FACTOID # 8: Bookworms: Vermont has the highest number of high school teachers per capita and third highest number of librarians per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Gresham's School
Gresham's School
Motto Al Worship Be to God Only
Established 1555
Type Independent
Religious affiliation Church of England
Headmaster Mr Antony R. Clark MA (Cantab.) (2001-)
Chairman of Governors Mr A.N.G. Duckworth-Chad OBE, DL
Founder Sir John Gresham
Location Holt
Norfolk
NR25 6EA
England Flag of England
Staff 90 (approx.)
Students 790 (approx.)
Gender Co-educational
Ages 4 to 18
Houses Howson's (1903), Woodlands (1905), Farfield (1911), Tallis (1961), Oakeley (1971), Edinburgh (1984), and Britten (1992)
School colours Black and white
Former pupils Old Greshamians
Patron H.R.H. Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh
Affiliations Worshipful Company of Fishmongers and HMC
Website greshams.com

Gresham’s School is an independent coeducational boarding school at Holt in North Norfolk, England, founded in the year 1555, a member of the HMC. Image File history File links Greshams-arms. ... Events Russia breaks 60 year old truce with Sweden by attacking Finland February 2 - Diet of Augsburg begins February 4 - John Rogers becomes first Protestant martyr in England February 9 - Bishop of Gloucester John Hooper is burned at the stake May 23 - Paul IV becomes Pope. ... The Church of England logo since 1998 The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... The degree of Master of Arts degree is an undergraduate degree awarded by the universities of Oxford and Cambridge as well as by the University of Dublin. ... The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world, with one of the most selective sets of entry requirements in the United Kingdom. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Anthony Nicholas George Duckworth-Chad OBE, DL, of Pynkney Hall, near Kings Lynn, Norfolk, England, born 1942, is a landowner, City of London business man, and a senior county officer for Norfolk. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... The Deputy Lieutenant is the deputy to the Lord Lieutenant of a county. ... Sir John Gresham (1492 - 23 October 1556) was an English merchant and financier who worked for King Henry VIII of England, Cardinal Wolsey and Thomas Cromwell. ... Holt is a market town in the county of Norfolk, England. ... Norfolk (IPA: //) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... Farfield is one of the seven boarding houses at Greshams School, an English Public School in Holt, Norfolk. ... Prince Philip redirects here. ... The Worshipful Company of Fishmongers is one of the Livery Companies of the City of London. ... The Headmasters and Headmistresses Conference (HMC) is an association of the headmasters or headmistressess of 242 leading day and boarding independent boys and coeducational schools in the United Kingdom, Crown dependencies and the Republic of Ireland. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... A boarding school is a usually fee-charging school where some or all pupils not only study, but also live during term time, with their fellow students and possibly teachers. ... Holt is a market town in the county of Norfolk, England. ... North Norfolk is a local government district in Norfolk, England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Events Russia breaks 60 year old truce with Sweden by attacking Finland February 2 - Diet of Augsburg begins February 4 - John Rogers becomes first Protestant martyr in England February 9 - Bishop of Gloucester John Hooper is burned at the stake May 23 - Paul IV becomes Pope. ... The Headmasters and Headmistresses Conference (HMC) is an association of the headmasters or headmistressess of 242 leading day and boarding independent boys and coeducational schools in the United Kingdom, Crown dependencies and the Republic of Ireland. ...

Contents

History

Big School, 1903, architect Sir John Simpson

ImageMetadata File history File links Bigschool. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Bigschool. ... Sir John William Simpson FRIBA (born Brighton, 9 August 1858, died Highgate, Middlesex, 30 March 1933) was an English architect and was President of the Royal Institute of British Architects from 1919 to 1921. ...

The School

Gresham's School was established at Holt by Sir John Gresham in 1555, during the reign of Queen Mary I.[1] For its home he gave the school his manor house at Holt, which he had bought in 1546 from his elder brother Sir William Gresham.[2] Holt is a market town in the county of Norfolk, England. ... Sir John Gresham (1492 - 23 October 1556) was an English merchant and financier who worked for King Henry VIII of England, Cardinal Wolsey and Thomas Cromwell. ... Events Russia breaks 60 year old truce with Sweden by attacking Finland February 2 - Diet of Augsburg begins February 4 - John Rogers becomes first Protestant martyr in England February 9 - Bishop of Gloucester John Hooper is burned at the stake May 23 - Paul IV becomes Pope. ... Mary II (30 April 1662–28 December 1694) reigned as Queen of England and Ireland from 13 February 1689, and as Queen of Scots (as Mary II of Scotland) from 11 April 1689 until her death. ... Ightham Mote For the London district, see Manor House, London. ...


The founding of Gresham's was connected to King Henry VIII's suppression of the Priory of Augustinian canons at Beeston Regis in June 1539. The priory, established in 1216, had operated a school which John Gresham and his brothers probably attended, but the school came to an end with the priory, leaving no provision for education in the vicinity of Holt.[1] “Henry VIII” redirects here. ... A priory is an ecclesiastical circumscription run by a prior. ... Detail of St. ... Beeston Regis is a village and civil parish in the North Norfolk district of Norfolk, England. ... Events May 30 - In Florida, Hernando de Soto lands at Tampa Bay with 600 soldiers with the goal to find gold. ... // Prince Louis of France, the future King Louis VIII, invades England in the First Barons War Henry III becomes King of England. ...


The new school opened and was granted a Royal Charter in 1562.[1] Early records are in Latin and call the school Libera Schola Grammaticalis Johannis Gresham Militis. The founder endowed Gresham's generously, placing its property in trust with the Worshipful Company of Fishmongers of London, and full estate records dating from the school's foundation are held at the Guildhall Library.[1] Close links with the Fishmongers' Company continue to this day.[3] For the ship of the same name, see Royal Charter (ship). ... Year 1562 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... The Worshipful Company of Fishmongers is one of the Livery Companies of the City of London. ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state Constituent country Region Greater London Status City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor David Lewis  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - Total 1. ... The Guildhall Library is administered by the Corporation of London, the government of the City of London, which is the historical heart of London, England. ...


The School Library contains the Foundation Library, a collection of books and manuscripts provided at the school's establishment in 1555 and later.[4] Events Russia breaks 60 year old truce with Sweden by attacking Finland February 2 - Diet of Augsburg begins February 4 - John Rogers becomes first Protestant martyr in England February 9 - Bishop of Gloucester John Hooper is burned at the stake May 23 - Paul IV becomes Pope. ...


On Christmas Day 1650, the Reverend Thomas Cooper, MA, a former usher of Gresham's, was hanged for his part in a Royalist rebellion on behalf of Charles II. His body was left hanging on a gibbet in Holt's Market Place. is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1650 (MDCL) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... The degree of Master of Arts degree is an undergraduate degree awarded by the universities of Oxford and Cambridge as well as by the University of Dublin. ... Arms of the Fishmongers Company and Sir John Gresham This is a list of the Masters (later Headmasters) and Ushers (later Second Masters) of Greshams School, Holt. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... Holt is a market town in the county of Norfolk, England. ...


For three hundred and fifty years, the School was based in what is now called the Old School House, or "Osh", the former manor house of Holt overlooking the Market Place in the town centre. In 1708, the school escaped a major fire which destroyed most of the rest of the mediaeval town of Holt. This resulted in most of the buildings now to be seen in the town centre belonging to the eighteenth century.[1] Ightham Mote For the London district, see Manor House, London. ... Holt is a market town in the county of Norfolk, England. ... // Events March 23 - James Francis Edward Stuart lands at the Firth of Forth July 1 - Tewoflos becomes Emperor of Ethiopia September 28 - Peter the Great defeats the Swedes at the Battle of Lesnaya Kandahar conquered by Mir Wais In Masuria one third of the population die during the plague J... Holt is a market town in the county of Norfolk, England. ...


One of the school's 18th century heads was John Holmes, appointed at the age of twenty-seven, a prolific writer of educational textbooks who led the school between 1730 and his death in 1760.[1][5] (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... John Holmes (born 1702 or 1703, died Holt, Norfolk, 22 December 1760), was an 18th century schoolmaster and writer on education, Master of Greshams School in Norfolk. ...


The Old School was rebuilt and converted in 1859.[1] In the early 1900s, under an ambitious headmaster called George Howson (who had moved to Gresham's from Uppingham), the school expanded onto a new campus of some two hundred acres at the eastern edge of the town,[6] while keeping the Old School House as one of its houses.[1] When Howson arrived at Gresham's, he found it in numbers much as it had been when founded in 1555: in 1900 there were only forty Holt Scholars, plus seven boarders.[1] Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Arms of the Fishmongers Company and Sir John Gresham This is a list of the Masters (later Headmasters) and Ushers (later Second Masters) of Greshams School, Holt. ... Uppingham School is a co-educational public school situated in the small town of Uppingham in Rutland, England. ... Events Russia breaks 60 year old truce with Sweden by attacking Finland February 2 - Diet of Augsburg begins February 4 - John Rogers becomes first Protestant martyr in England February 9 - Bishop of Gloucester John Hooper is burned at the stake May 23 - Paul IV becomes Pope. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ...


The New School (by the architect Sir John Simpson) was opened by Field Marshal Sir Evelyn Wood on 30 September, 1903.[1] This consisted of School House (renamed Howson's in 1919) and the Main Building, including Big School. Woodlands was acquired and opened as a new house in 1905, and Farfield built in 1911. The School Chapel was completed in 1916, during the Great War, during which one hundred Old Greshamians were killed.[7] Sir John William Simpson FRIBA (born Brighton, 9 August 1858, died Highgate, Middlesex, 30 March 1933) was an English architect and was President of the Royal Institute of British Architects from 1919 to 1921. ... Photo submitted by Marion Hebblethwaite. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


The school was evacuated to Newquay in Cornwall during the Second World War, between June 1940 and March 1944.[1] , The town should not be confused with New Quay in Wales. ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Under the long headship of Logie Bruce Lockhart (1955-1982), there was a further period of change and expansion. Tallis (a new boys' house named after a 17th century Master of the school) was built and opened in 1961 and Oakeley (the first girls' house) in 1971, when girls were first admitted to the Sixth Form only.[1] The school became fully co-educational in the early 1980s.[1] Logie Bruce Lockhart MA (Cantab. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ...


There are now four boarding houses for boys and three for girls (see "Houses" section below), as well as a wide range of buildings. These include Big School, the School Chapel, the Auden Theatre, the Cairns Centre, the School Library, the Music Centre, the Central Block, the Thatched Classrooms, the Reith Laboratories, the Biology Building, the Armoury, and others.


In February, 2005, Gresham's School's 450th anniversary was marked by a service at Norwich Cathedral attended by the school's Patron, Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh and 1,500 past and present Greshamians. In July, 2005, the Eastern Daily Press called it "a school which changed the world."[8] Norwich Cathedral: Spire and south transcept. ... Prince Philip redirects here. ... The Eastern Daily Press is a regional newspaper covering Norfolk, and northern parts of Suffolk and eastern Cambridgeshire, and is published daily in Norwich, UK. Originally a broadsheet, it changed to compact (tabloid) format in the mid-1990s. ...


Headmasters

See List of Masters of Gresham's School. Arms of the Fishmongers Company and Sir John Gresham This is a list of the Masters (later Headmasters) and Ushers (later Second Masters) of Greshams School, Holt. ...


Old Greshamians

See List of notable Old Greshamians. The following is a list of notable Old Greshamians, former pupils of Greshams School, Norfolk, England. ...


Houses

Most Gresham's students are boarders and live in one of the school's seven houses. Four of these are for boys: Howson's (1903), Woodlands (1905), Farfield (1911), and Tallis (1961). Three houses are for girls: Oakeley (1971), Edinburgh (1984), and Britten (1992). Image File history File linksMetadata Farfield_House. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Farfield_House. ... Farfield is one of the seven boarding houses at Greshams School, an English Public School in Holt, Norfolk. ... The House System is a traditional feature of British schools, similar to the collegiate system of a university. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... Farfield is one of the seven boarding houses at Greshams School, an English Public School in Holt, Norfolk. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ...


Each house has a house-master or house-mistress and a house-tutor and matron. There are house teams for team sports, as well as other house activities, such as evening prayers, "prep", and dramatic productions. Most houses are around seventy strong.[9]


Senior boys and girls may be appointed as house prefects. Some of those are then chosen as school prefects, and one in each house as House Captain. A prefect (from the Latin praefectus, perfect participle of praeficere: make in front, i. ...


The Old School House was previously the whole school, then from 1905 to 1936 the Junior House, then from 1936 to 1993 a boarding house of the Senior School and is now the home of the Gresham's pre-preparatory school.[1]


Junior Schools

The Old School House and new war memorial, 1921
The Old School House and new war memorial, 1921

The former Junior School of Gresham's was reorganized into a Preparatory School and a Pre-Preparatory School in 1984,[1] both on their own sites at Holt, with their own heads and staff. Like the Senior School, both are fully co-educational. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... In English language usage in the former British Empire, the present-day Commonwealth, a preparatory school (usually abbreviated to prep school) is an independent school preparing children up to the age of eleven or thirteen for fee-paying, secondary independent schools, some of which are called public schools. ... Holt is a market town in the county of Norfolk, England. ... Arms of the Fishmongers Company and Sir John Gresham This is a list of the Masters (later Headmasters) and Ushers (later Second Masters) of Greshams School, Holt. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ...


The Preparatory school has over two hundred children between the ages of eight and thirteen and takes full and weekly boarders as well as day pupils. Many continue into the Senior School. The school's Kenwyn House was once a house of the Senior School called Bengal Lodge.


The Pre-Preparatory School is housed in the Old School House and is a day school for one hundred boys and girls between the ages of three and eight.


Admission to the school

In most cases, admission to the senior school of Gresham's depends on success at the Common Entrance Examination, usually taken between the ages of eleven and thirteen. Common Entrance has three compulsory core subjects, English, Maths and Science, and other papers can be chosen from French, German, Spanish, Latin, Greek, Geography, History, and Religious Studies. The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ...


The school also has its own entrance examination for candidates from maintained schools.


Curriculum

The school teaches most subjects of the mainstream humanistic curriculum. While only limited choices between courses need to be made for GCSE, in the Sixth form at A-level pupils choose three or four subjects, and most combinations are possible.[9] GCSE is an acronym that can refer to: General Certificate of Secondary Education global common subexpression elimination - an optimisation technique used by some compilers This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... England, Wales, Northern Ireland The sixth form, in the English, Welsh and Northern Irish education systems, is the term used to refer to the final two years of secondary schooling (when students are about sixteen to eighteen years of age), during which students normally prepare for their GCE A-level... The A-level, short for Advanced Level, is a General Certificate of Education qualification in the United Kingdom, usually taken by students during the optional final two years of secondary school (Years 12 & 13, commonly called the Sixth Form), or at a separate sixth form college or further education college...

The school has been an International Baccalaureate World School (IB code 003433), offering the IB Diploma Programme, since February 2007.[9][10] For other uses, see Classics (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... A modern language is any human language that is used by societies in the world today. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, including literature composed in English by writers not necessarily from England; Joseph Conrad was Polish, Robert Burns was Scottish, James Joyce was Irish, Dylan Thomas was Welsh, Edgar Allan Poe was American, Salman Rushdie is Indian, V.S... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... For the song by Girls Aloud see Biology (song) Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, speech lit. ... This article is about the engineering discipline. ... RAM (Random Access Memory) Look up computing in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... All Saints Chapel in the Cathedral Basilica of St. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... This article is about the study of the past in human terms. ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Religious studies is the designation commonly used in the English-speaking world for a multi-disciplinary, secular study of religion that dates to the late 19th century in Europe (and the influential early work of such scholars as Friedrich Max Müller, in England, and Cornelius P. Tiele, in the... This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into International Baccalaureate Organization. ...


The aim of the school is to give a good all-round education and to prepare pupils for university entry and for other careers, such as the armed forces[9] . Most Greshamians move on to top British universities, such as Oxford, Cambridge, St Andrews, Bristol, Durham and Edinburgh. The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... St Marys College Bute Medical School St Leonards College[5][6] Affiliations 1994 Group Website http://www. ... The University of Bristol is a university in Bristol, England. ... Durham University is a university in England. ... The University of Edinburgh (Scottish Gaelic: ), founded in 1582,[4] is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ...


School terms

The school's year is divided into three terms, Michaelmas (early September to mid December), Lent (early January to the Easter holiday) and Summer (the Easter holiday to mid July). In the middle of each term there is a half-term holiday, usually a week long. For boarders, there are also other home weekends. An academic term is a division of an academic year, the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ... Michaelmas term is the first term of Oxford University, Cambridge University, LSE, University of Wales, Lampeter, Durham University, and formerly University of Newcastle upon Tynes academic year, and is the only term name shared by Oxford and Cambridge, Oxford and Lampeter and Oxford and Durham. ... Lent term is the name of the spring term at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ...


The academic year begins with the Michaelmas term and ends with the Summer term, so starts at the end of the summer holiday. An academic term is the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ...


School sports

Gresham's School bronze medal for sports, dated 1900
Gresham's School bronze medal for sports, dated 1900

Apart from its sports grounds for cricket, rugby football, hockey, and soccer, the school has its own indoor swimming pool, squash, tennis and badminton courts, gymnasium and extensive school woods. It owns a boat-house at Barton Broad and a shooting lodge at Bisley, as well as a shooting range at the school. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about the sport. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Hockey is any of a family of sports in which two teams compete by trying to maneuver a ball, or a hard, round disc called a puck, into the opponents net or goal, using a hockey stick. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Swimmer redirects here. ... Squash racquet and ball Players in a glass-backed squash court International Squash Singles Court, as specified by the World Squash Federation Squash is an indoor racquet sport that was formerly called Squash racquets, a reference to the squashable soft ball used in the game (compared with the harder ball... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... This article is about the sport. ... Barton Broad lies within The Broads National Park in Norfolk, England. ... The village of Bisley, in Surrey, England, is well known to rifle marksmen around the world. ...


The principal school sports for boys are rugby (Michaelmas Term), hockey (Lent Term), and cricket (Summer Term). There is a wide range of other school sports, including tennis, badminton, soccer, squash, golf, martial arts, swimming, riding, sailing, cross-country running, shooting and canoeing. As an alternative to formal sports, Gresham's students may take part in 'School Works', chiefly forestry activities in the woodland attached to the main school campus. This article is about the sport. ... Hawaiian State Grappling Championships. ... Swimmer redirects here. ... A young rider at a horse show in Australia. ... For either of the songs named Sailing, see Sailing (song). ... US Armed Forces cross country meet Cross-country running is a sport in which teams of runners compete to complete a course over open or rough terrain before other teams. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Canoeing is the recreational or sporting activity of paddling a canoe or kayak. ...


An Old Greshamian, Richard Leman, was a member of the gold-medal winning British hockey squad at the 1988 Summer Olympics and of the bronze-medal winning team at the 1984 Summer Olympics. Another OG, Gawain Briars, was the British number one squash player and now heads the world Professional Squash Association. Brother and sister Ralph and Natasha Firman are both racing drivers, and Natasha was the winner of the inaugural Formula Woman championship in 2004. Giles Baring and Andrew Corran were first-class cricketers, and Andy Mulligan and Nick Youngs played rugby for England. In rifle-shooting, Gresham's has been one of the top ten schools in England for about sixty years, and Glyn Barnett won a shooting Gold Medal in the 2006 Commonwealth Games at Melbourne. In the field of winter sports, the 11th Earl of Northesk took an Olympic medal for toboganning (then called 'skeleton') in 1928. Notable mountaineers have included Tom Bourdillon, Percy Wyn-Harris, Peter Lloyd and Matthew Dickinson. Richard Leman (born on July 13, 1959) is a former field hockey player, who was a member of the golden winning British squad at the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul. ... Johnson winning the 100 m final The 1988 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIV Olympiad, were held in 1988 in Seoul, South Korea. ... Music sample: Olympic Fanfare and Theme ( file info) — composed by John Williams for the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles Problems listening to the file? See media help. ... According to several books of the Old Testament, Og (pronounced , , or ; meaning gigantic) was an ancient Amorite king of Bashan who, along with his sons and army, was slain by Moses and his men at the battle of Edrei (probably modern day Dara, Syria). ... Gawain Peter Briars (born 4 April 1958) is a sportsman and lawyer in the United Kingdom. ... The Professional Squash Association (PSA) is the governing body for the Mens professional Squash circuit. ... Ralph Firman (born 20 May 1975) is a racing driver from Britain, although racing under Irish citizenship (his mother Angela is Irish) and an Irish-issued racing licence. ... Natasha Firman is an English racing driver, and was the winner of the inaugural Formula Woman championship in 2004. ... Auto racing (also known as automobile racing or autosport) is a sport involving racing automobiles. ... Formula Woman, officially known as the Privilege Insurance Formula Woman Championship, is a female-only car racing series started in 2004 in the UK. It was inspired by the lack of female drivers in other series and was created, amongst other reasons, to boost the female audience of the sport. ... Amyas Evelyn Giles Baring (born Roehampton, London, 21 January 1910, died Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland, 29 August 1986), known as Giles Baring, was a first-class English cricketer between the years 1930 and 1946. ... Andrew John Corran (born November 25, 1936 in Norwich) was a first-class English cricketer. ... Andrew (Andy) Armstrong Mulligan, was born on 4 February 1936 et Kasauli, a small cantonment town in Solan district in the Indian state of Himachal Pradesh, and died on 24 February 2001. ... Nicholas Gerald Youngs (born 15 December 1959) is a former English rugby union footballer who played for Leicester Tigers and England, gaining 6 England caps in 1983-1984. ... First international (also the worlds first)  Scotland 4–1 England  (27 March 1871) Largest win  England 134–0 Romania  (17 November 2001) Worst defeat  Australia 76–0 England  (6 June 1998) World Cup Appearances 6 (First in 1987) Best result Champions, 2003 The England national rugby union team represents... Dr Glyn Cawley Daer Barnett (born 1 December 1970) is a British international rifleman who won a shooting Gold Medal at the 2006 Commonwealth Games in Melbourne. ... The 2006 Commonwealth Games were held in Melbourne, Australia between March 15 and March 26, 2006. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre. ... A winter sport is a sport commonly played during winter, usually a sport played on snow or ice. ... David Ludovic George Hopetoun Carnegie, 11th Earl of Northesk (24 September 1901 - November 1963), elected a Scottish representative peer, was also an Olympic medallist. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Thomas Duncan Bourdillon (born 1924, died Bernese Oberland, 29 July 1956), was a British mountaineer, a member of the team which conquered Mount Everest in 1953. ... Sir Percy Wyn-Harris (born 1903, died 1979) was an English mountaineer and yachtsman and was Colonial governor of The Gambia between 1949 and 1958. ... Peter Lloyd (born 26 June 1907, Sheffield, England, died Toowoomba, Queensland, Australia, 11 April 2003), was a mountaineer and engineer, a President of the Alpine Club. ... Matt Dickinson is a film-maker and writer who specialises in the wild places and people of the world. ...


Religion

Gresham's is a Church of England foundation, but the school is open to all denominations and religions.[9] Services are a focal point of the School's life, with a morning assembly in Chapel on four mornings of the week and in Big School on the other three. The Saturday morning service is a choral practice, and Holy Communion may be taken on Sundays. There are also formal prayers in each boarding house in the evenings. The Church of England logo since 1998 The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ...


Non-Anglicans are excused communion services on Sundays, and Roman Catholics attend mass on Sunday at the church of Our Lady and St Joseph in Sheringham. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Sheringham from the mound Sheringham is a seaside town (population 7143[1]) in Norfolk, England, west of Cromer. ...


If wished, boys and girls may be prepared at the School for Confirmation into the Church of England, which is usually conducted by the Bishop of Norwich or one of his suffragan Bishops. Confirmation is a rite used in many Christian Churches. ... The Church of England logo since 1998 The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... Arms of the Bishop of Norwich The Bishop of Norwich is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Norwich in the Province of Canterbury. ...


The school was designated as having a Church of England religious character by the Designation of Schools Having a Religious Character (Independent Schools) (England) Order 2004 (No 72).[11] The Church of England logo since 1998 The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ...


The tune called Woodlands, the usual setting for the hymn Lift Up Your Hearts!, was composed for the school in 1916 by Walter Greatorex, a Gresham's music master. Lift up your hearts! is an English hymn written in 1881 by H. Montague Butler. ... Walter Greatorex (1877-1949) was an English composer and musician, probably best remembered for his tune Woodlands, used for the setting of H. Montague Butlers hymn Lift up your hearts! // Born in Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, the son of a bank manager, from 1888 to 1893 Greatorex was a boy chorister...


The foundation stone of the Chapel was laid by the chairman of governors, Sir Edward Busk, on 8 June 1912.[12] The Chapel bell, cast in Whitechapel in 1915, is inscribed with the words Ring in the Christ that is to be, which are the last line of Alfred, Lord Tennyson's poem Ring Out, Wild Bells (1850).[1] Whitechapel is a place in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, United Kingdom. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Lord Tennyson, Poet Laureate Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson (August 6, 1809 - October 6, 1892) is generally regarded as one of the greatest English poets. ... Ring Out, Wild Bells is a poem by Alfred, Lord Tennyson. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Old Greshamians include several bishops, David Hand, Archbishop of Papua New Guinea, and John Bradburne, a candidate for canonization. The Most Reverend Geoffrey David Hand KBE GCL MA (born Clermont, Queensland, Australia, 11 May 1918, died Port Moresby, 6 April 2006, was the Anglican Archbishop of Papua New Guinea. ... The Archbishop of Papua New Guinea is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Anglican Church of Papua New Guinea, part of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... John Randal Bradburne (born 1921, Skirwith, Cumbria, died 1979, near Mutoko, Zimbabwe) was a lay member of the Order of St Francis, a poet, warden of the Mtemwa leper colony at Mutoko. ... This article is about the process of declaring saints. ...


Out of school activities

Love's Labour's Lost by Gresham's, c. 1914
Love's Labour's Lost by Gresham's, c. 1914

There is a School Orchestra, a School Choir, a Duke of Edinburgh's Award Scheme (more than five hundred Gold Awards have been achieved since its inception in 1972), and a large number of school clubs, such as the Debating Society, the Natural History Society, the Sailing Club, and the Chess Club. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For the film, see Loves Labours Lost (2000 film). ... The logo of the Duke of Edinburghs Award. ...


North Norfolk Divers, a branch of the British Sub-Aqua Club, is based at the school. // The British Sub-Aqua Club or BSAC is the governing body of recreational diving in Britain. ...


A school play is produced at the end of every Summer Term, and each house also produces a play once a year. There are also many visits to concerts, plays and other outside events.[9]


Combined Cadet Force

Gresham's has a long military tradition, from Sir Christopher Heydon, who took part in the capture of Cádiz in 1596, to Tom Wintringham, commander of the British Battalion of the International Brigades in the Spanish Civil War, and General Sir Robert Bray, Deputy Supreme Allied Commander Europe[1]. Image File history File links R_ANGLIAN_Regiment_Cap_Badge. ... Image File history File links R_ANGLIAN_Regiment_Cap_Badge. ... Sir Christopher Heydon, (born in Surrey, England, 14 August 1561, died 1623), was an English soldier and writer on astrology. ... Location Location of Cádiz Coordinates : Time Zone : General information Native name Cádiz (Spanish) Spanish name Cádiz Postal code – Website http://www. ... Thomas Henry (Tom) Wintringham (1898-1949) was a British soldier, military historian, journalist, poet, Marxist, politician and author. ... The British Battalion (1936-1938) was the 16th battalion of the International Brigades during the Spanish Civil War. ... The three-pointed red star, symbol of the International Brigades The International Brigades were Republican military units in the Spanish Civil War, formed of many non-state sponsored volunteers of different countries who traveled to Spain, to fight for the republic in the Spanish Civil War between 1936 and 1939. ... Not to be confused with the Spanish Civil War of 1820-1823. ... General Sir Robert Napier Hubert Campbell Bray GBE KCB DSO (1909–1983) was a British soldier, deputy Supreme Commander Europe of NATOs Allied Command from 1967 to 1970. ...


Before the Second World War, the school had an Officers Training Corps. During the 1940s, OTCs in British schools were renamed 'Junior Training Corps', and the school's JTC was amalgamated into the Combined Cadet Force in April, 1948, which continues to provide military training. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... The Officer Training Corps (OTC) is a part of the British Army that provides military leadership training to students at UK universities. ... The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... The Combined Cadet Force (CCF) is a Ministry of Defence sponsored youth organisation in the United Kingdom. ...


The CCF's Army section is now associated with the 1st Battalion of the Royal Anglian Regiment (previously with the Royal Norfolk Regiment, to 1959, and the 1st East Anglian Regiment, 1959 to 1964) and has some 270 students as cadets. About another 130 are in the CCF's Air section, and training takes place on one afternoon of each week. Activities include shooting, expeditions, combat manoeuvres, ambush and continuity drills, signals training, orienteering, climbing, kayaking, line-laying, first aid and lifesaving, motor mechanics, and hovercraft construction.[9] The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... The Royal Anglian Regiment (R ANGLIAN) is an infantry regiment of the British Army, part of the Queens Division. ... The Royal Norfolk Regiment, orignally formed as the Norfolk Regiment, was a regiment of the British Army. ... The 1st East Anglian Regiment (Royal Norfolk and Suffolk) was an infantry regiment of the British Army. ... RAF redirects here. ...


A Biennial Review of the Gresham's School CCF Contingent was carried out on 10 May 2006 by General Sir Richard Dannatt KCB CBE MC, Commander-in-Chief Land Command and Chief of the General Staff designate.[9] General Sir Francis Richard Dannatt, KCB, CBE, MC (born 23 December 1950) is the Chief of the General Staff, the professional head of the British Army. ...


Scholarships

Scholarships are available, giving a reduction in school fees. These include Open Academic Scholarships, Music, Art and Drama Scholarships, Lockhart Academic Scholarships, Edinburgh Scholarships, Fishmongers' Company Open Scholarships and Fishmongers' Art Scholarships, Sports Scholarships and All Rounder Scholarships. There is also an award called the 450th Anniversary Boarding Award.[9] This article is about scholarship (noun) and scholarship as a form of financial aid. ...


Examinations for Academic Scholarships are held every November for admission the following September, while Scholarships in Music, Sport, Art, and Drama are awarded on the basis of interviews and practical work.[9]


Sixth Form Scholarships for Sport, Music, Art, and academic distinction are awarded in December for the two years beginning the following September and are open to external and internal candidates.[9]


The maximum value of a Scholarship is half of the school's fees, but the value may be increased by a bursary in cases of financial need. This article is about scholarship (noun) and scholarship as a form of financial aid. ... The New Zealand University Bursary or Bursary was New Zealands standard secondary school leaving qualification gained at the end of NZ Form VII (= UK Upper Sixth Form). ...


Roughly one in four Gresham's pupils hold a scholarship, and about one in eight receive a bursary for financial need.


Enquiries about Scholarships should be made to The Registrar, Gresham's School, Holt, Norfolk NR25 6EA (registrar@greshams.com).[9]


Fees

The school's annual fees for the academic year 2006-07 are:[9]

  • Senior School boarders: £21,705
  • Senior School non-boarders: £16,815
  • Preparatory School boarders: £15,840
  • Preparatory School non-boarders: £12,150
  • Pre-preparatory School Year 3: £6,660
  • Pre-preparatory School Year 2: £6,330
  • Pre-preparatory School Year 1: £6,000

In September 2005, Gresham's was one of the leading British schools (including Ampleforth, Eton, Charterhouse, Harrow, Haileybury, Marlborough, Rugby, Shrewsbury, Stowe, Wellington and Winchester) which were considered by the Office of Fair Trading to be operating a fee-fixing cartel in breach of the Competition Act 1998. All of the schools were ordered to abandon the practice of exchanging information on their planned fees. Ampleforth College in North Yorkshire is the largest private Catholic mixed boarding school in the UK, and it is occasionally referred to as the Catholic Eton, a sobriquet also attached at different times to Beaumont (no longer open) and Stonyhurst College (both Jesuit schools) and which was Cardinal Newmans... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (privately funded and independent) for boys, founded in 1440 by King Henry VI. It is located in Eton, near Windsor in England, north of Windsor Castle, and... Charterhouse (Originally, Suttons Hospital in Charterhouse) is a famous boys English public school, located in Godalming in the county of Surrey. ... Harrow School, (originally: The Free Grammar School of John Lyon; generally: Harrow), is an independent school for boys (aged 13-18), and is located in Harrow on the Hill in the London Borough of Harrow. ... Haileybury College is an English public school founded in 1862. ... Marlborough College is a British independent boarding school in the county of Wiltshire. ... A view of Rugby School from The Close, the playing field where according to legend Rugby was invented Rugby School, located in the town of Rugby, Warwickshire, is one of the oldest public schools in England and is one of the major co-educational boarding schools in the country. ... Shrewsbury School (formally known as King Edward VI Grammar School, Shrewsbury) is an independent school, located in Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England. ... Stowe School is a famous British independent school in Stowe, Buckinghamshire, referred to as a public school. ... Wellington College, the national monument to the Duke of Wellington, is an English co-educational public school located in the Berkshire village of Crowthorne. ... Winchester College is a well-known boys independent school, and an example of an English public school, in the city of Winchester in Hampshire, England. ... The Office of Fair Trading or OFT is a UK statutory body established by the Fair Trading Act 1973, which enforces both consumer protection and competition law, acting as the UKs economic regulator. ...


Governing body

More than half of the school's Governing Body represent the Worshipful Company of Fishmongers, who have been the school's trustees since 1555[1]. The Chairman of Governors (currently Mr A.N.G. Duckworth-Chad, D.L., a Norfolk landowner)[13] is always a past or present Prime Warden of the Fishmongers' Company. The previous Chairman was the late Admiral Earl Cairns[1]. The present Prime Warden, Sir Richard Carew Pole, is also a governor[13]. Image File history File links Fishmongers-arms. ... Image File history File links Fishmongers-arms. ... The Worshipful Company of Fishmongers is one of the Livery Companies of the City of London. ... The Worshipful Company of Fishmongers is one of the Livery Companies of the City of London. ... Events Russia breaks 60 year old truce with Sweden by attacking Finland February 2 - Diet of Augsburg begins February 4 - John Rogers becomes first Protestant martyr in England February 9 - Bishop of Gloucester John Hooper is burned at the stake May 23 - Paul IV becomes Pope. ... Anthony Nicholas George Duckworth-Chad OBE, DL, of Pynkney Hall, near Kings Lynn, Norfolk, England, born 1942, is a landowner, City of London business man, and a senior county officer for Norfolk. ... The Deputy Lieutenant is the deputy to the Lord Lieutenant of a county. ... The Worshipful Company of Fishmongers is one of the Livery Companies of the City of London. ... Rear-Admiral the Rt Hon Earl Cairns, GCVO CB, was Her Majestys Marshal of the Diplomatic Corps in the Royal Household of the Sovereign of the United Kingdom from 1962 to 1971. ... Sir Richard Carew Pole, Baronet, OBE, DL, is the present holder of the baronetcy granted to his ancestor by King Charles I in 1628. ...


The governing body includes a representative of Cambridge University, currently Lady Perry of Southwark, and one of Norfolk County Council[13], and it also seeks to include some distinguished Old Greshamians. The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... Pauline Perry, Baroness Perry of Southwark (born Pauline Welch 15 October 1931) is an educationalist, a Conservative politician and a member of the British House of Lords. ... Norfolk (IPA: //) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ... The following is a list of notable Old Greshamians, former pupils of Greshams School, Norfolk, England. ...


The Clerk of the Fishmongers' Company also acts as Clerk to the Governing Body, and its meetings are held at Fishmongers' Hall in the City of London[1]. The Worshipful Company of Fishmongers is one of the Livery Companies of the City of London. ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state Constituent country Region Greater London Status City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor David Lewis  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - Total 1. ...


The Grasshopper

The Gresham grasshopper
The Gresham grasshopper

The Grasshopper is used as the badge of several Gresham's School clubs, and a long-established school periodical is called The Grasshopper. The green insect appears as the crest above the school's coat of arms, commemorating the Founder, Sir John Gresham, whose family crest it was. The Gresham Grasshopper is also used by Gresham College and can be seen as the weathervane on the Royal Exchange in the City of London, founded in 1565 by Gresham's nephew Sir Thomas Gresham, and the similar weathervane on the Faneuil Hall in Boston, Massachusetts, is modelled on the Royal Exchange's. The first Royal Exchange was profusely decorated with grasshoppers. Image File history File links Grasshopper-crest. ... Image File history File links Grasshopper-crest. ... Sir John Gresham (1492 - 23 October 1556) was an English merchant and financier who worked for King Henry VIII of England, Cardinal Wolsey and Thomas Cromwell. ... Sir Thomas Greshams grasshopper crest is used as a symbol of the College Gresham College is an unusual institution of higher learning off Holborn in central London. ... A weather vane, also called a wind vane, is a movable device attached to an elevated object such as a roof for showing the direction of the wind. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state Constituent country Region Greater London Status City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor David Lewis  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - Total 1. ... // Events March 1 - the city of Rio de Janeiro is founded. ... Sir John Gresham (1492 - 23 October 1556) was an English merchant and financier who worked for King Henry VIII of England, Cardinal Wolsey and Thomas Cromwell. ... Portrait by Anthonis Mor, c. ... [[Media:Example. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


According to an ancient legend of the Greshams, the founder of the family, Roger de Gresham, was a foundling abandoned as a new-born baby in long grass in North Norfolk in the 13th century and found there by a woman whose attention was drawn to the child by a grasshopper. A beautiful story, it is more likely that the grasshopper is simply an heraldic rebus on the name Gresham, with gres being a Middle English form of grass (Old English grœs). North Norfolk is a local government district in Norfolk, England. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Heraldry in its most general sense encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. ... Rebus Principle (Linguistics) is using the existing symbols, such as pictograms, purely for their sounds regardless of their meaning, to represent new words. ... Old English redirects here. ...


In the system of English heraldry, the grasshopper is said to represent wisdom and nobility[14].


Development and external relations

During the celebrations of the school's 450th year in 2005, the establishment was announced of a Foundation to focus on encouraging legacies and donations for scholarships, bursaries and specific major projects. A Director of Development and External Relations has since been appointed, as part of a programme of reaching out to Old Greshamians, and gatherings are planned around the UK and overseas.[9]


Gresham's bibliography

  • A New Grammar of the Latin Tongue... freed from the many obscurities, defects, superfluities, and errors, which render the common grammar an insufferable impediment to the progress of education, by John Holmes (1732, thirteenth edition 1788)
  • History of England, Performed by the Gentlemen of the Grammar School... at their Christmas breaking up, by John Holmes (drama, published in Latin and English, 1737)
  • The Art of Rhetorick made easy... to meet the needs of the time when schoolboys are expected to be led, sooth'd and entic'd to their studies … rather than by force and harsh discipline drove, as in days of yore, by John Holmes (1738)
  • The Mirror of Literature, Amusement and Instruction, 27 August 1825
  • Crockford's Scholastic Directory, 1861 (has article on Gresham's School)
  • History of Holt: a brief study of parish, church and school by the Rev. L.B. Radford (Rounce & Wortley, 1908)
  • Sermons by a Lay Headmaster, Preached at Gresham's School, 1900-1918 by George William Saul Howson (Longmans, Green and Co, 1920)
  • One Hundred Terms at Gresham's School by J. R. Eccles (1934)
  • My Life as a Public School Master by J. R. Eccles (1948)
  • Schoolmaster's Harvest: some findings of fifty years, 1894-1944 by James Herbert Simpson, (London, Faber and Faber, 1954)
  • The History and Register of Gresham's School, 1555-1954 by Charles Lawrence Scruton Lidell and A.B. Douglas (Ipswich, 1955)
  • A Catalogue of the Foundation Library of Gresham's School, by Peter John Lee (Holt, 1965)
  • Stuff and Nonsense: Observations of a Norfolk Scot by Logie Bruce Lockhart (The Larks Press, 1981) ISBN 0 948400 40 4
  • Gresham's in Wartime by Philip S. Newell and Bernard Sankey (1988)
  • When Heroes Die by Sue Smart (Breedon Books, 2001) ISBN 1-85983-256-3
  • I Will Plant Me a Tree: an Illustrated History of Gresham's School by S.G.G. Benson and Martin Crossley Evans (James & James, London, 2002) ISBN 0-907383-92-0

John Holmes (born 1702 or 1703, died Holt, Norfolk, 22 December 1760), was an 18th century schoolmaster and writer on education, Master of Greshams School in Norfolk. ... Logie Bruce Lockhart MA (Cantab. ...

Archives

The arms of the Fishmongers' Company and Sir John Gresham, which Gresham's used side by side until its own arms were granted
The arms of the Fishmongers' Company and Sir John Gresham, which Gresham's used side by side until its own arms were granted

The Manuscripts Section of the Guildhall Library in the City of London holds the following Gresham's School records[15]: Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Worshipful Company of Fishmongers is one of the Livery Companies of the City of London. ... Sir John Gresham (1492 - 23 October 1556) was an English merchant and financier who worked for King Henry VIII of England, Cardinal Wolsey and Thomas Cromwell. ... The Guildhall Library is administered by the Corporation of London, the government of the City of London, which is the historical heart of London, England. ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state Constituent country Region Greater London Status City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor David Lewis  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - Total 1. ...

The Norfolk Record Office also holds some Gresham's accessions,[16] including a bundle of correspondence relating to the school from 1799 to 1810 between the Fishmongers' Company and Adey & Repton, including copies of statutes.[17] Year 1547 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... Events February 13 - Galileo Galilei arrives in Rome for his trial before the Inquisition. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Events July 30 - Baltimore, Maryland is founded. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


See also

Arms of the Fishmongers Company and Sir John Gresham This is a list of the Masters (later Headmasters) and Ushers (later Second Masters) of Greshams School, Holt. ... The following is a list of notable Old Greshamians, former pupils of Greshams School, Norfolk, England. ... Farfield is one of the seven boarding houses at Greshams School, an English Public School in Holt, Norfolk. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t I Will Plant Me a Tree: an Illustrated History of Gresham's School by S.G.G. Benson and Martin Crossley Evans (James & James, London, 2002) ISBN 0-907383-92-0
  2. ^ See John Gresham: The Gresham Family
  3. ^ The Worshipful Company of Fishmongers official site (accessed 15 August 2007)
  4. ^ A Catalogue of the Foundation Library of Gresham's School, by P.J. Lee (Holt, 1965)
  5. ^ John Holmes (1702/3–1760), schoolmaster and writer on education by David Stoker in Dictionary of National Biography (OUP, 2004)
  6. ^ Image of main Gresham's campus at art-e-mail.com (accessed 29 August 2007)
  7. ^ When Heroes Die by Sue Smart (Breedon Books, 2001) ISBN 1-85983-256-3
  8. ^ Eastern Daily Press, Norwich, July 2005
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Gresham's School online
  10. ^ *Gresham's at the International Baccalaureate Organization (accessed 15 August 2007)
  11. ^ Designation of Schools Having a Religious Character (Independent Schools) (England) Order 2004 (accessed 15 August 2007)
  12. ^ The Times of London, Monday, 10 June, 1912, page 4
  13. ^ a b c [List of Governors List of governors of Gresham's School] at gresham's.com
  14. ^ Symbolisms of Heraldry at digiserve.com (accessed 9 October 2007)
  15. ^ Guildhall Library Manuscripts Section (Accessions 7282, 7789A/1-2, 7791/1-4, 20341 and 20342/1-2)
  16. ^ Norfolk Record Office
  17. ^ Gresham's accessions, reference NRA 27820 Repton (accessed 15 August 2007)
  • The History and Register of Gresham's School, 1555-1954 (Ipswich, 1955)
  • Gresham's Preparatory School

Sir John Gresham (1492 - 23 October 1556) was an English merchant and financier who worked for King Henry VIII of England, Cardinal Wolsey and Thomas Cromwell. ... The Dictionary of National Biography (or DNB) is a standard work of reference on notable figures from British history. ... Oxford University Press (OUP) is a highly-respected publishing house and a department of the University of Oxford in England. ... The Eastern Daily Press is a regional newspaper covering Norfolk, and northern parts of Suffolk and eastern Cambridgeshire, and is published daily in Norwich, UK. Originally a broadsheet, it changed to compact (tabloid) format in the mid-1990s. ... Norwich (pronounced IPA: ) is a city in East Anglia, in Eastern England. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...

External links

  • Gresham's School online - Official site
  • ISI Inspection Report on Gresham’s School, 2004
  • The Auden Theatre, Gresham's School
  • Auden Theatre & school location map
  • Gresham's at art-e-mail.com
  • Map of Holt
  • Woodlands House (Gresham's) online

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m