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Encyclopedia > Griffin Bell

Griffin Boyette Bell (born October 31, 1918) is an American lawyer and former United States Attorney General. He served as Attorney general under the Carter Administration. He is an attorney with the law firm King & Spalding. Image File history File linksMetadata GriffenBell2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata GriffenBell2. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... -1...

Contents

Early years and legal practice.

Bell was born in Americus, Georgia, He attended several public schools before enrolling at the Georgia Southwestern College and then at the Walter F. George School of Law at Mercer University. During World War II, Bell served in the United States Army Quartermaster Corps from 1942 to 1946. He practiced law at King & Spalding in Georgia from 1948 to 1961. He returned to the firm before and after his service as the United States Attorney General. Bell handled many high profile cases after leaving office, such as the internal investigation concerning the cash management practices of E. F. Hutton & Co.. Americus is a city located in Sumter County, Georgia. ... ... The Walter F. George School of Law, founded in 1873, is one of the oldest law schools in the United States. ... Mercer University is a private, coeducational, faith-based university with a Baptist heritage, located in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The United States Army is the largest, and by some standards oldest, established branch of the armed forces of the United States and is one of seven uniformed services. ... The Quartermaster Corps is a combat service support branch of the United States Army. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... -1... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... E. F. Hutton & Co. ...


Political career

President John F. Kennedy appointed Bell, who had been the co-chairman of Kennedy's presidential campaign in Georgia, to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit in 1961. He served for more than fourteen years on the Fifth Circuit. He often played a key role in mediating disputes between the court's factions during the zenith of the American Civil Rights Movement. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... The United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the following United States District Courts: Western, Middle, and Eastern Districts of Louisiana Northern and Southern Districts of Mississippi Western, Eastern, Northern, and Southern Districts of Texas The court is based at... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The civil rights movement in the United States has been a long, primarily nonviolent struggle to bring full civil rights and equality under the law to all citizens of United States. ...


He resigned from the court on March 1976 to resume his law practice. In December 1976, President Jimmy Carter nominated him to become the 72nd Attorney General of the United States. He served until August 1979. His Watergate era nomination was initially controversial because he is a Southerner and a friend of the President. However, by the time he left office, Bell had allayed the concerns and won the praise of many of his critics in the United States Senate and the media. He was credited with bringing needed independence and professionalism to the Department of Justice. Unprecedented and not duplicated since, Bell posted publicly every day his third party contacts, including meetings and calls with the White House, members of Congress, or other non-Justice Department persons to rebuild confidence in the Department of Justice. For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States...


Bell led the effort to pass the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act in 1978. The Carter administration, advised by Bell, greatly increased the number of women and minorities serving on the federal bench. Bell recruited an Eighth Circuit judge, Wade McCree, an African American, to serve as Solicitor General of the United States, and an African American lawyer for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund he had admired as a lawyer while a judge, Drew R. Days III, to head the Civil Rights Division. Bell successfully led the negotiations to divide his former appellate Court, the Fifth Circuit spanning from Georgia to Texas, into two courts: the Fifth Circuit based in New Orleans and the Eleventh Circuit based in Atlanta. Bell also led efforts to professionalize the Federal Bureau of Investigation after Watergate and recruited another federal appellate judge to recommend to the President as Director, Judge William Webster of the Eighth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals. After Bell resigned as Attorney General in August 1979, President Carter thereafter appointed him as Special Ambassador to the Helsinki Convention. The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) of 1978 is a U.S. federal law prescribing procedures for the physical and electronic surveillance and collection of foreign intelligence information between foreign powers and agents of foreign powers (which may include American citizens and permanent residents engaged in espionage and violating U... For the set of principles on human experimentation, see Declaration of Helsinki. ...


From 1985 to 1987, Bell served as a member of the Secretary of State’s Advisory Committee on South Africa. In 1989, he was appointed Vice Chairman of President George H.W. Bush’s Commission on Federal Ethics Law Reform. During the Iran Contra Affair investigation, he was counsel to President Bush. As a lawyer during this period, he specialized in corporate internal investigations, many that were high profile, like that for E.F. Hutton following federal indictments for its cash management practices. This article is about the year. ... This article is about the year 1987. ... Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born June... In the Iran-Contra Affair, United States President Ronald Reagans administration secretly sold arms to Iran, which was engaged in a bloody war with its neighbor Iraq from 1980 to 1988 (see Iran-Iraq War), and diverted the proceeds to the Contra rebels fighting to overthrow the leftist and...


Society

Bell, whose wit was widely reported, was an especially popular member of the Carter Cabinet and well-known in the social scene. Bell introduced rooster pepper sausage as one of the more publicized lore in Washington. The dish, made from rooster spur pepper from Georgia, was widely rumored to be an aphrodisiac. It was maintained that he slipped supplies of the potent sausage into the White House to President Carter through their mutual close friend, Charles Kirbo. The Alfalfa Club is a century-old Washington institution of social, political and business America. At its annual dinner in 1979, Bell was the Alfalfa nominee for President of the United States and quipped as he began his acceptance speech that he hoped that President Carter would now understand the full meaning of his warning that he would not serve as Attorney General during the President's re-election campaign. This article is about agents which increase sexual desire. ...


Bell was the first cabinet official named in Mr. Richard Blackwell's list of best dressed Americans in 1978, citing the former Attorney General's penchant for wide, sleek, bold-colored ties that were emblematic of mid-to-late 1970s fashion. The Cabinet meets in the Cabinet Room on May 16, 2001. ... Mr. ...


See also

This is an incomplete list of Political appointees in the United States Government whose party was different from that of the President who made the appointment. ...

Sources

Preceded by
Edward H. Levi
United States Attorney General
1977–1979
Succeeded by
Benjamin R. Civiletti
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  Results from FactBites:
 
New Georgia Encyclopedia: Griffin Bell (b. 1918) (774 words)
Griffin Bell was the seventy-second attorney general of the United States and a major figure in the American legal profession
Griffin Boyette Bell was born in rural Sumter County on October 31, 1918, to Thelma Leola Pilcher and Adlai Cleveland Bell, a cotton farmer.
Bell served as a chair of John F. Kennedy's 1960 presidential campaign, and in October 1961 President Kennedy appointed him judge of the Fifth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, where he actively participated, often as a moderate voice, in the implementation of desegregation orders across the Deep South.
Griffin Boyette Bell - Further Readings (975 words)
Bell's nomination ran into trouble when it was revealed that he belonged to three clubs that were in effect racially segregated.
Bell agreed to quit the clubs and was nominated to the post of attorney general on January 25, 1977.
Griffin Bell was named to the advisory committee that would advise the secretary of defense on the social and legal implications of the new surveillance technology.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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