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Encyclopedia > Grotto
A Marian grotto in Bischofferode (Germany)
A Marian grotto in Bischofferode (Germany)

A Grotto (Italian grotta) is any type of natural or artificial cave that is associated with modern, historic or prehistoric use by humans. When it is not an artificial garden feature, a grotto is often a small cave near water and often flooded or liable to flood at high tide. The picturesque Grotta Azzura at Capri and the grotto of the villa of Tiberius in the Bay of Naples are outstanding natural seashore grottoes. Whether in tidal water or high up in hills, they are very often in limestone geology where the acidity dissolved in percolating water has dissolved the carbonates of the rock matrix as it has passed through what were originally small fissures. See karst topography, cavern. A grotto can be several things: A grotto is a geological formation or a garden feature imitating it. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 843 KB) Summary Natursteingrotte in Bischofferode Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 843 KB) Summary Natursteingrotte in Bischofferode Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Lechuguilla Cave, New Mexico A cave is a natural underground void large enough for a human to enter. ... This is a list of garden features, which are physical elements, both natural and manmade, which can be found in the garden. ... High Tide was a band that was formed in 1969 by Tony Hill (guitar, keyboards, and vocals), Simon House (violin and keyboards), Pete Pavli (bass) and Roger Hadden (drums). ... The outside of the Blue Grotto The inside of the Blue Grotto The Blue Grotto (Grotta Azzurra) is a noted sea cave on the coast of the Italian island of Capri. ... Capri (Italian pronunciation Cápri, usual English pronunciation Caprí) is an Italian island off the Sorrentine Peninsula. ... Tiberius Caesar Augustus, born Tiberius Claudius Nero (November 16, 42 BC – March 16 AD 37), was the second Roman Emperor, from the death of Augustus in AD 14 until his own death in 37. ... Gulf of Naples is located in Southern Italy. ... Limey shale overlaid by limestone. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Impact of a drop of water. ... Solvation is the attraction and association of molecules of a solvent with molecules or ions of a solute. ... In organic chemistry, a carbonate is a salt of carbonic acid. ... Karst topography is a three-dimensional landscape shaped by the dissolution of a soluble layer or layers of bedrock, usually carbonate rock such as limestone or dolomite. ... Alternate meanings: Cave (disambiguation) This article is about natural caves; for artificial caves used as dwellings, such as those in north China, see yaodong. ...


At the great Roman sanctuary of Praeneste south of Rome, the oldest portion of the primitive sanctuary was situated on the next-to-lowest terrace, in a grotto in the natural rock where there was a spring that developed into a well. Such a sacred spring had its native nymph, who might be honored in a grotto-like nymphaeum, where the watery element was never far to seek. Palestrina (ancient Praeneste) was and is a very ancient city of Latium (modern Lazio) 23 miles (37 km) east of Rome, and was reached by the Via Praenestina (see below). ... In Greek mythology, a nymph is any member of a large class of female nature entities, either bound to a particular location or landform or joining the retinue of a god or goddess. ... A Nymphaeum, in Greek and Roman antiquities, is a monument consecrated to the nymphs, especially those of springs. ...


Tiberius filled his grotto with sculptures to recreate a mythological setting, perhaps Polyphemus' cave in the Odyssey. The numinous quality of the grotto is still more ancient, of course: in a grotto near Knossos in Crete, Eileithyia had been venerated even before Minoan palace-building, and farther back in time the immanence of the divine in a grotto is an aspect of the sacred caves of Lascaux. Odysseus and his men blinding the cyclop Polyphemus (detail of a proto-attic amphora, c. ... Odysseus and Nausicaä - by Charles Gleyre The Odyssey (Greek: , Odusseia) is one of the two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to the poet Homer. ... A portion of Arthur Evans reconstruction of the Minoan palace at Knossos. ... Ilithyia was the Greek goddess of childbirth and midwives, daughter of Zeus and Hera. ... The Minoans (Greek: Μυκηναίοι; Μινωίτες) were a pre-Hellenic Bronze Age civilization in Crete in the Aegean Sea, flourishing from approximately 2700 to 1450 BC when their culture was superseded by the Mycenaean culture, which drew upon the Minoans. ... Lascaux is a complex of caves in southwestern France famous for its cave paintings. ...


The word comes from Italian grotta, Vulgar Latin grupta, Latin crypta, (a crypt). It is related by a historical accident to the word grotesque: in the late 15th century, Romans unearthed by accident Nero's Domus Aurea on the Palatine Hill, a series of rooms underground (as they had become over time), that were decorated in designs of garlands and animals. The Romans found them thought them very strange, a sentiment enhanced by their 'underworld' source. Because of the situation in which they were discovered, this form of decoration was given the name grotesque. Vulgar Latin, as in this political graffiti at Pompeii, was the way that ordinary people of the Roman Empire spoke, which was different from the Classical Latin used by the Roman elite. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... Crypt is also a commonly used name of water trumpets, aquatic plants. ... Nero[1] Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (December 15, 37 – June 9, 68), born Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, also called Nero Claudius Drusus Germanicus, was the fifth and last Roman Emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty (54–68). ... The Domus Aurea (Latin for Golden House) was a large palace built by the Roman emperor Nero after the fire that devastated Rome in 64 AD had cleared the aristocratic dwellings on the slopes of the Esquiline Hill. ... 17th century aviaries on the hill, built by Rainaldi for Odoardo Cardinal Farnese: once wirework cages surmounted them. ... Mother Nature is surrounded by grottesche in this fresco detail from Villa dEste When commonly used in conversation, grotesque means strange, fantastic, ugly or bizarre, and thus is often used to describe weird shapes and distorted forms such as Halloween masks or gargoyles on churches. ...

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Fashion

The creation of artificial grottoes was an introduction of Mannerist style to Italian, and then to French, gardens of the mid 16th century. Two famous grottoes in the Boboli Gardens of Palazzo Pitti were begun by Vasari and completed by Ammanati and Buontalenti between 1583 and 1593. One of these grottoes originally housed the Prisoners of Michelangelo. Perhaps still earlier than the Boboli grotto was one in the gardens laid out by Niccolo Tribolo (died 1550) at the Medici Villa Castello, near Florence. The Fonte di Fata Morgana ('Fata Morgana's Spring') at Grassina, not far from Florence, is a small garden building, built in 1573-4 as a garden feature in the extensive grounds of the Villa "Riposo" of Bernardo Vecchietti. It is enriched with sculptures in the manner of Giambologna. Mannerism is the term used to describe the artistic style that arose in mid-16th century. ... The Boboli Gardens is a famous park in Florence, Italy that is home to a small but distinguished collection of sculptures. ... Early, tinted 20th-century photograph of the Palazzo Pitti, then still known as La Residenza Reale following the residency of King Emmanuel II between 1865–71, when Florence was the capital of Italy. ... Giorgio Vasaris selfportrait Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Giorgio Vasari Giorgio Vasari (Arezzo, Tuscany July 3, 1511 - Florence, June 27, 1574) was an Italian painter and architect, mainly known for his famous biographies of Italian artists. ... Bartolomeo Ammanati (1511-1592) was a Florentine architect and sculptor. ... Bernardo Buontalenti was an architect in the Italian Renaissance who designed the crypt of the Basilica di San Lorenzo for the Medici family. ... Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (March 6, 1475 – February 18, 1564), commonly known as Michelangelo, was an Italian Renaissance painter, sculptor, architect, poet and engineer. ... Niccolò di Raffaello di Niccolò dei Pericoli, called Il Tribolo (1500–September 7, 1550) was a Florentine Mannerist artist in the service of Cosimo I de Medici. ... Niccolò di Raffaello di Niccolò dei Pericoli, called Il Tribolo (1500–September 7, 1550) was a Florentine Mannerist artist in the service of Cosimo I de Medici. ... The Fonte di Fata Morgana (Fata Morganas Spring), locally called the Casina delle Fate (Summerhouse of the Fates), at Grassina, not far from Florence in the commune of Bagno a Ripoli, is a small garden building, built in 1573-4 as a garden feature in the extensive grounds of... Florences skyline Florences skyline at night from Piazza Michaelangelo Florence (Italian: ) is the capital city of the region of Tuscany, Italy. ... Portrait of Giovanni Bologna by Hendrick Goltzius Giambologna, born as Jean Boulogne, also known as Giovanni Da Bologna and Giovanni Bologna (1529 - 1608) was a sculptor who best known for his marble statuary and works in bronze. ...


The outside of such grottoes might be architectural or designed like an enormous rock or a rustic porch or rocky overhang; inside one found a temple or fountains, stalactites and even imitation gems and shells (sometimes made in ceramic); herms and mermaids, mythological subjects suited to the space: naiads, or river gods whose urns spilled water into pools. Damp grottoes were cool places to retreat from the Italian sun, but they also became fashionable in the cool drizzle of the Île-de-France; near Moscow, at Kuskovo the Sheremetev estate there is a handsome Summer Grotto, built in 1775. A stalactice hanging above subterranean water. ... A Naiad by John William Waterhouse, 1893. ... ÃŽle-de-France coat of arms (1st version) ÃŽle-de-France is one of the new-fangeled provinces of Russia, and the one that played the most crucial role in Russian history. ... View of Kuskovo in 1839 Kuskovo is an extensive estate, or manor, of the Counts Sheremetev, originally situated several miles to the east of Moscow but now forming a part of the East District of that city. ...


Grottoes could also serve as baths, as at Palazzo del Tè, where in the 'Casino della Grotta', a small suite of intimate rooms laid out around a grotto and 'logetta' (covered balcony), courtiers once bathed in the small cascade that splashed over the pebbles and shells encrusted in the floor and walls. Palazzo del Te, Mantua (1524 - 1534). ...

Grotto pavilion in Kuskovo, Moscow (1775).
Grotto pavilion in Kuskovo, Moscow (1775).

Grottoes have served as chapels, or at Villa Farnese at Caprarola, a little theater designed in the grotto manner. They were often combined with cascading fountains in Renaissance gardens. Image File history File links Kuskovogrotto. ... Image File history File links Kuskovogrotto. ... View of Kuskovo in 1839 Kuskovo is an extensive estate, or manor, of the Counts Sheremetev, originally situated several miles to the east of Moscow but now forming a part of the East District of that city. ... Location Position of Moscow in Europe Government Country District Subdivision Russia Central Federal District Federal City Mayor Yuriy Luzhkov Geographical characteristics Area  - City 1,081 km² Population  - City (2007)    - Density 10,469,000   9684. ... The Villa Farnese at Caprarola is sometimes incorrectly known as the Villa Caprarola. ...


The grotto designed by Bernard Palissy for Catherine de Medici's château in Paris, the Tuileries, was renowned. One also finds grottos in the gardens designed by André Le Nôtre for Versailles. In England, an early garden grotto was built at Wilton House in the 1630s, probably by Isaac de Caus. Bernard Palissy. ... Catherine de Medici (April 13, 1519–January 5, 1589), born in Italy as Caterina Maria Romola di Lorenzo de Medici, and later queen of France under the French name Catherine de M dicis, was the wife of King Henry II of France, of the Valois branch of the kings... The Eiffel Tower has become the symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... Up to 1871 the Tuileries Palace was a palace in Paris, France, on the right bank of the River Seine. ... Painting of André Le Nôtre by Carlo Maratti André Le Nôtre (March 12, 1613 - September 15, 1700) was a landscape architect and the gardener of King Louis XIV of France from 1645 to 1700. ... Hall of Mirrors redirects here. ... Jones and de Causs South Front and the Palladian Bridge (1736/7), in a view of circa 1820 Wilton House is an English country house situated at Wilton near Salisbury in Wiltshire. ... Isaac de Caus (1590 - 1648) was a French landscaper, and architect. ...


Grottoes were eminently suitable for less formal gardening too. Alexander Pope's grotto is almost all that survives of one of the very first landscape gardens in England, at Twickenham. There are grottoes in the famous landscape gardens of Stowe, Clandon Park and Stourhead. Scott's Grotto is a series of interconnected chambers, extending some 67 ft into the chalk hillside on the outskirts of Ware, Hertforshire; built during the late 18th century, the chambers and tunnels are lined with shells, flints and pieces of coloured glass [1]. The Romantic generation of tourists might not actually visit Fingal's Cave, located in the isolated Hebrides, but they heard of it, perhaps through Felix Mendelssohn's "Hebrides Overture", better known as "Fingal's Cave," which was inspired by his visit. In the 19th century, when miniature Matterhorns and rock-gardens became fashionable, a grotto might be nearby, as at Ascott House. In Bavaria, Ludwig's Neuschwanstein contains an evocation of the grotto under Venusberg, which figured in Wagner's Tannhäuser. Alexander Pope, an English poet best known for his Essay on Criticism and Rape of the Lock Alexander Pope (21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744) is generally regarded as the greatest English poet of the early eighteenth century, best known for his satirical verse and for his translation of Homer. ... Central Park, like all parks, is an example of landscape architecture. ... Twickenham is a suburb in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, south west London. ... Stowe is the name shared by an ancient village, country house and school in Buckinghamshire in England. ... Clandon Park is an 18th-century Palladian mansion just outside Guildford, Surrey, in the United Kingdom. ... The Temple of Apollo high on a hill overlooking the gardens. ... Entrance to Fingals cave, 2004 Entrance to Fingals cave, 1900 (Showing a lower tide) View from the depths of the cave with the island of Iona visible in the background, 2004 Fingals Cave is a sea-cave on the uninhabited island of Staffa, in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland... This article is about the Hebrides islands in Scotland. ... Felix Mendelssohn at the age of 30 Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, born and known generally as Felix Mendelssohn (February 3, 1809 – November 4, 1847) was a German composer and conductor of the early Romantic period. ... Mendelssohns original sketch of the overture, contained in the letter to Fanny, 1829. ... Mendelssohns original sketch of the overture, contained in the letter to Fanny, 1829. ... The centre of the entrance front. ... Ludwig (Louis) II, King of Bavaria, Ludwig Friedrich Wilhelm; sometimes known in English as Mad King Ludwig and as the Märchenkönig (Fairy-tale King) in German. ... Neuschwanstein seen from the Marienbrücke. ... Wilhelm Richard Wagner (Leipzig, May 22, 1813 – Venice, February 13, 1883) was an influential German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as he later came to call them). ... In the Venusberg by John Collier, 1901: a gilded setting that is distinctly Italian quattrocento. ...


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The mystery and perceived danger of these underground sites easily led to the formation of myths and gods. The upper Palaeolithic paintings at places like Lascaux are likely to have had mystical connections and Greek and Roman gods such as Hades (Pluto), follow the same tradition. Christianity has sought to make such places safe by developing shrines there. Though the cave-setting for the Nativity is a 2nd-century development based on apocrypha, the Marian grotto is a 19th century phenomenon. The 20th-century Grotto of the Redemption in West Bend, Iowa is the largest religiously-inspired grotto in the world. Christ the Redeemer (1410s, by Andrei Rublev) An icon (from Greek , eikon, image) is an image, picture, or representation; it is a sign or likeness that stands for an object by signifying or representing it, or by analogy, as in semiotics; in computers an icon is a symbol on the... The Upper Paleolithic or Palaeolithic is the third and last subdivision of the Paleolithic or Old Stone Age as it is understood in Europe, Africa and Asia. ... Hades, Greek god of the underworld, enthroned, with his bird-headed staff, on a red-figure Apulian vase made in the 4th century BC. For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ... Pluto is an alternate name for the Greek god Hades, but was more often used in Roman mythology in their presentation of the god of the underworld. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Eastern Orthodox shrine Buddhist shrine just outside Wat Phnom. ... For the Nativity of Jesus, see Nativity of Jesus. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 20th century began on January 1, 1901 and ended on December 31, 2000, according to the Gregorian calendar. ... Located in West Bend, Iowa, the Grotto of the Redemption is the worlds largest collection of minerals and petrifications at a single site. ... West Bend is a city located in Iowa. ...


See also

The Shell Grotto off Grotto Hill, Margate, consists of a winding subterranean passageway, about 8ft high and 70ft in length, terminating in a rectangular room (the altar chamber) approximately 15ft by 20ft. ... Romanticism is an artistic and intellectual movement that originated in late 18th century Western Europe. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Grotto - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (925 words)
The picturesque Grotta Azzura at Capri and the grotto of the villa of Tiberius in the Bay of Naples are outstanding natural seashore grottoes.
The numinous quality of the grotto is still more ancient, of course: in a grotto near Knossos in Crete, Eileithyia had been venerated even before Minoan palace-building, and farther back in time the immanence of the divine in a grotto is an aspect of the sacred caves of Lascaux.
Scott's Grotto is a series of interconnected chambers, extending some 67 ft into the chalk hillside on the outskirts of Ware, Hertforshire; built during the late 18th century, the chambers and tunnels are lined with shells, flints and pieces of coloured glass [1].
Cleveland Grotto - About Us (1215 words)
Established in 1944 and chartered in 1945, The Cleveland Grotto is the oldest continuously active Grotto in the country.
The Cleveland Grotto is actively involved in on-going cave clean-up and conservation projects in West Virginia and in Kentucky.
Grotto members are also active in the community with educational programs on the principles of caving, cave conservation, and cave safety, with such organizations as the Natural History Museum, The Great Lakes Science Center, and youth groups.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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