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Encyclopedia > Groton School
Groton School
Image:Groton.png
Motto Cui servire est regnare ("to whom to serve is to rule")
Established 1884
Type Private Coeducational Secondary
Affiliation Episcopal
Headmaster Richard B. Commons
Students 352
Grades 8–12
Location Groton, Massachusetts, U.S.
Campus Suburban / Rural
Mascot Zebra (unofficial)
Website www.groton.org

Groton School is a private, Episcopal, college preparatory boarding school located in Groton, Massachusetts, U.S. It enrolls approximately 350 boys and girls, from the eighth (Second Form) through twelfth grades (Sixth Form). Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Groton School Logo This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... Educational institutions are often categorised along several dimensions. ... This article is about the Episcopal Church in the United States. ...   Settled: 1655 â€“ Incorporated: 1655 Zip Code(s): 01450 â€“ Area Code(s): 351 / 978 Official website: http://www. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... This article is about the Episcopal Church in the United States. ... A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school (usually shortened to preparatory school, or prep school) is a private secondary school (or high school) designed to prepare a student for higher education. ... A boarding school is a usually fee-paying school where some or all pupils not only study, but also live during term time, with their fellow students and possibly teachers. ...   Settled: 1655 â€“ Incorporated: 1655 Zip Code(s): 01450 â€“ Area Code(s): 351 / 978 Official website: http://www. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... England, Wales, Northern Ireland The sixth form, in the English, Welsh and Northern Irish education systems, is the term used to refer to the final two years of secondary schooling (when students are about sixteen to eighteen years of age), during which students normally prepare for their GCE A-level...


The school is a member of the Independent School League and is one of the schools collectively known as St. Grottlesex, a term that refers to several American boarding schools in New England that have become associated, in the popular mind, with educating the wealthy and political elite. The Independent School League (ISL) is composed of sixteen prestigious New England preparatory schools that compete athletically and academically. ... Refers to the elite group of American boarding schools including Groton, St. ...

Contents

History

Groton School was founded in 1884 by the Rev. Endicott Peabody, a member of a prominent Massachusetts family and an Episcopal clergyman. The land for the school was donated to Peabody by two brothers, James and Prescott Lawrence, whose family home was located on Farmers Row in Groton, Massachusetts, north of Groton School's present location. Backed by affluent figures of the time, such as the Rt. Rev. Phillips Brooks, the Rev. William Lawrence, William Crowninshield Endicott, J.P. Morgan, and his father, Samuel Endicott Peabody, Peabody received pledges of $39,000 for the construction of a schoolhouse, if an additional $40,000 could be raised as an endowment. (The endowment is worth $289,000,000 today.) Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Rev. ... Phillips Brooks (December 13, 1835 - January 23, 1893), was a noted United States clergyman and author, who briefly served as Bishop of Massachusetts in the Episcopal Church during the early 1890s. ... William Lawrence, (1850–1941), was elected as the 7th Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts (1893–1927). ... William Crowninshield Endicott (November 19, 1826 - May 6, 1900) was an American politician. ... John Pierpont Morgan (April 17, 1837 – March 31, 1913), American financier and banker, was born in Hartford, Connecticut, a son of Junius Spencer Morgan (1813–1890), who was a partner of George Peabody and the founder of the house of J. S. Morgan & Co. ...


Peabody served as headmaster of the school for over fifty years, until his retirement in 1940. He instituted a Spartan educational system that included cold showers and cubicles, suscribing to the model of "muscular Christianity" which he himself experienced at Cheltenham College in England as a boy. Peabody hoped to graduate men who would serve the public good, rather than enter professional life. The school's motto, "Cui Servire Est Regnare," taken from the Anglican Book of Common Prayer, translates roughly as "Whose service is perfect freedom." A common but incorrect translation is "To serve is to rule." The dative relative pronoun "cui" may be translated as "to whom" or "for whom," leading to some confusion. However, "Cui" ("Whom") is generally understood to refer to God, therefore lending Groton's motto to its proper translation: "For Whom to serve is to reign", or "Whose service is perfect freedom." Sparta (Doric: Spártā, Attic: Spártē) is a city in southern Greece. ... Muscular Christianity is the view of the Victorian-era English writers Charles Kingsley and Thomas Hughes (though the name was bestowed by others). ...


The Rev. Endicott Peabody was succeeded at the end of the 1940 school year by the Rev. John Crocker, who had been for 10 years the chaplain for Episcopal students at Princeton University. He himself was a 1918 graduate of Groton School; 15 members of his family were alumni. During his tenure as headmaster at Groton School, the Rev. John Crocker was known for his courageous viewpoints. In September 1951, three years before the Supreme Court's Brown v. Board of Education decision outlawing segregation in public schools, Groton School accepted its first African-American student. In April 1965 he and his wife, accompanied by 75 Groton School students, marched with the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. during a civil rights demonstration in Boston. After 25 years as headmaster at Groton School, he retired in June 1965.


Groton School has changed significantly over the past 100 years. Although most students in the early years were from New England and New York, its students now come from across the country and around the world. However, some traditions remain, such as handshakes to end the day, the school's commitment to public service, its small community, and its attachment to the Episcopal Church.


Campus

Groton's 385-acre campus encompasses rolling forests, expansive meadows, a portion of the Nashua river, and various athletic fields, as well as academic buildings and dormitories. Most of the buildings on campus are situated around the Circle, which is the School's common green shaped like a circle. Tradition prohibits students from crossing the Circle to reach the opposite side of the campus. The School's buildings include St. John's Chapel, the Schoolhouse, Brooks House and Hundred House Dormitories, the McCormick Library (58,000 volumes and 100+ periodicals), the Campbell Performing Arts Center, the Dining Hall, the Dillon Art Center and De Menil Gallery. Other facilities include the Alumni House, New Athletic and Recreation Center, Pratt and O'Brien Rinks and Tennis Center, the Bingham Boathouse, outdoor tennis clay courts and hardcourts, and many faculty homes. The landscape was designed by famous architect Frederick Law Olmsted, who is noted for his design of Central Park and various other academic institutions. Frederick Law Olmsted (April 26, 1822 – August 28, 1903) was a United States landscape architect, famous for designing many well-known urban parks, including Central Park and Prospect Park in New York City. ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ...


Students

The students are divided into forms ranging from Second form to Sixth form (8th to 12th grade). Second and third formers live in Brooks House, part of Lower School, with their prefects; fourth, fifth, and the remaining sixth formers live in Hundred House, also known as Upper School, and in two dorms in Lower School. Each dorm has 2-12 prefects, and is headed and named after a faculty member who has an apartment that is connected to the dorm.


In the 2006-2007 school year there are 352 students, 175 boys and 177 girls; 306 boarders and 36 day students and faculty/staff children. A breakdown by Forms is as follows: Second Form (8th grade) - 29; Third Form (9th grade)- 71; Fourth Form (10th grade)- 82; Fifth Form (11th grade)- 88; Sixth Form (12th grade)- 82.


In 2006, the median SAT I scores were 690 reading, 700 writing, and 690 math. Between 2002 and 2006, Groton graduates attended the following colleges most frequently (in order): Harvard University, Princeton University, Brown University, Georgetown University, Trinity College, Vanderbilt University, University of Edinburgh, Yale University, University of Virginia, Cornell University, Columbia University, Middlebury College, and Tufts University. Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey, in the United States of America. ... Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Georgetown University is an elite private research university located in Georgetown, Washington, D.C., United States. ... Trinity College is a private liberal arts college in Hartford, Connecticut. ... Vanderbilt University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in Nashville, Tennessee. ... The University of Edinburgh (Scottish Gaelic: ), founded in 1582,[4] is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... “Yale” redirects here. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... Cornell University is a university located in Ithaca, New York, USA. Its two medical campuses are in New York City and Education City, Qatar. ... Columbia University is a private research university in the United States and a member of the prestigious Ivy League. ... Middlebury College is a small, private liberal arts college located in the rural town of Middlebury, Vermont, United States. ... Tufts University is a private research university in Medford/Somerville, Massachusetts, suburbs of Boston. ...


Traditions

Groton is an intimate community as 90% of students are boarders and most teachers live on campus in dorms or faculty housing. Classes are small, ranging from 12-14 students. There are regularly scheduled sit-down dinners during fall term and during spring term; at sit-down dinner, faculty and students dress up formally and sit down for a proper 45 minute dinner and are served by students assigned as waiters. On the school's birthday in the fall, sit-down dinner features a jolly singing of "Blue Bottles" (the tune is similar to "100 Bottles of Beer on the Wall"). At the request of the VIth form, the members of which yell "We want blue bottles!", the Vth form gathers at the entrance to the dining hall and, under the conductorship of the youngest faculty alumnus who sets the tempo of the song by swinging a large carving knife back and forth, counts down the age of the school. Following Thursday evening sit-down dinners, many students and faculty gather in the Webb-Marshall Room below the dining hall for an intramural debate featuring members of the school's Debating Society — Groton's oldest extracurricular organization. These debates also feature the Triple Speak, a fun and lighthearted extemporaneous speech during which the speaker must address at first only a single random word, but then incorporate a second and, finally, a third random word, which are announced during the speech.


On Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays the Groton community begins the day with chapel. Preceding daily chapel is a prelude played by the school's organist; the service then begins at eight o'clock with a period of silence followed by a prayer and reading from one of several religious faiths and then a chapel talk. A "chapel talk" is delivered by the Headmaster, the Chaplain, a faculty member, a musical ensemble, a club or student organization, or a student. Many students see giving a chapel talk in their VIth form year as a rite of passage. Daily chapel concludes with a hymn and a postlude, which is also played by the school's organist. Students and faculty may opt to leave chapel during the postlude to do work program and to attend Roll Call.


Originally intended for taking attendance, Roll Call is now a general assembly where daily announcements are made. Led by one of the school's two Senior Prefects, the Brooks House Prefect, or the Hundred House Prefect (both of whom are members of the VIth Form and are elected by their peers), Roll Call usually features both clever and entertaining skits and serious announcements. Once a term, the Headmaster calls off class and announces a Surprise Holiday. Surprise Holiday is announced at Roll Call by the appearance of a bright green jacket, usually integrated into a skit. One day near the end of the year, the VIth form collectively will conduct a filibuster during Roll Call, causing the meeting to run well into (and sometimes right through) first period. However, since the installment of Mr. Commons as Headmaster, the administration has been less lenient, and the filibuster seems to be a dying tradition.


One of the most notable of the school's traditions is hand-shaking. Each day at Groton concludes with students shaking hands with their dorm heads and prefects. As part of the school's Prize Day (commencement) proceedings, every member of the VIth form shakes hands with both the entire faculty and all underclassmen. After examinations, a similar ritual takes place as all underclassmen shake hands with the faculty before leaving for summer vacation.


The tradition of the service of Nine Lessons and Carols dates back to the 1930s, only a few years after the service was introduced by King's College at Cambridge University (which is still the most famous Lessons and Carols service, broadcast on radio each year). Every year, students prepare a Christmas service of carols sung to the music of the school chamber ensemble and the school's 5000+ pipe Aeolian-Skinner organ. The nine lessons begin with the story of Adam and Eve's banishment from the Garden of Eden in the book of Genesis and include readings from Isaiah, Luke, and Matthew. The last lesson, the first fourteen verses of the first chapter of the Gospel of John is always read by the Headmaster. This reading is used again as in the last of three readings for the Festival of Light on the first Sunday after Epiphany, where it is again read by the Headmaster. Aeolian-Skinner was a builder of a large number of pipe organs in the first part of the 20th century. ...


Abuse allegation

In 1999, Massachusetts State Police began investigating the claim of former students that they had been sexually abused by other students in dormitories in 1996 and 1997. Subsequently, another student brought a charge against the school. Six years later, on April 25, 2005, Groton School pleaded guilty to the misdemeanor charge of failing to report students' sexual abuse complaints to the state. The School paid a $1,000 fine. In the fall of 2006 Groton School issued a full apology to the victims.


Sports

  • Fall
    • Boys: Soccer, Football, and Cross Country
    • Girls: Soccer, Cross Country, and Field Hockey
  • Winter
    • Boys: Squash, basketball, and ice hockey
    • Girls: Squash, basketball, and ice hockey
  • Spring
    • Boys: Crew, track, tennis, lacrosse, and baseball
    • Girls: Crew, track, tennis, and lacrosse

Groton School is one of the thirteen original founders of the Independent School League, but it also competes with schools outside of the league. There are several expansions of Independent School League and ISL: Independent School League can refer to the Boston area Independent School League, a group of 16 elite New England preparatory schools. ...


Groton's traditional athletic rival is St. Mark's School. The day the two schools meet in athletic competition every term is called St. Mark's Day. Currently, Groton has tied the most recent fall, lost six winter seasons in a row, and has lost the most recent spring competition. As a side note, Middlesex's official school rival is St. Georges's School; however, Middlesex also has a Groton Day - Groton does not have a Middlesex Day. For the private boys school in Dallas, see St. ... The Middlesex Guildhall at Westminster Middlesex is one of the 39 historic counties of England and was the second smallest (after Rutland). ...


Notable alumni

Notable alumni of Groton School include: An alumnus (masculine) or alumna (feminine) is a former student of a college, university, or school. ...

Adrian S. Fisher Adrian S. Fisher (1914 - 1983) was an American lawyer and federal public servant, who had the distinction of clerking for two Supreme Court Justices, Louis Brandeis (1938-39) and Felix Frankfurter (1939). ... Scud Missile The U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA) was established as an independent agency by the Arms Control and Disarmament Act (75 Stat. ... Alexandra competing in the Bonaire EcoSwim 10K race. ... Baywatch was a popular American television series about the Los Angeles County Lifeguards who patrol the crowded beaches of Los Angeles County, California. ... Archibald Bulloch Roosevelt, Jr. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... Ayi Kwei Armah is a Ghanian writer. ... 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Sources

  • Ashburn, Frank D., Peabody of Groton, Coward McCann, Inc., New York, 1944.
  • Hoyt, Edwin P., The Peabody Influence, Dodd, Mead & Company, New York, 1968.
  • Fenton, John H., "Groton Headmaster Ends 25-Year Tenure," New York Times, June 13, 1965, p. 80.


Members of the Independent School League, New England
Belmont Hill School | Buckingham Browne & Nichols | Brooks School | The Governor's Academy | Groton School | Lawrence Academy at Groton | Middlesex School | Milton Academy | Noble and Greenough School | Rivers School | Roxbury Latin School | St. George's School | St. Mark's School | St. Paul's School | St. Sebastian's School | Thayer Academy

The Independent School League (ISL) is composed of sixteen prestigious New England preparatory schools that compete athletically and academically. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Belmont Hill School an all-boys preparatory school located on a 23 acre campus in Belmont, a suburb of Boston, Massachusetts. ... Address 80 Gerrys Landing Road Town Cambridge, Massachusetts Country U.S. Browne & Nichols established 1883, by George H. Browne & Edgar H. Nichols[1] The Buckingham School established 1889 Buckingham Browne & Nichols merger 1974 Conference Independent School League Type Private Coeducational Religious Affiliation Secular Grades Pre-K to 12 (on... Brooks School Brooks School is a private co-educational, preparatory secondary school in North Andover, Massachusetts. ... The Governors Academy (formerly Governor Dummer Academy) is an independent school with 376 students in grades nine through twelve. ... Lawrence Academy at Groton Lawrence Academy at Groton, (occasionally called LA or Lacademy), is a co-educational preparatory school located in Groton, Massachusetts, in the United States. ... Middlesex School The Circle, Middlesex School, Concord, Massachusetts Clay Centennial Center, Middlesex School, Concord, Massachusetts Middlesex School is an independent preparatory school for grades 9 - 12 located in Concord, Massachusetts, USA. It was founded in 1901 by Frederick Winsor, who headed the school until 1937. ... Milton Academy is a private, preparatory, coeducational boarding and day school in Milton, Massachusetts. ... The Noble and Greenough School, popularly referred to as Nobles, is a coeducational, nonsectarian day and boarding school for students in grades seven through twelve. ... The Rivers School The Rivers School is a private, coeducational, preparatory school, located in Weston, Massachusetts. ... Roxbury Latin School, founded in 1645 and located at 101 Saint Theresa Avenue in West Roxbury, Massachusetts since 1927, is the oldest school in continuous existence in North America. ... St. ... For the private boys school in Dallas, see St. ... St. ... Saint Sebastians School, also known colloquially as St. ... Thayer Academy (TA) is a private, co-educational, college-preparatory day school located in Braintree, Massachusetts. ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Groton School - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1623 words)
The school is a member of the Independent School League and is one of the schools collectively known as St.
Groton School was founded in 1884 by the Rev. Endicott Peabody, a member of a prominent Massachusetts family and an Episcopal clergyman.
Groton's campus is beautiful, encompassing a portion of the Nashua River, rolling forests, and expansive meadows.
Groton, Massachusetts - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (648 words)
Groton is home to two renowned college preparatory schools: Groton School, founded in 1884, and Lawrence Academy at Groton, founded in 1793.
Groton would again be beset by Indians during Queen Anne's War, when several citizens of the town were abducted to Canada.
Groton is drained by the Nashua and Squannacook rivers.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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