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Encyclopedia > Groschen

Groschen (Latin: Grossus, German: Groschen, Italian: grossone, Czech: groš, Polish: grosz, Hungarian: garas, Romanian: gros) was the (sometimes colloquial) name for a coin used in various German-speaking states as well as some non-German-speaking countries of Central Europe (Bohemia, Poland), The Romanian Principalities. The name derives from the Italian denaro grosso, or large penny, combined with the German diminutive suffix "-chen." Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Central Europe The Alpine Countries and the Visegrád Group (Political map, 2004) Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... Flag of Bohemia Bohemia (Czech: ; German: ) is a historical region in central Europe, occupying the western and middle thirds of the Czech Republic. ... For the NBA basketball player with the nickname see Penny Hardaway A variety of low value coins, including an Irish 2p piece and many U.S. pennies. ... A diminutive is a formation of a word used to convey a slight degree of the root meaning, smallness of the object named, encapsulation, intimacy, or endearment. ... Look up Suffix in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Contents

History

Tiroler Groschen of 1286
Tiroler Groschen of 1286

Names like Groschen, grossus/grossi, grossone, Grosz, Gros, Groš, Garas etc. were used in the Middle Ages for all thick silver coins, as opposed to thin silver coins such as deniers or pennies. Historically it was equal to between several and a dozen denarii. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... General Name, Symbol, Number silver, Ag, 47 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 5, d Appearance lustrous white metal Standard atomic weight 107. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Denier can refer to: Denier, linear density of mass in fibres. ... Above: A variety of coins considered to be lower-value, including an Irish 2p piece and many US pennies. ... First row : c. ...


The type was introduced in 1271 by Duke Meinhard II of Tyrol in Merano. The 1286 example depicted here weighs 1,45 g, it is marked with ME IN AR DVS and a Double Cross (Obverse), and with DUX TIROL and the Eagle of Tirol (Reverse) For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... Meinhard II (c. ... Coat of arms of Tyrol: *[1] The Tyrol is a historical region in Western Central Europe, which includes the Austrian state of Tyrol (consisting of North Tyrol and East Tyrol) and the Italian regions known as the South Tyrol and Trentino. ... Merano (Italian: Merano; German: Meran; Ladin: Meran; Latin: Merona; Note that many of the regions Italian languages/dialects use Meran), is a city in the Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol region of Italy. ... The letter G is the seventh letter in the Latin alphabet. ... Double Cross is the first produced, but the second aired, episode for the third season of the science fiction television show Sliders. ... The term obverse, and its opposite, reverse, describe the two sides of units of currency and many other kinds of two-sided objects, most often in reference to coins, but also to medals, drawings, old master prints and other works of art. ... Tyrol (Tirol in German) is a federal state or Bundesland, located in the west of Austria. ... The term obverse, and its opposite, reverse, describe the two sides of units of currency and many other kinds of two-sided objects, most often in reference to coins, but also to medals, drawings, old master prints and other works of art. ...


The name derives either from the crossus (double cross), or from grossus denarius turnosus (Gross Denarius of Tours, gros tournois). First row : c. ... Tours is a city in France, the préfecture (capital city) of the Indre-et-Loire département, on the lower reaches of the river Loire, between Orléans and the Atlantic coast. ...

A Grossone coined in Bologna, Italy, in the 15th century.
A Grossone coined in Bologna, Italy, in the 15th century.

It was minted since the Middle Ages in the following areas: Image File history File links Grossone_Bentivoglio. ... Image File history File links Grossone_Bentivoglio. ... Bologna (IPA , from Latin Bononia, Bulåggna in Emiliano-Romagnolo) is the capital city of Emilia-Romagna in northern Italy, in the Pianura Padana, between the Po River and the Apennines, exactly between the Reno River and the Sàvena River. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ...

Later the tradition of Groschen was dropped in most states while others continued to mint only coins smaller than the original coin. In Poland for example, since 1526 these included coins of 1/2 grosz, 1 grosz, 1,5 grosz, 2 grosz, 3 grosz, 4 grosz and 6 grosz. Their weight gradually dropped to 1,8 grammes of silver and since 1752 they were replaced by copper coins of the same name. Coat of arms of Tyrol: *[1] The Tyrol is a historical region in Western Central Europe, which includes the Austrian state of Tyrol (consisting of North Tyrol and East Tyrol) and the Italian regions known as the South Tyrol and Trentino. ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1], also as Edward the Lawgiver because of his legal reforms, and as Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and who tried to do the same to Scotland. ... Flag of Bohemia Bohemia (Czech: ; German: ) is a historical region in central Europe, occupying the western and middle thirds of the Czech Republic. ... Events February 22 - Jubilee of Pope Boniface VIII. March 10 - Wardrobe accounts of King Edward I of Englanddo (aka Edward Longshanks) include a reference to a game called creag being played at the town of Newenden in Kent. ... Prager Groschen (German: , Latin: , Czech: , Polish: ) was a Groschen-type silver coin that became very common throughout the Medieval Central Europe. ... Central Europe The Alpine Countries and the Visegrád Group (Political map, 2004) Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... Events Battle of Najera, Peter I of Castile restored as King. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... First row : c. ... January 14 - Treaty of Madrid. ... 1752 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


In recent times, the name was used by two currencies in circulation:

Likewise, in Germany Groschen remained a slang term for the 10 Pfennig coin, thus a 1/10 part both of the (West German) Deutsche Mark and the East German Mark. The word has lost popularity with the introduction of the Euro, although it can still be heard on occasion, especially from older people. Złoty (literally meaning golden, plural: złote or złotych, depending on the number) is the Polish currency unit. ... The Schilling was the currency of Austria until the Euro exchange in 2002. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Year 1945and died 2007 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The pfennig was a small German coin valued at 1/100 of a Deutsche Mark and other German currencies with the name Mark. ... The Deutsche Mark (DM, DEM) was the official currency of West and, from 1990, unified Germany. ... ISO 4217 Code DDM User(s) German Democratic Republic Pegged with Deutsche Mark = M11 Subunit 1/100 pfennig Symbol M Plural Mark pfennig Pfennig Coins Freq. ... “EUR” redirects here. ...


In Western Ukraine, grosh is still a slang term for the kopiyka, a 1/100 part of a Hryvnia. The Ukrainian word for money, hroshi, ultimately derives from this term also. For a Wiktionary project on slang terms, see here {Missing Link} Slang is the use of highly informal words and expressions that are not considered standard in the speakers dialect or language. ... The hryvnia (Ukrainian гривня) has been the national currency of Ukraine since 1996 when it replaced the coupon (or karbovanets), the temporary currency used after Ukraine left the Soviet Union and the ruble zone. ... The hryvnia (Ukrainian гривня) has been the national currency of Ukraine since 1996 when it replaced the coupon (or karbovanets), the temporary currency used after Ukraine left the Soviet Union and the ruble zone. ...


In Bulgaria, the grosh (Cyrillic: грош) was used as a currency until the lev was introduced in the 19th century. The term has been retained as a general word for a coin or currency in a number of money-related proverbs and sayings, and can also be regularly encountered in folk tales or stories set vaguely in the past. The Cyrillic alphabet (or azbuka, from the old name of the first two letters) is an alphabet used for several East and South Slavic languages; (Belarusian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian, Rusyn, Serbian, and Ukrainian) and many other languages of the former Soviet Union, Asia and Eastern Europe. ... ISO 4217 Code BGN User(s) Bulgaria Inflation 7. ...


In Israel 'Grush' (Plural 'Grushim') is used as slang for a small cost ("pennies"). This usage comes from the Yiddish used by Israel's Ashkenazi population, ultimately deriving from its German and Eastern European origins. Yiddish (ייִדיש, Jiddisch) is a Germanic language spoken by about four million Jews throughout the world. ... Ashkenazi Jews, also known as Ashkenazic Jews or Ashkenazim (אַשְׁכֲּנָזִי אַשְׁכֲּנָזִים Standard Hebrew, AÅ¡kanazi,AÅ¡kanazim, Tiberian Hebrew, ʾAÅ¡kănāzî, ʾAÅ¡kănāzîm, pronounced sing. ...


Germany

In Germany, the name Groschen (both singular and plural) replaced Schilling as the common name for a 12 Pfennig coin. In the 18th Century it was used predominantly in the northern states as a coin worth 1/24 of a Reichsthaler (equal to 1/32 of a Conventionsthaler). In the 19th century, beginning in 1821 in Prussia, a new currency system was introduced in which the Groschen (often called the Silbergroschen or Neugroschen to distinguish it from older Groschen) was worth 1/30 of a Thaler (Taler). Following German unification and decimalization, the Groschen was replaced by the 10 Pfennig coin and Groschen remained a nickname for the 10 Pfennig coin until the introduction of the Euro. The Schilling was the currency of Austria until the Euro exchange in 2002. ... The pfennig was a small German coin valued at 1/100 of a Deutsche Mark and other German currencies with the name Mark. ... The Reichsthaler began as a subsidiary denomination to the Conventionsthaler, introduced in the Holy Roman Empire in 1754. ... The Conventionstaler was a standard silver coin of the Holy Roman Empire. ... The coronation banquet for George IV 1821 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Motto Suum cuique Latin: To each his own Prussia at its peak, as leading state of the German Empire Capital Königsberg, later Berlin Government Duke1  - 1525–68 Albert I (first)  - 1688–1701 Frederick III (last) King1  - 1701–13 Frederick I (first)  - 1888–1918 William II (last) Prime Minister1,2... Examples of German and Austrian Thalers compared to a US quarter piece (bottom center) The Thaler (or Taler) was a silver coin used throughout Europe for almost four hundred years. ... “EUR” redirects here. ...


Austria

Austrian 2 Groschen coin, 1925
Austrian 2 Groschen coin, 1925
Austrian 10 Groschen coin, 1994
Austrian 10 Groschen coin, 1994

Austria introduced the groschen in 1924 as the subdivision of the schilling. It was restored, along with the schilling, in 1945 and continued in use until the introduction of the euro in 2002. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 402 pixelsFull resolution (1290 × 648 pixel, file size: 98 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Obsolete Austrian 10 Groschen coin. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 402 pixelsFull resolution (1290 × 648 pixel, file size: 98 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Obsolete Austrian 10 Groschen coin. ... The Schilling was the currency of Austria until 1999, when the Euro was introduced at a fixed parity of €1 = 13. ... “EUR” redirects here. ...


See also

Prager Groschen (German: , Latin: , Czech: , Polish: ) was a Groschen-type silver coin that became very common throughout the Medieval Central Europe. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... An official restrike of the 1486 Tiroler Guldengroschen The guldengroschen was a large silver coin originally minted in Tirol in 1486. ... The silbergroschen was a coin used in Prussia and several other states in northern Germany during the 19th century, worth one thirtieth of a thaler. ... The Neugroschen was introduced in 1841 in Saxony. ... The Threepenny Opera (Die Dreigroschenoper) was a revolutionary piece of musical theatre written by the German dramatist Bertolt Brecht in collaboration with the composer Kurt Weill in 1928. ...

External link

  • http://www.tclayton.demon.co.uk/fourd.html

 
 

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