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Encyclopedia > Grover Washington Jr

Grover Washington, Jr. (12 December 1943 - 17 December 1999) has been considered by many to be the founding father of smooth jazz and a master of the jazz-funk genre. December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1943 is a common year starting on Friday. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1999 is a common year starting on Friday Anno Domini (or the Current Era), and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Smooth jazz is generally described as a subset of jazz that combinines instruments (and, at times, improvisation) traditionally associated with its parent genre and stylistic influences drawn from, among other sources, funk, pop and R&B. Since the late 1980s, it has become highly successful as a radio format; one... Soul jazz was a development of hard bop which incorporated strong blues and gospel influences in music for small groups featuring keyboards, especially the Hammond organ. ...


Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, Washington made some of the genre's most memorable hits, including "Mr. Magic," "Black Frost," and "The Best is Yet to Come." In addition, he performed very frequently with other artists, including Bill Withers on "Just the Two of Us" (which is still a popular hit on the radio today) and Phyllis Hyman on "A Sacred Kind of Love." Bill Withers, the singer/songwriter, was born on July 4, 1938 in the small coal-mining town of Slab Fork, West Virginia. ... Phyllis Hyman (6 July 1949 - 30 July 1995) was a soul artist. ...


He is also remembered for his take on a Dave Brubeck classic, called "Take Another Five." Dave Brubeck is an American jazz pianist who wrote a number of jazz standards, including In Your Own Sweet Way and The Duke. ...


Washington was born in Buffalo, New York, 12 December 1943. Regarded as one of the revolutionaries in jazz music, he was and is considered one of the greatest saxophone players in modern jazz history. He led many others to follow in his footsteps. Aerial view of downtown Buffalo, New York Buffalo, is an American city in western New York. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York City Governor George Pataki (R) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1943 is a common year starting on Friday. ... Jazz master Louis Armstrong was one of the best loved and best known of all jazz musicians. ... Saxophones of different sizes play in different registers. ...


Washington's history was music-filled. His mother was a church chorister, and his father was a collector of old jazz 78s and a saxophonist as well, so music was everywhere in the home. He grew up with the great jazzmen and big band leaders like Benny Goodman, Fletcher Henderson, and others like them. At the age of 10, with the desire for him to be more than he could be, Grover Sr. gave Jr. a saxophone. He practiced and sneaked into clubs to see famous Buffalo blues musicians. A church building is a building used in Christian worship. ... A choir or chorus is a musical ensemble of singers. ... Benny Goodman, born Benjamin David Goodman, (May 30, 1909 – June 13, 1986) was a famous Jazz musician, known as King of Swing, Patriarch of the Clarinet, and Swings Senior Statesman. // Childhood and early years Goodman was born in Chicago, the son of poor Jewish immigrants who lived on Chicago... Fletcher Hamilton Henderson, Jr. ... For other uses, see blues (disambiguation) Blues is a vocal and instrumental music form which emerged in the African-American community of the United States. ...


He left Buffalo and played with a midwest group called the Four Clefs. He was drafted into the US Army shortly thereafter, but this was to be to his advantage, as he met drummer Billy Cobham. Cobham, a mainstay in New York City, introduced Washington to many New York musicians. After leaving the Army, Washington freelanced his talents around New York City, eventually landing in Philadelphia in 1967. US Army Seal The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the United States, the most densely populated major city in North America, and is at the center of international finance, politics, entertainment, and culture. ... Philadelphia is a village located in Jefferson County, New York. ... 1967 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Grover's big break came at the expense of another artist. Alto sax man Hank Crawford was unable to make a recording date with Prestige Records, and Washington took his place, even though he was a backup. This led to his first album, "Inner City Blues". He was talented, and displayed heart and soul with soprano, alto, tenor, and baritone saxophones. Refreshing for his time, he made headway into the jazz mainstream. His fifth album, 1974's "Mister Magic" was a commercial success, and introduced guitarist Eric Gale in as a near-permanent member in Washington's arsenal. Alto saxophone The alto saxophone is a variety of the saxophone, a family of woodwind instruments invented by Adolphe Sax. ... 1974 is a common year starting on Tuesday (click on link for calendar). ...


A string of acclaimed records brought Washington through the 1970s, which culminated in the signature piece for everything Washington would do from then on. 1980's Winelight was the album that defined everything Washington was about. The album was smooth, fused with R&B and easy listening feel. Washington's love of basketball, especially the Philadelphia 76ers, led him to dedicate his first track, "Let It Flow" to Julius Irving (Dr. J). The highlight of the album, and a main staple of radio airplay everywhere, was his great collaboration with soul artist Bill Withers, "Just The Two Of Us". It was also the final step away from Motown, landing him on Elektra Records and into a new era of jazz excellence. The album went platinum in 1981, and also won Grammy Awards in 1982 for Best R&B Song ("Just The Two Of Us"), and Best Jazz Fusion Performance ("Winelight"). "Winelight" was also nominated for Record of the Year and Song of the Year.-1... 1980 is a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... Basketball is very popular in U.S. colleges. ... The Philadelphia 76ers are a National Basketball Association team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, also known as the Sixers for short. ... Julius Erving (born February 22, 1950 in Roosevelt, New York), commonly known by the nickname Dr. J, is an American basketball player who helped launch the modern style of play that emphasizes leaping ability and play above the rim. ... For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... Motown Record Company, L.P., also known as Tamla-Motown outside of the United States, is a record label specializing in the musical genres of R&B, pop, soul music, and hip-hop music. ... Elektra Records was a record label started in 1950 by Jac Holzman and Paul Rickholt, who both invested $300. ... The description Gold Album is applied to recorded music albums that have sold a minimum number of copies (in the US, currently 500,000 sales). ... 1981 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... 1982 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


From that point, Washington is credited (or scorned, as some may say) for giving rise to a new batch of talent that would make its mark in the late 80s and early 90s. He is blamed for bringing Kenny G to the forefront, but also credited with bringing such smooth jazz artists as Walter Beasley, Steve Cole, Pamela Williams, and The Philadelphia Experiment. KENNY G IS AN INSULT TO JAZZ! KENNY IF YOU KEEP PLAYING POP I WILL CHOP YOUR HAIR OFF AND TAKE YOUR SOPRANO! START PLAYING SOME GOOD MUSIC DAMNIT! ILL EVEN BUY YOU A REAL BOOK IF NEED BE! ...


The tragedy and irony of Washington's life was that while he was able to get his big break from another artist's absence, Washington lived long enough to bring smooth jazz to the last points of the old millennium, but didn't outlive Hank Crawford, who's absence gave him his big break. On December 17th, 1999, while waiting in the green room after taping four songs for the Early Show, at CBS Studios in New York City, Washington collapsed. He was taken to St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital, where he was pronounced dead at about 7:30 p.m. His doctors determined that he had suffered a massive heart attack. 1999 is a common year starting on Friday Anno Domini (or the Current Era), and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... A green room is a room in a theatre similar to a changeroom for the accommodation of actors and actresses when not required on the stage. ... CBS (Columbia Broadcasting System) is a major television network and radio broadcaster in the United States. ...


Grover Washington's legacy lives on in the futures of up-and-coming jazz artists, and his life is celebrated from college campuses all around the nation to the hallowed streets of his own Philadelphia, his adopted hometown.


  Results from FactBites:
 
Grover Washington, Jr. (809 words)
Grover Washington, Jr.'s love of music began a a child growing up in Buffalo, New York; his mother (who sang in church choirs) and father (collector of jazz 78s) bought him a saxophone at age ten.
Grover's soulful, sophisticated sound developed through the 1970s and the success of his next three albums--All the King's Horses, Soul Box and especially Mister Magic--landed him as a headliner in the concert halls, and opened the door to session work with the likes of Bob James, Randy Weston, Eric Gale, and Dave Grusin.
Grover's saxophone can be heard playing the national anthem at a Philadelphia 76'ers' game (revealing his lifelong passion for basketball); performing at Penn's Landing in Philadelphia for July 4th (with one million listeners in attendance) or at the Blue Note jazz club in New York (playing to sold-out rooms).
Grover Washington, Jr. - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (742 words)
Washington was born in Buffalo, New York, 12 December 1943.
From that point, Washington is credited (or scorned, as some may say) for giving rise to a new batch of talent that would make its mark in the late 80s and early 90s.
Grover Washington Jr.'s legacy lives on in the futures of up-and-coming jazz artists, and his life is celebrated from college campuses all around the nation to the hallowed streets of his own Philadelphia, his adopted hometown.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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