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Encyclopedia > Grinnell College
Grinnell College

Motto: Veritas et Humanitas (Latin)
(Truth and Humanity)
Established 1846
Type: Private
Endowment: $1.67 billion (June '06)[1]
President: Russell K. Osgood
Faculty: 156 full-time, 43 part-time
Students: 1500
Location Grinnell, Iowa, USA
Campus: Rural, 120 acres (486,000 m²)
Colors: Scarlet and Black
Nickname: Pioneers
Affiliations: formerly Congregationalist
Website: www.grinnell.edu
Grinnell students celebrate the end of the semester outside Gates Residence Hall in May 2006.

Grinnell College is a private liberal arts college in Grinnell, Iowa, United States with a strong tradition of social activism. It was founded in 1846, when a group of transplanted New England Congregationalists formed the Trustees of Iowa College. It is currently ranked as one of the top liberal arts colleges in the nation by US News & World Report and received the "Best All-Around" college rating from Newsweek magazine in 2004.[2] Grinnell's per student endowment is larger than that of any other liberal arts college.[3] Image: Grinnell College Seal This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Private schools are schools not administered by local or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public funds. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... Merchants National Bank, architect Louis Sullivan. ... Official language(s) English Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Largest metro area Des Moines metropolitan area Area  Ranked 26th  - Total 56,272 sq mi (145,743 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 199 miles (320 km)  - % water 0. ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas (also referred to as the country, countryside) are settled places outside towns and cities. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Scarlet (from the Persian saqirlat or Latin astacus, crayfish) is a red color with a hue that is somewhat toward the orange. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... File links The following pages link to this file: Grinnell College Categories: Images with unknown source ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 580 KB) Summary Taken by MadMaxMarchHare. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 580 KB) Summary Taken by MadMaxMarchHare. ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... Merchants National Bank, architect Louis Sullivan. ... Official language(s) English Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Largest metro area Des Moines metropolitan area Area  Ranked 26th  - Total 56,272 sq mi (145,743 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 199 miles (320 km)  - % water 0. ... Social activists are people who act as the conscience and voice of many individuals within a society. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ...

Contents

History

In 1843 eleven Congregational ministers, all of whom trained at Andover Theological Seminary in Massachusetts, set out to proselytize on the frontier. Each man pledged to gather a church and together the group or band would seek to establish a college. When the group arrived in Iowa later that year, each selected a different town in which to establish a congregation. In 1846 they collectively established Iowa College in Davenport. A few months later, Iowa joined the Union. Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... Andover Theological Seminary, now part of Andover Newton Theological School, is the oldest graduate school of theology in the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Motto: Working together to serve you Location in the State of Iowa Coordinates: , Country State County Scott County Incorporated 1839 Government  - Mayor Ed Winborn Area  - City  64. ...


The first 25 years of Grinnell's history saw a change in name and location. Iowa College moved farther west from Davenport, Iowa, to the town of Grinnell and unofficially adopted the name of its new benefactor: an abolitionist minister, Josiah Bushnell Grinnell. The name of the corporation "The Trustees of Iowa College" remained, but in 1909 the name "Grinnell College" was adopted by the trustees for the institution itself. This article is about the abolition of slavery. ... Josiah Bushnell Grinnell (born December 22, 1821) was a U.S. Congressman from Iowa, ordained Presbyterian clergyman, founder of Grinnell, Iowa and benefactor of Grinnell College. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


In its early years, the College experienced setbacks. Although two students received bachelor of arts degrees in 1854 (the first to be granted by a college west of the Mississippi River), within 10 years the Civil War had claimed most of Grinnell's students and professors. In the decade following the war, growth resumed: women were officially admitted as candidates for degrees, and the curriculum was enlarged to include then-new areas of academic studies, such as natural sciences with laboratory work. 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The term natural science as the way in which different fields of study are defined is determined as much by historical convention as by the present day meaning of the words. ...


In 1882, Grinnell College was struck by a tornado — then called a cyclone, after which the college yearbook was named. The storm devastated the campus and destroyed both College buildings. Rebuilding began immediately, and the determination to expand wasn't limited to architecture: the curriculum was again extended to include departments in political science (the first in the United States) and modern languages. Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ...


Grinnell became known as the center of the Social Gospel reform movement,[4] as Robert Handy writes, "The movement centered on the campus of Iowa (now Grinnell) College. Its leading figures were Professor George D. Herron and President George A. Gates" [5]. Other firsts pointed to the lighter side of college life: the first intercollegiate football and baseball games west of the Mississippi were played in Grinnell, and the home teams won. The Social Gospel movement is a Protestant Christian intellectual movement that was most prominent in the late 19th century and early 20th century. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... This article is about the sport. ...


As the 20th century began, Grinnell established a Phi Beta Kappa chapter, introduced the departmental "major" system of study, began Grinnell-in-China (an educational mission that lasted until the Japanese invasion and resumed in 1987), and built a women's residence hall system that became a national model.[6] The social consciousness fostered at Grinnell during these years became evident during Franklin D. Roosevelt's presidency, when Grinnell graduates Harry Hopkins '12, Chester Davis '11, Paul Appleby '13, Hallie Ferguson Flanagan '11, and Florence Stewart Kerr '12 became influential New Deal administrators. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... Combatants China  United States1 Soviet Union2  Empire of Japan Collaborationist Chinese Army3 Commanders Chiang Kai-shek, Chen Cheng, Yan Xishan, Feng Yuxiang, Li Zongren, Xue Yue, Bai Chongxi, Peng Dehuai, Joseph Stilwell, Claire Chennault, Aleksandr Vasilevsky Hirohito, Fumimaro Konoe, Hideki Tojo, Kotohito Kanin, Matsui Iwane, Hajime Sugiyama, Shunroku Hata... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... FDR redirects here. ... Harry Lloyd Hopkins Harry Lloyd Hopkins (August 17, 1890 – January 29, 1946) was one of Franklin Delano Roosevelts closest advisors. ... Paul Henson Appleby (1891-1963) was an important theorist of public administration in democracies. ... The New Deal was the title President Franklin D. Roosevelt gave to the series of programs he initiated between 1933 and 1938 with the goal of providing relief, recovery, and reform (3 Rs) to the people and economy of the United States during the Great Depression. ...


Concern with social issues, educational innovation, and individual expression continue to shape Grinnell. As an example, the school’s travel-service program, Grinnell Corps, preceded the establishment of the Peace Corps by many years. Other recent innovations include first-year tutorials, cooperative pre-professional programs, and comprehensive programs in quantitative studies and the societal impacts of technology globally. It has been suggested that Crisis corps be merged into this article or section. ...


Academics

A Grinnell education is anchored in intense, active learning that occurs in one-on-one interactions between faculty members and students. The school is well-known for its rigorous academic program and the extensiveness and diversity of its extracurricular activities. Recent data place Grinnell at No. 9 of all U.S. institutions (includes both universities and colleges) for the proportion of graduates who go on to earn Ph.D. degrees and No. 15 for graduating female Ph.D. earners.[7]


Grinnell's open curriculum encourages students to take initiative and assume responsibility for their own courses of study, developed under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Outside of the First-Year Tutorial (a one-semester special topics seminar that stresses methods of inquiry, critical analysis, and writing skills), there are no core requirements. To graduate, students are expected to complete at least 32 credits in a major field and a total of 124 credits of academic work, with no more than 48 credits in one department and no more than 92 credits in one division. In the humanities, arts, and social and natural sciences at Grinnell, students have opportunities to conduct original research and undertake advanced study through independent and interdisciplinary projects that foster intellectual discovery.


Grinnell has twenty-six major departments and ten interdisciplinary concentrations. Popular majors include Biology, History, English, Political Science, and Economics. Over half of the student body studies abroad. Grinnell has a campus in London, Grinnell-in-London, as well as Grinnell-in-Washington D.C. For the song by Girls Aloud see Biology (song) Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, speech lit. ... This article is about the study of the past in human terms. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Grinnell’s commitment to the importance of off-campus study reflects the school’s emphasis on social and political awareness and the international nature of its campus. Approximately 60 percent of all Grinnell students participate in more than seventy off-campus programs, including the Grinnell-in-London program and study tours of China, France, Greece, and Russia. These study programs in Europe (including Russia), Africa, the Near East, and Asia, as well as nine programs in Central and South America, provide the opportunity for research in many disciplines, from archeology to education to mathematics. In addition to off-campus programs, Grinnell offers internship programs in such areas as urban studies, art, and marine biology for students interested in field-based learning and experience in professional settings. Second- and third-year students may apply for summer internship grants and receive credit for the experience. Semester programs in the United States include those at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Newberry Library, National Theatre Institute, and Grinnell-in-Washington, D.C. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... The Near East is a term commonly used by archaeologists, geographers and historians, less commonly by journalists and commentators, to refer to the region encompassing Anatolia (the Asian portion of modern Turkey), the Levant (modern Israel/Palestine, the West Bank, the Gaza Strip, Jordan, Syria and Lebanon), Georgia, Armenia, and... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Central America (disambiguation). ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... A combination of federal, state and private funds is providing $300 million for the construction of 13 facilities on ORNLs new main campus. ... Newberry Library Newberry Library Newberry Library from Washington Square Park The Newberry Library is a research library for the humanities and social sciences in Chicago, Illinois, established in 1887 by a bequest by Walter Loomis Newberry. ... ...


Intensive teaching, active learning, residence in a community of cultural and global diversity, and the institution's commitment to self-governance in both social and academic life--these elements come together to form a distinctive experience of liberal education.


Despite the growing trend of U.S. students taking five or more years to finish an undergraduate degree, Grinnell College is strongly oriented towards students being enrolled full time in exactly eight consecutive semesters at the college, although exceptions are available for medical issues and other emergencies.[6] To avoid being suspended from the college, students must make "normal progress towards graduation." This generally means that the student must take at least 12 credits of classes in each individual semester, with grades of a C or better. A student who is not making normal progress towards graduation is placed on academic probation and may be dismissed from the college.[7]


Tuition and financial aid

Grinnell's combined tuition, room, board, and fees for the 2007-2008 academic year is $42,422. Tuition and fees are $34,392 and room and board are $8,030. Grinnell offers a significant amount of merit-based aid in comparison with peer institutions with about 90% of students receiving some form of financial aid.[8] The average financial aid package is over $26,000.[9]


Grinnell College is one of a few dozen US colleges that maintains need-blind admissions and meets the full demonstrated financial need of all U.S. residents who are admitted to the college. Need-blind admission is a U.S. term denoting a college admission policy in which the admitting institution claims not to consider an applicants financial situation when deciding admission. ...


With the first-year students enrolled in the 2006-2007 school year, Grinnell has ended its need-blind admissions policy for international applicants. Under the old policy, students from countries outside the U.S. were admitted without any consideration of their ability to afford four years of study at the college. However, financial aid offers to these students were limited to half the cost of tuition.[8] International students frequently carried very high workloads in an effort to pay the bills, and their academic performance often suffered. (Many students wonder, given Grinnell's sizable endowment, why the college does not simply increase the aid given to international students rather than requiring those who are of meager economic means to work additional hours in campus jobs.) [9] Under the new "need-sensitive" or "need-aware" policy, international students whose demonstrated financial needs can be met are given a slight admissions edge over applicants who can't. The twin hopes are that the enrolled international students will be able to dedicate more energy to their schoolwork, and also that this will ultimately allow the college to provide higher tuition grants to international students. Need-blind admission is a U.S. term denoting a college admission policy in which the admitting institution claims not to consider an applicants financial situation when deciding admission. ...


Athletics

Grinnell Athletics "Honor G"

The school's varsity sports teams are named the Pioneers. They participate in eighteen intercollegiate sports at the NCAA Division III level and in the Midwest Conference. In addition, Grinnell has several club sports teams that compete in non-varsity sports such as Water Polo, Ultimate Frisbee and Rugby union. File links The following pages link to this file: Grinnell College Categories: Images with unknown source ... File links The following pages link to this file: Grinnell College Categories: Images with unknown source ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (or GLIAC) is an intercollegiate athletic conference affiliated with the NCAA’s Division II. The GLIAC was founded in June 1972. ... Water polo is a team water sport that combines some elements of swimming and football. ... Ultimate (sometimes called ultimate Frisbee in reference to the trademarked brand name) is a non-contact competitive team game played with a 175 gram flying disc. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ...


Nearly one-third of recent Grinnell graduates participated in at least one of 20 varsity sports while attending the college and the college has led the Midwest Conference in the total number of Academic All-Conference honorees in last six years.


In February 2005, Grinnell became the first Division III school featured in a regular season basketball game by the ESPN network family in 30 years, when it faced off against the Beloit Buccaneers on ESPN 2.[10] Grinnell was narrowly defeated 86 to 85.[11] Grinnell College's basketball team attracted ESPN due to the team's unique style of playing basketball, known simply as "The System." Coach David Arseneault's "system" incorporates a continual full-court press, a fast-paced offense, an emphasis on offensive rebounding, a barrage of three-point shots and substitutions of five players at a time every 35 to 40 seconds. "The System" has been criticized for not teaching the principles of defense. However, under "The System," Grinnell has won three conference championships over the past ten years and have regularly placed in the top half of the conference. Coach Arseneault's teams have set numerous NCAA scoring records and several individuals on the Grinnell team have led the nation in scoring or assists.[12] Beloit College is a liberal arts college in Beloit, Wisconsin and a member of the Associated Colleges of the Midwest. ...


Campus

East Campus dormitories connected by Grinnell's distinctive loggia.

Grinnell College is located in the town of Grinnell, Iowa, halfway between Des Moines and Iowa City. The 120-acre campus contains sixty-three buildings ranging in architectural style from Collegiate Gothic to Bauhaus. The residential part of campus is divided into three sections: North Campus, East Campus, and South Campus. Each campus's dormitories, modeled explicitly after the residential colleges of Oxford and Cambridge, are connected by a loggia, an architectural signature of the college. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 604 KB) Summary Taken by MadMaxMarchHare. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 604 KB) Summary Taken by MadMaxMarchHare. ... For the surname, see Loggia (surname). ... Merchants National Bank, architect Louis Sullivan. ... This article is about the state capital of Iowa. ... Iowa City is a city located in Johnson County, Iowa, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 62,220. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... For the British gothic rock band, see Bauhaus (band). ... For the surname, see Loggia (surname). ...


The college maintains a 365-acre environmental research area called the Conard Environmental Research Area (CERA). The U.S. Green Building Council awarded CERA's Environmental Education Center a gold certification. The building is the first in Iowa to receive the designation.[13]


Many building projects have been undertaken in recent years at the College including a new athletics center, the Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, the renovation of the Robert Noyce '49 Science Center and the Joe Rosenfield '25 Student Center. Noted architect César Pelli designed the athletics center, the Joe Rosenfield Student '25 Center, and the Bucksbaum Center for the Arts.[14] The Bucksbaum Center for the Arts is part of Grinnell College, located in Grinnell, Iowa. ... muu Cesar Pelli (born October 12, 1926 in San Miguel de Tucumán, Argentina) is a noted Argentine architect known for designing some of the worlds tallest buildings and other major urban landmarks. ...


Social activities and organizations

The organizational structure of the Student Government Association, wielding a yearly budget of over $360,000 and unusually strong administrative influence, covers almost all aspects of student activity and campus life. There are no sororities or fraternities.


Service organizations are popular. The Alternative Break ("AltBreak") program takes students to pursue service initiatives during school holidays, and as of 2005, Grinnell had more alumni per capita serving in the Peace Corps than any other college in the nation.[15] The college also runs its own post-graduation service program known as Grinnell Corps in Grinnell, China, Namibia, Lesotho, Greece, Macau and Nepal, though the Nepal program is currently suspended for safety reasons.[16] It has been suggested that Crisis corps be merged into this article or section. ... Merchants National Bank, architect Louis Sullivan. ...


The Scarlet and Black is the campus newspaper and KDIC (88.5 FM) is the student-run radio station. The Scarlet and Black is the current, official college newspaper at Grinnell College. ...


Endowment

Grinnell's $1.67 billion endowment- the largest among the nation's liberal arts colleges- is evident in the college's facilities, art collections, and generous financial aid programs. Under the stewardship of Warren Buffett and Joseph Rosenfield, the college has adopted an opportunistic and innovative stategy in managing its assets. In 1976, Grinnell's capital fund acquired a TV station, [17] one of many investments that were unprecedented in their time for a college endowment. Another innovative move that significantly grew the endowment occurred when Rosenfield and the college contributed to the founding of Intel- an investment exceeding 10% of the venture capital raised to start the semiconductor company (Robert Noyce, Intel co-founder, is a Grinnell alumnus.)[18] Warren Edward Buffett (b. ... Joseph Frankel Rosenfield (May 16, 1904—June 7, 2000) was an American lawyer, businessman and philanthropist. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Intel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC, SEHK: 4335), founded in 1968 as Integrated Electronics Corporation, is an American multinational corporation that is best known for designing and manufacturing microprocessors and specialized integrated circuits. ... Robert Noyce Robert Noyce (December 12, 1927 – June 3, 1990), nicknamed the Mayor of Silicon Valley, co-founded Fairchild Semiconductor in 1957 and Intel in 1968. ... Intel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC, SEHK: 4335), founded in 1968 as Integrated Electronics Corporation, is an American multinational corporation that is best known for designing and manufacturing microprocessors and specialized integrated circuits. ...


Since the late 1960's, Warren Buffett has played a visible role in growing the endowment at Grinnell, where he serves as a life trustee.


Notable alumni

Harry Hopkins, 1912, senior advisor to Franklin Delano Roosevelt, principle architect of the New Deal, WPA administrator. [19] This list of Grinnell College alumni includes graduates, non-graduate former students, and current students of Grinnell College. ... Harry Lloyd Hopkins Harry Lloyd Hopkins (August 17, 1890 – January 29, 1946) was one of Franklin Delano Roosevelts closest advisors. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... The New Deal was the title President Franklin D. Roosevelt gave to the series of programs he initiated between 1933 and 1938 with the goal of providing relief, recovery, and reform (3 Rs) to the people and economy of the United States during the Great Depression. ... WPA Graphic The Works Progress Administration (later Work Projects Administration, abbreviated WPA), was created on May 6, 1935 by Presidential order (Congress funded it annually but did not set it up). ...


Joseph Welch, 1914, Head attorney for the United States Army during the Army-McCarthy Hearings. [20] Joseph Nye Welch (October 22, 1890 – October 6, 1960) was the head attorney for the United States Army while it was under investigation by Joseph McCarthys Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations for Communist activities. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... Early in 1954, the U.S. Army accused Senator Joseph R. McCarthy (Republican, Wisconsin), and his chief counsel, Roy Cohn, of pressuring the Army to give favorable treatment to former McCarthy aide and friend of Cohns, G. David Schine. ...


Robert Noyce, 1949, nicknamed "Mayor of Silicon Valley", co-founder of Intel, co-inventor of the integrated circuit.[21] Robert Noyce Robert Noyce (December 12, 1927 – June 3, 1990), nicknamed the Mayor of Silicon Valley, co-founded Fairchild Semiconductor in 1957 and Intel in 1968. ... Intel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC, SEHK: 4335), founded in 1968 as Integrated Electronics Corporation, is an American multinational corporation that is best known for designing and manufacturing microprocessors and specialized integrated circuits. ... Integrated circuit of Atmel Diopsis 740 System on Chip showing memory blocks, logic and input/output pads around the periphery Microchips with a transparent window, showing the integrated circuit inside. ...


Herbie Hancock, 1960, Jazz musician and composer who has won an Academy Award and multiple Grammy Awards, member of Miles Davis's "second great quintet". [22] Herbert Jeffrey Hancock (born April 12, 1940) is an Academy Award and multiple Grammy Award-winning jazz pianist and composer from Chicago, Illinois, U.S. Hancock is one of jazz musics most important and influential pianists and composers. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... Miles Dewey Davis III (May 26, 1926 – September 28, 1991) was an American jazz musician, widely considered to be one of the most influential of the 20th century. ...


John Garang, 1969, leader of the rebel Sudan People's Liberation Army, later vice president of Sudan. [23] John Garang, August 2004 John Garang de Mabior (June 23, 1945 – July 30, 2005) was the vice president of Sudan and former leader of the rebel Sudan Peoples Liberation Army. ... SPLA/M emblem Sudan Peoples Liberation Army/Movement (SPLA/M) is a member of the National Democratic Alliance (NDA), the main opposition group in Sudan. ...


Thomas Cech, 1970, Co-winner of 1989 Nobel Prize in Chemistry ``for [...] discovery of catalytic properties of RNA, president of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. [24] [25] Thomas R. Cech was born on December 8, 1947 in Chicago. ... This is a list of Nobel Prize laureates in Chemistry from 1901 to 2006. ... The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) is a United States non-profit medical research institute based in Chevy Chase, Maryland and originally founded by the aviator and engineer Howard Hughes in 1953. ...


Virtual communities and social networking websites

GrinnellPlans is a virtual community consisting of 3,302 members as of February 26, 2007.[26] Most members are current students or alumni, but faculty, staff members, and (by invitation) other friends of the College have also joined. A virtual community, e-community or online community is a group of people that primarily interact via communication media such as letters, telephone, email or Usenet rather than face to face. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


In 2003, Information Technology at Grinnell College ordered that GrinnellPlans not be hosted on Grinnell College property because of the College's concerns regarding possibly illegal content on the system. GrinnellPlans moved to an off-campus host. It is supported through user donations and is not affiliated with Grinnell College. Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


References

  1. ^ data available from college for June, 2006 at [1].
  2. ^ Newsweek. [2]. September 1, 2003
  3. ^ The Chronicle of Higher Education. In Iowa, 2 Colleges Separated by 150 Miles and $1.37-Billion. April 7, 2006.
  4. ^ Morgan, J. (1969), "The Development of Sociology and the Social Gospel in America", Sociological Analysis 30 (1): 42-53. see footnote 4.
  5. ^ Handy, Robert (1950), "George D. Herron and the Kingdom Movement", Church History 19 (2): 97-115
  6. ^ McHale, Cathryn (1935), "Education for Women: The significance of Present-Day College Education for Women and Curriculum Changes", Journal of Higher Education
  7. ^ Source: Weighted Baccalaureate Origins Study, Higher Education Data Sharing Consortium, 2006.
  8. ^ Grinnell College, Office of Admission. Tuition & Fees. Accessed February 26, 2007.
  9. ^ college board page accessed October 2, 2007.
  10. ^ Amy Farnum. NCAA Sports. Grinnell Goes Big-Time. January 28, 2005.
  11. ^ D3Hoops.com Beloit 86, Grinnell 85. February 3, 2005.
  12. ^ Official 2007 NCAA Men's Basketball Records Book. [3]. Accessed March 7, 2007.
  13. ^ United States Green Building Council. [ http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=1548]. Accessed May 14, 2007.
  14. ^ The Chronicle of Higher Education. [ http://chronicle.com/temp/reprint.php?id=cqyxfcc3pr3w0hxfc29gtmgxtgvr3nlg In Iowa, 2 Colleges Separated by 150 Miles and $1.37-Billion]. April 7, 2006.
  15. ^ Peace Corps. Peace Corps Announces the Colleges and Universities that Have Produced the Most Peace Corps Volunteers. January 24, 2005.
  16. ^ Grinnell College, Office of Social Commitment. Grinnell Corps. Accessed February 26, 2007.
  17. ^ Time. [4]. Jan 15, 1979.
  18. ^ CNNMoney. [5]. June 1, 2000.
  19. ^ Harry Hopkins (English). U-S-History.com. Retrieved on 25 February 2007.
  20. ^ Joseph Nye Welch Biography (English). The Biography Channel. Retrieved on 25 February 2007.
  21. ^ IEEEVM: Robert Noyce (English). IEEE. Retrieved on 26 February 2007.
  22. ^ Herbie Hancock (English). Grinnell College. Retrieved on 02 February 2007.
  23. ^ Biography of the Late Dr. John Garang de-Mabior (English). Gurtong Peace Project. Retrieved on 25 February 2007.
  24. ^ Chemistry 1989 (English). Nobel Foundation. Retrieved on 11 March 2007.
  25. ^ Thomas R. Cech (English). Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Retrieved on 26 January 2007.
  26. ^ GrinnellPlans. Planlove v2.4.2.

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Grinnell College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2105 words)
As a recognition of the rigor of its academic progam, the College was awarded a Phi Beta Kappa chapter, Beta of Iowa, in 1908.
Grinnell College is located in the town of Grinnell, Iowa, halfway between Des Moines and Iowa City.
Grinnell is one of the few colleges with Amherst and Brown that has an "open curriculum," meaning students are free from general requirements, with the exception of a writing-intensive "tutorial" during the first year.
Grinnell College - definition of Grinnell College - Labor Law Talk Dictionary (272 words)
Grinnell College is a four-year undergraduate liberal arts college located in Grinnell, Iowa.
The college was originally known as Iowa College, was the first college to the West of the Mississippi River and dates from June 10, 1846, when a group of transplanted New England Congregationalist with strong social-reformer backgrounds organized as the Trustees of Iowa College.
Grinnell College is one of several liberal arts colleges that have an active campus-wide blogosphere community.
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