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Encyclopedia > Guinea pig
Domestic Guinea Pig

Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Rodentia
Suborder: Hystricomorpha
Family: Caviidae
Subfamily: Caviinae
Genus: Cavia
Species: C. porcellus
Binomial name
Cavia porcellus
(Erxleben, 1777)
Synonyms

Mus porcellus
Cavia cobaya
Cavia anolaimae
Cavia cutleri
Cavia leucopyga
Cavia longipilis Look up guinea pig in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Guinea_1. ... The conservation status of a species is an indicator of the likelihood of that species remaining extant either in the present day or the near future. ... Image File history File links Status_iucn2. ... Least Concern (LC) is an IUCN category assigned to extant species or lower taxa which have been evaluated but do not qualify for any other category. ... The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (also known as the IUCN Red List and Red Data List), created in 1963, is the worlds most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species and can be found here. ... Scientific classification redirects here. ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Typical Classes See below Chordates (phylum Chordata) are a group of animals that includes the vertebrates, together with several closely related invertebrates. ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria For the folk-rock band see The Mammals. ... Suborders Sciuromorpha Castorimorpha Myomorpha Anomaluromorpha Hystricomorpha Rodentia is an order of mammals also known as rodents, characterised by two continuously-growing incisors in the upper and lower jaws which must be kept short by gnawing. ... Families Ctenodactylidae †Tammquammyidae †Diatomyidae †Yuomyidae †Chapattimyidae †Tsaganomyidae Laonastidae †Baluchimyinae Hystricidae †Myophiomyidae †Diamantomyidae †Phiomyidae †Kenyamyidae Petromuridae Thryonomyidae Bathyergidae †Bathyergoididae Erethizontidae Dasyproctidae Agoutidae †Eocardiidae Dinomyidae Caviidae Hydrochaeridae Octodontidae Ctenomyidae Echimyidae Myocastoridae Capromyidae †Heptaxodontidae Chinchillidae †Neoepiblemidae Abrocomidae Skull of a capybara showing the enlarged infraorbital canal present in most members of the Hystricomorpha. ... Subfamilies  Caviinae  Dolichotinae The Cavy (family Caviidae) is divided in two subfamilies: Subfamily Caviinae: cavies and guinea pigs Genus Cavia, this genus is especially called cavy. ... Genera †Neoprocavia †Allocavia †Palaeocavia †Neocavia †Dolicavia †Macrocavia †Caviops †Pascualia Galea Microcavia Cavia Kerodon Caviinae is a subfamily uniting all liing members of the family Caviidae with the exception of the maras. ... Species Cavia aperea Cavia tschudii Cavia guianae Cavia anolaimae Cavia nana Cavia porcellus Cavia fulgida Cavia magna Cavia intermedia Cavia is a genus in the Caviinae subfamily that contains the rodents commonly known as guinea pigs. ... Latin name redirects here. ... In scientific nomenclature, synonyms are different scientific names used for a single taxon. ... Binomial name J. A. Allen, 1916 Cavia anolaimae is a guinea pig species from South America. ...

The Guinea pig (also commonly called the cavy after its scientific name) is a species of rodent belonging to the family Caviidae and the genus Cavia. Despite their common name, these animals are not pigs, nor do they come from Guinea. They are native to the Andes, and while no longer extant in the wild, they are closely related to several species that are commonly found in the grassy plains and plateaus of the region. The guinea pig plays an important role in the folk culture of many indigenous South American groups, especially as a food source, but also in folk medicine and in community religious ceremonies.[1] Since the 1960s, efforts have been made to increase consumption of the animal outside South America.[2] Suborders Sciuromorpha Castorimorpha Myomorpha Anomaluromorpha Hystricomorpha Rodentia is an order of mammals also known as rodents, characterised by two continuously-growing incisors in the upper and lower jaws which must be kept short by gnawing. ... Subfamilies  Caviinae  Dolichotinae The Cavy (family Caviidae) is divided in two subfamilies: Subfamily Caviinae: cavies and guinea pigs Genus Cavia, this genus is especially called cavy. ... Species Cavia aperea Cavia tschudii Cavia guianae Cavia anolaimae Cavia nana Cavia porcellus Cavia fulgida Cavia magna Cavia intermedia Cavia is a genus in the Caviinae subfamily that contains the rodents commonly known as guinea pigs. ... For other uses, see Pig (disambiguation). ... This article is about the mountain system in South America. ... In biology, extant taxon is commonly used in discussions of living and fossil species. ... Folk culture refers to the localized lifestyle of a subsistence or otherwise inward looking culture. ... For other uses, see Native Americans (disambiguation). ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... A traditional healer in Côte dIvoire Folk medicine refers collectively to procedures traditionally used for treatment of illness and injury, aid to childbirth, and maintenance of wellness. ...


In Western societies, the guinea pig has enjoyed widespread popularity as a household pet since its introduction by European traders in the 16th century. Their docile nature, their responsiveness to handling and feeding, and the relative ease of caring for them, continue to make the guinea pig a popular pet. Organizations devoted to competitive breeding of guinea pigs have been formed worldwide, and many specialized breeds of guinea pig, with varying coat colors and compositions, are cultivated by breeders. This article is about animals kept for companionship. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Animal fancy is a hobby that includes pet and exotic pet ownership, showing and other competitions, breeding and judging. ... A long-haired lilac, orange and white Satin Peruvian Guinea pig Domesticated guinea pigs come in many breeds which have been developed since their arrival in Europe and North America. ...


Guinea pig is also used as a metaphor in English for a subject of experimentation; this usage became common in the first half of the 20th century. Biological experimentation on guinea pigs has been carried out since the 17th century; the animals were frequently used as a model organism in the 19th and 20th centuries, but have since been largely replaced by other rodents such as mice and rats. They are still used in research, primarily as models for human medical conditions such as juvenile diabetes, tuberculosis, scurvy, and pregnancy complications. This article is about metaphor in literature and rhetoric. ... A model organism is a species that is extensively studied to understand particular biological phenomena, with the expectation that discoveries made in the organism model will provide insight into the workings of other organisms. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The House Mouse (Mus musculus) is one of the most numerous species of the genus Mus commonly termed a mouse. ... Binomial name (Berkenhout, 1769) Brown Rat range The brown rat, common rat, Norway rat, Norwegian rat or wharf rat (Rattus norvegicus) is one of the best-known and common rats, and also one of the largest. ... This article is about the disease that features high blood sugar. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... Scurvy (N.Lat. ... Pre-eclampsia (previously called toxemia) is a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy. ...

Contents

History

Moche Guinea Pig ca. 200 A.D. Larco Museum Collection, Lima, Peru
Moche Guinea Pig ca. 200 A.D. Larco Museum Collection, Lima, Peru

The common guinea pig was first domesticated as early as 5000 BC for food by tribes in the Andean region of South America (present-day Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia).[3] Statues dating from ca. 500 BC to 500 AD that depict guinea pigs have been unearthed in archaeological digs in Peru and Ecuador.[4] The Moche people of ancient Peru worshipped animals and often depicted the guinea pig in their art.[5] From ca. 1200 AD to the Spanish conquest in 1532, selective breeding resulted in many varieties of domestic guinea pigs, which form the basis for some of the modern domestic breeds.[6] They continue to be a food source in the region; most households in the Andean highlands raise the animal, which subsists off the family's vegetable scraps.[7] Folklore traditions involving guinea pigs are numerous; they are exchanged as gifts, used in customary social and religious ceremonies, and frequently referenced in spoken metaphors.[8] They also play a role in traditional healing rituals by folk doctors, or curanderos, who use the animals to diagnose diseases such as jaundice, rheumatism, arthritis and typhus.[9] They are rubbed against the bodies of the sick, and are seen as a supernatural medium.[10] Black guinea pigs are considered especially useful for diagnoses.[11] The animal also may be cut open and its entrails examined to determine whether the cure was effective.[12] These methods are widely accepted in many parts of the Andes, where Western medicine is either unavailable or distrusted.[13] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Larco Museum (Spanish: ) is located in the Pueblo Libre District in Lima, Peru. ... Dogs and sheep were among the first animals to be domesticated. ... This article is about the mountain system in South America. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... Look up Circa on Wiktionary, the free dictionary The Latin word circa, literally meaning about, is often used to describe various dates (often birth and death dates) that are uncertain. ... For referencing in Wikipedia, see Wikipedia:Citing sources. ... The Moche civilization (alternately, the Mochica culture, Early Chimu, Pre-Chimu, Proto-Chimu, etc. ... The Spanish conquest of the Inca Empire was a process through which a group of Spaniards led by Francisco Pizarro succeeded in toppling the Inca Empire in the early 16th-century. ... A long-haired lilac, orange and white Satin Peruvian Guinea pig Domesticated guinea pigs come in many breeds which have been developed since their arrival in Europe and North America. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about metaphor in literature and rhetoric. ... A curandero (or curandera for a female) is a traditional folk healer or shaman prevalent in Latin America, and especially in Mexico and in Chicano communities in the southwestern United States. ... In general, diagnosis (plural diagnoses) has two distinct dictionary definitions. ... Look up jaundice in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Rheumatism or Rheumatic disorder is a non-specific term for medical problems affecting the heart, bones, joints, kidney, skin and lung. ... Arthritis (from Greek arthro-, joint + -itis, inflammation; plural: arthritides) is a group of conditions where there is damage caused to the joints of the body. ... For the unrelated disease caused by Salmonella typhi, see Typhoid fever. ... For other uses, see Supernatural (disambiguation). ... See drugs, medication, and pharmacology for substances that are used to treat patients. ...


Spanish, Dutch and English traders brought guinea pigs to Europe, where they quickly became popular as exotic pets among the upper classes and royalty, including Queen Elizabeth I.[14] The earliest known written account of the guinea pig dates from 1547, in a description of the animal from Santo Domingo; because cavies are not native to Hispaniola, the animal must have been introduced there by Spanish travelers.[15] The guinea pig was first described in the West in 1554 by the Swiss naturalist Konrad Gesner.[16] Its binomial scientific name was first used by Erxleben in 1777; it is an amalgam of Pallas's generic designation (1766) and Linnaeus's specific conferral (1758).[15] For a comprehensive list of the territories that formed the British Empire, see Evolution of the British Empire. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Capuchin monkeys are among the primates kept as exotic pets An exotic pet is a rare or unusual creature kept as a pet, or a creature kept as a pet which is not commonly thought of as a pet. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ... For other uses, see Santo Domingo (disambiguation). ... Early map of Hispaniola Hispaniola (from Spanish, La Española) is the second-largest and most populous island of the Antilles, lying between the islands of Cuba to the west, and Puerto Rico to the east. ... Conrad von Gesner (Konrad von Gesner, Conrad Gessner, Conradus Gesnerus) (26 March 1516-13 December 1565) was a Swiss naturalist. ... Latin name redirects here. ... Johann Christian Polycarp Erxleben Institute of Veterinary Medicine of Georg-August-University Goettingen from 1771-1775, first and oldest academic Veterinary School in Germany Johann Christian Polycarp Erxleben (June 22, 1744 - August 19, 1777) was a German naturalist. ... Peter Simon Pallas (September 22, 1741 - September 8, 1811) was a German-born Russian zoologist. ... In biological nomenclature, a generic name or the name of a genus (sometimes genus name) is the name of a genus. ... A painting of Carolus Linnaeus Carl Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as Carl von Linné, and who wrote under the Latinized name Carolus Linnaeus (May 23, 1707 – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish scientist who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of taxonomy. ... In zoological nomenclature, a specific name is the second part (second name) in the name of a species (a binomen). ...


Name

The scientific name of the common species is Cavia porcellus, with porcellus being Latin for "little pig". Cavia is New Latin; it is derived from cabiai, the animal's name in the language of the Galibi tribes once native to French Guiana.[17] Cabiai may be an adaptation of the Portuguese çavia (now savia), which is itself derived from the Tupi word saujá, meaning rat.[18] Guinea pigs are called quwi or jaca in Quechua and cuy or cuyo (pl. cuyes, cuyos) in the Spanish of Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia.[19] Paradoxically, breeders tend to use the more formal "cavy" to describe the animal, while in scientific and laboratory contexts it is far more commonly referred to by the more colloquial "guinea pig".[20] Latin name redirects here. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... New Latin (or Neo-Latin) is a post-medieval version of Latin, now used primarily in International Scientific Vocabulary cladistics and systematics. ... The Galibi were a Cariban-speaking people who lived in the Lesser Antilles and northern South America at the time of European settlement. ... The Tupi languages are a language family of 70 languages which are spoken by Indian tribesmen in South America. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Quechuan languages. ... Animal fancy is a hobby that includes pet and exotic pet ownership, showing and other competitions, breeding and judging. ...


How the animals came to be thought of as "pigs" is not clear. They are built somewhat like pigs, with large heads relative to their bodies, stout necks, and rounded rumps with no tail of any consequence; some of the sounds they emit are very similar to those made by pigs, and they also spend a large amount of time eating.[21] They can survive for long periods in small quarters, like a 'pig pen', and were thus easily transported on ships to Europe.[22] For other uses, see Pig (disambiguation). ...


The animal's name carries porcine connotations in many European languages. The German word for them is Meerschweinchen, literally "little sea pigs". (The Polish świnka morska and Russian морская свинка mean exactly the same.) This derives from nautical history: sailing ships stopping to reprovision in the New World would pick up stores of guinea pigs, which provided an easily transportable source of fresh meat; Schweinswal (pig-whale) is German for porpoise, which was another food source for sailors. The French term is Cochon d'Inde (Indian pig); the Dutch used to call it guinees biggetje (Guinean piglet) or Spaanse rat (Spanish rat) in some dialects, and in Portuguese the guinea pig is sometimes referred to as porquinho da Índia (little Indian pig). This is not universal; for example, the common word in Spanish is conejillo de Indias (little rabbit of India / the Indies).[19] Species Sus barbatus Sus bucculentus Sus cebifrons Sus celebensis Sus domesticus Sus heureni Sus philippensis Sus salvanius Sus scrofa Sus timoriensis Sus verrucosus Pigs are ungulates native to Eurasia collectively grouped under the genus Sus within the Suidae family. ... See also: Age of Sail and Afro-Asiatic age of discovery For the computer wargame, Age of Discovery, see Global Diplomacy. ... Frontispiece of Peter Martyr dAnghieras De orbe novo (On the New World). Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, 1722. ... Genera Neophocaena Phocoena - Harbor porpoise Phocoenoides - Dalls porpoise The porpoises are small cetaceans of the family Phocoenidae; they are related to whales and dolphins. ...


The origin of "guinea" in "guinea pig" is harder to explain. One theory is that the animals were brought to Europe by way of Guinea, leading people to think they had originated there.[20] "Guinea" was also frequently used in English to refer generally to any far-off, unknown country, and so the name may simply be a colorful reference to the animal's foreignness.[23] Another theory suggests the "guinea" in the name is a corruption of "Guiana", an area in South America, though the animals are not native to that region.[23][24] A common misconception is that they were so named because they were sold for the price of a guinea coin; this theory is untenable, because the guinea was first struck in England in 1663, and William Harvey used the term "Ginny-pig" as early as 1653.[25] Others believe "guinea" may be an alteration of the word coney (rabbit); guinea pigs were referred to as "pig coneys" in Edward Topsell's 1607 treatise on quadrupeds.[20] Guiana (also known as the Guiana highlands or the Guiana shield) forms a portion of the northern coast of South America. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... The Guinea coin of 1663 was the first British machine-struck gold coin. ... This article is about William Harvey, the English doctor. ... An image of Papilio machaon, from Topsells History Edward Topsell (c. ... The Zebra is an example of a quadruped. ...


Traits and environment

Two parti-colored Abyssinian guinea pigs
Two parti-colored Abyssinian guinea pigs

Guinea pigs are large for rodents, weighing between 700 and 1200g (1.5-2.5 pounds), and measuring between 20 and 25cm (8–10 inches) in length.[26] They typically live an average of four to five years, but may live as long as eight years.[27] According to the 2006 Guinness Book of Records the longest living guinea pig survived 14 years, 10.5 months.[28] Two abyssinian guinea pigs. ... Two abyssinian guinea pigs. ... Kg redirects here. ... Look up pound in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Suresh Joachim, minutes away from breaking the ironing world record at 55 hours and 5 minutes, at Shoppers World, Brampton. ...


In the 1990s, a minority scientific opinion emerged proposing that caviomorphs, such as guinea pigs, chinchillas and degus, are not rodents and should be reclassified as a separate order of mammals (similar to lagomorphs).[29][30] Subsequent research using wider sampling has restored consensus among mammalian biologists that the current classification of rodents as monophyletic is justified.[31][32] Suborders Sciuromorpha Castorimorpha Myomorpha Anomaluromorpha Hystricomorpha Rodentia is an order of mammals also known as rodents, characterised by two continuously-growing incisors in the upper and lower jaws which must be kept short by gnawing. ... Species Erethizontidae Dasyproctidae Agoutidae †Eocardiidae Dinomyidae Caviidae Octodontidae Ctenomyidae Echimyidae Myocastoridae Capromyidae †Heptaxodontidae Chinchillidae †Neoepiblemidae Abrocomidae Caviomorpha is the name for the rodent infraorder or parvorder that unites all South American hystricognaths. ... For other uses, see Chinchilla (disambiguation). ... Binomial name (Molina, 1782) The Degu (Octodon degus) is a small caviomorph rodent that is native to Chile. ... For the science of classifying living things, see alpha taxonomy. ... In scientific classification used in biology, the order (Latin: ordo, plural ordines) is a rank between class and family (termed a taxon at that rank). ... Families Leporidae Ochotonidae The Lagomorphs, order Lagomorpha, are an order of mammals of which there are two families, Leporidae (hares and rabbits), and Ochotonidae (pikas). ... In phylogenetics, a group is monophyletic (Greek: of one race) if it consists of an inferred common ancestor and all its descendants. ...


Natural habitat

Cavia porcellus is not found naturally in the wild; it is likely descendant from some closely related species of cavies, such as Cavia aperea, Cavia fulgida, and Cavia tschudii, which are still commonly found in various regions of South America.[15] Some species of cavy identified in the 20th century, such as Cavia anolaimae and Cavia guianae, may be domestic guinea pigs that have become feral by reintroduction into the wild.[6] Wild cavies are found on grassy plains and occupy an ecological niche similar to that of the cow. They are social, living in the wild in small groups which consist of several females (sows), a male (boar), and the young (which in a break with the preceding porcine nomenclature are called pups). They move together in groups (herds) eating grass or other vegetation, and do not store food.[33] While they do not burrow or build nests, they frequently seek shelter in the burrows of other animals, as well as in crevices and tunnels formed by vegetation.[33] They are crepuscular, tending to be most active during dawn and dusk, when it is harder for predators to spot them.[34] Species Cavia aperea Cavia tschudii Cavia guianae Cavia anolaimae Cavia nana Cavia porcellus Cavia fulgida Cavia magna Cavia intermedia Cavia is a genus in the Caviinae subfamily that contains the rodents commonly known as guinea pigs. ... Binomial name Erxleben, 1777 The Brazilian Guinea Pig, Cavia aperea, is a guinea pig species from South America. ... Binomial name Wagler, 1831 The Shiny Guinea Pig, Cavia fulgida, is a guinea pig species from South America. ... Binomial name Cavia tschudii Fitzinger, 1867[1] The Montane Guinea Pig, Cavia tschudii, is a guinea pig species from South America. ... Binomial name J. A. Allen, 1916 Cavia anolaimae is a guinea pig species from South America. ... Binomial name Thomas, 1901 Cavia guianae is a guinea pig species from South America. ... A feral horse (an American mustang) in Wyoming A feral animal or plant is one that has escaped from domestication and returned, partly or wholly, to its wild state. ... Two lichens on a rock, in two different ecological niches In ecology, a niche; (pronounced nich, neesh or nish)[1] is a term describing the relational position of a species or population in its ecosystem[1]. The ecological niche; describes how an organism or population responds to the distribution of... For general information about the genus, including other species of cattle, see Bos. ... For other uses, see Pig (disambiguation). ... Categories: Animal stubs | Animal behaviour | Social psychology ... A burrow is a hole or tunnel dug into the ground by an animal to create a space suitable for habitation, temporary refuge, or as a byproduct of locomotion. ... Vegetation is a general term for the plant life of a region; it refers to the ground cover provided by plants, and is, by far, the most abundant biotic element of the biosphere. ... Adult Firefly or Lightning Bug – a Crepuscular Beetle Photuris lucicrescens Crepuscular is a term used to describe animals that are primarily active during the twilight. ...


Domestic habitat

Domesticated guinea pigs thrive in groups of two or more; groups of sows, or groups of one or more sows and a neutered boar are common combinations. Guinea pigs learn to recognize and bond with other individual guinea pigs, and testing of boars shows that their neuroendocrine stress response is significantly lowered in the presence of a bonded female when compared to the presence of unfamiliar females.[35] Groups of boars may also get along, provided that their cage has enough space, they are introduced at an early age, and no females are present.[36] Domestic guinea pigs have developed a different biological rhythm from their wild counterparts, and have longer periods of activity followed by short periods of sleep in between.[34] Activity is scattered randomly over the 24 hours of the day; aside from avoidance of intense light, no regular circadian patterns are apparent.[34] redirect Template:Db-reason synaptophysin ... A circadian rhythm is a roughly-24-hour cycle in the physiological processes of living beings, including plants, animals, fungi and cyanobacteria. ...

This cat has accepted this pair of guinea pigs. The success of this type of interspecies interaction varies according to the individual animals involved
This cat has accepted this pair of guinea pigs. The success of this type of interspecies interaction varies according to the individual animals involved

Domestic guinea pigs generally live in cages, although some owners of large numbers of guinea pigs will dedicate entire rooms to their pets. Cages with solid or wire mesh floors are used, although wire mesh floors can cause injury and may be associated with an infection commonly known as bumblefoot (ulcerative pododermatitis).[37] "Cubes and Coroplast" (or C&C) style cages are now a common choice.[38] Cages are often lined with wood shavings or a similar material. Bedding made from red cedar and pine, both softwoods, was commonly used in past decades, but these materials are now believed to contain harmful phenols (aromatic hydrocarbons) and oils.[39] Safer beddings include those made from hardwoods (such as aspen); paper products and corn cob materials are other alternatives.[39] Guinea pigs tend to be messy within their cages; they often jump into their food bowls or kick bedding and feces into them, and their urine crystallizes on cage surfaces and can be difficult to remove.[40] After its cage has been cleaned, a guinea pig will typically urinate and drag the lower body across the floor of the cage to mark its territory.[41] Male guinea pigs may also mark their territory in this way when they are taken out of their cages. For other uses, see Mesh (disambiguation). ... Bumblefoot (ulcerative pododermatitis) is a bacterial infection and inflammatory reaction on the foot of birds of prey and rodents. ... Coroplast is a brand name of corrugated plastic and a registered trademark of Coroplast, Inc. ... Red Cedar may refer to: Australian Red Cedar, Toona australis Eastern Red Cedar, Juniperus virginiana Red Cedar, Acrocarpus fraxinifolius Western Red Cedar, Thuja plicata Michigan)]] Red Cedar River (Wisconsin) Cedar (disambiguation) Category: ... Subgenera Subgenus Strobus Subgenus Ducampopinus Subgenus Pinus See Pinus classification for complete taxonomy to species level. ... Despite being fairly hard, cedar is a softwood Softwood is a generic term used in woodworking and the lumber industries for wood from conifers (needle-bearing trees from the order Pinales). ... Phenol, also known under an older name of carbolic acid, is a colourless crystalline solid with a typical sweet tarry odor. ... Beech is a typical temperate zone hardwood The term hardwood designates wood from angiosperm trees. ... For other uses, see Aspen (disambiguation). ... This article is about the urine of animals generally. ...


Guinea pigs do not generally thrive when housed with other species. Cohousing of guinea pigs with other rodents such as gerbils and hamsters may increase instances of respiratory and other infections,[42] and such rodents may act aggressively toward the guinea pig.[43] Larger animals may regard guinea pigs as prey, though some (such as dogs) can be trained to accept them.[44] Guinea pigs can be safely housed with degu as they share the same dietary needs and have similar behavioural traits. Opinion is divided over the cohousing of guinea pigs and domestic rabbits. Some published sources say that guinea pigs and rabbits complement each other well when sharing a cage.[44][45] However, as lagomorphs, rabbits have different nutritional requirements, and so the two species cannot be fed the same food.[46] Rabbits may also harbor diseases (such as the respiratory infections Bordetella and Pasteurella), to which guinea pigs are susceptible.[47] Even the dwarf rabbit is much stronger than the guinea pig and may cause intentional or inadvertent injury.[48] For other uses, see Gerbil (disambiguation). ... Genera Mesocricetus Phodopus Cricetus Cricetulus Allocricetulus Cansumys Tscherskia Hamsters are rodents belonging to the subfamily Cricetinae. ... Prey can refer to: Look up Prey in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A prey animal eaten by a predator in an act called predation. ... Trinomial name Canis lupus familiaris The dog (Canis lupus familiaris) is a domestic subspecies of the wolf, a mammal of the Canidae family of the order Carnivora. ... Binomial name (Molina, 1782) The Degu (Octodon degus) is a small caviomorph rodent that is native to Chile. ... This article is about domesticated European rabbits. ... Families Leporidae Ochotonidae Prolagidae (extinct) The Lagomorphs, order Lagomorpha, are an order of mammals of which there are two families, Leporidae (hares and rabbits), and Ochotonidae (pikas). ... Species B. bronchiseptica etc. ... Species Pasteurella is a genus of Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic bacteria. ... Dwarf rabbits are a variety of domestic European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). ...


Behavior

Guinea pigs can learn complex paths to food, and can accurately remember a learned path for months. Their strongest and overwhelming problem solving strategy is 'activity'[49] While guinea pigs can jump small obstacles, they cannot climb, and are not particularly agile. They startle extremely easily, and will either freeze in place for long periods or run for cover with rapid, darting motions when they sense danger.[34] Larger groups of startled guinea pigs will "stampede", running in haphazard directions as a means of confusing predators.[50] When excited, guinea pigs may repeatedly perform little hops in the air (known as "popcorning"), a movement analogous to the ferret's war dance.[51] They are also exceedingly good swimmers.[52] The weasel war dance is a colloquial term for a behavior of excited ferrets. ...


Like many rodents, guinea pigs sometimes participate in social grooming, and they regularly self-groom.[53] A milky-white substance is secreted from their eyes and rubbed into the hair during the grooming process.[54] Groups of boars will often chew each other's hair, but this is a method of establishing hierarchy within a group, rather than a social gesture.[52] Dominance is also established through biting (especially of the ears), piloerection, aggressive noises, head thrusts, and leaping attacks.[55] Non-sexual simulated mounting for dominance is also common among same-sex groups. In social animals and humans social grooming is a major social activity, and a means by which animals who live in proximity can bond and reinforce social structures, family links, and build relationships. ... Goose bumps on a human Goose bumps, also called goose pimples, goose flesh, chill bumps, chicken skin, or the medical term cutis anserina, are the bumps on a persons skin at the base of body hairs which involuntarily develop when a person is cold or experiences strong emotions such... Look up Mount in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Guinea pigs have poor sight, but well-developed senses of hearing, smell, and touch.[56] Vocalization is the primary means of communication between members of the species.[57] Some sounds are:[58][59] Olfaction (also known as olfactics) refers to the sense of smell. ...

  • Wheek - A loud noise, the name of which is onomatopoeic, also known as a Whistle. An expression of general excitement, it may occur in response to the presence of its owner or to feeding. It is sometimes used to find other guinea pigs if they are running. If a guinea pig is lost, it may wheek for assistance. listen 
  • Bubbling or Purring - This sound is made when the guinea pig is enjoying itself, such as when being petted or held. They may also make this sound when grooming, crawling around to investigate a new place, or when given food. listen 
  • Rumbling - This sound is normally related to dominance within a group, though it can also come as a response to comfort or contentment. While courting, a male usually purrs deeply, swaying and circling the female[60] in a behavior called "rumblestrutting". listen 
  • Chutting and Whining - These are sounds made in pursuit situations, by the pursuer and pursuee, respectively. listen 
  • Chattering - This sound is made by rapidly gnashing the teeth, and is generally a sign of warning. Guinea pigs tend to raise their heads when making this sound.
  • Squealing or Shrieking - A high-pitched sound of discontent, in response to pain or danger. listen 
  • Chirping - This less-common sound, likened to bird song, seems to be related to stress. Very rarely, the chirping will last for several minutes. listen 

For the supervillain, see Onomatopoeia (comics). ... Image File history File links Guinea_Pig_Feeding_Wheek. ... Image File history File links Guinea_Pig_Happy. ... Image File history File links Guinea_Pig_Keep_Away. ... Image File history File links Guinea_Pig_Angry. ... Image File history File links Guinea_Pig_In_Distress. ... Blackbird (Turdus merula), singing male. ... Image File history File links Guinea_Pig_Chirping. ...

Breeding

Pregnant sow one week before delivering three pups
Pregnant sow one week before delivering three pups

The guinea pig is able to breed year-round, with birth peaks usually coming in the spring; as many as five litters can be produced per year.[6] The gestation period lasts from 59–72 days, with an average of 63–68 days.[41] Because of the long gestation period and the large size of the pups, pregnant females may become large and eggplant-shaped, although the change in size and shape varies. Newborn pups are well-developed with hair, teeth, claws and partial eyesight;[52] they are immediately mobile, and begin eating solid food immediately, though they continue to suckle. Litters yield 1–6 pups, with an average of three;[27] the largest recorded litter size is 17.[61] In smaller litters, difficulties may occur during labour due to over-sized pups. Large litters result in higher incidences of stillbirth, but because the pups are delivered at an advanced stage of development, lack of access to the mother's milk has little effect on the mortality rate of newborns.[62] Cohabitating females assist in mothering duties if lactating.[63] Picture of a pregnant guinea pig 1 week before delivering 3 pups. ... Picture of a pregnant guinea pig 1 week before delivering 3 pups. ... Gestation is the carrying of an embryo or fetus inside a female viviparous animal. ... Binomial name L. The aubergine, eggplant or brinjal (Solanum melongena) is a solanaceous plant bearing a fruit of the same name, commonly used as a vegetable in cooking. ... Breastfeeding an infant Breastfeeding is the process of a woman feeding an infant or young child with milk from her breasts, usually directly from the nipples. ... A litter of pigs A litter is a group of newly born, young animals from the same mother and usually from one set of parents. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...

Guinea pig pup at eight hours old
Guinea pig pup at eight hours old

Male and female guinea pigs do not differ in external appearance apart from general size. The position of the anus is very close to the genitals in both sexes. Female genitals are distinguished by a Y-shaped configuration formed from a vulvar flap; while the male genitals may look similar with the penis and anus forming a like shape, the penis will protrude if pressure is applied to the surrounding hair.[64] The male's testes may also be visible externally from scrotal swelling. Guinea Pig baby. ... Guinea Pig baby. ... Female (left) and male Common Pheasant, illustrating the dramatic difference in both color and size, between the sexes Sexual dimorphism is the systematic difference in form between individuals of different sex in the same species. ...


Males reach sexual maturity at 3–5 weeks; females can be fertile as early as four weeks and can carry litters before they are adults.[65] Females that have never given birth commonly develop irreversible fusing of the pubic symphysis, a joint in the pelvis, after six months of age.[41] If they become pregnant after this has happened, the birth canal will not widen sufficiently; this may lead to dystocia and death as they attempt to give birth.[66] Females can become pregnant 6–48 hours after giving birth, but it is not healthy for a female to be thus constantly pregnant.[67] The pubic symphysis is the midline cartilaginous joint uniting the superior rami of the left and right pubic bones (pubis). ... The pelvis (pl. ... Dystocia (antonym eutocia) is an abnormal or difficult childbirth or labour. ...


Toxemia of pregnancy is common and kills many pregnant females. Signs of toxemia include anorexia, lack of energy, excessive salivation, a sweet or fruity breath odor due to ketones, and seizures in advanced cases.[68] Pregnancy toxemia appears to be most common in hot climates.[69] Other serious complications of pregnancy can include a prolapsed uterus, hypocalcemia, and mastitis.[70] Pre-eclampsia (previously called toxemia) is a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy. ... Ketone group A ketone (pronounced as key tone) is either the functional group characterized by a carbonyl group (O=C) linked to two other carbon atoms or a chemical compound that contains this functional group. ... This article is about epileptic seizures. ... Prolapse literally means To fall out of place. ... In medicine, hypocalcaemia is the presence of less than a total calcium of 2. ... Mastitis is the inflammation of the mammalian breast caused by the blocking of the milk ducts while the mother is lactating (see breastfeeding). ...


Diet

A silver agouti guinea pig eating grass
A silver agouti guinea pig eating grass

Grass is the guinea pig's natural diet. Their molars are particularly suited for grinding plant matter, and grow continuously throughout the animal's life.[71] Most grass-eating mammals are quite large and have a long digestive tract; while guinea pigs have much longer colons than most rodents, they must also supplement their diet by coprophagy, the eating of their own feces.[72] However, they do not consume all their feces indiscriminately, but produce special soft pellets, called cecotropes, which recycle B vitamins, fiber, and bacteria required for proper digestion.[73] The cecotropes (or caecal pellets) are eaten directly from the anus, unless the guinea pig is pregnant or obese.[46] They share this behaviour with rabbits. In older boars (the condition is rarer in young ones), the muscles which allow the softer pellets to be expelled from the anus for consumption can become weak. This creates a condition known as anal impaction, which prevents the boar from redigesting cecotropes, though harder pellets may pass through the impacted mass.[74] The condition may be temporarily alleviated by carefully expelling the impacted feces. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Grass (disambiguation). ... Molars are the rearmost and most complicated kind of tooth in most mammals. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Large intestine. ... Coprophagia is the consumption of feces. ... Cecotropes (originally spelled caecotrophes) also known as night faeces, are the product of the cecum, a part of the digestive system in mammals of the order lagomorpha, which includes two families: Leporidae (hares and rabbits), and Ochotonidae (pikas). ... The B vitamins are eight water-soluble vitamins that play important roles in cell metabolism. ... For other uses, see Rabbit (disambiguation). ...


Guinea pigs benefit from feeding on fresh grass hay, such as timothy hay, in addition to food pellets which are often based from timothy. Alfalfa is also a popular food choice; most guinea pigs will eat large amounts of alfalfa when offered it,[75] though there exists some controversy over the feeding of alfalfa to adult guinea pigs. Some pet owners and veterinary organizations have advised that, as a legume rather than a grass hay, alfalfa consumed in large amounts may lead to obesity, as well as bladder stones due to excess calcium, in any but pregnant and very young guinea pigs.[76][77] However, published scientific sources mention alfalfa as a source for replenishment of protein, amino acids and fiber.[78][79] Binomial name Phleum pratense L. Timothy-grass, a North American name for Phleum pratense, is an abundant perennial grass native to most of Europe except for the Mediterranean. ... For the Our Gang (Little Rascals) character, see Carl Switzer. ... This article is about the fruit of the plants also called legumes. For the plants themselves, see Fabaceae . ... Bladder stones in animals are a common occurrence, especially in domestic animals such as dogs and cats. ... For other uses, see Calcium (disambiguation). ... This article is about the class of chemicals. ...


Like humans, but unlike most other mammals, guinea pigs cannot synthesize their own vitamin C and must obtain this vital nutrient from food. If guinea pigs do not ingest enough vitamin C, they can suffer from potentially fatal scurvy. Guinea pigs require about 10 mg of vitamin C daily (20 mg if pregnant), which can be obtained through fresh, raw fruits and vegetables (such as apple, broccoli, cabbage, carrot, celery, and spinach) or through dietary supplements.[80] Healthy diets for guinea pigs require a complex balance of calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, and hydrogen ions; adequate amounts of vitamins E, A, and D are also necessary.[81] Imbalanced diets have been associated with muscular dystrophy, metastatic calcification, difficulties with pregnancy, vitamin deficiencies, and teeth problems.[82] Some sources also suggest[weasel words] that guinea pigs are especially susceptible to gall and kidney stones, making it important to limit calcium intake in their diet. This may involve limiting or eliminating multi-vitamin supplements and calcium-rich foods (like commercially-produced yogurt drops, spinach or very high proportions of alfalfa).[citation needed] Guinea pigs tend to be fickle eaters when it comes to fresh fruits and vegetables, having learned early in life what is and is not appropriate to consume, and their habits are difficult to change after maturity.[83] They do not respond well to sudden changes in diet; they may stop eating and starve rather than accepting new food types.[52] A constant supply of hay or other food is generally recommended, as guinea pigs feed continuously and may develop habits such as chewing on their own hair if food is not present.[84] Because guinea pigs' teeth grow constantly, they routinely gnaw, lest their teeth become too large for their mouth, a common problem in rodents.[38] Guinea pigs will also chew on cloth, paper, plastic, and rubber. Homo sapiens (Latin: wise man) is the scientific name for the human species. ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria For the folk-rock band see The Mammals. ... This article is about the nutrient. ... Scurvy (N.Lat. ... General Name, symbol, number magnesium, Mg, 12 Chemical series alkaline earth metals Group, period, block 2, 3, s Appearance silvery white solid at room temp Standard atomic weight 24. ... General Name, symbol, number phosphorus, P, 15 Chemical series nonmetals Group, period, block 15, 3, p Appearance waxy white/ red/ black/ colorless Standard atomic weight 30. ... General Name, symbol, number potassium, K, 19 Chemical series alkali metals Group, period, block 1, 4, s Appearance silvery white Standard atomic weight 39. ... Hydronium is the common name for the cation H3O+. Nomenclature According to IUPAC ion nomenclature, it should be referred to as oxonium. ... Tocopherol, or Vitamin E, is a fat-soluble vitamin in eight forms that is an important antioxidant. ... The structure of retinol, the most common dietary form of vitamin A Vitamin A is an essential human nutrient. ... Vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin that contributes to the maintenance of normal levels of calcium and phosphorus in the bloodstream. ... Muscular dystrophy refers to a group of genetic, hereditary muscle diseases that cause progressive muscle weakness. ... Metastatic calcification is deposition of calcium salts in otherwise normal tissue, because of elevated levels of calcium and other minerals in blood because of deranged metabolism, synthesis or disposal. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Families Many, see text The order Rodentia is the most numerous of all the branches on the mammal family tree. ...


A number of plants are poisonous to guinea pigs, including bracken, bryony, buttercup, charlock, deadly nightshade, foxglove, hellebore, hemlock, lily of the valley, mayweed, monkshood, potato, privet, ragwort, rhubarb, speedwell, toadflax and wild celery.[85] Additionally, any plant which grows from a bulb (e.g., tulip and onion) is normally considered poisonous.[85] Species Pteridium aquilinum Pteridium caudatum Pteridium esculentum Pteridium latiusculum and about 6-7 other species For the Irish television soap opera, see Bracken (TV). ... Species (White Bryony) (Cretan Bryony), Bryony or briony is the common name for species in the genus Bryonia of perennial, tendril-climbing, dioecious herbs with palmately lobed leaves and flowers in axillary clusters. ... This article is about the flower. ... Species See text Brassica is a plant genus, in the cabbage family (Cruciferae, also known, more fashionably, as the Brassicaceae). ... Binomial name L. Deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna), also known as belladonna or dwale, is a well-known perennial herbaceous plant, with leaves and berries that are highly toxic and hallucinogenic. ... Species Digitalis ferruginea Digitalis grandiflora Digitalis lanata Digitalis lutea Digitalis obscura Digitalis purpurea Digitalis is a genus of about 20 species of herbaceous biennials, perennials and shrubs in the foxglove family Scrophulariaceae. ... Species See text(#Species) Hellebores (the Genus Helleborus in the Family Ranunculaceae) are perennial flowering plants that are often grown in gardens for decorative purposes, as well as for their purported medicinal abilities and uses in witchcraft. ... Look up hemlock in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Binomial name Convallaria majalis Lily of the valley is a flowering plant of the Convallaria genus. ... Species See text Matricaria is a genus of flowering plants in the sunflower family (Asteraceae). ... Species See text Aconitum is a genus of flowering plants belonging to the buttercup family Ranunculaceae. ... For other uses, see Potato (disambiguation). ... Species See text Privet was originally the name for the European semi-evergreen shrub Ligustrum vulgare, and later also for the more reliably evergreen Ligustrum ovalifolium (Japanese privet), used extensively for privacy hedging (hence privet, private). ... Species See text The Genus Senecio of the daisy family (Family Asteraceae) includes ragworts and groundsels. ... For other uses see Rhubarb (disambiguation) Species About 60, including: R. nobile R. palmatum Rhubarb is a perennial plant that grows from thick short rhizomes, comprising the genus Rheum. ... Speedwell may refer to Speedwell Island Speedwell Cavern A ship named Speedwell any plant of the Veronica genus This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Toadflax is the English name of several related genera of plants in the family Scrophulariaceae: Anarrhinum Antirrhinum (also called Snapdragon) Chaenorhinum Cymbalaria Linaria Misopates This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Binomial name Vallisneria americana Michx. ... Shallot bulbs A bulb is an underground vertical shoot that has modified leaves (or thickened leaf bases) that is used as food storage organs by a dormant plant. ... [[Media:Example. ... For other uses, see Onion (disambiguation). ...


Health

A parti-colored guinea pig suffering from Torticollis, or wry neck
A parti-colored guinea pig suffering from Torticollis, or wry neck

Common ailments in domestic guinea pigs include respiratory infections, diarrhea, scurvy (vitamin C deficiency, typically characterized by sluggishness), abscesses due to infection (often in the neck, due to hay embedded in the throat, or from external scratches), and infections by lice, mites or fungus.[86] Image File history File linksMetadata Mvc-872s. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Mvc-872s. ... Torticollis, or wry neck, is a condition in which the head is tilted toward one side, and the chin is elevated and turned toward the opposite side. ... Upper respiratory tract infection, also popularly known as either the acronym URTI or URI, is the disease characterised by an acute infection which involves the upper respiratory tract: nose, sinuses, pharynx, or larynx. ... In medicine, diarrhea, also spelled diarrhoea (see spelling differences), refers to frequent loose or liquid bowel movements. ... Scurvy (N.Lat. ... This article is about the nutrient. ... For the death metal band, see Abscess (band). ... Suborders Anoplura (sucking lice) Rhyncophthirina Ischnocera (avian lice) Amblycera (chewing lice) Lice (singular: louse) (order Phthiraptera) are an order of over 3000 species of wingless parasitic insects. ... Mites, along with ticks, belong to the subclass Acarina (also known as Acari) and the class Arachnida. ... For the fictional character, see Fungus the Bogeyman. ...


Mange mites (Trixacarus caviae) are a common cause of hair loss, and other symptoms may also include excessive scratching, unusually aggressive behavior when touched (due to pain), and, in some instances, seizures.[87] Guinea pigs may also suffer from "running lice" (Gliricola porcelli), a small white insect which can be seen moving through the hair; the eggs of these lice, which appear as black or white specks attached to the hair, are sometimes referred to as "static lice". Giving a bath with neem oil soap is a gentle and effective way of ridding the pig of lice. Other causes of hair loss can be due to hormonal upsets caused by underlying medical conditions such as ovarian cysts.[88] Benign ovarian cyst. ...


Foreign bodies, especially small pieces of hay or straw, can become lodged in the eyes of guinea pigs, resulting in excessive blinking, tearing, and in some cases an opaque film over the eye due to corneal ulcer.[89] Hay or straw dust will also cause sneezing. While it is normal for guinea pigs to sneeze periodically, frequent sneezing may be a symptom of pneumonia, especially in response to atmospheric changes. Pneumonia may also be accompanied by torticollis and can be fatal.[90] Large corneal ulcer in a dog A corneal ulcer, or ulcerative keratitis, is an inflammatory condition of the cornea involving loss of its outer layer. ... For other uses, see Sneeze (disambiguation). ... Pneumonia is an illness which can result from a variety of causes, including infection with bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites. ... Torticollis, or wry neck, is a condition in which the head is tilted toward one side, and the chin is elevated and turned toward the opposite side. ...


Because the guinea pig has a stout, compact body, the animal more easily tolerates excessive cold than excessive heat.[91] Its normal body temperature is 101–104 °F (38.5–40 °C),[92] and so its ideal ambient air temperature range is similar to the human's, about 65–75 °F (18–24 °C).[91] Consistent ambient temperatures in excess of 90 °F (32 °C) have been linked to hyperthermia and death, especially among pregnant sows.[91] Guinea pigs are not well suited to environments that feature wind or frequent drafts,[93] and respond poorly to extremes of humidity outside of the range of 30–70%.[94] Thermoregulation is the ability of an organism to keep its body temperature within certain boundaries, even when temperature surrounding is very different. ... For other uses, see Room temperature (disambiguation). ... Hyperthermia in its advanced state referred to as heat stroke or sunstroke, is an acute condition which occurs when the body produces or absorbs more heat than it can dissipate. ... The term humidity is usually taken in daily language to refer to relative humidity. ...


Guinea pigs are prey animals whose survival instinct is to mask pain and signs of illness, and many times health problems may not be apparent until a condition is severe or in its advanced stages. Treatment of disease is made more difficult by the extreme sensitivity guinea pigs have to most antibiotics, including penicillin, which kill off the intestinal flora and quickly bring on episodes of diarrhea and in some cases, death.[95] Predator and Prey redirect here. ... Staphylococcus aureus - Antibiotics test plate. ... Penicillin core structure Penicillin (abbreviated PCN) is a group of β-lactam antibiotics used in the treatment of bacterial infections caused by susceptible, usually Gram-positive, organisms. ... numerous beneficial bacterial microorganisms found in the lower intestine ...


Similar to the inherited genetic diseases of other breeds of animal (such as hip dysplasia in canines), a number of genetic abnormalities of guinea pigs have been reported. Most commonly, the roan coloration of Abyssinian guinea pigs is associated with congenital eye disorders and problems with the digestive system.[96] Other genetic disorders include "waltzing disease" (deafness coupled with a tendency to run in circles), palsy, and tremor conditions.[97] A genetic disorder is a condition caused by abnormalities in genes or chromosomes. ... This article is about hip dysplasia, a condition affecting the hip joint, which occurs in humans but is more commonly associated with animals, especially dogs (Canine hip dysplasia). ... A red roan horse Roan is a type of coat color in horses (and, occasionally, in other animals, such as dogs and cattle) that is a mixture of white hairs with a base coat of another color. ... A long-haired lilac, orange and white Satin Peruvian Guinea pig Domesticated guinea pigs come in many breeds which have been developed since their arrival in Europe and North America. ... A congenital disorder is a medical condition or defect that is present at or before birth (for example, congenital heart disease). ... Palsy is a medical term derived from the word paralysis that is defined as paralysis of a body part often accompanied by loss of feeling and uncontrolled body movements such as shaking. ... For the film, see Tremors (film). ...


Pets

Main article: Guinea pig breed
A guinea pig being held
A guinea pig being held

If handled correctly early in their life, guinea pigs become amenable to being picked up and carried, and seldom bite or scratch.[52] They are timid explorers, and rarely attempt to escape from their cages, even when an opportunity presents itself.[98] Guinea pigs who become familiar with their owner will whistle on the owner's approach; they will also learn to whistle in response to the rustling of plastic bags or the opening of refrigerator doors, where their food is stored. A prize-winning lilac Silkie There are many breeds of Guinea pig which have been developed since its domestication ca. ...


Domesticated guinea pigs come in many breeds, which have been developed since their introduction to Europe and North America. These varieties vary in hair and color composition. The most common varieties found in pet stores are the English shorthair (also known as the American), which have a short, smooth coat, and the Abyssinian, whose coat is ruffled with cowlicks, or rosettes. Also popular among breeders are the Peruvian and the Sheltie (or Silkie), both straight longhair breeds, and the Texel, a curly longhair. Dogs and sheep were among the first animals to be domesticated. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... North American redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A jaguar with prominent rosettes A rosette is a rose-like marking or formation which is found in clusters and patches on the fur of leopards, jaguars, and other big cats. ... A prize-winning lilac Silkie There are many breeds of Guinea pig which have been developed since its domestication ca. ...


Cavy Clubs and Associations dedicated to the showing and breeding of guinea pigs have been established worldwide. The American Cavy Breeders Association, an adjunct to the American Rabbit Breeders Association, is the governing body in the United States and Canada.[99] The British Cavy Council governs cavy clubs in the United Kingdom. Similar organizations exist in Australia (Australian National Cavy Council)[100] and New Zealand (New Zealand Cavy Club).[101] Each club publishes its own Standard of Perfection and determines which breeds are eligible for showing. The American Rabbit Breeders Association (ARBA) is a national domestic rabbit breeders club situated in the United States. ... The British Cavy Council is the governing body in the United Kingdom for national, regional, and local cavy (guinea pig) clubs, and also for the wide range of breed clubs which exist on a national basis to further the interests of particular cavy breeds, and to provide a forum for...

A lilac, orange and white Satin Peruvian guinea pig (show-length coat)
A lilac, orange and white Satin Peruvian guinea pig (show-length coat)

As a result of their widespread popularity in human domestic life, and especially because of their popularity in households with children, guinea pigs have shown a presence in culture and media. Some noted appearances of the animal in literature are The Fairy Caravan, a novel by Beatrix Potter,[102] and Michael Bond's Olga da Polga series for children,[103] both of which feature guinea pigs as the central protagonist. Another appearance is in The Magician's Nephew by C. S. Lewis: in the first (chronologically) of his The Chronicles of Narnia series, a guinea pig is the first creature to travel to the Wood between the Worlds.[104] The short story Pigs is Pigs by Ellis Parker Butler is a tale of bureaucratic incompetence; two guinea pigs held at a train station breed unchecked while humans argue as to whether they are "pigs" for the purpose of determining freight charges.[105] Image File history File links Rene2. ... Image File history File links Rene2. ... For other uses, see Literature (disambiguation). ... The Fairy Caravan is a book written and illustrated by Beatrix Potter. ... Helen Beatrix Potter (28 July 1866 – 22 December 1943) was an English author and illustrator, botanist, and conservationist, best known for her childrens books, which featured animal characters such as Peter Rabbit. ... Michael Bond, OBE, (born January 13, 1926 in Newbury, Berkshire) is an English childrens author. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ... The Magicians Nephew is a fantasy novel for children written by C. S. Lewis. ... Clive Staples Jack Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an Irish author and scholar. ... Narnia redirects here. ... The Wood between the Worlds is a location in The Magicians Nephew, part of the Chronicles of Narnia series by C. S. Lewis. ... Pigs is Pigs cover when originally published in 1905. ... Ellis Parker Butler (December 5, 1869–September 13, 1937) was an American author. ... In sociological theories, bureaucracy is an organizational structure characterized by regularized procedure, division of responsibility, hierarchy, and impersonal relationships. ... Passengers bustle around the typical grand edifice of Londons Broad Street station in 1865. ...


Guinea pigs have also been featured in film and television. A guinea pig named Rodney, voiced by Chris Rock, was a prominent character in the 1998 film Dr. Dolittle and Lenny the Guinea pig is a co-star on Nick Jr's Wonder Pets. Guinea pigs were used in some major advertising campaigns in the 1990s and 2000s, notably for Egg Banking plc,[106] Snapple, and Blockbuster Video.[107] The Blockbuster campaign is considered by some guinea pig advocates to have been a factor in the rise of cohousing guinea pigs and rabbits.[48] Christopher Julius Rock III[5] (born February 7, 1965)[6][7] is an Emmy Award winning American comedian, actor, screenwriter, television producer, film producer and director. ... For other uses, see Doctor Dolittle (Disambiguation). ... Nick Jr. ... Linny the Guinea Pig, Tuck the Turtle, and Ming-Ming Duckling are The Wonder Pets. ... Generally speaking, advertising is the paid promotion of goods, services, companies and ideas by an identified sponsor. ... Egg Banking plc is a British internet bank, with headquarters in Derby, Dudley and London, England. ... Snapple is a beverage company based in Rye Brook, New York that produces a variety of teas and fruit drinks which are sold in glass bottles, soda-style cans, and plastic bottles. ... Blockbuster video store This article is about the chain of video stores. ...


Scientific research

The use of guinea pigs in scientific experimentation dates back at least to the 17th century, when the Italian biologists Marcello Malpighi and Carlo Fracassati conducted vivisections of guinea pigs in their examinations of anatomic structures.[108] In 1780, Antoine Lavoisier used a guinea pig in his experiments with the calorimeter, a device used to measure heat production. The heat from the guinea pig's respiration melted snow surrounding the calorimeter, showing that respiratory gas exchange is a combustion, similar to a candle burning.[109] Guinea pigs played a major role in the establishment of germ theory in the late 19th century, through the experiments of Louis Pasteur, Émile Roux, and Robert Koch.[110] Guinea pigs have been launched into orbital space-flight several times, first by the USSR on the Sputnik 9 biosatellite of March 9, 1961 - with a successful recovery.[111] China also launched and recovered a biosatellite in 1990 which included guinea pigs as passengers.[112] Marcello Malpighi (March 10, 1628 - September 30, 1694) was an Italian doctor, who gave his name to several physiological features. ... Etymologically, Vivisection refers to the dissection of, or any cutting or surgery upon, a living organism. ... Human heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ... Lavoisier redirects here. ... A calorimeter is a device used for calorimetry, the science of measuring the heat of chemical reactions or physical changes as well as heat capacity. ... This article is about the chemical reaction combustion. ... The germ theory of disease states that many diseases are caused by microorganisms, and that microorganisms grow by reproduction, rather than being spontaneously generated. ... Louis Pasteur (December 27 1822 – September 28, 1895) was a French chemist and microbiologist best known for his remarkable breakthroughs in the causes and prevention of disease. ... Emile Roux Pierre Paul Emile Roux (b. ... For the American lobbyist, see Bobby Koch. ... Squirrel monkey Baker rode a Jupiter missile (modeled above) into space in 1959 Animals in space originally served to test the survivability of spaceflight before manned space missions were attempted. ... State motto (Russian): Пролетарии всех стран, соединяйтесь! (Transliterated: Proletarii vsekh stran, soedinyaytes!) (Translated: Workers of the world, unite!) Capital Moscow Official language None; Russian (de facto) Government Federation of Soviet republics Area  - Total  - % water 1st before collapse 22,402,200 km² Approx. ... Crew None Mission Parameters Mass: 4,700 kg Perigee: 173 km Apogee: 239 km Inclination: 64. ... A biosatellite is an artificial satellite designed to carry life in space. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In English, the term guinea pig is commonly used as a metaphor for a subject of scientific experimentation. This dates back to the early 20th century; the Oxford English Dictionary notes its first usage in this capacity in 1913.[113] In 1933, Consumers' Research founders F. J. Schlink and Arthur Kallet wrote a book entitled 100,000,000 Guinea Pigs, extending the metaphor to consumer society.[114] The book became a national bestseller in the United States, thus further popularizing the term, and spurred the growth of the consumer protection movement.[115] The negative connotation of the term was later employed in the novel The Guinea Pigs by Czech author Ludvík Vaculík as an allegory for Soviet totalitarianism.[116] The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is the most successful dictionary of the English language, (not to be confused with the one-volume Oxford Dictionary of English, formerly New Oxford Dictionary of English, of... Consumers Research is a non-profit organization established in 1929 by Stuart Chase (1888-1985) and F.J. Schlink (1891-1995), after the success of their book Your Moneys Worth: A study in the waste of the Consumers Dollar galvanized interest in testing products on behalf of consumers. ... Frederick J. Schlink (October 26, 1891 - January 15, 1995) was an American consumer rights activist. ... Arthur Kallet (1902-February 25, 1972) was a director of Consumers Research who became the first staff director of Consumers Union and founder of its magazine Consumer Reports. ... Consumer protection is a form of government regulation which protects the interests of consumers. ... This article lacks information on the importance of the subject matter. ... Soviet redirects here. ... Totalitarianism is a term employed by some political scientists, especially those in the field of comparative politics, to describe modern regimes in which the state regulates nearly every aspect of public and private behavior. ...

A guinea pig being inoculated
A guinea pig being inoculated

Guinea pigs were popular laboratory animals until the later 20th century; about 2.5 million guinea pigs were used annually in the U.S. for research in the 1960s,[117] but that total decreased to about 375,000 by the mid-1990s.[52] As of 2007, they constitute approximately 2% of the current total of laboratory animals.[117] In the past they were widely used to standardize vaccines and antiviral agents; they were also often employed in studies on the production of antibodies in response to extreme allergic reactions, or anaphylaxis.[118] Less common uses included research in pharmacology and irradiation.[118] Since the middle 20th century, they have been replaced in laboratory contexts primarily by mice and rats. This is in part because research into the genetics of guinea pigs has lagged behind that of other rodents, although geneticists W. E. Castle and Sewall Wright made a number of contributions to this area of study, especially regarding coat color.[97][119] In 2004, the U.S.'s National Human Genome Research Institute announced plans to sequence the genome of the domestic guinea pig.[120] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 563 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 720 pixel, file size: 82 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Image of a guinea pig (cavia porcellus) being inoculated from the public domain image archive from the Library of Congress. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 563 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 720 pixel, file size: 82 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Image of a guinea pig (cavia porcellus) being inoculated from the public domain image archive from the Library of Congress. ... Inoculation, originally Variolation, is a method of purposefully infecting a person with smallpox (Variola) in a controlled manner so as to minimise the severity of the infection and also to induce immunity against further infection. ... A vaccine is an antigenic preparation used to establish immunity to a disease. ... Antiviral drugs are a class of medication used specifically for treating viral infections. ... Each antibody binds to a specific antigen; an interaction similar to a lock and key. ... Allergy is an abnormal reaction to a substance foreign to the body that is acquired, predictable and rapid. ... Anaphylaxis is an acute systemic (multi-system) and severe Type I Hypersensitivity allergic reaction in humans and other mammals. ... Pharmacology (in Greek: pharmakon (φάρμακον) meaning drug, and lego (λέγω) to tell (about)) is the study of how drugs interact with living organisms to produce a change in function. ... Irradiation is the process by which an item is exposed to radiation. ... Professor William Ernest Castle ( October 25, 1867 — June 3, 1962) was an early American geneticist Biography Castle was born on a farm in Ohio and took an early interest in natural history. ... Sewall Green Wright ForMemRS (December 21, 1889 – March 3, 1988) was an American geneticist known for his influential work on evolutionary theory. ... The Blue Morpho butterfly, native to Central America, derives its distinctive blue coloring from iridescence rather than from pigmentation. ... The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) is a division of the National Institutes of Health, located in Bethesda, Maryland. ... In biology the genome of an organism is the whole hereditary information of an organism that is encoded in the DNA (or, for some viruses, RNA). ...


The guinea pig was most extensively implemented in research and diagnosis of infectious diseases.[118] Common uses included identification of brucellosis, Chagas disease, cholera, diphtheria, foot-and-mouth disease, glanders, Q fever, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and various strains of typhus.[118] They are still frequently used to diagnose tuberculosis, since they are easily infected by human tuberculosis bacteria.[117] Because guinea pigs are one of the few animals which, like humans, cannot synthesize vitamin C but must obtain it from their diet, they are ideal for researching scurvy.[117] Complement, an important component for serology, was first isolated from the blood of the guinea pig.[117] Guinea pigs have an unusual insulin mutation,[121] and are a suitable species for the generation of anti-insulin antibodies.[122] Present at a level 10 times that found in other mammals, the insulin in guinea pigs may be important in growth regulation, a role usually played by growth hormone.[123] Additionally, guinea pigs have been identified as model organisms for the study of juvenile diabetes and, because of the frequency of pregnancy toxemia, of preeclampsia in human females.[63] This false-colored electron micrograph shows a malaria sporozoite migrating through the midgut epithelia. ... Distribution of cholera Cholera, sometimes known as Asiatic cholera or epidemic cholera, is an infectious gastroenteritis caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. ... Not to be confused with hand, foot and mouth disease. ... Glanders is an infectious disease that occurs primarily in horses, mules, and donkeys. ... Binomial name Wolbach, 1919 Rocky Mountain spotted fever is the most severe and most frequently reported rickettsial illness in the United States, and has been diagnosed throughout the Americas. ... For the unrelated disease caused by Salmonella typhi, see Typhoid fever. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... This article is about the nutrient. ... Scurvy (N.Lat. ... A complement protein attacking an invader. ... Serology is the scientific study of blood serum. ... Growth hormone (GH) or somatotropin (STH) is a protein hormone which stimulates growth and cell reproduction in humans and other animals. ... A model organism is a species that is extensively studied to understand particular biological phenomena, with the expectation that discoveries made in the organism model will provide insight into the workings of other organisms. ... This article is about the disease that features high blood sugar. ... Pre-eclampsia (previously called toxemia) is a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy. ...


Guinea pig strains used in scientific research are primarily outbred strains. Aside from the common American or English stock, the two main outbred strains in laboratory use are the Hartley and Dunkin-Hartley; these English strains are albino, although pigmented strains are also available.[124] Inbred strains are less common and are usually used for very specific research, such as immune system molecular biology. Of the inbred strains that have been created, the two that are still used with any frequency are, following Sewall Wright's designations, "Strain 2" and "Strain 13".[97][124] The modern "Skinny pig" hairless and immunodeficient breed was the result of a spontaneous genetic mutation in inbred laboratory strains from the Hartley stock at the Eastman Kodak Company in 1979, and henceforth was deliberately reproduced by Charles River Laboratories.[125] In biology, Strain can be used two ways. ... Albinism is a genetic condition resulting in a lack of pigmentation in the eyes, skin and hair. ... Linear animals or inbred strains are animals of a particular species which are nearly identical to each other in genotype due to long inbreeding. ... Skinny Pigs are a hairless variety of guinea pigs or cavies which result from a mutation in the rhino gene. ... In medicine, immunodeficiency (or immune deficiency) is a state in which the immune systems ability to fight infectious disease is compromised or entirely absent. ... Eastman Kodak Company (NYSE: EK) is a large multinational public company producing photographic equipment. ... Charles River Laboratories is a leading provider of animal research models, as well as a range of biomedical products and outsourcing services, for use in the discovery, development and testing of new pharmaceuticals. ...


As food

Two Peruvian dishes of cuy meat
Two Peruvian dishes of cuy meat

Guinea pigs (called cuy, cuye, curí) were originally domesticated for their meat in the Andes. Traditionally, the animal was usually reserved for ceremonial meals by indigenous people in the Andean highlands, but since the 1960s it has become more socially acceptable for consumption by all people.[126] It continues to be a major part of the diet in Peru and Bolivia, particularly in the Andes Mountains highlands; it is also eaten in some areas of Ecuador (mainly in the Sierra) and Colombia.[127] Because guinea pigs require much less room than traditional livestock and reproduce extremely quickly, they are a more profitable source of food and income than many traditional stock animals, such as pigs and cows;[128] moreover, they can be raised in an urban environment. Both rural and urban families raise guinea pigs for supplementary income, and the animals are commonly bought and sold at local markets and large-scale municipal fairs.[129] Guinea pig meat is high in protein and low in fat and cholesterol, and is described as being similar to rabbit and the dark meat of chicken.[2][130] The animal may be served fried (chactado or frito), broiled (asado), or roasted (al horno), and in urban restaurants may also be served in a casserole or a fricassee.[131] Ecuadorians commonly consume sopa or locro de cuy, a soup dish.[131] Pachamanca or huatia, a process similar to barbecueing, is also popular, and is usually served with corn beer (chicha) in traditional settings.[131] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... This article is about the mountain system in South America. ... See also architecture with non-sequential dynamic execution scheduling (ANDES). ... Map of Ecuador Ecuador is a country in Western South America, bordering the Pacific Ocean at the Equator (for which the country is named), between Colombia and Peru. ... Sheep are commonly bred as livestock. ... A representation of the 3D structure of myoglobin showing coloured alpha helices. ... For other uses, see FAT. Fats consist of a wide group of compounds that are generally soluble in organic solvents and largely insoluble in water. ... Cholesterol is a sterol (a combination steroid and alcohol). ... For other uses, see Rabbit (disambiguation). ... Roast Chicken Not including 32% bones. ... In cooking, a casserole (from the French for stew pan) is a large, deep, covered pot or dish used both in the oven and as a serving dish. ... Fricassee is poultry or other white meat cut into pieces and stewed in a white gravy. ... Pachamanca Pachamanca is a traditional Peruvian dish based on the baking, with the aid of hot stones, of lamb, mutton, pork, chicken or guinea pig, marinated in spices. ... Pachamanca prepared using a huatia A huatia (IPA: or IPA: ) is a traditional Peruvian earthen oven which dates back to the days of the Inca Empire. ... A barbecue on a trailer at a block party in Kansas City. ... Chicha served with pipeño Chicha is a Spanish word for any variety of fermented beverage. ...

Cuy being raised at home in the traditional Andean fashion
Cuy being raised at home in the traditional Andean fashion

Peruvians consume an estimated 65 million guinea pigs each year, and the animal is so entrenched in the culture that one famous painting of the Last Supper in the main cathedral in Cusco shows Christ and the twelve disciples dining on guinea pig.[2] The animal remains an important aspect of certain religious events in both rural and urban areas of Peru. A religious celebration known as jaca tsariy ("collecting the cuys") is a major festival in many villages in the Antonio Raimondi province of eastern Peru, and is celebrated in smaller ceremonies in Lima.[132] It is a syncretistic event, combining elements of Catholicism and pre-Columbian religious practices, and revolves around the celebration of local patron saints.[132] The exact form that the jaca tsariy takes differs from town to town; in some localities, a sirvinti (servant) is appointed to go from door to door, collecting donations of guinea pigs, while in others, guinea pigs may be brought to a communal area to be released in a mock bullfight.[132] Meals such as cuy chactado are always served as part of these festivities, and the killing and serving of the animal is framed by some communities as a symbolic satire of local politicians or important figures.[132] In the Tungurahua and Cotopaxi provinces of central Ecuador, guinea pigs are employed in the celebrations surrounding the feast of Corpus Christi as part of the Ensayo, which is a community meal, and the Octava, where castillos (greased poles) are erected with prizes tied to the crossbars, from which several guinea pigs may be hung.[133] The Peruvian town of Churin has an annual festival which involves dressing guinea pigs in elaborate costumes for a competition.[134] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 522 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1384 × 1590 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 522 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1384 × 1590 pixel, file size: 1. ... For other uses, see The Last Supper (disambiguation). ... This article is the city in Peru. ... This page is about the title, office or what is known in Christian theology as the Divine Person. ... This article is about Lima, Peru. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... As a Christian ecclesiastical term, Catholic—from the Greek adjective , meaning general or universal[1]—is described in the Oxford English Dictionary as follows: ~Church, (originally) whole body of Christians; ~, belonging to or in accord with (a) this, (b) the church before separation into Greek or Eastern and Latin or... The pre-Columbian era incorporates all period subdivisions in the history and prehistory of the Americas before the appearance of significant European influences on the American continents. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... Spanish toreo, corrida de toros or tauromaquia; Portuguese corrida de touros or tauromaquia) is a blood sport that involves, most of the times, professional performers (matadores) who execute various formal moves with the goal of appearing graceful and confident, while masterful over the bull itself; these maneuvers are performed at... 1867 edition of Punch, a ground-breaking British magazine of popular humour, including a good deal of satire of the contemporary social and political scene. ... Map of Tungurahua Province in Ecuador. ... Cotopaxi is one of the provinces of Ecuador. ... Corpus Christi Procession in Germany This article is about the Catholic feast of Corpus Christi. ... Country Region Province Huaura Time zone PET (UTC-5)  - Summer (DST) PET (UTC-5) Churin is a town in Peru, located in the Huaura Province. ...


Andean immigrants in New York City raise and sell guinea pigs for meat, and some ethnic restaurants in major United States cities serve cuy as a delicacy.[135] Peruvian research universities, especially La Molina National Agrarian University, began experimental programs in the 1960s with the intention of breeding larger-sized guinea pigs.[136] Subsequent university efforts have sought to change breeding and husbandry procedures in South America, in order to make the raising of guinea pigs as livestock more economically sustainable.[137] In the 1990s and 2000s, the university began exporting the larger breed guinea pigs to Europe, Japan, and the United States in the hope of increasing human consumption outside of South America.[2] Efforts have also been made to introduce guinea pig husbandry in developing countries in West Africa.[128] Nevertheless, as a food source they are still generally considered taboo in North America and Europe; in reality television, guinea pig meat has been consumed as an exotic dish by such Western celebrity chefs as Andrew Zimmern (for his show Bizarre Foods) and Anthony Bourdain in No Reservations. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... La Molina National Agrarian University (Spanish:Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina) (UNALM) is a state-owned university in Lima, Peru. ... Shepherd with his sheep in FăgăraÅŸ Mountains, Romania. ...  Western Africa (UN subregion)  Maghreb[1] West Africa or Western Africa is the westernmost region of the African continent. ... This article is about practices and beliefs in relation to various animals as food. ... // This article is about the genre of TV shows. ... In its strictest sense, a celebrity chef is a someone who has become well-known for his/her cooking. ... On location for his show, Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern. ... Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern is a documentary-styled travel and cuisine program hosted by Andrew Zimmern on the Travel Channel. ... Anthony Michael Tony Bourdain (born June 25, 1956) is an American author and chef. ...


See also

Mammals Portal

Image File history File links Portal. ... The British Cavy Council is the governing body in the United Kingdom for national, regional, and local cavy (guinea pig) clubs, and also for the wide range of breed clubs which exist on a national basis to further the interests of particular cavy breeds, and to provide a forum for... hes quite nice Peter Gurney (March 9, 1938 - July 2, 2006[1]) was a campaigner for the rights and welfare of guinea pigs. ... A dying guinea pig. ...

Footnotes

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  3. ^ Morales, p. 3.
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  9. ^ Morales, p. 96.
  10. ^ Morales, p. 78.
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  12. ^ Morales, p. 83.
  13. ^ Morales, pp. 75–78.
  14. ^ Morales, p. 3.
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Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Nature is a prominent scientific journal, first published on 4 November 1869. ... Nature is a prominent scientific journal, first published on 4 November 1869. ... The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (USA), mostly commonly referred to as PNAS, is the official publication of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Egg Banking plc is a British internet bank, with headquarters in Derby, Dudley and London, England. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see AOL (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... NASA Logo Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-09-01, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... National Institutes of Health Building 50 at NIH Clinical Center - Building 10 The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is an agency of the United States Ministry of Health and Human Services and is the primary agency of the United States government responsible for biomedical and health-related research. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, usually referred to as PNAS, is the official journal of the United States National Academy of Sciences. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases is based at Fort Detrick, Frederick, Maryland. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Christian Science Monitor (CSM) is an international newspaper published daily, Monday through Friday. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ITN may refer to: Independent Television News In the news, a section on the Main Page of English Wikipedia This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Morales, Edmundo (1995). The Guinea Pig : Healing, Food, and Ritual in the Andes. University of Arizona Press. ISBN 0-8165-1558-1. 
  • Richardson, V.C.G. (2000). Diseases of Domestic Guinea Pigs, 2nd edition, Blackwell. ISBN 0-632-05209-0. 
  • Terril, Lizabeth A. (1998). The Laboratory Guinea Pig. CRC Press. ISBN 0-8493-2564-1. 
  • Vanderlip, Sharon (2003). The Guinea Pig Handbook. Barron's. ISBN 0-7641-2288-6. 
  • Wagner, Joseph E. (1976). The Biology of the Guinea Pig. Academic Press. ISBN 0-12-730050-3. 

External links

Look up Guinea pig in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Cavia porcellus
Wikispecies has information related to:
Cavia porcellus
Wikibooks
Wikibooks has a book on the topic of
Animal Care/Guinea pig
  • Australian National Cavy Council Inc
  • ACBA - American Cavy Breeders' Association
  • Laboratory Guinea Pig
  • Domestic Guinea Pig Genome Project page at GenBank

Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... Image File history File links Wikispecies-logo. ... Wikispecies is a wiki-based online project supported by the Wikimedia Foundation that aims to create a comprehensive free content catalogue of all species (including animalia, plantae, fungi, bacteria, archaea, and protista). ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo-en. ... Wikibooks logo Wikibooks, previously called Wikimedia Free Textbook Project and Wikimedia-Textbooks, is a wiki for the creation of books. ... Subfamilies  Caviinae  Dolichotinae The Cavy (family Caviidae) is divided in two subfamilies: Subfamily Caviinae: cavies and guinea pigs Genus Cavia, this genus is especially called cavy. ... Phyla Subkingdom Parazoa Porifera (sponges) Subkingdom Agnotozoa Placozoa Orthonectida Rhombozoa Subkingdom Metazoa Radiata Cnidaria Ctenophora - Comb jellies Bilateria Protostomia Acoelomorpha Platyhelminthes - Flatworms Nemertina - Ribbon worms Gastrotricha Gnathostomulida - Jawed worms Micrognathozoa Rotifera - Rotifers Acanthocephala Priapulida Kinorhyncha Loricifera Entoprocta Nematoda - Roundworms Nematomorpha - Horsehair worms Cycliophora Mollusca - Mollusks Sipuncula - Peanut worms Annelida - Segmented... Typical Classes Subphylum Urochordata - Tunicates Ascidiacea Thaliacea Larvacea Subphylum Cephalochordata - Lancelets Subphylum Myxini - Hagfishes Subphylum Vertebrata - Vertebrates Petromyzontida - Lampreys Placodermi (extinct) Chondrichthyes - Cartilaginous fishes Acanthodii (extinct) Actinopterygii - Ray-finned fishes Actinistia - Coelacanths Dipnoi - Lungfishes Amphibia - Amphibians Reptilia - Reptiles Aves - Birds Mammalia - Mammals Chordates (phylum Chordata) include the vertebrates, together with... Orders Subclass Monotremata Monotremata Subclass Marsupialia Didelphimorphia Paucituberculata Microbiotheria Dasyuromorphia Peramelemorphia Notoryctemorphia Diprotodontia Subclass Placentalia Xenarthra Dermoptera Desmostylia Scandentia Primates Rodentia Lagomorpha Insectivora Chiroptera Pholidota Carnivora Perissodactyla Artiodactyla Cetacea Afrosoricida Macroscelidea Tubulidentata Hyracoidea Proboscidea Sirenia The mammals are the class of vertebrate animals primarily characterized by the presence of mammary... Suborders Sciuromorpha Castorimorpha Myomorpha Anomaluromorpha Hystricomorpha Rodentia is an order of mammals also known as rodents, characterised by two continuously-growing incisors in the upper and lower jaws which must be kept short by gnawing. ... Families Ctenodactylidae †Tammquammyidae †Diatomyidae †Yuomyidae †Chapattimyidae †Tsaganomyidae Laonastidae †Baluchimyinae Hystricidae †Myophiomyidae †Diamantomyidae †Phiomyidae †Kenyamyidae Petromuridae Thryonomyidae Bathyergidae †Bathyergoididae Erethizontidae Dasyproctidae Agoutidae †Eocardiidae Dinomyidae Caviidae Hydrochaeridae Octodontidae Ctenomyidae Echimyidae Myocastoridae Capromyidae †Heptaxodontidae Chinchillidae †Neoepiblemidae Abrocomidae Skull of a capybara showing the enlarged infraorbital canal present in most members of the Hystricomorpha. ... Genera †Neoprocavia †Allocavia †Palaeocavia †Neocavia †Dolicavia †Macrocavia †Caviops †Pascualia Galea Microcavia Cavia Kerodon Caviinae is a subfamily uniting all liing members of the family Caviidae with the exception of the maras. ... Binomial name Galea flavidens Brandt et. ... Binomial name Galea spixii Wagler et. ... Species Cavia aperea Cavia tschudii Cavia guianae Cavia anolaimae Cavia nana Cavia porcellus Cavia fulgida Cavia magna Cavia intermedia Cavia is a genus in the Caviinae subfamily that contains the rodents commonly known as guinea pigs. ... Binomial name Cavia aperea Erxleben, 1777 The Brazilian Guinea Pig, Cavia aperea, is a guinea pig species from South America. ... Binomial name Cavia fulgida Wagler, 1831 The Shiny Guinea Pig, Cavia fulgida, is a guinea pig species from South America. ... Binomial name Cavia intermedia Cherem et. ... Binomial name Ximenez et. ... Species , Patagonian Mara , Chacoan Mara The maras (Dolichotis) are a genus of the cavy family. ... Species , Patagonian Mara , Chacoan Mara The maras (Dolichotis) are a genus of the cavy family. ... Binomial name Dolichotis patagonum (Zimmermann, 1780) The Patagonian Mara, Dolichotis patagonum, is a relativly large rodent. ... Binomial name Dolichotis salinicola Burmeister, 1876 The Chacoan Mara, Dolichotis salinicola, is a relatively large rodent from South America of the cavy family. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1766) Capybara range Capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris[1], known as carpincho in Spanish and capivara in Portuguese[2]) is the largest rodent still in existence in the world,[3] related to guinea pigs, agouti, coyphillas and chinchillas. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1766) Capybara range Capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris[1], known as carpincho in Spanish and capivara in Portuguese[2]) is the largest rodent still in existence in the world,[3] related to guinea pigs, agouti, coyphillas and chinchillas. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1766) Capybara range Capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris[1], known as carpincho in Spanish and capivara in Portuguese[2]) is the largest rodent still in existence in the world,[3] related to guinea pigs, agouti, coyphillas and chinchillas. ... [[{{{diversity_link}}}|Diversity]] {{{diversity}}} Binomial name Kerodon rupestris Wied-Neuwied, 1820 Trinomial name {{{trinomial}}} Type Species {{{type_species}}} {{{subdivision_ranks}}} [[Image:{{{range_map}}}|{{{range_map_width}}}|]] Synonyms {{{synonyms}}} The Rock Cavy or Mocó, Kerodon rupestris, is a cavy species endemic to eastern Brazil, from easter Piauí state to Minas Gerais state. ... [[{{{diversity_link}}}|Diversity]] {{{diversity}}} Binomial name Kerodon rupestris Wied-Neuwied, 1820 Trinomial name {{{trinomial}}} Type Species {{{type_species}}} {{{subdivision_ranks}}} {{{subdivision}}} [[Image:{{{range_map}}}|{{{range_map_width}}}|]] Synonyms {{{synonyms}}} The Rock Cavy or Mocó, Kerodon rupestris, is a cavy species endemic to eastern Brazil, from easter Piauí state to Minas Gerais state. ... Binomial name Kerodon acrobata Moojen et. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Guinea Pig Care (1925 words)
Guinea pigs are very vocal and this vocalization plays an important part in socialization with other pigs or humans.
Guinea pigs are the gentlest of all the pocket pets, which include mice, hamsters, rats and gerbils and so are ideal pets for responsible children.
Guinea pigs handle cold quite well but they are very susceptible to heat stroke.
Guinea Pigs Club :: Cavy History (679 words)
Herds of buffalo-sized guinea pigs roamed South America millions of years ago, according to a study of a fossil that is today recognised as the biggest rodent ever discovered.
Unearthed in the town of Urumaco, in an arid region of Venezuela 250 miles west of Caracas, the remains of the huge water-loving rodent and associated fossils and plant evidence suggest that the area was once a lush, tropical landscape roamed by giants.
Guinea pigs, being social creatures, do best kept in groups of two or more, but most readily available commercial cages are not large enough to house a pair of pigs.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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