FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Guanidine

Guanidine is a crystalline compound of strong alkalinity formed by the oxidation of guanine. It is used in the manufacture of plastics and explosives. It is found in urine as a normal product of protein metabolism. With a pKa of 12.5, guanidine is protonated, with a charge of +1 in physiological conditions. Crystal (disambiguation) Insulin crystals A crystal is a solid in which the constituent atoms, molecules, or ions are packed in a regularly ordered, repeating pattern extending in all three spatial dimensions. ... Alkalinity or AT is a measure of the acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of a solution. ... The most fundamental reactions in chemistry are the redox processes. ... Guanine is one of the five main nucleobases found in the nucleic acids DNA and RNA; the others being adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil. ... The term plastics covers a range of synthetic or semi-synthetic organic condensation or polymerization products that can be molded or extruded into objects or films or fibers. ... This article is concerned solely with chemical explosives. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Santorio Santorio (1561-1636) in his steelyard balance, from Ars de statica medecina, first published 1614 Metabolism (from μεταβολισμος (metabolismos)) is the biochemical modification of chemical compounds in living organisms anggjgjhnd cell (b). ... In chemistry and biochemistry, acid dissociation constant, the acidity constant, or the acid-ionization constant () is a specific type of equilibrium constant that indicates the extent of dissociation of hydrogen ions from an acid. ...

Guanidine (protonated form shown)
Chemical name Guanidine
Chemical formula CNH(NH2)2
Molecular mass 59.0706 g/mol
CAS number 1729-17-5
Density x.xxx g/cm3
Melting point 50 °C
Boiling point xx.x °C
SMILES C(=N)(N)N
Disclaimer and references

Guanidine Hydrochloride has chaotropic properties and is used to denature proteins. Empirically, guanidine hydrochloride is known to denature proteins with a linear relationship between concentration and free energy of unfolding. Image File history File links Guanidine+.jpg Summary I made it myself, using CS ChemDraw Std and PyMOL(TM) Molecular Graphics System, Version 0. ... IUPAC nomenclature is a system of naming chemical compounds and of describing the science of chemistry in general. ... A chemical formula (also called molecular formula) is a concise way of expressing information about the atoms that constitute a particular chemical compound. ... The molecular mass (abbreviated MM) of a substance, called molecular weight and abbreviated as MW, is the mass of one molecule of that substance, relative to the unified atomic mass unit u (equal to 1/12 the mass of one atom of carbon-12). ... CAS registry numbers are unique numerical identifiers for chemical compounds, polymers, biological sequences, mixtures and alloys. ... Density (symbol: ρ - Greek: rho) is a measure of mass per unit of volume. ... The melting point of a solid is the temperature at which it changes state from solid to liquid. ... The boiling point of a substance is the temperature at which it can change its state from a liquid to a gas throughout the bulk of the liquid at a given pressure. ... The simplified molecular input line entry specification or SMILES is a specification for unambiguously describing the structure of chemical molecules using short ASCII strings. ... The free energy is a measure of the amount of mechanical (or other) work that can be extracted from a system, and is helpful in engineering applications. ...


Guanidines are a group of organic compounds sharing a common functional group with the general structure (R1R2N)(R3R4N)C=N-R5. The central bond within this group is that of an imine; the other recognizable motif within this group is an aminal. An example of a guanidine is triazabicyclodecene. Benzene An organic compound is any member of a large class of chemical compounds whose molecules contain carbon, with the exception of carbides, carbonates, carbon oxides and elementary carbon. ... In organic chemistry functional groups are specific groups of atoms within molecules, that are responsible for the characteristic chemical reactions of those molecules. ... An imine is a functional group or chemical compound containing a carbon-nitrogen double bond. ... A hemiaminal is a functional group or type of chemical compound that has a hydroxyl group and a amine attached to the same carbon atom: -C(OH)(NR2)-. R can be hydrogen or an alkyl group. ... Triazabicyclodecene or 1,5,7-Triazabicyclo[4. ...



Guanidine is currently being considered as an alternative fuel. In the presence of a catalyst, a mole of free-base guanidine combines with 2 moles of water to form 3 moles of ammonia and 1 mole of carbon dioxide. The ammonia can be used directly as a fuel for internal combustion engines, or decomposed into nitrogen and hydrogen gas for use in fuel cells. The guanidine could be supplied as a fuel in solid form as pure guanidine (melting point ~ 50 C) or as a lower melting point eutectic mixture with urea. Guanidine could also be supplied as solutions in ethanol, as a replacement for the gasoline component in E85 fuel.


  Results from FactBites:
 
Guanidine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (267 words)
Guanidine is a crystalline compound of strong alkalinity formed by the oxidation of guanine.
Empirically, guanidine hydrochloride is known to denature proteins with a linear relationship between concentration and free energy of unfolding.
In the presence of a catalyst, a mole of free-base guanidine combines with 2 moles of water to form 3 moles of ammonia and 1 mole of carbon dioxide.
GUANIDINE NITRATE (899 words)
The aqueous mixture of (Note 10) is similar to some aqueous mixtures used in sizable quantities for rock blasting; a confined mixture of this sort is especially hazardous.
A 10 per cent excess of ammonium nitrate is used because the biguanide mononitrate which is formed as an intermediate is strongly basic and tends to attack the unreacted ammonium nitrate, as is evidenced by the liberation of ammonia during the heating.
The excess of ammonium nitrate can be easily separated from the guanidine nitrate by the crystallization from water, and it does not interfere with the conversion of guanidine nitrate into nitroguanidine by the action of strong sulfuric acid.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m