FACTOID # 8: Bookworms: Vermont has the highest number of high school teachers per capita and third highest number of librarians per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Guadeloupe" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Guadeloupe
Région Guadeloupe
(Region flag) (Region logo)
Location
Map of France highlighting the Region of Guadeloupe
Administration
Capital Basse-Terre
Regional President Victorin Lurel
(PS) (since 2004)
Departments Guadeloupe
Arrondissements 2[1]
Cantons 40[1]
Communes 32[1]
Statistics
Land area1 1,628 km²[1]
Population (Ranked 23rd)
 - January 1, 2006 est. ca. 405,000[1]
 - March 8, 1999 census 386,566[1]
 - Density (2006) 249/km²[1]
1 French Land Register data, which exclude lakes, ponds, and glaciers larger than 1 km² (0.386 sq. mi. or 247 acres) as well as the estuaries of rivers
France

Guadeloupe is an archipelago located in the eastern Caribbean Sea at 16°15′N, 61°35′W, with a land area of 1,628 square kilometres (629 sq. mi).[1] It is an overseas department of France. As with the other overseas departments, Guadeloupe is also one of the twenty-six regions of France (being an overseas region) and an integral part of the Republic. As part of France, Guadeloupe is part of the European Union; hence its currency is the euro.[2] Guadeloupe is however not party to the Schengen Agreement. Image File history File links GuadFlag. ... Image File history File links GuadLogo1. ... Image File history File links LocationGuadeloupe. ... Basse-Terre Island (top) from space, September 1994 Basse-Terre is the name of the western of the two largest islands of Guadeloupe. ... In France, the president of the regional council (French: Président du conseil régional) is the elected official who heads the conseil régional of a région, a state-level territory. ... The Socialist Party (Parti Socialiste, PS) is one of the largest political parties in France. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Departments (French: IPA: ) are administrative units of France and many former French colonies, roughly analogous to English counties. ... The 100 French departments are divided into 342 arrondissements, which may be translated into English as districts. ... The cantons of France are administrative divisions subdividing arrondissements and départements. ... Map of the 36,568 communes of metropolitan France. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here areas between 1,000 km² and 10,000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ... // The following are ranked lists of French régions. ... Rio de la Plata estuary Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Estuaries An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Mergui Archipelago An archipelago is a landform which consists of a chain or cluster of islands. ... Map of Central America and the Caribbean Caribbean Sea from space (top left). ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Overseas region (French: Région doutre-mer), is a recent designation given to the overseas departments which have similar powers to those of the regions of metropolitan France. ... “EUR” redirects here. ...  Implementing countries  Implementing through partnership with a signatory state  Members (not yet implemented)  Expressed interest in joining A monument to the Agreement in Schengen A typical Schengen border crossing without any border control post, just the common EU-state sign welcoming the visitor, as here between Germany and Austria The...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Guadeloupe

During his second trip to America Christopher Columbus became the first European to land on Guadeloupe in November 1493, seeking fresh water. He called it Santa María de Guadalupe de Extremadura, after the image of the Virgin Mary venerated at the Spanish monastery of Villuercas, in Guadalupe, Extremadura. However, the expedition set ashore just south of Capesterre but did not leave any settlers ashore. Guadeloupe was first sighted by Christopher Columbus in 1493, but the indigenous Carib population successfully fended off European efforts to settle the island until 1635, when it became a French possession. ... Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator and maritime explorer credited as the discoverer of the Americas. ... 1493 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... According to the New Testament, Mary (Judeo-Aramaic מרים Maryām Bitter; Arabic مريم (Maryam); Septuagint Greek Μαριαμ, Mariam, Μαρια, Maria; Geez: ማሪያም, Māryām; Syriac: Mart, Maryam, Madonna), was the mother of Jesus of Nazareth, who at the time of his conception was the betrothed wife of Saint Joseph (cf. ... The Royal Monastery of Santa Maria de Guadalupe (Spanish: Real Monasterio de Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe) is a monastic establishment in Cáceres province of the Extremadura autonomous community of Spain; it was the most important monastery in the country for more than four centuries. ...


After successful settlement on the island of St Christophe (St Kitts), the French American Islands Company delegated Charles Lienard and Jean Duplessis, Lord of Ossonville to colonize one or any of the region’s islands, Guadeloupe, Martinique or Dominica. Due to Martinique’s inhospitable nature, the duo resolved to settle in Guadeloupe. The French took possession of the island in 1635 and wiped out many of the Carib amerindians. It was annexed to the kingdom of France in 1674. Over the next century, the island was seized several times by the British. One indication of Guadeloupe's prosperity at this time is that in the Treaty of Paris (1763), France, defeated in war, accepted to abandon its territorial claims in Canada in return for British recognition of French control of Guadeloupe[citation needed]. Events February 10 - The Académie française in Paris is expanded to become a national academy for the artistic elite. ... Events February 19 - England and the Netherlands sign the Treaty of Westminster. ... The Treaty of Paris, often called the Peace of Paris, or the Treaty of 1763, was signed on February 10, 1763, by the kingdoms of Great Britain, France and Spain, with Portugal in agreement. ... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1790, the upper classes of Guadeloupe refused to obey the new laws of equal rights for the free colored and attempted to declare independence, resulting in great disturbances; a fire broke out in Pointe-à-Pitre and devastated a third of the town, and a struggle between the monarchists (who wanted independence) and the republicans (who were faithful to revolutionary France) ended in the victory of the monarchists, who declared independence in 1791, followed by the refusal to receive the new governor appointed by Paris in 1792. In 1793, a slave rebellion started, which made the upper classes turn to the British and ask them to occupy the island. Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Pointe-à-Pitre is the main town of the French Caribbean island and French département doutre-mer of Guadeloupe, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


In an effort to take advantage of the chaos ensuing from the French Revolution, Britain attempted to seize Guadeloupe in 1794 and held it from April 21 to June 2. The French retook the island under the command of Victor Hugues, who succeeded in freeing the slaves. They revolted and turned on the slave-owners who controlled the sugar plantations, but when American interests were threatened, Napoleon sent a force to suppress the rebels and reinstitute slavery. Louis Delgrès and a group of revolutionary soldiers killed themselves on the slopes of the Matouba volcano when it became obvious that the invading troops would take control of the island. The occupation force killed approximately 10,000 Guadeloupeans in the process of restoring order to the island. The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Victor Hugues - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Slave redirects here. ... Magnification of grains of sugar, showing their monoclinic hemihedral crystalline structure. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Louis Delgrès was a mulatto leader of the movement in Guadeloupe resisting reoccupation (and thus the reinstitution of slavery) by Napoleonic France. ...


On February 5, 1813 the British once again seized the island and held it until March 3, 1813, when it was ceded to Sweden as a consequence of the Napoleonic Wars. Sweden already had a colony in the area, but merely a year later Sweden left the island to France in the Treaty of Paris of 1814. An ensuing settlement between Sweden and the British gave rise to the Guadeloupe Fund. French control of Guadeloupe was finally acknowledged in the Treaty of Vienna in 1815. Slavery was abolished on the island in 1848 at the initiative of Victor Schoelcher. Today the population of Guadeloupe is mostly of African origin with an important European and Indian active population. Lebanese, Chinese, and people of many other origins are also present. is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (63rd in leap years). ... Year 1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Combatants Austria[1] Portugal Prussia[1] Russia[2] Spain[3] Sweden United Kingdom[4] Ottoman Empire[5] Holy Roman Empire[6] French Empire Holland Kingdom of Italy Kingdom of Naples Duchy of Warsaw Bavaria[7] Saxony[8] Denmark [9] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack von Leiberich Gebhard von... The 1814 Treaty of Paris, signed on May 30, 1814, ended the war between France and the Sixth Coalition of the United Kingdom, Russia, Austria, Sweden and Prussia. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Charles XIV John of Sweden The Guadeloupe Fund (Swedish: Guadeloupefonden) was established by Swedens Riksdag of the Estates in 1815 for the benefit of Crown Prince and Regent Charles XIV John of Sweden, also known as Jean-Baptiste Bernadotte, and his heirs. ... There were several treaties of Vienna: Treaty of Vienna, 1725 Treaty of Vienna, 1731 Treaty of Vienna, 1738 Treaty of Vienna, 1809 Treaty of Vienna, 1815 Treaty of Vienna, 1864 This is a disambiguation page—a list of articles associated with the same title. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Victor Schoelcher (1804 - 25 December 1893) was a French abolitionist writer in the 1800s and the main spokesman for a group from Paris who worked for the abolition of slavery, and formed an abolition society in 1834. ...


On February 22, 2007 the communes of Saint-Martin and Saint-Barthélemy were officially detached from Guadeloupe and became overseas collectivities separate from Guadeloupe. February 22 is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Map of the 36,568 communes of metropolitan France. ... Anthem: La Marseillaise Capital (and largest city) Marigot Official languages French Government  -  President of France Jacques Chirac  -  Prefect Dominique Lacroix  -  President of the Territorial Council none yet; however Albert Fleming is the mayor of Saint-Martin Overseas Collectivity of France   -  Island divided between France and the Netherlands 23 March 1648... Anthem For Sweden - The Land of The Incredible Biffs Capital (and largest city) Gustavia Official languages Swedish Government  -  Prime Minister of Sweden Nick XII Bonaparte  -  Prefect Per af Biffsläkt  -  President of the Territorial Council none yet; however Henning is the mayor of Saint-Barthelemy Overseas Collectivity of Sweden   -  Swedish... A collectivité doutre-mer (in English Overseas Community) or COM, is an administrative division of France. ...


Geography

In green (with red legend) are the former constituent parts of the Guadeloupe region/department among the Leeward Islands . On February 22, 2007, Saint-Martin and Saint-Barthélemy seceded from Guadeloupe, but Marie-Galante, La Désirade, and Les Saintes are still part of the Guadeloupe region/department.
Map of the Guadeloupe archipelago
Map of the Guadeloupe archipelago

Guadeloupe comprises five islands: Basse-Terre, Grande-Terre (separated from Basse-Terre by a narrow sea channel called Salt River) with the adjacent islands of La Désirade, Les Saintes and Marie-Galante. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (763x643, 12 KB) Made map myself File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (763x643, 12 KB) Made map myself File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Leeward Islands are the northern islands of the Lesser Antilles. ... February 22 is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Anthem: La Marseillaise Capital (and largest city) Marigot Official languages French Government  -  President of France Jacques Chirac  -  Prefect Dominique Lacroix  -  President of the Territorial Council none yet; however Albert Fleming is the mayor of Saint-Martin Overseas Collectivity of France   -  Island divided between France and the Netherlands 23 March 1648... Anthem For Sweden - The Land of The Incredible Biffs Capital (and largest city) Gustavia Official languages Swedish Government  -  Prime Minister of Sweden Nick XII Bonaparte  -  Prefect Per af Biffsläkt  -  President of the Territorial Council none yet; however Henning is the mayor of Saint-Barthelemy Overseas Collectivity of Sweden   -  Swedish... Marie-Galante, an island of the Caribbean Sea in the Guadeloupe archipelago of the French West Indies, and as part of the Guadeloupe Département doutre-mer, is a constitutional part of France. ... Guadeloupe, with La Désirade in the northeast La Désirade is an island in the French département doutre-mer Guadeloupe. ... The ÃŽles des Saintes are a group of islands within the French Département doutre-mer Guadeloupe. ... Map of the French overseas département of Guadeloupe from the CIA World Factbook. ... Map of the French overseas département of Guadeloupe from the CIA World Factbook. ... Basse-Terre Island (top) from space, September 1994 Basse-Terre is the name of the western of the two largest islands of Guadeloupe. ... Guadeloupe consists of two islands separated by a salt river and whose combined shape resembles a butterfly. ... Guadeloupe, with La Désirade in the northeast La Désirade is an island in the French département doutre-mer Guadeloupe. ... The ÃŽles des Saintes are a group of islands within the French Département doutre-mer Guadeloupe. ... Marie-Galante, an island of the Caribbean Sea in the Guadeloupe archipelago of the French West Indies, and as part of the Guadeloupe Département doutre-mer, is a constitutional part of France. ...


Basse-Terre has a rough volcanic relief, while Grande-Terre features rolling hills and flat plains. This article is about volcanoes in geology. ...


Further to the north, Saint-Barthélemy and the French part of Saint Martin once came under the jurisdiction of Guadeloupe but on December 7, 2003, both of these areas voted to become an overseas territorial collectivity. [1]
Anthem For Sweden - The Land of The Incredible Biffs Capital (and largest city) Gustavia Official languages Swedish Government  -  Prime Minister of Sweden Nick XII Bonaparte  -  Prefect Per af Biffsläkt  -  President of the Territorial Council none yet; however Henning is the mayor of Saint-Barthelemy Overseas Collectivity of Sweden   -  Swedish... Anthem: La Marseillaise Capital (and largest city) Marigot Official languages French Government  -  President of France Jacques Chirac  -  Prefect Dominique Lacroix  -  President of the Territorial Council none yet; however Albert Fleming is the mayor of Saint-Martin Overseas Collectivity of France   -  Island divided between France and the Netherlands 23 March 1648... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Demographics

(July 2006 estimates from the CIA World Factbook; note that these estimates disagree with official INSEE estimates and that they also include Saint-Martin and Saint-Barthélemy) INSEE is the French abbreviation for the French National Institute for Statistics and Economic Studies (French: Institut National de la Statistique et des Études Économiques). ... Anthem: La Marseillaise Capital (and largest city) Marigot Official languages French Government  -  President of France Jacques Chirac  -  Prefect Dominique Lacroix  -  President of the Territorial Council none yet; however Albert Fleming is the mayor of Saint-Martin Overseas Collectivity of France   -  Island divided between France and the Netherlands 23 March 1648... Anthem For Sweden - The Land of The Incredible Biffs Capital (and largest city) Gustavia Official languages Swedish Government  -  Prime Minister of Sweden Nick XII Bonaparte  -  Prefect Per af Biffsläkt  -  President of the Territorial Council none yet; however Henning is the mayor of Saint-Barthelemy Overseas Collectivity of Sweden   -  Swedish...

Population 452,776
Age structure 0 to 14 years 23.6% male 54,725
female 52,348
15 to 64 years 67.1% male 150,934
female 153,094
65 years and older 9.2% male 17,353
female 24,322
Population growth rate   0.88%
Birth rate 15.05 births per 1,000 people
Death rate 6.09 deaths
Net migration rate -0.15 migrants
Sex ratio
(male:female)
at birth 1.05
under 15 years
15 to 64 years 0.99
65 years and older 0.71
Overall 0.97
Infant mortality rate 8.41 deaths per 1,000 live births
Life expectancy
at birth
males 74.91 years
females 81.37 years
Overall 78.06 years
Total fertility rate 1.9 children born per woman
Demonym Guadeloupean(s) (not Guadeloupians)
Adjectival Guadeloupe, Guadeloupean
Ethnic groups[3] Black / Mulatto 75%
White 11%
Tamil / East Indian 9%
Lebanese / Syrians 3%
Chinese / others 2%
Religion Roman Catholic 91%
Protestant 5%
Hindu / African 4%
Jehovah's Witnesses 2%
Language French (official) 99%, Creole patois
Literacy[4] males 90%
females
Overall

Sex ratio by country for total population. ... is the death of infants in the first year of life. ... World map of human life expectancy, 2005 Life expectancy is a statistical measure of the average length of survival of a living thing. ... Fertility is a measure of reproduction: the number of children born per couple, person or population. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... An adjective is a part of speech which modifies a noun, usually making its meaning more specific. ... Look up black in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Mulatto (Spanish mulato, small mule, person of mixed race, mulatto, from mulo, mule, from Old Spanish, from Latin mÅ«lus. ... Whites redirects here. ... Languages Tamil Religions Hinduism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Jainism Related ethnic groups Dravidian people Brahui people Kannadigas Malayalis Tamils Telugus Tuluvas Gonds The Tamil people are an ethnic group from the Indian subcontinent with a recorded history going back more than two millennia. ... The Indies, on the display globe of the Field Museum, Chicago The Indies or East Indies (or East India) is a term used to describe lands of South and South-East Asia, occupying all of the former British India, the present Indian Union, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, Maldives, and... Of lesser importance than religious belonging, ethnic background is still a factor in Lebanon. ... Languages Chinese languages Religions Predominantly Taoism, Mahayana Buddhism, traditional Chinese religions, and atheism. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Protestantism encompasses the forms... Hinduism (known as in modern Indian languages) is a religious tradition that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... the original black people. Some would call them niggers, which has over the years come to be an offensive, racist term for blacks, but originally it just meant ignorant person and since black slaves were considered ignorant, they were called this. ... Watchtower Buildings in Brooklyn, New York Jehovah’s Witnesses are an international religious group that rejects much of modern mainstream Christianity in favor of what they believe is a restored form of First Century Christianity. ... A creole language, or simply a creole, is stable language that originated from a non-trivial combination of two or more languages, typically with many features that are not inherited from any parent. ... Patois, although without a formal definition in linguistics, can be used to describe a language considered as nonstandard. ... World literacy rates by country The traditional definition of literacy is considered to be the ability to read and write, or the ability to use language to read, write, listen, and speak. ...

Administrative divisions

View from Guadeloupe
View from Guadeloupe

Administratively, Guadeloupe is divided into arrondissements, cantons and communes: Download high resolution version (892x661, 137 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (892x661, 137 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The 100 French departments are divided into 342 arrondissements, which may be translated into English as districts. ... The cantons of France are administrative divisions subdividing arrondissements and départements. ... Map of the 36,568 communes of metropolitan France. ...

See also: Overseas departments and territories of France and Administrative divisions of France


The 3 arrondissements of the Guadeloupe department are: Arrondissement of Basse-Terre, (prefecture of the Guadeloupe department: Basse-Terre) with 17 cantons and 18 communes. ... The following is a list of the 43 cantons of the Guadeloupe department, an overseas department of France, sorted by arrondissement: Baie-Mahault Basse-Terre 1st Canton Basse-Terre 2nd Canton Bouillante Capesterre-Belle-Eau 1st Canton Capesterre-Belle-Eau 2nd Canton Gourbeyre Goyave Lamentin Petit-Bourg Pointe-Noire Saint... The following is a list of the 34 communes of Guadeloupe overseas département of France. ... French overseas departments and territories The French Overseas Departments and Territories (French: départements doutre-mer and territoires doutre-mer or DOM-TOM) consist broadly of French-administered territories outside of Europe. ... Metropolitan (i. ...


Politics

Guadeloupe

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
Guadeloupe
Image File history File links GuadFlag. ... Country name: conventional long form: Department of Guadeloupe conventional short form: Guadeloupe local long form: Département de la Guadeloupe local short form: Guadeloupe Data code: GP Dependency status: overseas department of France Government type: NA Capital: Basse-Terre Administrative divisions: none (overseas department of France) Independence: none (overseas department...


See also: Politics of France

Other countries · Atlas
 Politics Portal
view  talk  edit
National holiday Bastille Day, 14 July (1789)
Slavery Abolition Day 27 May (1848)
Constitution[5] 28 September (1958)
Legal system French
Suffrage Universal at 18 years old
Executive branch Chief of state President Nicolas Sarkozy
represented by Prefect Jean-Jacques Brot
since 7 May 2007
since 12 June 2006
Head of government President of the General Council Jacques Gillot
President of the Regional Council Victorin Lurel
since 26 March 2001
since 22 April 2004
Cabinet n/a
Elections French president elected by popular vote for five-year term;
Prefect appointed by the French president on advice of the French Ministry of the Interior;
General and Regional Council presidents elected by membership of those councils.
Election results n/a
Legislative branch Unicameral General Council (Conseil général; 42 seats)
Unicameral Regional Council (Conseil régional; 41 seats)
members elected by popular vote
to serve six-year terms
Elections[6] General Council
last held March 2004, next due 2010
Regional Council
last held 28 March 2004, next due March 2008[7]
Election results General Council
Percent of vote by party: n/a
Seats by party:
left-wing candidates 11, PS 8, PCG 3, PPDG 6
right-wing candidates 5, RPR 8, UDF 1
Regional Council
Percent of vote by party:
PS 58.4%, UMP 41.6%
Seats by party:
PS 29, UMP 12
Judicial branch Court of Appeal (Cour d'Appel) in Basse-Terre;
Assize Court (Cour d'assises) in Basse-Terre to try felonies, consisting of three judges and a popular jury;
Several first instance courts of varying competence levels, in Basse-Terre, Pointe-à-Pitre, Saint-Martin and Grand-Bourg.
Political parties Guadeloupe Communist Party (PCG) · FGPS · Progressive Democratic Party (PPDG) · Union for a Popular Movement (UMP) (formerly the Rassemblement pour la Republique, RPR) · Socialist Party (PS) · Union for French Democracy (UDF)
Pressure groups Union for the Liberation of Guadeloupe (ULPG) · General Federation of Guadeloupe Workers (CGT-G) · General Union of Guadeloupe Workers (UGTG) · Movement for Independent Guadeloupe (MPGI) · The Socialist Party
International
membership
FZ · WCL · WFTU
See also: Colonial and Departmental Heads of Guadeloupe

Political parties in Guadeloupe lists political parties in Guadeloupe. ... Politics of Guadeloupe Categories: Election related stubs | Elections in Guadeloupe ... The Politics of France take place in a framework of a semi-presidential representative democratic republic, whereby the President of France is head of state and the Prime Minister of France head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. ... Information on politics by country is available for every country, including both de jure and de facto independent states, inhabited dependent territories, as well as areas of special sovereignty. ... Bastille Day is the French national holiday, celebrated on July 14th of each year. ... July 14 is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... September 28 is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The executive is the branch of a government charged with implementing, or executing, the law and running the day-to-day affairs of the government or state. ... The President of France, known officially as the President of the Republic (Président de la République in French), is Frances elected Head of State. ... Nicolas Sarkozy (IPA: —  ), (born Nicolas Paul Stéphane Sarközy de Nagy-Bocsa on 28 January 1955 in Paris, France) is the current President of France and ex officio Co-prince of Andorra. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Jacques Gillot, b. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Interior Minister is a member of a Cabinet in a Government. ... Unicameralism is the practice of having only one legislative or parliamentary chamber. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 28 is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Basse-Terre Island (top) from space, September 1994 Basse-Terre is the name of the western of the two largest islands of Guadeloupe. ... For the record label, see Felony Records The term felony is a term used in common law systems for very serious crimes, whereas misdemeanors are considered to be less serious offenses. ... Pointe-à-Pitre is the main town of the French Caribbean island and French département doutre-mer of Guadeloupe, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... Anthem: La Marseillaise Capital (and largest city) Marigot Official languages French Government  -  President of France Jacques Chirac  -  Prefect Dominique Lacroix  -  President of the Territorial Council none yet; however Albert Fleming is the mayor of Saint-Martin Overseas Collectivity of France   -  Island divided between France and the Netherlands 23 March 1648... A political party is a political organization subscribing to a certain ideology or formed around very special issues. ... The Guadeloupe Communist Party (Parti Communiste Guadeloupéen) is a political party in the French Overseas Department of Guadeloupe. ... An advocacy group, interest group or lobbying group is a group, however loosely or tightly organized, doing advocacy: those determined to encourage or prevent changes in public policy without trying to be elected. ... FZ.se is a Swedish gaming site, initially named FragZone. ... WCL is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings, as described below: Washington College of Law, American Universitys law school in Washington, D.C. Water Closet, a European euphemism for a room in which toilet facilities are located. ... The World Federation of Trade Unions (WFTU) was established in the wake of the Second World War to bring together trade unions across the world in a single international organization, much like the United Nations. ... List of Colonial and Departmental Heads of Guadaloupe (Dates in italics indicate de facto continuation of office) Note: currently, the prefect is not the true deparmental head, which is the president of the general council. ...

Culture

Beach in Guadeloupe
Beach in Guadeloupe

Guadeloupe's culture is probably best known for the islanders' literary achievements, particularly the poetry of Saint-John Perse, the pseudonym used by Alexis Léger. Perse won the 1960 Nobel Prize in Literature "for the soaring flight and the evocative images of his poetry which in a visionary fashion reflects the conditions of our time." Download high resolution version (899x663, 139 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (899x663, 139 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Saint-John Perse (pseudonym of Alexis Leger) (May 31, 1887 – September 20, 1975) was a French poet and diplomat who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1960 for the soaring flight and evocative imagery of his poetry. ... Saint-John Perse (pseudonym of Alexis Leger) (May 31, 1887 – September 20, 1975) was a French poet and diplomat who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1960 for the soaring flight and evocative imagery of his poetry. ... Nobel Prize in Literature medal. ...


Guadeloupe has always had a rich literary production prolonged today by many living writers, poets, novelists, essayists and journalists, among them Maryse Condé, Ernest Pépin and Simone Schwartz-Bart.


Also culturally important are the arts, particularly painting and sculpture. Famous painters and/or sculptors include Michel Rovelas, Claudie Cancellier, Jean-Claude Echard, Christian Bracy, Roger Arekian, les Frères Baptiste, Michelle Chomereau-Lamothe, Léogane, Pédurand, Nicole Réache, Victor Sainsily. Photographer and visual effects artist Karim Sahai of Weta Digital, New-Zealand, has worked on the visual effects of The Lord of the Rings, King Kong, X-Men, etc.


Music and dance are also very popular, and the widely accepted interaction of African, French and Indian[8] cultures has given birth to some original new forms specific to the archipelago. Islanders enjoy many local dance styles including the quadrille "au commandement", zouk, zouk-love, toumbélé, as well as all the modern international dances. Typical Guadeloupean music includes la biguine and gwo ka à la base. Many international festivals take place in Guadeloupe, like the Creole Blues Festival, the Marie-Galante Festival, Festival Gwo-Ka Cotellon, etc. It goes without saying that all the Euro-French forms of art are also omnipresent in the melting pot. for the equestrian form of quadrille, see Quadrille (dressage) Quadrille is a historic dance performed by four couples in a square formation, a precursor to traditional square dancing. ... Biguine is a style of music that originated in Martinique in the 19th century. ...


Another element of the Guadeloupean culture is its dress. Women in particular have a unique style of traditional dresses, with many layers of colorful fabrics, now only worn on special occasions. On festive occasions they also wore a madras (originally the 'kerchief' from South India) head scarf tied in many different symbolic forms. The headdress could be done in many styles with names like the "bat" style, or the "firefighter" style, as well as the "Guadeloupean woman." Jewelry is also important, mainly of gold, in the Guadeloupean lady's dress, a product of European, African and Indian inspiration. Many famous couturiers like Devaed or Mondelo are Guadeloupeans.


Football (soccer) is popular in Guadeloupe. Thierry Henry, a star of the French National Team and Spanish League club FC Barcelona, often visits, as his father Antoine was originally from the island. Lilian Thuram, a star football defender for France and FC Barcelona, was born in Guadeloupe. The French national team and Manchester United striker, Louis Saha, is also of Guadeloupean descent as is Swansea City goalkeeper Willy Gueret. The region's football team also experienced recent success, advancing all the way to the 2007 CONCACAF Gold Cup semi-finals, where they were slightly defeated 1-0 by CONCACAF powerhouse, Mexico. Many valuable track and field athletes, such as Marie-José Perec, Patricia Girard-Léno and Christine Arron, are also Guadeloupe natives. Thierry Daniel Henry (IPA: ) (born 17 August 1977 in Paris, France) is a French football player. ... First International Belgium 3 - 3 France (Brussels, Belgium; 1 May 1904) Largest win France 10 - 0 Azerbaijan (Paris, France; 6 September 1995) Worst defeat Denmark 17 - 1 France (London, England; 19 October 1908) World Cup Appearances 11 (First in 1930) Best result Winners, 1998 European Championship Appearances 6 (First in... Futbol Club Barcelona, known familiarly as Barça (IPA: baɾ.sÉ™), is a Spanish sports club based in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. ... Lilian Thuram (born Ruddy Lilian Thuram-Ulien, January 1, 1972 in Pointe-à-Pitre, Guadeloupe) is a French professional football defender, the most capped player in the history of the France national team. ... Futbol Club Barcelona, known familiarly as Barça (IPA: baɾ.sÉ™), is a Spanish sports club based in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. ... Manchester Uniteds emblem Manchester United F.C. (often abbreviated to Man United or just Man U, pronounced man-yoo) is an English football club based at Old Trafford in Greater Manchester. ... Louis Laurent Saha (born 8 August 1978 in Paris) is a French international footballer of Guadaloupian descent who plays for the English club, Manchester United. ... Swansea City F.C. are a Welsh football team currently playing in Football League Two. ... Willy Guéret (born 3 August 1973 in St Claude, Guadeloupe) is a French professional footballer who currently plays for Swansea City. ... First international Martinique 6 - 0 Guadeloupe (Martinique; Date Unknown, 1934) Biggest win Guadeloupe 11 - 0 USVI (Haiti; April 12, 2001) Biggest defeat Martinique 6 - 0 Guadeloupe (Martinique; Date Unknown, 1934) Martinique 8 - 2 Guadeloupe (Martinique; Date Unknown, 1975) CONCACAF Gold Cup Appearances 1 (First in 2007) Best result Semi final... The 2007 CONCACAF Gold Cup is the ninth edition of the Gold Cup, the association football championship of North and Central America and the Caribbean (CONCACAF). ... CONCACAF (the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football) is the continent-wide governing body for association football in North America, Central America and the Caribbean. ... A womens 400m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track. ... Marie-José Pérec (born May 9, 1968) is a French athlete, specialised in the 200 and 400 m, and triple Olympic champion. ... Patricia Girard-Léno (born April 8, 1968 in Pointe-à-Pitre, Guadeloupe, France) is a French athlete who competed mainly in the 100 metre Hurdles. ... Christine Arron (born September 13, 1973 in Les Abymes, Guadeloupe) is a track and field sprint athlete, competing internationally for France. ...


Economy

Carbet Falls
Carbet Falls
Main article: Economy of Guadeloupe

The economy of Guadeloupe depends on tourism, agriculture, light industry and services. It also depends on France for large subsidies and imports. Download high resolution version (660x890, 209 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (660x890, 209 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The economy of Guadeloupe depends on agriculture, tourism, light industry, and services. ... Tourists on Oahu, Hawaii Tourism is travel for predominantly recreational or leisure purposes or the provision of services to support this leisure travel. ... Heavy industry does not have a single fixed meaning compared to light industry. ... Services are: plural of service Tertiary sector of industry IRC services Web services the name of a first-class cricket team in India This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Tourism is a key industry, with 83.3% of tourists visiting from metropolitan France, 10.8% coming from the rest of Europe, 3.4% coming from the United States, 1.5% coming from Canada, 0.4% coming from South America and 0.6% coming from the rest of the world.[9] An increasingly large number of cruise ships visit the islands. Metropolitan France Metropolitan France (French: or la Métropole) is the part of France located in Europe, including Corsica (French: Corse). ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ...


The traditional sugarcane crop is slowly being replaced by other crops, such as bananas (which now supply about 50% of export earnings), eggplant, guinnep, noni, sapotilla, paroka, pikinga, giraumon squash, yam, gourd, plantain, christophine, monbin, prunecafé, cocoa, jackfruit, pomegranate, and many varieties of flowers. Other vegetables and root crops are cultivated for local consumption, although Guadeloupe is still dependent on imported food, mainly from France. Species Saccharum arundinaceum Saccharum bengalense Saccharum edule Saccharum officinarum Saccharum procerum Saccharum ravennae Saccharum robustum Saccharum sinense Saccharum spontaneum Sugarcane or Sugar cane (Saccharum) is a genus of 6 to 37 species (depending on taxonomic interpretation) of tall grasses (family Poaceae, tribe Andropogoneae), native to warm temperate to tropical regions... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Binomial name L. The eggplant, aubergine or brinjal (Solanum melongena) is a solanaceous plant bearing a fruit of the same name, commonly used as a vegetable in cooking. ... Binomial name Melicoccus bijugatus P.Browne The Mamoncillo Melicoccus bijugatus, also known as the Quenepa, Chenet, Genip, Spanish Lime, or Kinnip, is a fruit-bearing tree in the soapberry family Sapindaceae, native to a wide area of the American tropics including Central America, Colombia and the Caribbean. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into articles entitled Noni and Noni juice. ... Yam may refer to: Yam (vegetable), the common name for members of genus Dioscorea A colloquial name for the sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), particularly in the United States The New Zealand name for the vegetable oca Yam (route), Genghis Khan and the Mongols supply point system Yam (god), the Levantine... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Species Musa × paradisiaca A big load of plantains in Masaya, Nicaragua Cooking plantains (pronounced plan-TENZ or plan-TAINZ) are a kind of plantains that are generally used for cooking, as contrasted with the soft, sweet banana varieties (which are sometimes called dessert bananas). ... Cocoa beans in a cacao pod Cocoa is the dried and partially fermented fatty seed of the cacao tree from which chocolate is made. ... Binomial name Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam. ... Binomial name Punica granatum L. The Pomegranate (Punica granatum) is a fruit-bearing deciduous shrub or small tree growing to 5–8 m tall. ... A Phalaenopsis flower Rudbeckia fulgida A flower, (<Old French flo(u)r<Latin florem<flos), also known as a bloom or blossom, is the reproductive structure found in flowering plants (plants of the division Magnoliophyta, also called angiosperms). ...


Light industry features sugar and rum, solar energy, and many industrial productions. Most manufactured goods and fuel are imported. Unemployment is especially high among the youth. Hurricanes periodically devastate the economy. Magnification of grains of sugar, showing their monoclinic hemihedral crystalline structure. ... Caribbean rum, circa 1941 Rum is a distilled beverage made from sugarcane by-products such as molasses and sugarcane juice by a process of fermentation and distillation. ...


The country code top-level domain (ccTLD) for Guadeloupe is ".gp". A country code top-level domain (ccTLD) is a top-level domain used and reserved for a country or a dependent territory. ... . ...


Footnotes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Figure without the territories of Saint-Martin and Saint-Barthélemy detached from Guadeloupe on February 22, 2007.
  2. ^ Guadeloupe is pictured on all Euro banknotes, on the backside at the bottom of each note, right of the Greek ΕΥΡΩ (EURO) next to the denomiation.
  3. ^ Approximate figures as ethnicity is not polled during a French census.
  4. ^ Defined as those aged 15 or over who can read and write; based on 1982 estimates.
  5. ^ French constitution.
  6. ^ Guadeloupe elects two representatives to the Sénat; elections last held September 2004, next due ?September 2013
    Percent of vote by party: n/a;
    Seats by party: n/a;
    Guadeloupe elects four representatives to the Assemblée nationale; elections last held 9-16 June 2002, next due June 2007
    Percent of vote by party: n/a;
    Seats by party: RPR 2, PS 1, other right-wing parties 1
  7. ^ to elect half the membership.
  8. ^ Sahai, Sharad (1998).Guadeloupe Lights Up: French-lettered Indians in a remote corner of the Caribbean reclaim their Hindu identity. Hinduism Today, Digital Edition, February 1998.
  9. ^ Guadeloupe - Economie (FR) (1998). Retrieved on 2006-06-10.

Anthem: La Marseillaise Capital (and largest city) Marigot Official languages French Government  -  President of France Jacques Chirac  -  Prefect Dominique Lacroix  -  President of the Territorial Council none yet; however Albert Fleming is the mayor of Saint-Martin Overseas Collectivity of France   -  Island divided between France and the Netherlands 23 March 1648... Anthem For Sweden - The Land of The Incredible Biffs Capital (and largest city) Gustavia Official languages Swedish Government  -  Prime Minister of Sweden Nick XII Bonaparte  -  Prefect Per af Biffsläkt  -  President of the Territorial Council none yet; however Henning is the mayor of Saint-Barthelemy Overseas Collectivity of Sweden   -  Swedish... February 22 is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... The euro sign in its official logo form. ... 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... The current Constitution of France was adopted on October 4, 1958, and has been amended 17 times, most recently on March 28, 2003. ... The Senate amphitheater in the Luxembourg Palace The Senate (in French :le Sénat) is the upper house of the Parliament of France. ... The Palais Bourbon, front The French National Assembly (French: Assemblée nationale) is one of the two houses of the bicameral Parliament of France under the Fifth Republic. ... June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... June 16 is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... June 10 is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Guadeloupe. ... Telephones - main lines in use: 159,000 (1995) Telephones - mobile cellular: 814 (1990) Telephone system: domestic facilities inadequate domestic: NA international: satellite earth station - 1 Intelsat (Atlantic Ocean); microwave radio relay to Antigua and Barbuda, Dominica, and Martinique Radio broadcast stations: AM 1, FM 17, shortwave 0 (1998) Radios: 113... Military branches: no regular indigenous military forces; French Forces, Gendarmerie Military - note: defense is the responsibility of France See also : Guadeloupe Categories: Guadeloupe ... The former French colonies of Martinique and Guadeloupe are small islands in the Caribbean. ... Railways: total: NA km; privately-owned, narrow-gauge plantation lines Highways: total: 2,082 km paved: 1,742 km unpaved: 340 km (1985 est. ... Scouting is active in Guadeloupe, connected administratively to Saint Martin in the Région Guadeloupe et Saint Martin. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Guadeloupe
  • Préfecture de la région Guadeloupe - Official site of the prefecture of Guadeloupe (in French)
  • Région Guadeloupe - Official site of the Regional Council of Guadeloupe
  • Les Îles de Guadeloupe - Official site of the Guadeloupe Islands Tourism Board
  • Office du Tourisme de Marie-Galante - Official site of the Tourist Board of Marie-Galante
  • Office Municipal du Tourisme de Terre de Haut, Les Saintes - Official site of the Tourist Board of Les Saintes
  • Office du Tourisme du Moule - Official site of the Tourist Board of Le Moule
  • Guadeloupe Islands - site of the Guadeloupe Islands Tourism Board
  • Bouillante - site of Bouillante Tourism Board

  Results from FactBites:
 
Guadeloupe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1220 words)
Guadeloupe is an archipelago located in the eastern Caribbean Sea at 16°15′N 61°35′W, with a total area of 1,780 square kilometres (687 sq. mi).
Guadeloupe was populated from 300 BC by the Arawak Amerindians, who fished and developed agriculture on the island.
One indication of Guadeloupe's prosperity at this time is that in the Treaty of Paris (1763), France decided to abandon its territorial claims in Canada in return for British recognition of French control of Guadeloupe.
Guadeloupe - definition of Guadeloupe in Encyclopedia (207 words)
Guadeloupe, in the Caribbean Sea, is an archipelago with a total area of 1,704 km² located in the Eastern Caribbean.
Administratively speaking, Guadeloupe is an overseas département (département d'outre-mer, or DOM) of France.
Guadeloupe comprises five islands: Guadeloupe proper (Basse-Terre), Grande-Terre (separated from Basse-Terre by a narrow sea channel called salt river) with the adjacent islands of La Désirade, Les Saintes and Marie Galante.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m