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Encyclopedia > Guantanamo Bay Naval Base
Guantanamo Bay Naval Base
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Image:Gitmo Aerial.jpg
Aerial view of Guantánamo Bay
Type Military base
Built 1898
In use 1898 - present
Controlled by United States Navy
Battles/wars 1898 invasion of Guantánamo Bay

Guantánamo Bay Naval Base is located at the southeastern end of Cuba and has been used by the United States Navy for more than a century. It is the oldest overseas U.S. Navy Base and the only one in a country with which the United States does not have diplomatic relations.[1] The United States controls the land on both sides of the southern part of Guantánamo Bay (Bahía de Guantánamo in Spanish) under a lease set up in the wake of the 1898 Spanish-American War. The lease was established in a 1903 agreement between the two governments, and its terms were modified in a 1934 treaty.[2][3] The current Cuban government considers the U.S. presence in Guantánamo to be an illegal occupation of the area, and argues that the Cuban-American Treaty, which established the lease in 1903, now violates article 52 of the 1969 Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties, though the issue is still open to argument.[4][5] However, Article 4 of the same document states that Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties shall not be retroactively applied to any treaties made before it.[6] Gitmo could refer to: An informal name in the US military for Guantánamo Bay Gitmo, a Swedish documentary about Guantanamo Bay Club Gitmo, a term used on The Rush Limbaugh Show This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Guantánamo or Guantanamo may refer to: Guantánamo Province in southeastern Cuba Guantánamo, a city and seat of Guantánamo Province Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, a body of water on the south shore of Cuba Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, a U.S. Navy facility on the island of... Map of Cuba with location of Guantánamo Bay indicated. ... Aerial view of Guantanamo Bay, collected from http://www. ... USN redirects here. ... Aerial view of Guantanamo Bay The 1898 invasion of Guantánamo Bay happened between the 6th–10th June 1898, during the Spanish-American war, when American and Cuban forces invaded the strategically and commercially important area of Guantanamo Bay in Cuba, and took control of it from Spanish forces. ... USN redirects here. ... Map of Cuba with location of Guantánamo Bay indicated. ... In international law, a concession is a territory within a country that is administered by another entity than the state which holds sovereignty over it. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Kingdom of Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares Ramón Blanco Casualties 3,289 U.S. dead (432 from combat); considerably higher although undetermined Cuban and... The Cuban-American treaty was signed on February 16, 1903 by the President of Cuba and on February 23, 1903 by the President of the United States. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... The Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties (or VCLT), adopted on May 22, 1969 and opened for signature on May 23, 1969, codified the pre-existing customary international law on treaties, with some necessary gap-filling and clarifications. ... The Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties (or VCLT), adopted on May 22, 1969 and opened for signature on May 23, 1969, codified the pre-existing customary international law on treaties, with some necessary gap-filling and clarifications. ...


Since 2002, the naval base has contained a military prison, the Guantanamo Bay detention camp, for persons alleged to be militant combatants captured in Afghanistan and later in Iraq. Prior to July 11, 2006, the Bush Administration maintained that these detainees are not protected under the Geneva Convention.[7] Military Prison is where the level military operates some type of military prison system. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Detention, Treatment, and Trial of Certain Non-Citizens in the War Against Terrorism Wikisource has original text related to this article: Statement of Alberto J Mora on interrogation abuse, July 7, 2004 Guantanamo Bay detention camp is a joint military prison and... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Original document. ...

Contents

History

Map of Cuba with location of Guantánamo Bay indicated.
Map of Cuba with location of Guantánamo Bay indicated.
See also Timeline of Guantánamo Bay
See also List of commanders of Guantanamo Bay Naval Base

Theee Alex Crowe bay was originally called Guantánamo by the Taíno. Christopher Columbus landed at the location known as Fisherman's Point in 1494. The bay was briefly renamed Cumberland Bay when the British took it in the first part of the 18th century during the War of Jenkins' Ear. In 1790, the British garrison at Cumberland died of fever as had a previous British force,[8] before they could attack Santiago by land.[9] Image File history File links Guantanamo_Bay_map. ... Image File history File links Guantanamo_Bay_map. ... Noteworthy Events of Guantánamo Bay. ... This is a listing of commandants and commanders of the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base. ... For other uses, see Taino (disambiguation). ... Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator, colonizer, and explorer and one of the first Europeans to explore the Americas after the Vikings. ... Combatants British Empire Spain Commanders Edward Vernon James E. Oglethorpe George Anson Charles Knowles Blas de Lezo Manuel de Montiano Andrés Reggio The War of Jenkins Ear was a conflict between Great Britain and Spain that lasted from 1739 to 1748. ...


During the Spanish-American War, the U.S. fleet attacking Santiago retreated to Guantánamo's excellent harbor to ride out the summer hurricane season of 1898. The Marines landed with naval support, but required Cuban scouts to push off Spanish resistance that increased as they moved inland. This area became the location of U.S. Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, which covers about 45 square miles (116 km²) and is sometimes abbreviated as GTMO or "Gitmo". Combatants United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Kingdom of Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares Ramón Blanco Casualties 3,289 U.S. dead (432 from combat); considerably higher although undetermined Cuban and... This article is about weather phenomena. ... Aerial view of Guantanamo Bay The 1898 invasion of Guantánamo Bay happened between the 6th–10th June 1898, during the Spanish-American war, when American and Cuban forces invaded the strategically and commercially important area of Guantanamo Bay in Cuba, and took control of it from Spanish forces. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...

Satellite view of Guantánamo Bay
Satellite view of Guantánamo Bay

By the war's end, the U.S. government had obtained control of all of Cuba from Spain. A perpetual lease for the area around Guantánamo Bay was offered February 23, 1903, from Tomás Estrada Palma, an American citizen, who became the first President of Cuba. The Cuban-American Treaty gave, among other things, the Republic of Cuba ultimate sovereignty over Guantánamo Bay while granting the United States "complete jurisdiction and control" of the area for coaling and naval stations. Download high resolution version (1153x865, 287 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1153x865, 287 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Tomás Estrada Palma (1835 - 1908) was a Cuban political figure, [[1]]. He served as the first president of Cuba between 1902 and 1906. ... The Cuban-American treaty was signed on February 16, 1903 by the President of Cuba and on February 23, 1903 by the President of the United States. ...


A 1934 treaty reaffirming the lease granted Cuba and her trading partners free access through the bay, modified the lease payment from $2,000 in U.S. gold coins per year, to the 1934 equivalent value of $4,085 in U.S. dollars, and made the lease permanent unless both governments agreed to break it or the U.S. abandoned the base property. Since the Cuban Revolution the government under Fidel Castro has cashed only one of the rent checks from the US government, and only because of "confusion" in the heady early days of the leftist revolution. The remaining uncashed checks made out to "Treasurer General of the Republic" (A position that has ceased to exist after the revolution) are kept in Castro's office stuffed into a desk drawer. [1]

In 1983, Cuban workers return home through the North East Gate.
In 1983, Cuban workers return home through the North East Gate.

Until the 1953-59 revolution, thousands of Cubans commuted daily from outside the base to jobs within. In mid-1958, vehicular traffic was stopped; workers were required to walk through the base's several gates. Public Works Center buses were pressed into service almost overnight to carry the tides of workers to and from the gate.[10] By 2006, only two elderly Cubans still crossed the base's North East Gate daily to work on the base; this because the Cuban government prohibits new recruitment. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1890x2800, 2209 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Guantanamo Bay Naval Base ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1890x2800, 2209 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Guantanamo Bay Naval Base ... The Cuban Revolution refers to the revolution that led to the overthrow of General Fulgencio Batistas regime on January 1, 1959 by the 26th of July Movement and other revolutionary elements within the country. ...


During the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962, the families of military personnel were evacuated from the base. Notified of the evacuation on October 22, evacuees were told to pack one suitcase per family member, to bring evacuation and immunization cards, to tie pets in the yard, to leave the keys to the house on the dining table, and to wait in front of the house for buses.[11] Dependents traveled to the airfield for flights to the United States, or to ports for passage aboard evacuation ships. President Kennedy in a crowded Cabinet Room during the Cuban Missile Crisis. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Map of Guantánamo Bay showing approximate U.S. Naval Boundaries.
Map of Guantánamo Bay showing approximate U.S. Naval Boundaries.

Since 1939, the base's water had been supplied by pipelines that drew water from the Yateras River about 4.5 miles (7.2 km) northeast of the base. The U.S. government paid a fee for this; in 1964, it was about $14,000 a month for about two and a half million U.S. gallons (10 million L) per day. In 1964, the Cuban government stopped the flow. The base had about 14 million gallons water in storage, and strict water conservation was put into effect immediately. The U.S. first imported water from Jamaica via barges, then built desalination plants.[12] When the Cuban government accused the United States of stealing water, base commander John D. Bulkeley ordered that the pipelines be cut and a section removed. A 38-inch (964 mm) length of the 14-inch (355 mm) diameter pipe and a 20-inch (508 mm) length of the 10-inch (254 mm) diameter pipe were lifted from the ground and the openings sealed. After this resolution, family members were allowed to return to the base in December 1964. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (969x901, 117 KB) Summary CIA Government map of Guantanamo Bay Naval Base --- from http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (969x901, 117 KB) Summary CIA Government map of Guantanamo Bay Naval Base --- from http://www. ... The gallon (abbreviation: gal) is a unit of volume. ... The litre or liter (see spelling differences) is a unit of volume. ... Shevchenko BN350 desalination unit situated on the shore of the Caspian Sea. ... Vice Adm. ...


With over 9,500 U.S. sailors and marines,[13] Guantanamo Bay is the only U.S. base in operation in a Communist led country. This article is about a form of government in which the state operates under the control of a Communist Party. ...

The long-term lease of this territory by the United States has been unpopular with the current Cuban government since 1959, and the Cuban people as a whole. The present landlords of the territory covering Guantanamo Bay, the Communist Party of Cuba, claim that as land owners they may evict the people who live and work there, pointing to article 52[14] of the 1969 Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties which declares a treaty void if its conclusion has been procured by the threat or use of force — in this case by the inclusion, in 1901, of the Platt Amendment in the first Cuban Constitution. The United States warned the Cuban Constitutional Convention not to remove the Amendment, and stated U.S. troops would not leave Cuba until its terms had been adopted as a condition for the U.S. to grant independence. However, the United States argues that Article 4 of the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties prohibits retroactive (after the fact) application of said Convention to already existing treaties [15] such as the ones concluded between the US and Cuba in 1903 and 1934. The Platt Amendment was dissolved in 1934, and the treaty re-affirming the lease to the base was signed after Franklin D. Roosevelt dispatched 29 US warships to Cuba and Key West to protect U.S. interests following a military coup.[16] Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... The Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties (or VCLT), adopted on May 22, 1969 and opened for signature on May 23, 1969, codified the pre-existing customary international law on treaties, with some necessary gap-filling and clarifications. ... Page one of the Platt Amendment The Platt Amendment was a rider amended to the Army Appropriations Act, a United States federal law passed on March 2, 1901 that stipulated the conditions for the withdrawal of United States troops remaining in Cuba since the Spanish-American War, and defined the... Cuba has had several constitutions. ... The Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties (or VCLT), adopted on May 22, 1969 and opened for signature on May 23, 1969, codified the pre-existing customary international law on treaties, with some necessary gap-filling and clarifications. ... Map of Key West Key West is a city located in Monroe County, Florida. ...

Two of the wind turbines installed by the Navy in 2005.
Two of the wind turbines installed by the Navy in 2005.

Since coming to power in 1959, Cuban President Fidel Castro has refused to cash all but the very first rent check in protest. [17] But the United States argues that its cashing signifies Havana's ratification of the lease — and that ratification by the new government renders moot any questions about violations of sovereignty and illegal military occupation.[citation needed] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1696x1824, 1598 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Guantanamo Bay Naval Base Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1696x1824, 1598 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Guantanamo Bay Naval Base Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fidel Alejandro Castro Ruz (born on August 13, 1926) is the current President of Cuba but on indefinite medical hiatus. ...


The San Francisco Chronicle published an article, on April 22, 2007, about the base, and the conditions under which the treaty would be rendered void.[18] The article states the treaty allows the USA to use the base for "coaling and naval purposes only." It states it does not allow the USA to use it for detaining "enemy combatants", or trying them for war crimes. It further states that the treaty explicitly proscribes "commercial, industrial or other enterprise within said areas." And yet the base sports half a dozen fast-food concessions. According to the article, American business, political and cultural figures with regular contact with Cuban leaders say they have the impression that the Cuban government wants the U.S. military off the island but that the issue isn't a priority now.[18] Todays San Francisco Chronicle was founded in 1865 as The Daily Dramatic Chronicle by teenage brothers Charles de Young and Michael H. de Young. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


"Gitmo" has a U.S. amateur radio call sign series, KG4 followed by two letters. This is completely distinct from Cuban radio callsigns, which typically begin with CO or CM. For "ham" purposes it is considered to be a separate "entity." Not surprisingly, this position is not recognized by Cuba's amateur radio society. Amateur radio station with modern solid-state transceiver featuring LCD and DSP capabilities Amateur radio, often called ham radio, is both a hobby and a service that uses various types of radio communications equipment to communicate with other radio amateurs for public service, recreation and self-training. ... Call sign can refer to different types of call signs: Airline call sign Aviator call sign Cosmonaut call sign Radio and television call signs Tactical call sign, also known as a tactical designator See also: International Callsign Allocations, Maritime Mobile Service Identity This is a disambiguation page — a navigational...


Notable persons born at the naval base include actor Peter Bergman and American-British guitarist Isaac Guillory. Autographed photo of Peter Bergman Peter Bergman as Jack Abbott Peter Bergman (born June 11, 1953) is a three time Emmy Award-winning American soap opera actor. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... Isaac Guillory (February 27, 1947 - December 31, 2000) was a Cuban-born-American guitarist. ...


In 2005, the Navy completed a $12 million wind project, erecting four wind turbines capable of supplying about a quarter of the base's peak power needs, reducing diesel fuel usage and pollution from the existing diesel generators.[19]


Cactus Curtain

Minefield maintenance Marines stack mines for disposal, 1997.
Minefield maintenance Marines stack mines for disposal, 1997.

After the Revolution, some Cubans sought refuge on the base. In fall 1961, Cuba had its troops plant an 8-mile (13 km) barrier of cactus along the northeastern section of the fence. This was dubbed the "Cactus Curtain", an allusion to Europe's Iron Curtain[10] and the Bamboo Curtain in East Asia. In 2006, despite the continuing lack of diplomatic relations between the countries, the United States agreed to return fugitives from Cuban law to Cuban authorities, and Cuba agreed to return fugitives from U.S. law, for offenses committed in Guantánamo Bay, to U.S. authorities. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2100x1375, 1020 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Guantanamo Bay Naval Base ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2100x1375, 1020 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Guantanamo Bay Naval Base ... “Miles” redirects here. ... Warsaw Pact countries to the east of the Iron Curtain are shaded red; NATO members to the west of it — blue. ... Bamboo Curtain in 1959 The Bamboo Curtain was the east Asian version of the Iron Curtain. ...


U.S. troops placed 75,000 land mines across the "no man's land" between the U.S. and Cuban border, creating the second-largest minefield in the world, and the largest in the Western Hemisphere. On May 16, 1996, U.S. president Bill Clinton ordered their removal. They have since been replaced with motion and sound sensors to detect intruders. The Cuban government has not removed the corresponding minefield on its side of the border.[20] A landmine is a type of mine which is placed onto or into the ground and explodes when triggered by a vehicle or person. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ...


Detention of prisoners

Captives upon arrival at Camp X-Ray, January 2002
Captives upon arrival at Camp X-Ray, January 2002

In the last quarter of the 20th century, the base was used to house Cuban and Haitian refugees intercepted on the high seas. In the early 1990s, it held refugees who fled Haiti after military forces overthrew democratically elected President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. These refugees were held in a detainment area called Camp Bulkeley until United States District Court Judge Sterling Johnson Jr. declared the camp unconstitutional on June 8, 1993. This decision was later vacated. The last Haitian migrants departed Guantánamo on 1 November 1995. Wikisource has original text related to this article: Detention, Treatment, and Trial of Certain Non-Citizens in the War Against Terrorism Wikisource has original text related to this article: Statement of Alberto J Mora on interrogation abuse, July 7, 2004 Guantanamo Bay detention camp is a joint military prison and... Download high resolution version (704x704, 88 KB)Detainees at Camp X-Ray Original caption: Detainees in orange jumpsuits sit in a holding area under the watchful eyes of Military Police at Camp X-Ray at Naval Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, during in-processing to the temporary detention facility on Jan. ... Download high resolution version (704x704, 88 KB)Detainees at Camp X-Ray Original caption: Detainees in orange jumpsuits sit in a holding area under the watchful eyes of Military Police at Camp X-Ray at Naval Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, during in-processing to the temporary detention facility on Jan. ... Jean-Bertrand Aristide (born July 15, 1953) is a Haitian politician and former Roman Catholic priest who was President of Haiti in 1991, again from 1994 to 1996, and then from 2001 to 2004. ... Camp Bulkeley was a detainment area located within the United States military base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where HIV-positive refugees and asylum seekers were held during the early 1990s. ... Map of the boundaries of the United States Courts of Appeals and United States District Courts The United States district courts are the general trial courts of the United States federal court system. ... Sterling Johnson, Jr. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Upon appeal, a court judgment can be upheld, vacated, or reversed. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ...


The Migrant Operations Center on Guantánamo typically keeps fewer than 30 people interdicted at sea in the Caribbean region.


Beginning in 2002, a small portion of the base was used to imprison several hundred individuals — some of whom were captured by US forces in Afghanistan, though the majority were 'bought' for a substantial bounty (generally in the region of $US 5000) from various warlords and mercenaries both in Afghanistan and elsewhere — at Camp Delta, Camp Echo, Camp Iguana, and the now-closed Camp X-Ray. The US military has asserted that some, but not all, of these captives are linked to Al-Qaida or the Taliban. The military has withheld the evidence against captives asserted to be linked to terrorist organizations or enemy states. In litigation regarding the availability of fundamental rights to those imprisoned at the base, the U.S. Supreme Court has recognized that the captives "have been imprisoned in territory over which the United States exercises exclusive jurisdiction and control."[21] Therefore, the captives have the fundamental right to due process of law under the Fifth Amendment. A district court has since held that the "Geneva Conventions applied to the Taliban captives, but not to members of al Qaeda terrorist organization."[22] A Camp Delta recreation and exercise area at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. ... Camp Echo is one of six detention camps that make up the main Camp Delta, at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp, run by the United States military. ... Camp Iguana is a small compound in the detainment camp complex on the US Naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. ... Camp X-Ray, shown here under construction, was a temporary holding facility for detainees held at U.S. Naval Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. ...


On 10 June 2006, the Department of Defense reported that three Guantánamo Bay captives committed suicide. The military reported the men hanged themselves with nooses made of sheets and clothes. One of the men was first detained when he was a juvenile. They each had been imprisoned for the past four years, but never charged with a crime. Before June 10, the Department of Defense acknowledged there had been 41 suicide attempts at the camp. On 24 August 2006, the 24 year old Murat Kurnaz was released from the base. He claimed to have been exposed to water torture, sexual harassment and desecration of Islam while staying on Guantanamo. The documentary "Prisoner 345", interviews other former captives, Sami al-Hajj and Moazzam Beg, making similar claims of harassment. is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Murat Kurnaz (born March 19, 1982 in Bremen, Germany) was held in extrajudicial detention and claims to have been tortured[1] in the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, Cuba for four years. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ...

The closing-down of the Guantánamo Prison has been requested by Amnesty International (May 2005), the United Nations (February 2006) and the European Union (May 2006). On June 10, 2006 three prisoners held by the United States at the Guantanamo Bay detainment camps committed suicide. ...


On 6 September 2006, President Bush announced that enemy combatants held by the CIA will be transferred to the custody of DOD, and held at Guantánamo Prison. Among approximately 500 prisoners in Guantánamo Bay, only 10 have been tried by the Guantanamo military commission, but all cases have been stayed pending the adjustments being made to comply with the Hamdi decision by the U.S. Supreme Court. is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Military commissions are among procedures planned by the U.S. Bush administration to deal with detainees it links to al-Qaeda. ...


Businesses represented at Guantánamo Bay

Guantánamo's McDonald's
Guantánamo's McDonald's

In 1986, Guantanamo became host to Cuba's first and only McDonald's restaurant, as well as a Subway.[23] These fast food restaurants are on base, and not accessible to Cubans. It has been reported that prisoners cooperating with interrogations have been rewarded with Happy Meals from the McDonald's located on the mainside of the base.[24] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants, primarily selling hamburgers, chicken, french fries, milkshakes and soft drinks. ... SUBWAY® is the name of a franchise fast food restaurant that mainly sells sandwiches and salads. ... Fast food is food prepared and served quickly at a fast-food restaurant or shop at low cost. ... Happy Meal logo, English Happy Meal logo, Japanese Happy Meal logo, Spanish A Happy Meal is a meal specially tailored for children, sold at McDonalds since 1979. ...


is 2003, Guantanamo opened a combined KFC and A&W restaurants at the bowling alley and a Pizza Hut Express at the Wind Jammer Restaurant[citation needed]. It should be noted that all the restaurants on the installation are franchises owned and operated by the Department of the Navy, and all proceeds from these restaurants are used to support morale, welfare and recreation (MWR) activities for service personnel and their families[citation needed]. KFC, also known as Kentucky Fried Chicken, is a food chain based in Louisville, Kentucky, known mainly for its fried chicken. ... A&W is a brand name used by two companies: A&W Restaurants A&W Root Beer - once only at the restaurants, now available at supermarkets This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Pizza Hut Inc. ...


Fictional representations and mentions of Guantanamo

One of the guard towers at Guantanamo Bay, 1991.
One of the guard towers at Guantanamo Bay, 1991.
  • The movie A Few Good Men (1992) depicts a legal trial concerning an incident that took place at Guantánamo. It was filmed primarily in the United States.
  • Guantánamo was featured in the movie Bad Boys II (2003), although it was actually filmed in Puerto Rico.
  • Guantánamo was mentioned in the James Bond movie GoldenEye (1995).
  • Guantánamo is frequently referenced in the TV series JAG, and its spin-off series NCIS, usually as a threat to persuade suspects with even loose connections to terrorists to confess to crimes or inform on friends.
  • Guantánamo is referenced several times in the 2nd season of the TV series, 24.
  • A character in the Showtime series Sleeper Cell was a prior detainee at Guantanamo.
  • The helicopter simulation game Apache Havoc features a fictional Cuban-American war set around Guantánamo.
  • The flight simulator A-10 Cuba! bases the player in the Guantánamo Bay Naval Base.
  • The Matthew Reilly novel Seven Ancient Wonders features a prison break from Guantánamo Bay.
  • Guantánamo is the setting by the graphic novella An Accidental Death of Ed Brubaker and Eric Shanower, about two teenagers living there in the 1970s.
  • The Road to Guantánamo (2006) is a docu-drama directed by Michael Winterbottom about the incarceration of three British detainees at Guantánamo Bay Naval Base.
  • GITMO-The new rules of war (2005) is a Swedish documentary directed by Erik Gandini and Tarik Saleh about the connection between Abu Ghraib and Guantánamo.
  • Is mentioned in the 1996 track "Ready or Not" by the Fugees. The lyrics are "I refugee from Guantanamo Bay, dance around the border like I'm Cassius Clay"
  • The novel series Piers Anthony book, Bio of a Space Tyrant briefly mentions 'Tanamo Bay', a fictionalized version of Guantanamo Bay set in space on a moon of Jupiter.
  • Guantánamo Naval Base is where the protagonists forced antagonist Félix Cortez back to Castro's Cuba in Tom Clancy's novel "Clear and Present Danger".
  • James Grippando's 2004 novel Hear No Evil takes place partly at Guantánamo
  • Michael Moore's 2007 movie Sicko features a trip to Guantánamo for the sake of free medical care.
  • The CBS series Criminal Minds featured an episode in 2007 titled "Lessons Learned" where the BAU team interrogated a terrorist leader held in Guantánamo to determine the location of an attack in the USA

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See also

Cuba Portal
Historical:
Current:

Image File history File links Flag_of_Cuba. ... Cuba and the United States of America have had a mutual interest in one another since well before either of their independence movements. ... Page one of the Platt Amendment The Platt Amendment was a rider amended to the Army Appropriations Act, a United States federal law passed on March 2, 1901 that stipulated the conditions for the withdrawal of United States troops remaining in Cuba since the Spanish-American War, and defined the... This article concerns a televised production about the U.S. military facility on the island of Cuba. ... Foreign establishments are not legally part of a countrys territory under its laws, but are under the physical control of the country. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay was a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Zambales, Philippines. ... The Panama Canal Zone (Spanish: ), was a 553 square mile (1,432 km²) territory inside of Panama, consisting of the Panama Canal and an area generally extending 5 miles (8. ... Treaty ports were port cities in China, Japan and Korea opened to foreign trade by the so-called Unequal Treaties, i. ... After the Irish Free State won independence in 1922, three deep water Treaty Ports, at Berehaven, Queenstown (renamed Cobh) and Lough Swilly, were retained by the United Kingdom as sovereign bases. ... For other uses, see Goa (disambiguation). ... Anthem God Save the Queen Akrotiri and Dhekelia (Occupied Areas) Sovereign Base Areas indicated in pink. ...

References

  1. ^ U.S. Naval Station Guantanamo Bay. U.S. Naval Station Guantanamo Bay Public Affairs Office. Retrieved on June 11, 2007.
  2. ^ Agreement Between the United States and Cuba for the Lease of Lands for Coaling and Naval stations. The Avalon project, Yale Law School (February 23, 1903). Retrieved on 2007-06-20.
  3. ^ Treaty Between the United States of America and Cuba. The Avalon project, Yale Law School (May 29, 1934). Retrieved on 2007-06-20.
  4. ^ de Zayas, Alfred (19 November 2003), The status of Guantanimo bay and the status of the detainees., University of British Columbia Faculty of Law: Office of the Dean of the Law School at the University of British Columbia, <http://alfreddezayas.com/Lectures/GUANTANAMOlecture2.doc>. Retrieved on 2007-06-22
  5. ^ COHA Research Staff (15 March 2007). A Constructive Plot to Return Guantanamo Bay to Cuba in the Near Future. Council on Hemispheric Affairs. Retrieved on 2007-06-22.
  6. ^ http://untreaty.un.org/ilc/texts/instruments/english/conventions/1_1_1969.pdf pdf
  7. ^ Washington Post Staff Writers (2006-07-12). U.S. Shifts Policy on Geneva Conventions Bowing to Justices, Administration Says It Will Apply Treaties to Terror Suspects (html) (English) A01. Washington Post. Retrieved on 2007-03-20.
  8. ^ Guantanamo Bay Freeport. Globalisation Institute (13 April 2005). Retrieved on 2006-03-15.
  9. ^ Colonel Robert D. Heinl, Jr., U.S.M.C. (February 1962). "How We Got GUANTANAMO". American Heritage Magazine 13 (2). 
  10. ^ a b M. E. Murphy, Rear Admiral, U. S. Navy. The History of Guantanamo Bay 1494 -1964: Chapter 18, "Introduction of Part II, 1953 - 1964". Retrieved on 2006-03-15.
  11. ^ The History of Guantánamo Bay 1494 -1964: Chapter 19, "Cuban Crisis, 1962". Retrieved on 2006-03-15.
  12. ^ The History of Guantanamo Bay 1494 -1964: Chapter 21, "The 1964 Water Crisis". Retrieved on 2006-03-15.
  13. ^ Ralston, Jeannie (April 2005). "09360 No-Man's-Land". National Geographic. 
  14. ^ Article 52 of the Vienna Convention on the Law of treaties.
  15. ^ http://untreaty.un.org/ilc/texts/instruments/english/conventions/1_1_1969.pdf pdf
  16. ^ Cuba and the United States: A Chronological History Jane Franklin 1997
  17. ^ Boadle, Anthony. "Castro: Cuba not cashing U.S. Guantanamo rent checks", Reuter, 17 August 2007. Retrieved on 17 August 2007. (English) 
  18. ^ a b Carol J. Williams. "Guantanamo echoes U.S. 'gunboat' past: Anti-American forces use Navy base as rallying symbol", San Francisco Chronicle, Sunday, April 22, 2007. Retrieved on April 22. 
  19. ^ United States Navy. The Department of Navy Debuts Largest Wind Energy Project To Date. April 25, 2005.
  20. ^ Destination Guantanamo Bay. BBC News (28 December 2001). Retrieved on 2006-03-15.
  21. ^ Rasul v. Bush, 542 U.S. 466 (2004).
  22. ^ In re Guantánamo captive Cases, 355 F.Supp.2d 443 (D.D.C. 2005).
  23. ^ Warner, Margaret (October 14 2003). INSIDE GUANTANAMO (HTML). Online NewsHour. Retrieved on 2006-03-15.
  24. ^ Corera, Gordon (16 Jan 2006). Guantanamo Bay's unhappy anniversary (HTML). The New Nation. Retrieved on 2006-03-15.

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External links

Wikinews
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Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ...

Official U.S. military website

  • NSGtmo.navy.mil — "U.S. Naval Station Guantanamo Bay Cuba: The United States' oldest overseas Naval Base"
  • Reprocessed Combatant Status Review Tribunal (CSRT) and Administrative Review Board (ARB) Documents

White House Statement

Maps and photos

Movie

Human rights affairs

  • Close Guantánamo Flotilla
  • Reporting on life behind the wire: The Sudanese journalist Sami al Hajj held in Guantanamo Bay, in The Independent, June 7, 2007

Coordinates: 19°54′N 75°9′W / 19.9, -75.15 For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Guantanamo Bay "GITMO" (2004 words)
The primary mission of Guantanamo Bay is to serve as a strategic logistics base for the Navy’s Atlantic Fleet and to support counter drug operations in the Caribbean.
Guantanamo Bay, located on the southeast coast of the island of Cuba about 500 statute miles southeast of Miami, Florida, is approached via the Windward Passage from the north or the Caribbean Sea from the south.
The deep bay is sheltered by the nearby Cuzco Hills (elevations to 495 ft) to the south and east and by mountains to the north.
Guantanamo Bay Naval Base and Ecological Crisis (5120 words)
During the fall of 1961, in the wake of the Bay of Pigs invasion, the Castro regime gave substance to the already-named boundary between the base and Cuban territory in an attempt to physically deter Cubans from using the base as a means of escape from the island.
Guantanamo bay is situated in the belt of the Caribbean trade winds; it receives sea breezes from the southeast during the afternoons, and, shortly after sunset, the wind changes to a northerly direction and becomes a land breeze.
Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, or "Gitmo" as it is commonly referred to, covers an area of 71 square miles, of which 23 square miles are water and the rest is either solid ground (approximately 35 square miles) or swampland (13 square miles).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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