the Eastern and Western Grey Kangaroo... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Distribution of Ostriches. ... Families Odobenidae Otariidae Phocidae Pinnipeds (fin-feet, lit. ... For other uses, see Lion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Toucan (disambiguation). ... A jingle is a memorable slogan, set to an engaging melody, mainly broadcast on radio and sometimes on television commercials. ... Dorothy Leigh Sayers (Oxford, 13 June 1893 – Witham, 17 December 1957) was a renowned British author, translator, student of classical and modern languages, and Christian humanist. ... RONALD FERNS Ronald Ferns (14 October 1925 – 2 December 1997) was an English illustrator, designer, cartoonist and surrealist painter in oil and watercolour. ...


In the late 1980s and early 1990s in the UK there was a series of humorous adverts featuring Rutger Hauer. Rutger Oelsen Hauer (IPA: [rʏtxɛr ulsɛn hʌuɛr]) (born in Breukelen, January 23, 1944) is a Dutch film actor. ...


The 1994-1995 Anticipation campaign, featuring actor Joe McKinney dancing to "Guaglione" by Perez Prado while his pint settled, became a legend in Ireland and put the song to number one in the charts for several weeks. The advertisement was also popular in the UK where the song reached number two. Anticipation is an award-winning Irish advertisement launched by Diageo in 1994 to promote Guinness-brand draught stout. ... Dámaso Pérez Prado (December 11, 1916 in Cuba - September 14, 1989 in Mexico) was a Cuban bandleader and composer. ...


In 2000, Guinness's 1999 advertisement Surfer was named the best television commercial of all time in a UK poll conducted by The Sunday Times and Channel 4. This advertisement is inspired by the famous 1980s Guinness TV and cinema ad, centred on a surfer riding a wave. The 1980s advertisement not only remained a popular iconic image in its own right but also entered the Irish cultural memory through inspiring a well known line in Christy Moore's song "Delirium Tremens". Surfer was produced by the advertising agency Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO; the advertisement can be downloaded from their website.[31] The Sunday Times is a Sunday broadsheet newspaper distributed in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News International which is in turn owned by News Corporation. ... This article is about the British television station. ... Christopher Andrew Christy Moore (born on May 7, 1945, in Newbridge, County Kildare) is a very popular Irish folk singer, songwriter, and guitarist. ... For the beer, see Delirium Tremens (beer). ... Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO is a UK-based advertising agency which has produced several well-known television commercials, including: The Guinness advert Surfer, voted the best television commercial of all time in a UK poll conducted by The Sunday Times and Channel 4. ...


Guinness won the 2001 Clio Award as the Advertiser of the Year, citing the work of five separate ad agencies around the world.[32] The Clio Awards are given to reward excellence in advertising and design. ...


In 2003 the Guinness TV campaign featuring Tom Crean won the gold Shark Award at the International Advertising Festival of Ireland,[33] while in 2005 their Irish Christmas campaign took a silver Shark.[34] This TV ad has been run every Christmas since 2003 and features pictures of snow falling in places around Ireland, evoking the James Joyce story The Dead, finishing at St. James's Gate Brewery with the line "Even at the home of the black stuff they dream of a white one". For Victoria Cross recipient, see Thomas Joseph Crean. ... This article is about the writer and poet. ... The Dead is the final short story in the collection Dubliners by James Joyce. ... St. ...


Their UK commercial noitulovE, first broadcast in October 2005, was the most-awarded commercial worldwide in 2006[35] In it, three men drink a pint of Guinness, then begin to both walk and evolve backward. Their 'reverse evolution' passes through an ancient homo sapiens, a monkey, a flying lemur, a pangolin, an ichthyasaur and a velociraptor until finally settling on a mud skipper drinking dirty water, which then expresses its disgust at the taste of the stuff, followed by the line "Good Things Come To Those Who Wait". The official name of the ad is "Noitulove"—which is "Evolution" backwards. This was later modified to have a different endings to advertise Guinness Extra Cold, often shown as "break bumpers" at the beginning and end of commercial breaks. The second endings show either the homo sapiens being suddenly frozen in a block of ice, the ichthyasaurs being frozen whilst swimming, or the pool of muddy water freezing over as the mud skipper takes a sip, freezing his tongue to the surface.


Guinness's 2007 advert, directed by Nicolai Fuglsig and filmed in Argentina is titled "Tipping Point". It involves a large-scale domino chain-reaction and, with a budget of £10m, is the most expensive advertisement for the company so far.[36][37] Domino redirects here—for other meanings of the word, see Domino (disambiguation). ...


Guinness worldwide sales

A pint of Guinness with a slice of brown bread and butter.

Sales of Guinness in Britain and Ireland declined 7% in 2006.[38] Image File history File links Ireland_37_bg_061402. ... Image File history File links Ireland_37_bg_061402. ...


Guinness has a significant share of the Africa beer market, where Guinness has been sold since 1827. About 40 per cent of worldwide total Guinness volume is brewed and sold in Africa, with Foreign Extra Stout the most popular variant. The Michael Power advertising campaign was a critical success for Guinness in Africa, running for nearly a decade before being replaced in 2006 with "Guinness Greatness". A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... Michael Power in Critical Assignment, 2003 Michael Power is an advertising character, the cornerstone of a massive marketing campaign by Guinness to promote its products in Africa. ...


In 2006, Canada was the fastest growing Guinness draught market in the world and on St. Patrick's Day in 2006, more Guinness was sold in Canada than in Ireland.[39]


Guinness sales in the United States showed a 9% increase.[40]


Merchandising

During Saint Patrick's Day outside Ireland, Guinness merchandise is available in many places that sell the drink. Merchandise includes clothing and hats, often available from behind the bar after a specified number of pints of Guinness have been purchased. St. ...


There is a popular tourist attraction for Guinness at St. James's Gate Brewery in Dublin, called the Guinness Storehouse, where a self-guided tour of the attraction starts with an overview of the ingredients used to make Guinness followed by a step-by-step description of how Guinness is made. After this a small amount of Guinness is provided to follow with a video of how Guinness is regularly tested by a panel of tasters and the visitor is shown how to properly taste Guinness. The rest of the tour includes many things such as the coopering trade within Guinness many years ago, a section dedicated to the advertising and merchandising efforts of Guinness over the years, and a section dedicated to historical artifacts and footage relating to Guinness. The tour finishes with a free pint of Guinness at the top of the building in the Gravity Bar, where the pint may be enjoyed with a 360-degree view of Dublin. A bar and a restaurant are available to visitors during the tour and a full selection of Guinness merchandise is available to purchase. St. ... A cooper readies the end of a barrel at the Van Ryn Brandy Cellar near Stellenbosch, South Africa The barrel is sealed with a lid, waterproofed using reed leaves, and the end-ring fitted Traditionally, a cooper is someone who makes wooden barrels, casks, buckets and other similar wooden objects. ...


Cooking

Guinness is often used as an ingredient in cooking, typically in stews or pies or as a base for a batter in which fish is deep fried.


See also

St. ... Bottles of Imperial Stout Stout and porter are dark beers made using roasted malts or roast barley. ... Arthur Guinness Arthur Guinness (September 24, 1725 – January 23, 1803) was an Irish brewer and the founder of the Guinness Brewery business and family. ... The Guinness share-trading fraud was a famous British business scandal of the 1980s. ... Guinness World Records 2008 edition. ...

Sources

  • Patrick Lynch and John Vaizey—Guinness's Brewery in the Irish Economy: 1759-1876 (1960) Cambridge University Press
  • Frederic Mullally—The Silver Salver: The Story of the Guinness Family (1981) Granada, ISBN 0-246-11271-9
  • Brian Sibley—The Book Of Guinness Advertising (1985) Guinness Books, ISBN 0-85112-400-3
  • Peter Pugh—Is Guinness Good for You: The Bid for Distillers – The Inside Story (1987) Financial Training Publications, ISBN 1-85185-074-0
  • Edward Guinness—The Guinness Book of Guinness (1988) Guinness Books
  • Michele Guinness—The Guinness Legend: The Changing Fortunes of a Great Family (1988) Hodder and Stoughton General Division, ISBN 0-340-43045-1
  • Jonathan Guinness—Requiem for a Family Business (1997) Macmillan Publishing, ISBN 0-333-66191-5
  • Derek Wilson—Dark and Light: The Story of the Guinness Family (1998) George Weidenfeld & Nicolson, Ltd., ISBN 0-297-81718-3
  • S.R. Dennison and Oliver MacDonagh—Guinness 1886-1939: From Incorporation to the Second World War (1998) Cork University Press, ISBN 1-85918-175-9
  • Jim Davies—The Book of Guinness Advertising (1998) Guinness Media Inc., ISBN 0-85112-067-9
  • Al Byrne—Guinness Times: My Days in the World’s Most Famous Brewery (1999) Town House, ISBN 1-86059-105-1
  • Michele Guinness—The Guinness Spirit: Brewers, Bankers, Ministers and Missionaries (1999) Hodder and Stoughton, ISBN 0-340-72165-0
  • Tony Corcoran—The Goodness of Guinness: The Brewery, Its People and the City of Dublin (2005) Liberties Press, ISBN 0-9545335-7-7
  • Mark Griffiths – Guinness is Guinness... the colourful story of a black and white brand (2005) Cyanbooks, London. ISBN 1-904879-28-4.
  • Charles Gannon – Cathal Gannon - The Life and Times of a Dublin Craftsman (2006) Lilliput Press, Dublin. ISBN 1-84351-086-3.
  • Bill Yenne – Guinness The 250-year quest for the perfect pint (2007) John Wiley, Hoboken. ISBN 978-0-470-12052-1.

Iorwerth Griffiths - 'Beer and Cider in Ireland: The Complete Guide' (2008) Liberties Press ISBN-13: 9781905483174

References

  1. ^ Barry, Dan (2000-08-28). In Ireland's Pubs, a Startling Trend. Lisdoonvarna Journal. The New York Times. Retrieved on 2008-04-10. “... while Guinness stout remains the best-selling alcoholic beverage in Ireland, over the last year its consumption here has declined by nearly 4 percent.”
  2. ^ Diageo Beer sales continue decline. Drinks Industry Ireland. Barkeeper (2007-02-26). Retrieved on 2008-04-10. “Nevertheless, Guinness continues to be Ireland’s number one beer 'by a wide margin' according to Michael Patten, Group Corporate Relations Director at Diageo Ireland, 'More than 40 per cent of all draught beer sold in Ireland is a Guinness'.”
  3. ^ Ron Pattinson's The Breweries of Ireland
  4. ^ Guinness: Frequently Asked Questions—guinness.com
  5. ^ Diageo Guinness Profile
  6. ^ "Guinness’s Brewery in the Irish Economy 1759–1876", Patrick Lynch and John Vaizey, published 1960, pages 150–151
  7. ^ Guinness Foreign Extra Stout (Nigerian)
  8. ^ Guinness Foreign Extra Stout (Chinese/Indonesian)
  9. ^ P3, main news section, by Daniel McConnell, Sunday Independent, June 17 2007).
  10. ^ Diageo pledges green future for the black stuff
  11. ^ Guinness good for you—officialBBC News
  12. ^ Guinness good for you—officialBBC News
  13. ^ Dyed Smarties make vegetarians see red, The Age, October 29, 2004.
  14. ^ GUINNESS - 'MAY CONTAIN FISH', Daily Mirror, May 21, 2007.
  15. ^ Guiinness website Guinness Extra Cold
  16. ^ APB: About APB: Our Markets: Singapore
  17. ^ http://www.guinness.com/en_sg/beer/foreignExtraStout/default.aspx
  18. ^ Formerly it was blended with beer that soured naturally as a result of fermenting in ancient oak tuns with a Brettanomyces population (see e.g. Protz,R., The Ale Trail, Eric Dobby Publishing, Kent, 1995. pp174-6.), now with pasteurised beer that has been soured bacterially. (See e.g. rec.food.drink.beer: Brettanomyces and Guinness)
  19. ^ Test marketed low alcohol Guinness Stout.
  20. ^ Weaker stout designed to pull Guinness out of a slump Irish Times Online
  21. ^ Guinness Red in the Sun newspaper.
  22. ^ Guinness sales rally for Diageo in H1 - Hospitality News on Barkeeper.ie
  23. ^ Guinness to launch fourth in brewhouse series - Hospitality News on Barkeeper.ie
  24. ^ Press Release announcing US availability of the Surger
  25. ^ Guinness Draught - Six Degrees of Preparation, Guinness Breweries.
  26. ^ Murray, Fergal: How to Pour the Perfect Guinness, Esquire, March 12, 2007.
  27. ^ Guinness Bubbles FAQ
  28. ^ BBC article on discovery of the scientific explanation for the sinking bubbles
  29. ^ Scientific explanation of Guinness bubble circulation
  30. ^ Griffiths, Mark (2004). Guinness is Guinness: The Colourful Story of a Black and White Brand. Cyan Communications. ISBN 0-9542829-4-9. 
  31. ^ Award winning "Surfer" Advert
  32. ^ Press Release—Clio Awards, 2001
  33. ^ International Advertising Festival of Ireland, 2003
  34. ^ International Advertising Festival of Ireland, 2005
  35. ^ Gunn, D;, Wilkie, E; The Gunn Report and Showreel of the Year (8th edition), FlaxmanWilkie, 30 November 2006. ISBN 978-0955164613
  36. ^ Guinness raises a glass to new advertisement(Sky News)
  37. ^ Domino drop is thirsty work (The Sun Online)
  38. ^ Declining Britain and Ireland sales, Guinness sales losing their frothBBC News
  39. ^ Spirit of the Irish—Edmonton Sun
  40. ^ University of Oregon Investment Group: Diageo PLC study

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External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Guinness Storehouse, Guinness brewery, Guinness factory – GUINNESS STOREHOUSE® (627 words)
Arthur Guinness was born in 1725 near Dublin in the town of Celbridge, county Kildare where his father, Richard Guinness, was a Land Steward.
Part of Richard's duties were to supervise the brewing of beer for the workers on the estate and it is probable that young Arthur first learnt the art of brewing from his father.
The GUINNESS, GUINNESS STOREHOUSE and GRAVITY words and the HARP and VORTEX Devices are trade marks.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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