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Encyclopedia > Griffin
Statue of a griffin at St. Mark's Basilica in Venice.
Statue of a griffin at St. Mark's Basilica in Venice.
An unusually naturalistic depiction of a griffin by Sir John Tenniel for Lewis Carroll’s Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.
A very early appearance of gryphons, dating from before 2000 BCE, two of them shown in comapny with the Sumerian deity Ningizzida.
A very early appearance of gryphons, dating from before 2000 BCE, two of them shown in comapny with the Sumerian deity Ningizzida.

The griffin, griffon or gryphon[1] (from Old French grifon[2]) is a legendary creature with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. As the lion was traditionally considered the king of the beasts and the eagle the king of the birds, the griffin was thought to be an especially powerful and majestic creature.[3] In antiquity it was a symbol of divine power and a guardian of the divine.[4] Griffin (also spelt gryphon, griffon or gryphin) can refer to: // Griffin Surname Griffin, a legendary creature. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 3072 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 3072 pixel, file size: 1. ... San Marco di Venezia, as seen from the Piazza San Marco St Marks Basilica (Italian: Basilica di San Marco in Venezia) is the most famous of the churches of Venice and one of the best known examples of Byzantine architecture. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Naturalism in art refers to the depiction of realistic objects in a natural setting. ... 1889 Self-portrait Sir John Tenniel (February 28, 1820 – February 25, 1914) was an English illustrator. ... Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (IPA: ) (27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll (), was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican clergyman and photographer. ... Alice in Wonderland redirects here. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Sumer (or Šumer; Sumerian: KI-EN-GIR [1]) was the earliest known civilization of the ancient Near East, located in lower Mesopotamia (modern Iraq), from the time of the earliest records in the mid 4th millennium BC until the rise of Babylonia in the late 3rd millennium BC. The term... The Sumerian god Ningizzida accompanied by two gryphons. ... Old French was the Romance dialect continuum spoken in territories corresponding roughly to the northern half of modern France and parts of modern Belgium and Switzerland from around 1000 to 1300. ... A legendary creature is a mythological or folkloric creature (often known as fabulous creatures in historical literature). ... For other uses, see Lion (disambiguation). ... Genera Several, see below. ... For other uses, see Divinity (disambiguation) and Divine (disambiguation). ...


Most contemporary illustrations give the griffin the forelegs of an eagle, with an eagle's legs and talons, although in some older illustrations it has a lion's forelimbs; it generally has a lion's hindquarters, however. Its eagle's head is conventionally given prominent ears; these are sometimes described as the lion's ears, but are often elongated (more like a horse's), and are sometimes feathered. Some writers describe the tail as a serpent, in the manner of a chimera.[citation needed] Cat claw A claw is a curved pointed appendage, found at the end of a toe or finger or, in arthropods, of the tarsus. ... For other uses, see Ear (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... For other uses, see Chimera. ...


Infrequently, a griffin is portrayed without wings (or a wingless eagle-headed lion is identified as a griffin); in 15th-century and later heraldry such a beast may be called a male griffin, an alce or a keythong. In heraldry, a griffin always has aquiline forelimbs; the beast with leonine forelimbs is distinguished as the opinicus. (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... Heraldry in its most general sense encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. ...

Contents

Early civilizations

Several griffin-like creatures - beasts with the head of an eagle or some other bird of prey - occur in art, architecture and mythology of many early civilizations. Orders Accipitriformes     Cathartidae     Pandionidae     Accipitridae     Sagittariidae Falconiformes     Falconidae A bird of prey or raptor is a bird that hunts its food, especially one that preys on mammals or other birds. ...


In Minoan Crete, such creatures were royal animals and guardians of throne rooms. [5] The Minoan civilization was a bronze age civilization which arose on Crete, an island in the Aegean Sea. ... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ...


In Ancient Egypt, a similar creature was depicted with a slender, feline body and the head of a falcon; this is tentatively identified as an axex.[6] Early statuary depicts them with wings that are horizontal and parallel along the back of the body. During the New Kingdom, depictions of griffins included hunting scenes.[citation needed] Khafres Pyramid and the Great Sphinx of Giza, built about 2550 BC during the Fourth Dynasty of the Old Kingdom,[1] are enduring symbols of the civilization of ancient Egypt Ancient Egypt was a civilization in Northeastern Africa concentrated along the middle to lower reaches of the Nile River... The New Kingdom is the period in ancient Egyptian history between the 16th century BCE and the 11th century BC, covering the Eighteenth, Nineteenth, and Twentieth Dynasties of Egypt. ...


Of the two sacred "birds" of Persian mythology, the homa and the simurgh, the homa is often described as griffin-like. Ancient Elamites used such a creature extensively in their architecture. During the Achaemenid Empire, homa were used widely as statues and symbols in palaces. Homa also had a special place in Persian literature as guardians of light.[citation needed] The beliefs and practices of the culturally and linguistically related group of ancient peoples who inhabited the Iranian Plateau and its borderlands, as well as areas of Central Asia from the Black Sea to Khotan (modern Ho-tien, China), form Persian mythology. ... Statues of two head Homa in Persepolis ruins, Iran A relief of Armenian tribute bearer carrying a metal vessel with Homa (griffin) handles. ... Sassanid silk twill textile of a Simorgh in a beaded surround, 6-7th c. ... Elam (Persian: تمدن ایلام) is one of the oldest recorded civilizations. ... Founder of empires: Cyrus, The Great is still revered in modern Iran as he was in all the successor Persian Empires. ... Kelileh va Demneh Persian manuscript copy dated 1429, from Herat, depicts the Jackal trying to lead the Lion astray. ...


Scythia

Protoceratops skeleton at the Wyoming Dinosaur Center... or a Scythian griffin skeleton?

The griffin was a common feature of "animal style" Scythian gold. It was said to inhabit the Scythian steppes that reached from the modern Ukraine to central Asia; there gold and precious stones were abundant and when strangers approached to gather the stones, the creatures would leap on them and tear them to pieces. The Scythians used giant petrified bones found in this area as proof of the existence of these griffins and thus keep outsiders away from the gold and precious stones. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Wyoming Dinosaur Center is located in Thermopolis, WY, and is one of the few dinosaur museums in the world to have its own excavation localities within driving distance of its laboratory and curation facility. ... Approximate extent of Scythia and Sarmatia in the 1st century BC (the orange background shows the spread of Eastern Iranian languages, among them Scytho-Sarmatian). ... This article is about the ecological zone type. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... In geology, petrifaction or petrification is the process by which organic material is converted into stone or a similar substance. ...


Adrienne Mayor, a classical folklorist, has recently suggested that these "griffin bones" were actually dinosaur fossils, which are common in this part of the world. In The First Fossil Hunters: Paleontology in Greek and Roman Times, she makes tentative connections between the rich fossil beds around the Mediterranean and across the steppes to the Gobi Desert and the myths of griffins, centaurs and archaic giants originating in the Classical world. Mayor draws upon similarities that exist between the prehistoric Protoceratops skeletons of the steppes leading to the Gobi Desert, and the legends of the gold-hoarding griffin told by nomadic Scythians of the region.[7] Adrienne Mayor is a classical folklorist whose main interests have been pre-Darwinian interpretations of paleontological remains (in The First Fossil Hunters) and the use of biochemical weapons in the ancient world (in Greek Fire, Poison Arrows & Scorpion Bombs). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Orders & Suborders Saurischia Sauropodomorpha Theropoda Ornithischia Thyreophora Ornithopoda Marginocephalia Dinosaurs were vertebrate animals that dominated the terrestrial ecosystem for over 160 million years, first appearing approximately 230 million years ago. ... A fossil Ammonite Fossils are the mineralized remains of animals or plants or other traces such as footprints. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... The Gobi Desert lies in the territory of the Peoples Republic of China and the Country of Mongolia. ... See also centaur (planetoid), Centaur (rocket stage) Guido Reni, Abduction of Deianira, 1620-21 In Greek mythology, the centaurs (Greek: Κένταυροι) are a race part human and part horse, with a horses body and a human head and torso (illustration, right). ... Stonehenge, England, erected by Neolithic peoples ca. ... Protoceratops is a sheep-sized, herbivorous ceratopsian dinosaur from the Upper Cretaceous of Mongolia. ... Skeleton is also a winter sport: see skeleton (sport). ...


Ancient Greece

Bronze griffin protome (Archaeological Museum, Delphi)
Bronze griffin protome (Archaeological Museum, Delphi)
A satyr, a griffin and an Arimaspe. Detail from an Attic red-figure chalice-crater, c.375–350 BC, from Eretria
A satyr, a griffin and an Arimaspe. Detail from an Attic red-figure chalice-crater, c.375–350 BC, from Eretria

In archaic Greek art bronze cauldrons fitted with apotropaic bronze griffon heads ("protomes") with gaping beaks, prominent upstanding ears and often a finial knop on the skull appear with such regularity that they are considered a genre, the Griefenkessel, by specialists. The "griffin cauldrons" are discussed by Ulf Jantzen, Griechische Griefenkessel (Berlin) 1955. Based on Anatolian prototypes for bronze cauldrons with animal heads, Jantzen concluded that the griffon cauldron was a Greek invention of c.700 BC, the earliest examples hammered over moulds rather than cast. Such griffon cauldrons were developed simultaneously in Samos and in Etruscan territories from the earliest 7th through the 6th centuries BC. The earliest Etruscan example is the famous griffon protomes from the Barberini Tomb.[8] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 426 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (640 × 900 pixel, file size: 524 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 426 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (640 × 900 pixel, file size: 524 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 659 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1820 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 659 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1820 pixel, file size: 2. ... A bald, bearded, horse-tailed satyr balances a winecup on his erect penis, a trick worthy of note, on an Attic red-figured psykter, ca. ... This is an article about the Greek city of Eretria. ... The art of ancient Greece has exercised an enormous influence on the culture of many countries from ancient times until the present, particularly in the areas of sculpture and architecture. ... Apotropaic is an adjective that means intended to ward off evil or averting or combating evil and commonly refers to objects such as amulets and talismans or other symbols. ... This article is about two nested areas of Turkey, a plateau region within a peninsula. ... Samos (Greek Σάμος; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is an island in southeastern Greece in the Aegean Sea, off the coast of Turkey. ... Extent of Etruscan civilization and the twelve Etruscan League cities. ...

Arimaspe on horseback fighting a griffin. Attic red-figure pelike in the Kerch style, c.375–350 BC, from Italy(?)
Arimaspe on horseback fighting a griffin. Attic red-figure pelike in the Kerch style, c.375–350 BC, from Italy(?)

In Greek literature, Scythian mythology is reflected by Hellenic writers' tales of griffins and the Arimaspi of distant Scythia near the cave of Boreas, the North Wind (Geskleithron), such as were elaborated in the lost archaic poem of Aristeas of Proconnesus (7th century BC), Arimaspea. Bedingfeld and Gwynn-Jones infer that Aristeas's griffin was, "the bearded vulture or lammergeyer, a huge bird with a wingspan of nearly three metres (ten feet), which nests in inaccessible cliffs in the Asiatic mountains. ... The gold of the region is real enough and is still mined today." They also suggest that Aristeas conflated the Scythian griffin with a similar creature - a composite of lion and eagle or lion and griffon vulture - already known to Greek culture. [9] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 394 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2400 × 3650 pixel, file size: 4. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 394 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2400 × 3650 pixel, file size: 4. ... Approximate extent of Scythia and Sarmatia in the 1st century BC (the orange background shows the spread of Eastern Iranian languages, among them Scytho-Sarmatian). ... A satyr (left), a griffin (centre) and an Arimaspus (right), detail of a red-figure calyx-krater, ca. ... Approximate extent of Scythia and Sarmatia in the 1st century BC (the orange background shows the spread of Eastern Iranian languages, among them Scytho-Sarmatian). ... There was one person and one god known as Boreas in Greek mythology. ... Aristeas was a semi-legendary Greek poet and miracle-worker, a native of Proconnesus in Asia Minor, active ca. ... Binomial name Gypaetus barbatus (Linnaeus, 1758) The Lammergeier or Bearded Vulture, Gypaetus barbatus, is an Old World vulture, the only member of the genus Gypaetus. ... Binomial name Gyps fulvus Hablizl, 1783 The Griffon Vulture, Gyps fulvus is an Old World vulture in the family Accipitridae, which also includes eagles, kites, buzzards and hawks. ...


In any case, Aristeas's tales were eagerly reported by Herodotus (484 BC–c.425 BC) and in Pliny the Elder's Natural History (77 AD), among others. Aeschylus (525–456 BC), in Prometheus Bound (804), has Prometheus warn Io: "Beware of the sharp-beaked hounds of Zeus that do not bark, the gryphons..."[10] In his Description of Greece (1.24.6), Pausanias (2nd century AD) says, "griffins are beasts like lions, but with the beak and wings of an eagle."[10] The griffin was said to build a nest, like an eagle: instead of eggs, it lays sapphires, and thus griffins are supposed to be female. The animal was supposed to watch over gold mines and hidden treasures, and to be the enemy of the horse. The incredibly rare offspring of griffin and horse was called a hippogriff. Herodotus of Halicarnassus (Greek: HÄ“rodotos Halikarnāsseus) was a Greek historian from Ionia who lived in the 5th century BC (ca. ... Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19th Century portrait. ... Naturalis Historia, 1669 edition, title page. ... This article is about the ancient Greek playwright. ... In Greek mythology, Prometheus (Ancient Greek: , forethought)[1] is a Titan known for his wily intelligence, who stole fire from Zeus and gave it to mortals for their use. ... Hermes, Io (as cow) and Argus, black-figure amphora, 540–530 BC, Staatliche Antikensammlungen (Inv. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... Pausanias (Greek: ) was a Greek traveller and geographer of the 2nd century A.D., who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. ... For other uses, see Nest (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Sapphire (disambiguation). ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... This article is about mineral extractions. ... Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... Roger Delivering Angelica by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, painted 1819, portrays the scene from Orlando furioso in which Roger, mounted on a hippogriff, rescues Angelique. ...


Stephen Friar notes that the griffin was regarded as an animal of the sun and pulled Apollo's chariot across the sky; but it pulled Nemesis's chariot too.[3]
Sol redirects here. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... Note: This article contains special characters. ...

Facing griffins guard a chalice, on a 12th century capital from the abbey of Mozac in the Auvergne
Facing griffins guard a chalice, on a 12th century capital from the abbey of Mozac in the Auvergne

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 596 pixelsFull resolution (2500 × 1864 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 596 pixelsFull resolution (2500 × 1864 pixel, file size: 2. ... Chalice For the Gothic Metal band, see Chalice (band) A chalice (from Latin calix, cup) is a goblet intended to hold drink. ... The Abbey of Mozac (Auvergne, France), near to Riom is classified as a historical monument and site of Roman civilization. ... (Region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Clermont-Ferrand Regional President René Souchon (PS) (since 2006) Departments Allier Cantal Haute-Loire Puy-de-Dôme Arrondissements 14 Cantons 158 Communes 1,310 Statistics Land area1 26,013 km² Population (Ranked 19th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ...

Medieval lore

A 9th-century Irish writer by the name of Stephen Scotus asserted that griffins were strictly monogamous. Not only did they mate for life, but if one partner died, the other would continue throughout the rest of its life alone, never to search for a new mate. The griffin was thus made an emblem of the Church's views on remarriage. As a means of recording the passage of time the 9th century was the century that lasted from 801 to 900. ... Faithfulness redirects here. ... Matrimony redirects here. ...


Being a union of a terrestrial beast and an aerial bird, it was seen in Christianity to be a symbol of Jesus Christ, who was both human and divine. As such it can be found sculpted on churches.[3] Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


The egg-laying habits of the female were first clearly described by St. Hildegard of Bingen, a German nun author of the 12th century. She outlined how the expectant mother would search out a cave with a very narrow entrance but plenty of room inside, sheltered from the elements. Here she would lay her three eggs (about the size of ostrich eggs), and stand guard over them. Illumination from the Liber Scivias showing Hildegard receiving a vision and dictating to her scribe and secretary Hildegard of Bingen (German: Hildegard von Bingen; Latin: Hildegardis Bingensis; 1098 – 17 September 1179), also known as Blessed Hildegard and Saint Hildegard, was a German magistra who later founded convents (Rupertsberg in 1150... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The present-day distribution of Ostriches. ...

Griffin bas-relief, from Picardy, ca 1260 (Musée de Picardie, Amiens)
Griffin bas-relief, from Picardy, ca 1260 (Musée de Picardie, Amiens)

According to Stephen Friar, a griffin's claw was believed to have medicinal properties and one of its feathers could restore sight to the blind.[3] Goblets fashioned from griffin claws (actually antelope horns) and griffin eggs (actually ostrich eggs) were highly prized in medieval European courts.[9] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 552 pixelsFull resolution (1701 × 1173 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 552 pixelsFull resolution (1701 × 1173 pixel, file size: 1. ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... Visual perception is one of the senses, consisting of the ability to detect light and interpret (see) it as the perception known as sight or naked eye vision. ... This article is about the visual condition. ... This article is about the herbivorous mammals. ...


By the 12th century the appearance of the griffin was substantially fixed: "All its bodily members are like a lion's, but its wings and mask are like an eagle's."[11] However, it is not yet clear if its forelimbs are the legs an eagle's or a lion's; although the description implies the latter, the accompanying illustration is ambiguous. It was left to the heralds to clarify that.


In heraldry

A heraldic griffin, from Dictionnaire raisonné de l'architecture française du XIe au XVIe siècle by Eugène Viollet-Le-Duc (1856)
A heraldic griffin, from Dictionnaire raisonné de l'architecture française du XIe au XVIe siècle by Eugène Viollet-Le-Duc (1856)

The griffin is often seen as a charge in heraldry. According to the Tractatus de armis of John de Bado Aureo (late fourteenth century), "A griffin borne in arms signifies that the first to bear it was a strong pugnacious man in whom were found two distinct natures and qualities, those of the eagle and the lion." Since the lion and the eagle were both important charges in heraldry, it is perhaps not surprising that their hybrid, the griffin, was also a frequent choice. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Eugène Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc (January 27, 1814 – September 17, 1879) was a French architect and theorist, famous for his restorations of medieval buildings. ... In heraldry, a charge is an image occupying the field on an escutcheon (or shield). ... Heraldry in its most general sense encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. ... The identity of the heraldic writer Johannes de Bado Aureo is a matter of dispute. ... This article is about a biological term. ...


Bedingfeld and Gwynn-Jones suggest a far more bellicose reason for its choice as a charge: That because of the bitter antipathy between griffins and horses, a griffin borne on a shield would instill fear in the horses of his opponents. They also note the first appearance of the griffin in English heraldry, in a 1167 seal of Richard de Redvers, Earl of Essex.[9] (However, other writers quote later dates for its first appearance.[12][3]) Earl of Essex is a title that has been held by several families and individuals, of which the best-known and most closely associated with the title was Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex (1566 - 1601). ...


The symbolism of the lion-eagle combination was also the subject of a quotation attributed to Chassaneus by Alexander Nisbet: "The griffin represents wisdom joined to fortitude, but wisdom is obliged to lead, and fortitude follow."[13]


The heraldic griffin establishes the contemporary depiction of the beast: Parker says, "The lower part of its body, with the tail and the hind-legs, belong to the lion; the head and the fore-part, with the legs and talons, to those of the eagle, but the head retains the ears of the lion. It has large wings, which also closely resemble those of the eagle."[14] (The variant with the forelimbs of a lion is distinguished as the opinicus, described below.)


Heraldic griffins are usually shown rearing up, facing dexter (to the right of the bearer of the shield)*, standing on one hind leg with the other hind leg and both forelegs raised (as shown in the image on the right and those in the gallery below). This posture is described in the Norman-French heraldic blazon as segreant, a term usually applied only to griffins (but sometimes also to dragons[4]). The generic term for this posture, used to describe lions and other beasts, is rampant. Dexter is the name of a number of places in the United States of America: Dexter, Alabama Dexter, Arkansas Dexter, Georgia Dexter, Illinois Dexter, Indiana Dexter, Iowa Dexter, Kansas Dexter, Kentucky Dexter, Maine Dexter, Michigan Dexter, Minnesota Dexter, Mississippi Dexter, Missouri Dexter, New Mexico Dexter, New York Dexter, North Carolina... This is an article about Heraldry. ...


A griffin's head is also seen as a charge in its own right, and it is distinguished from an eagle's head solely by its ears (see the Kartuzy and Filisur arms in the gallery below).

Griffin head as a charge
Griffin as a supporter

A heraldic griffin was included as one of the ten Queen's Beasts sculpted for the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953 (following the model of the King’s Beasts at Hampton Court) and this is now on display at Kew Gardens. The Queens Beasts are heraldic symbols depicting animals traditionally associated with British royal family. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... Kew Gardens is the name of several places: Kew Gardens is a commonly-used name for the Royal Botanic Gardens in Kew, London, United Kingdom Kew Gardens is the name of a park in The Beaches neighborhood of Toronto, Ontario, Canada Kew Gardens is also the name of a neighborhood...


Male griffin, alce or keythong

Parker says, of the griffin, "It may be represented as without wings, and then with rays or spikes of gold proceeding from several parts of its body. Sometimes it has two long straight horns. The term Alce is given, as if used by writers for a kind of griffin, but no example can be quoted." [14]


But the term alce is rare in modern heraldry reference books; this wingless, spiked variant is almost invariably called the male griffin - although this must be a very unusual case of sexual dimorphism because, as Stephen Friar puts it, "both creatures possess the usual male attributes".[3] Female (left) and male Common Pheasant, illustrating the dramatic difference in both color and size, between the sexes Sexual dimorphism is the systematic difference in form between individuals of different sex in the same species. ...


The male griffin itself is quite rare. It occurs as the dexter supporter (to the right of the bearer of the shield/ to the left of the viewer) in the arms of St. Leger entered at the visitation of Devon and Cornwall 1531 (College of Arms G 2, folio 24v) and as the supporter of the banner of a mid-16th-century Knight of the Garter in College of Arms Vincent 152 (pp 107-8). [12] In the late 19th century, Sir Henry William Dashwood was granted supporters: two male griffins Argent [white] gorged with a collar flory counter flory.[15] One was also recently granted as a crest in the arms of the City of Melfort, Saskatchewan (image).[16] (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... For other uses, see Knight (disambiguation) or Knights (disambiguation). ... The insignia of a knight of the Order of the Garter. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fleurs-de-lys on the flag of Quebec The fleur-de-lis (also spelled fleur-de-lys; plural fleurs-de-lis or -lys) is used in heraldry, where it is particularly associated with the France monarchy (see King of France). ... Location of Melfort, Saskatchewan Melfort (2006 population 5,192 is a small Canadian city in Saskatchewan, approximately 95 km (60 mi) southeast of Prince Albert. ...


The term keythong is rarer still. The definitive instance comes from James Planché, who notes, under the badge of the Earl of Ormonde (first creation) as recorded in a College of Arms manuscript from the reign of Edward IV, the single contemporary reference: "A pair of keythongs." Planche's footnote: "The word is certainly so written, and I have never seen it elsewhere. The figure resembles the Male Griffin, which has no wings, but rays or spikes of gold proceeding from several parts of his body, and sometimes with two long straight horns. ­­Vade [see] Parker's Glossary, under Griffin." [17] James Robinson Planché in 1835 James Robinson Planché (February 27, 1796 – May 30, 1880), was a dramatist, officer of arms and miscellaneous writer. ... The peerage titles Earl, Marquess and Duke of Ormonde have a long and complex history. ... The entrance of the College of Arms. ... Edward IV (April 28, 1442 – April 9, 1483) was King of England from March 4, 1461 to April 9, 1483, with a break of a few months in the period 1470–1471. ...


At the end of the 20th century the term keythong began to be taken up enthusiastically among adherents of heraldry - at least, among members of the Society for Creative Anachronism. The Society for Creative Anachronism (usually shortened to SCA) is a historical reenactment and living history group approximating mainly pre-17th century Western European history and culture. ...


Opinicus

An opinicus statant (standing on four feet)

The opinicus is a heraldic beast that differs from the griffin principally in that all four of its legs are those of a lion.[3] It is typically shown with the short tail of a camel and sometimes with a longer neck like a camel's (but still feathered). Image File history File links Opinicus. ... Image File history File links Opinicus. ... For other uses, see Camel (disambiguation). ...


However, Parker says, "[it] is allied more nearly to the dragon in the forepart and in the wings; but it has a beaked head and ears, something between the dragon and the griffin. The hind part and the four legs are probably intended to represent those of a lion, but the tail is short, and is said to be that of the camel."[14]


It was granted as a crest in 1561 to City of London's Company of Barber Surgeons (now the Worshipful Company of Barbers)[3][18], but is otherwise rare in British heraldry. A modern example can be found in the arms of Jonathan Munday: Azure an opinicus rampant Or armed Gules.[19] (Note that it is described as rampant rather than segreant.) Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state Constituent country Region Greater London Status City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor David Lewis  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - Total 1. ...


Other oddities

  • The "griffin" in the arms of Östergötland has dragon's wings. This is essentially a composite of two older arms, one charged with a lion, the other a dragon.
  • The arms of the Duchy of Pomerania features several typical griffins. However, the white "griffin" in the gules (red) sinister fess (middle right) piece has a fish's tail - only its lion's ears confirm that it's a fish-tailed griffin rather than a fish-tailed eagle.

(help· info) is a historical Province (landskap) in the south of Sweden. ... For other uses, see Dragon (disambiguation). ... West Pomeranian voivodship since 1999 West Pomerania (Polish: Pomorze Zachodnie, German: West Pommern; Latin Pomerania Occidentalis) or West Pomeranian Voivodship (Polish: województwo zachodniopomorskie) is an administrative region or voivodship in the northwestern part of Poland. ... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ...

Most likely to be mistaken for...

The following heraldic beasts are not griffins, but might be mistaken for them by the unwary.

  • The cockatrice, the king of the serpents, has a rooster's head, only two legs (rather like an eagle's or dragon's), dragon's wings, and a serpent's tail.[3]
  • The dragon supporters of the arms of City of London, including the single statues holding the arms that stand in each road leading into the City of London to mark its boundaries, are frequently misidentified as griffins. A heraldic dragon has a scaly body, membranous wings, no feathers and no eagle's beak.
  • A winged lion is the symbol of Saint Mark the Evangelist.

For other uses, see Rooster (disambiguation). ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state Constituent country Region Greater London Status City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor David Lewis  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - Total 1. ... Mark the Evangelist (מרקוס, Greek: Μάρκος) (1st century) is traditionally believed to be the author of the Gospel of Mark and a companion of Peter. ...

In architecture

A modernist, Egyptianized guardian griffin, Washington D.C.
A modernist, Egyptianized guardian griffin, Washington D.C.
Heraldic guardian griffin at Kasteel de Haar, Netherlands
Heraldic guardian griffin at Kasteel de Haar, Netherlands

In architectural decoration the griffin is usually represented as a four-footed beast with wings and the head of a leopard or tiger with horns, or with the head and beak of an eagle.[citation needed] Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Griffin HT1 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Griffin HT1 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Heraldic guardian Griffin, Kasteel de Haar photo by Dutch Wikipedian User:Ellywa See Nederlanse Wikipedia: (verw) (huidig) 20 jul 2003 17:55 . ... Heraldic guardian Griffin, Kasteel de Haar photo by Dutch Wikipedian User:Ellywa See Nederlanse Wikipedia: (verw) (huidig) 20 jul 2003 17:55 . ... This article is about building architecture. ... For other uses, see Leopard (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Tiger (disambiguation). ... Highland cow, a very old long-horned breed from Scotland. ...


The griffin is the symbol of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and you can see bronze castings of them perched on each corner of the museum's roof, protecting its collection.[20][21] The Philadelphia Museum of Art, located at the west end of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in Philadelphias Fairmount Park, was established in 1876 in conjunction with the Centennial Exposition of the same year and is now among the largest and most important art museums in the United States. ... This article is about the metal alloy. ... The Palais du Louvre in Paris, which houses the Musée du Louvre, one of the worlds most famous museums, and most certainly the largest. ...


In trademarks and other modern emblems

In a sense, trademarks, commercial logos and other corporate emblems are a continuation of heraldic traditions. Griffins occur in such marks sometimes from older heraldry and sometimes (like canting arms) as a pun on the corporate name. “(TM)” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Logo (disambiguation). ...

Aerospace and automotive

The old AB Scania-Vabis trademark featured a crowned griffin's head, taken from the arms of the county of Scania where the firm was based. This was the forerunner of the Saab-Scania trademark. (Saab had previously used the letters "SAAB" with either wings or a head-on view of a twin-engined airplane.) The griffin's head persists in the trademarks used by what are now three quite separate companies. [22] [23] Scania (SkÃ¥ne in Swedish  ) is a geographical region of Sweden on the southernmost tip of the Scandinavian peninsula, a historical province (landskap)[1] of the Kingdom of Sweden, since 1997 a county (Län) of Sweden, before 1658 part of the Kingdom of Denmark. ...


Vauxhall logo

The opinicus is also used as an emblem by the Vauxhall British GM branch. Vauxhall Motors Logo - illustration by the author This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... Vauxhall Motors Logo - illustration by the author This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... For information about the football team see Vauxhall Motors F.C. Vauxhall Motors is a UK car company. ... General Motors Corporation, also known as GM, an American multinational corporation, is the worlds largest auto company by production volume for the first 9 months of 2007, and by sales volume for 76 consecutive years. ...

UPM logo

The opinicus is also used as an emblem by the UPM Finnish paper mill company. The emblem has been in use since 1901 and was originally designed by Hugo Simberg.
Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... UPM-Kymmene (NYSE: UPM) is a Finnish pulp and paper manufacturer. ... Hugo Simberg (June 24, 1873 - July 12, 1917) was a Finnish symbolist painter and graphic artist. ...

Education
Media & Objects

In literature

For fictional characters named Griffin, see Griffin (surname)
Pre-1900
Post-1900

(In the movie of The Lion, The witch and the Wardrobe, there is a griffin, Gryphon, http://us.movies1.yimg.com/movies.yahoo.com/images/hv/photo/movie_pix/walt_disney/the_chronicles_of_narnia__the_lion_the_witch_and_the_wardrobe/fx_gryphon.jpg The Marvelous Land of Oz, commonly shortened to The Land of Oz, published in 1904, is the second of L. Frank Baums books set in the Land of Oz, and the sequel to The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. ... Clive Staples Jack Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an Irish author and scholar. ... Narnia redirects here. ... For other uses, see Aslan (disambiguation). ...

  • In T. H. White's The Once and Future King (1958), young Arthur and his step-brother Kay battle a fierce griffin with aid from Robin Wood A.K.A. Robin Hood soon after freeing captives of Morgan le Fay.
  • In Geoff Ryman's The Warrior Who Carried Life (1980), a huge, white griffin know as "The Beast Who Talks to God" is one of the major characters.
  • In the Dragonlance series (1984 onwards), griffins are under the command of Elves.
  • In Neil Gaiman's Sandman comic book series (1988-1996), a griffin is one of three guardians of Morpheus's palace in The Dreaming.
  • In Mercedes Lackey and Larry Dixon's The Mage Wars Trilogy - The Black Gryphon (1994), The White Gryphon (1995) and The Silver Gryphon (1996) - gryphons known as Skandranon, and, later, his son Tadrith are among the lead characters. In this series gryphons have human level intelligence and can use magic.
  • Griffins are among the magical creatures in J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter series (1997-2007). Harry Potter's house at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is called Gryffindor after its founder Godric Gryffindor. Fans have speculated that "Gryffindor" may come from the French gryffon d'or (golden griffin)[citation needed], but, oddly, its emblem is not a griffin, but a lion - which represents the supposed courageous nature of a true Gryffindor. In the movie versions, the gargoyle guarding the headmaster's office is depicted as a half-phoenix, half-lion griffin and the door-knocker is a griffin.
  • In Tamora Pierce's Squire, part of the Protector of the Small quaret, the main character Kel stumbles upon a baby griffin kidnapped from his parents and is forced to care for him until they can be found.
  • In Patricia McKillip's Song for the Basilisk (1998), a griffin is one of the book's main characters and appears as a symbol of the ruling house.
  • In Bruce Coville's Song of the Wanderer (1999), the second book of The Unicorn Chronicles series, a gryphon named Medafil is a character.
  • In Wilanne Schneider Belden's Frankie! (1987), a human baby turns into a griffin.
  • In Bill Peet's The Pinkish Purplish Bluish Egg (1984) a dove finds an odd egg, and raises the griffin that hatches from it. The griffin has the head of a bald eagle rather than the more usual golden eagle.

(unknown dates) Terence Hanbury White (May 29, 1906 – January 17, 1964) was an English writer, born in Bombay (now Mumbai), India. ... The Once and Future King is an Arthurian fantasy novel written by T.H. White. ... For other uses, see King Arthur (disambiguation). ... Sir Kay, son of Sir Ector, was one of the Knights of the Round Table and King Arthurs foster brother. ... Morgan le Fay, by Anthony Frederick Sandys (1829 - 1904), 1864 (Birmingham Art Gallery): A spell-brewing Morgaine distinctly of Tennysons generation Morgan le Fay, alternatively known as Morgaine, Morgain, Morgana and other variants, is a powerful sorceress and sometime antagonist of King Arthur and Guinevere in the Arthurian legend. ... Geoffrey Charles Ryman (born 1951) is a writer of science fiction, fantasy and slipstream fiction. ... The current edition Dragonlance logo, as seen on all books published in the more recent times. ... The list of Dragonlance creatures attempts to list the races that can be found in the Dragonlance setting. ... Neil Richard Gaiman (IPA: ) (born November 10, 1960[2]) is an English author of science fiction and fantasy short stories and novels, graphic novels, comics, and films. ... The Sandman is a comic book series written by Neil Gaiman and published in the United States by DC Comics for 75 issues from 1988 until 1996. ... Dream is one of the Endless, fictional characters from Neil Gaimans comic book series, The Sandman. ... The Dreaming is an original manga series created by Artist/Author Queenie Chan and published by TOKYOPOP. Jeanie and Amber Malkin - identical twin sisters - are new students at the 100-year-old Greenwich Private College, a boarding school in North Sydney that lies on the edge of vast, virgin bushlands. ... Mercedes Lackey (born June 24, 1950) (also known as Misty Lackey) is a prolific American author of fantasy novels. ... Magical creatures comprise a colourful and integral aspect of the wizarding world in the Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling. ... Joanne Jo Murray, née Rowling OBE[1] (born 31 July 1965),[2] who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling,[3] is a British writer and author of the Harry Potter fantasy series. ... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ... Harry James Potter is a fictional character and the main protagonist of J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter series of fantasy books. ... In J. K. Rowlings best-selling Harry Potter series of novels, Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is a school of magic for witches and wizards between the ages of eleven and seventeen. ... In the Harry Potter series, Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is divided into four houses, each bearing the last name of its founder: Godric Gryffindor, Salazar Slytherin, Rowena Ravenclaw and Helga Hufflepuff. ... In the Harry Potter series, the Hogwarts school of witchcraft and wizardry is divided into four houses, each bearing the last name of its founder - Godric Gryffindor, Salazar Slytherin, Rowena Ravenclaw and Helga Hufflepuff. ... For other mythic firebirds, see Fire bird (mythology). ... Tamora Pierce (born December 13, 1954) is a fantasy author who writes books for young adults. ... The Protector of the Small quartet is a series of books written by Tamora Pierce that tells the story of Keladry of Mindelan, a heroine in the fantasy land Tortall. ... Patricia A. McKillip (February 29, 1948—) is an American author of fantasy and science fiction novels. ... Bruce Coville (b. ... Song of the Wanderer is a fictional childrens book that is part of the The Unicorn Chronicles series by Bruce Coville. ... // The Unicorn Chronicles consists of two printed and two working books as of 2006 created by Bruce Coville. ... Bill Peet (January 29, 1915 – May 11, 2002) was a childrens book illustrator and a story writer for Disney Studios. ...

  • In Nick O'Donohoe's Crossroads series (including The Magic and the Healing, Under the Healing Sign, and Healing of Crossroads) about veterinary students called upon to help mythological creatures, griffins play a significant role.
  • In James C. Christianson's Voyage of the Basset, a griffon saves Casandra from the trolls.
  • J. K. Rowling's book Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban features Hippogriffs, creatures similar in appearance to griffins.

Joanne Jo Murray, née Rowling OBE[1] (born 31 July 1965),[2] who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling,[3] is a British writer and author of the Harry Potter fantasy series. ... HP3 redirects here. ...

In natural history

Some large species of Old World vultures are called gryphons, including the griffon vulture (Gyps fulvus), as are some breeds of dog (griffons). Genera See text. ... Binomial name Gyps fulvus Hablizl, 1783 The Griffon Vulture, Gyps fulvus is an Old World vulture in the family Accipitridae, which also includes eagles, kites, buzzards and hawks. ... Dogs have been selectively bred for thousands of years, sometimes by inbreeding dogs from the same ancestral lines, sometimes by mixing dogs from very different lines. ... Trinomial name Canis lupus familiaris The dog (Canis lupus familiaris) is a domestic subspecies of the wolf, a mammal of the Canidae family of the order Carnivora. ...


The scientific species name for the Andean Condor is Vultur gryphus; Latin for "griffin-vulture". Genera Vultur Gymnogyps For other uses, see Condor (disambiguation). ...


The name of an oviraptoran dinosaur Hagryphus giganteus is Latin for "gigantic Ha's Griffin". Species O. philoceratops Osborn, 1924 (type) Oviraptor is a genus of small Mongolian theropod dinosaur, first discovered by legendary paleontologist Roy Chapman Andrews, and first described by Henry Fairfield Osborn, in 1924. ... Orders & Suborders Saurischia Sauropodomorpha Theropoda Ornithischia Thyreophora Ornithopoda Marginocephalia Dinosaurs were vertebrate animals that dominated the terrestrial ecosystem for over 160 million years, first appearing approximately 230 million years ago. ... Binomial name Zanno & Sampson, 2005 Hagryphus (Has griffin, from Egyptian Ha, name of a god of the western desert and Greek gryphus meaning griffin (a mythological bird-like creature); Zanno and Sampson, 2005) is an oviraptorosaurian theropod dinosaur from the Upper Cretaceous Period of what is now Utah. ... In Egyptian mythology, Ha was a god of the deserts to the west of Egypt. ...


As a surname

Main article: Griffin (surname)

"Griffin" occurs as a surname in English-speaking countries. It has its origins as an anglicised form of the Irish "Ó Gríobhtha" and "Ó Griffín" or (especially in Wales) as a variant of "Griffith" and similar names. This shift is reinforced where the family has taken canting arms charged with a griffin. The surname Griffin has two primary Gaelic sources in Ireland, which pertain to the towns of Ballygriffey in Co. ... A family name, or surname, is that part of a persons name that indicates to what family he or she belongs. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This article is about the country. ... Queen Mothers funerary hatchment, showing the canting bows and lions of Bowes-Lyon Canting arms is a technique used in European heraldry whereby the name of the individual or community represented in a coat of arms is translated into a visual pun. ...


"Griffin" (and variants in other languages) may also have been adopted as a surname by other families who used arms charged with a griffin or a griffin's head (just as the House of Plantagenet took its name from the badge of a sprig of broom or planta genista). This is ostensibly the origin of the Swedish surname "Grip" (see main article). The House of Plantagenet (IPA: ), also called the House of Anjou, or Angevin dynasty was originally a noble family from France, which ruled the County of Anjou. ... Genera Argyrocytisus:1 species Cytisus: about 30-35 species Genista: about 90 species Petteria: 1 species Podocytisus: 1 species Retama: 4 species Spartium: 1 species Ref: ILDIS Version 6. ... The surname Griffin has two primary Gaelic sources in Ireland, which pertain to the towns of Ballygriffey in Co. ...


Roller Coaster

In 2007, Busch Gardens Williamsburg opened a themed roller coaster called the Griffon. The main feature of the coaster is a 205 foot vertical drop simulating the dive of a bird. Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Busch Gardens Europe is a theme park located in Williamsburg, Virginia. ... Griffon is a roller coaster, announced on August 23, 2006, at Busch Gardens Europe, located in Williamsburg, Virginia. ...


Notes and references

  1. ^ The spelling gryphon is the most common variant in English and is increasingly popular, especially in fantasy books, films, and RPGs; however, griffon is used in Dungeons & Dragons. Less common variants include gryphen, griffen, and gryphin. In other languages: Catalan griu, grif or grifó; Croatian grifon, grifin or grifen; Czech gryf; Danish grif; Dutch griffioen; Finnish aarnikotka or griippi; French griffon or grype; German Greif; Hungarian griff; Italian grifone; Latin gryps or gryphus; Lithuanian grifas; Norwegian griff; Persian شیردال‌ shirdal (lit. lion-eagle); Polish gryf or gryfon; Portuguese grifo; Russian грифо́ны or грифы; Serbian грифон or гриф; Spanish grifo or grifón; Swedish grip.
  2. ^ From Latin grȳphus, from Greek γρύψ gryps, from γρύπος grypos hooked.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i Friar, Stephen (1987). A New Dictionary of Heraldry. London: Alphabooks/A & C Black, p 173. ISBN 0906670446. 
  4. ^ a b von Volborth, Carl-Alexander (1981). Heraldry: Customs, Rules and Styles. Poole: New Orchard Editions, p 44-45. ISBN 185079037X. 
  5. ^ One example is shown in a photograph among the resources for a Greek archeology course at the University at Albany. However, apart from the file name it's not clear that this is a "true" griffin: The body is more like a leopard's, the head like a hawk's or other bird's, and it has no wings.
  6. ^ Dave's Mythical Creatures and Places:Ancient Egyptian Gods and Creatures. This appears to be the sole online depiction of a creature with this name.
  7. ^ Mayor, Adrienne (2000). The First Fossil Hunters: Paleontology in Greek and Roman Times. Princeton: Princeton University Press. ISBN 0691058636. 
  8. ^ Giglioli, G. Q. (1935). L'Arte Etruria. 
  9. ^ a b c Bedingfeld, Henry; Gwynn-Jones, Peter (1993). Heraldry. Wigston: Magna Books, p 80-81. ISBN 1854224336. 
  10. ^ a b Carlos Parada, Greek Mythology Link, "Bestiary"
  11. ^ White, T. H. (1992 (1954)). The Book of Beasts: Being a Translation From a Latin Bestiary of the Twelfth Century. Stroud: Alan Sutton, pp 22-24. ISBN 075090206X. 
  12. ^ a b Woodcock, Thomas; Robinson, John Martin (1988; pb 1990). The Oxford Guide to Heraldry. Oxford: Oxford Paperbacks/Oxford University Press, p 100 & plate 19. ISBN 0192852248. 
  13. ^ One possible translation of the original Latin: Gryphus significat sapientiam jungendam fortitudini, sed sapientiam debere praeire, fortitudinem sequi. Nisbet, Alexander (1722). System of Heraldry. Oxford: James Parker & Co., p 343 of Vol I of the 1816 ed.. 
  14. ^ a b c Parker, James (1894). A Glossary of Terms Used in Heraldry. Oxford: James Parker & Co.. : Griffin
  15. ^ Bedingfeld, Henry; Gwynn-Jones, Peter (1993). Heraldry. Wigston: Magna Books, p 71. ISBN 1854224336. 
  16. ^ City of Melfort Website
  17. ^ Planché, J. R. (1859). Pursuivant of Arms.  Source: Society of Creative Anachronism website
  18. ^ The Opinicus
  19. ^ The Heraldry Society - members' arms: Jonathan Munday
  20. ^ http://www.philamuseum.org/giving/441-495-380.html
  21. ^ http://www.glasssteelandstone.com/BuildingDetail/472.php
  22. ^ The history of the Saab emblem at The SaabMuseum.com
  23. ^ Mollerup, Per (1997). Marks of Excellence: The function and variety of trademarks. London: Phaidon Press, pp 22, 172. ISBN 0714834483. 

The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... This article is about traditional role-playing games. ... This article is about the role-playing game. ... Catalan IPA: (català IPA: or []) is a Romance language, the national language of Andorra, and a co-official language in the Spanish autonomous communities of Balearic Islands, Catalonia and Valencia, and in the city of LAlguer in the Italian island of Sardinia. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Farsi redirects here. ... Serbian (; ) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... A & C Black is a British book publishing company. ... Carl-Alexander von Volborth is a German-American heraldic artist and heraldist, born 21 February 1919 in Berlin-Charlottenburg. ... The University at Albany, (formerly known as Albany State University until the early 1990s) located in Albany, New York, in the USA, is one of four university centers of the State University of New York. ... For other uses, see Leopard (disambiguation). ... Genera Accipiter Micronisus Melierax Urotriorchis Erythrotriorchis The term hawk refers to birds of prey in any of three senses: Strictly, to mean any of the species in the bird sub-family Accipitrinae in the genera Accipiter, Micronisus, Melierax, Urotriorchis, and Megatriorchis. ... Adrienne Mayor is a classical folklorist whose main interests have been pre-Darwinian interpretations of paleontological remains (in The First Fossil Hunters) and the use of biochemical weapons in the ancient world (in Greek Fire, Poison Arrows & Scorpion Bombs). ... Peter Llewellyn Gwynn-Jones CVO, Garter Principal King of Arms, the senior English herald. ... Terence Hanbury White (May 29, 1906 – January 17, 1964) was an English writer, born in Bombay (now Mumbai), India. ... Thomas Woodcock, Norroy and Ulster King of Arms Thomas Woodcock, LVO, BA (Durham), LLB (Cambridge), FSA, DL (b. ... John Robinson in the procession to the annual service of the Order of the Garter Dr John Martin Robinson, FSA, (b. ... Oxford University Press (OUP) is a highly-respected publishing house and a department of the University of Oxford in England. ... Memorial to Alexander Nisbet in the Greyfriars Kirk, Edinburgh Frontpiece of Nisbets A System of Heraldry Alexander Nisbet (1657-1725) is one of the most important authors on Scottish heraldry. ... James Parker is the name of a number of a number of notable individuals: James Parker (1757–1805), English printmaker James Parker (1768–1837), United States Congressman James Parker (1776–1868), United States Congressman Sir James Parker (1803–1852), English judge and vice-chancellor James Parker (1854–1934), a Major... Peter Llewellyn Gwynn-Jones CVO, Garter Principal King of Arms, the senior English herald. ... James Robinson Planché in 1835 James Robinson Planché (February 27, 1796 – May 30, 1880), was a dramatist, officer of arms and miscellaneous writer. ... The Phaidon Press is one of the leading publishers of books on the visual arts, including art, architecture, photography, and design worldwide. ...

See also

Category: ... The surname Griffin has two primary Gaelic sources in Ireland, which pertain to the towns of Ballygriffey in Co. ... In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy roleplaying game, the griffon is a powerful, majestic and highly intelligent magical beast based upon the griffons of various mythologies. ... Roger Delivering Angelica by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, painted 1819, portrays the scene from Orlando furioso in which Roger, mounted on a hippogriff, rescues Angelique. ... Sassanid silk twill textile of a Simorgh in a beaded surround, 6-7th c. ... An Iranair Boeing 747-100 lands over the houses at London (Heathrow) Airport IRAN AIR is the national and international airline of Iran. ... The Saab JAS 39 Gripen (Griffin or Gryphon) is a fighter aircraft manufactured by the Swedish aerospace company Saab. ... An A-10 Thunderbolt II, F-86 Sabre, P-38 Lightning and P-51 Mustang fly in formation during an air show at Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. ... For the manufacturer of Saab cars, see Saab Automobile. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Griffins
  • The Gryphon Pages, a repository of griffin lore and information
  • Gryphon's Guild, a community site for gryphon fans

  Results from FactBites:
 
Griffin Webworks - Portland Website Design & Blog Design (57 words)
Griffin Webworks - Portland Website Design and Blog Design
Griffin Webworks is a one-man design shop located in Portland, Oregon that specializes in Website & Blog Design.
The one man behind all this, Chris Griffin, has been part of the web world in one form or another since 1999.
Griffins (993 words)
The griffin or gryphon is a mythical quadruped with the foreparts of an eagle and the rear, tail and hindquarters of a lion.
In its body, the griffin is blessed with the speed, flight, and penetrating vision of the eagle and the strength, courage, and majesty of the lion.
The griffin was also an embodiment of Nemesis, the goddess of vengeance and retribution, and turned her wheel of fortune.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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