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Encyclopedia > Gregory Peck
Gregory Peck

From the trailer for Roman Holiday (1953)
Birth name Eldred Gregory Peck
Born April 5, 1916(1916-04-05)
La Jolla, California, U.S. Flag of the United States
Died June 12, 2003 (aged 87)
Los Angeles, California, U.S. Flag of the United States
Years active 1944 - 1999
Spouse(s) Greta Kukkonen (1942-1955)
Veronique Passani (1955-2003)

Gregory Peck (April 5, 1916June 12, 2003) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. He was one of 20th Century Fox's most popular film stars, from the 1940s to the 1960s, and played important roles well into the 1990s. One of his most notable performances was as Atticus Finch in the 1962 film version of To Kill a Mockingbird, for which he won an Academy Award. President Lyndon Johnson honored Peck with the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1969 for his lifetime humanitarian efforts.[1] In 1999, the American Film Institute named Peck among the Greatest Male Stars of All Time, ranking at No. 12. Image File history File links Gregory_Peck_in_Roman_Holiday_trailer. ... Roman Holiday is a 1953 romantic comedy. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... One of the beaches at La Jolla Cove La Jolla, California, is a seaside resort community comprised of 42,808[1] residents within the city of San Diego. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: , State County Settled 1781 Incorporated April 4, 1850 Government  - Type Mayor-Council  - Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa  - City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo  - Governing body City Council Area  - City  498. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... // July 20 - Since You Went Away is released. ... The year 1999 in film involved some significant events. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... To Kill a Mockingbird is a 1962 film directed by Robert Mulligan and based on the novel of the same name by Harper Lee. ... The Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award is awarded periodically (although not every year) at the Academy Award ceremonies for outstanding contributions to humanitarian causes. ... The César Award is the national film award of France first given out in 1975. ... César: Prize (César dhonneur) ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... The Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture - Drama was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association as a separate category in 1951. ... The Yearling is a 1938 novel written by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings. ... To Kill a Mockingbird is a 1962 film directed by Robert Mulligan and based on the novel of the same name by Harper Lee. ... The Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievement in motion pictures has been given annually since 1952 by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association at the Golden Globe Award ceremonies in Hollywood, California. ... For other uses, see Moby-Dick in popular culture. ... The New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor is one of the awards given by the New York Film Critics Circle to honor the finest achievements in filmmaking. ... Twelve OClock High is a 1949 film about the United States Army Air Forces crews who flew daylight bombing missions against Germany and occupied France during World War II. The movie was adapted by Sy Bartlett, Henry King (uncredited) and Beirne Lay Jr. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Atticus Finch is a character in Harper Lees Pulitzer Prize-winning fictional novel To Kill A Mockingbird. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... To Kill a Mockingbird is a 1962 film directed by Robert Mulligan and based on the novel of the same name by Harper Lee. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... The Presidential Medal of Freedom The Presidential Medal of Freedom is one of the two highest civilian awards in the United States and is bestowed by the President of the United States (the other award which is considered its equivalent is the Congressional Gold Medal, which is bestowed by an... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Humanitarianism is the view that all people should be treated with the respect and dignity they deserve as human beings, and that advancing the well-being of humanity is a noble goal. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Part of the AFI 100 Years. ...

Contents

Biography

Early life

Peck was born Eldred Gregory Peck in San Diego, California's seaside community of La Jolla, the son of Gregory Pearl Peck, a chemist and pharmacist, and Missouri-born Bernice Mae Ayres. Peck's father was a Catholic of Armenian heritage and his mother converted to Catholicism upon marrying his father. Peck's Irish-born paternal grandmother, Catherine Ashe, was related to the Irish patriot Thomas Ashe, who took part in the Easter Rising less than three weeks after Peck's birth and died while on a hunger strike in 1917. Despite their strict Catholicism, Peck's parents divorced when he was five and he was raised by his grandmother.[citation needed] “San Diego” redirects here. ... One of the beaches at La Jolla Cove. ... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St Louis[1] Area  Ranked 21st  - Total 69,709 sq mi (180,693 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 300 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Thomas Ashe Thomas Ashe (12 January 1885 – 25 September 1917) born in Lispole, County Kerry, Ireland, a teacher, was a member of the Gaelic League, the Irish Republican Brotherhood as well as a founding member of the Irish Volunteers. ... Combatants Irish Volunteers, Irish Citizen Army, Irish Republican Brotherhood British Army Royal Irish Constabulary Commanders Patrick Pearse, James Connolly Brigadier-General Lowe General Sir John Maxwell Strength 1250 in Dublin, c. ... A hunger strike is a method of non-violent resistance in which participants fast as an act of political protest, or to provoke feelings of guilt or to achieve a goal such as a policy change. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Catholic is an adjective derived from the Greek adjective , meaning general; universal (cf. ...


Peck was sent to a Roman Catholic military school in Los Angeles at the age of 10 and then to San Diego High School. When he graduated, he enrolled at San Diego State University to improve his grades so that he could earn admission to his first-choice college, the University of California, Berkeley. For a short time, he took a job driving a truck for an oil company. In 1936, he enrolled as a pre-med student at UC Berkeley, majoring in English. Since he was 6'3" and very strong, he also decided to row on the university crew. Because of his great stature, the Berkeley acting coach spotted him and decided he would be perfect for his play. He developed an interest in acting and was recruited by Edwin Duerr, director of the school's Little Theater. He went on to appear in five plays during his senior year. Although his tuition fee was only $26 a year, Peck still struggled to pay, and had to work as a "hasher" (kitchen helper) for the Alpha Gamma Delta sorority in exchange for meals. Peck would later say about Berkeley that, "it was a very special experience for me and three of the greatest years of my life. It woke me up and made me a human being."[citation needed] In 1997, he donated $25,000 to the Berkeley crew team in honor of his coach, Ky Ebright. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Nickname: Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: , State County Settled 1781 Incorporated April 4, 1850 Government  - Type Mayor-Council  - Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa  - City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo  - Governing body City Council Area  - City  498. ... The 100 building of the San Diego High Educational Complex San Diego High School, a federal prison located on the southern edge of Balboa Park, was established in 1882 by Joseph Russ. ... San Diego State University (SDSU), founded in 1897 as San Diego Normal School, is the largest and oldest higher education facility in the greater San Diego area (generally the City and County of San Diego), and is part of the California State University system. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... Edwin Duerr (February 21, 1904 – August 13, 1985) was a theater and radio director. ... Carroll M. Ebright, better known as Ky Ebright was a legendary coach for the University of California, Berkeley crew team. ...


After graduating from Berkeley with a BA degree in English, Peck dropped the name "Eldred" and headed to New York City to study at the Neighborhood Playhouse with the legendary acting teacher Sanford Meisner. He was often broke and sometimes slept in Central Park. He worked at the 1939 World's Fair and as a tour guide for NBC's television broadcasting. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Neighborhood Playhouse is an actor training school in New York City, generally associated with the Meisner technique of Sanford Meisner. ... Sanford Meisner (August 31, 1905-February 2nd, 1997) was an actor and acting coach well known for the Meisner technique. ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Worlds Fair is any of various large expositions held since the mid-19th century. ... This article is about the television network. ...


He made his Broadway debut as the lead in Emlyn Williams' The Morning Star in 1942. His second Broadway performance that year was in The Willow and I with Edward Pawley. Peck's acting abilities were in high demand during World War II, since he was exempt from military service owing to a back injury suffered while receiving dance and movement lessons from Martha Graham as part of his acting training. Twentieth Century Fox claimed he had injured his back while rowing at university, but in Peck's words, "In Hollywood, they didn't think a dance class was macho enough, I guess. I've been trying to straighten out that story for years." [citation needed] For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... George Emlyn Williams CBE (26 November 1905–25 September 1987), known as Emlyn Williams, was a Welsh dramatist and actor. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Edward Joel Pawley (born March 16, 1901 in Kansas City, Missouri - died January 27, 1988 in Charlottesville, Virginia) is an American actor. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... For the supercentenarian, see Martha Graham (supercentenarian). ... Related articles FOX Television Network Fox Searchlight Pictures Fox Entertainment Group List of Hollywood movie studios List of movies Variant of current 20th Century Fox logo External links 20th Century Fox Movies official site Twentieth Century Fox is also the punning title of a song by The Doors on their...


Career

Peck's first film, Days of Glory, was released in 1944. Though many critics initially dismissed Peck's acting as wooden,[citation needed] he was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor five times, four of which came in his first five years of film acting: for The Keys of the Kingdom (1944), The Yearling (1946), Gentleman's Agreement (1947), and Twelve O'Clock High (1949). Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Gentlemans Agreement is a 1947 film about a journalist (played by Gregory Peck) who falsely represents himself as a Jew to research anti-semitism in the affluent community of Darien, Connecticut. ... Days of Glory is a 1944 film which tells the story of a group of guerrillas fighting back against impossible odds during the 1941 Nazi invasion of Russia. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... The Keys of the Kingdom is a 1944 film which tells the story of a young priest who struggles to establish a mission in China. ... The Yearling is a 1946 family film drama made by MGM. It was directed by Clarence Brown and produced by Sidney Franklin. ... Gentlemans Agreement is a 1947 film about a journalist (played by Gregory Peck) who falsely represents himself as a Jew to research anti-semitism in the affluent community of Darien, Connecticut. ... Twelve OClock High is a 1949 film about the United States Army Air Forces crews who flew daylight bombing missions against Germany and occupied France during World War II. The movie was adapted by Sy Bartlett, Henry King (uncredited) and Beirne Lay Jr. ...


Each of these early films introduced an aspect of Peck's persona.[citation needed] The Keys of the Kingdom emphasized his stately presence. As the farmer Penny Barker in The Yearling his good-humored warmth and affection toward the characters playing his son and wife confounded critics who had been insisting he was a lifeless performer. Duel in the Sun (1946) showed his range as an actor in his first "against type" role as a cruel, libidinous gunslinger. Gentleman's Agreement established his power in the "social conscience" genre in a film that took on the deep-seated but subtle anti-Semitism of mid-century corporate America.Twelve O'Clock High was the first of many successful war films in which Peck embodied the brave, effective, yet human fighting man. Duel in the Sun is a 1946 Western film which tells the story of a half-Hispanic girl who goes to live with her Anglo relatives, becoming involved in prejudice and forbidden love. ...


Among his other popular films were Moby Dick (1956), On the Beach (1959), which brought to life the terrors of global nuclear war, The Guns of Navarone (1961), and Roman Holiday (1953), with Audrey Hepburn in her Oscar-winning film debut. Peck and Hepburn were close friends until her death; Peck even introduced her to her first husband, Mel Ferrer. Moby Dick is a 1956 adaptation of Herman Melvilles novel Moby-Dick. ... On the Beach is a 1959 movie based on Nevil Shutes novel of the same name featuring Gregory Peck (USS Sawfish captain Dwight Lionel Towers), Ava Gardner (Moira Davidson), Fred Astaire (scientist Julian – John in the novel – Osborne) and Anthony Perkins (Australian naval officer Peter Holmes). ... This article is about the film, for the novel see The Guns of Navarone (novel) The Guns of Navarone is a 1961 film based on a well-known 1957 novel about World War II by Scottish thriller writer Alistair MacLean. ... Roman Holiday is a 1953 romantic comedy. ... Audrey Hepburn (4 May 1929 - 20 January 1993) was an Academy Award and Tony Award winning Anglo-Dutch actress of film and theatre, Broadway stage performer, ballerina, fashion model, and humanitarian. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Mel Ferrer (born August 25, 1917 in Elberon, New Jersey) is an American actor, film director and film producer. ...


Peck won the Academy award for his fifth nomination, playing Atticus Finch, a Depression-era lawyer and widowed father, in a film adaptation of the Harper Lee novel To Kill a Mockingbird. Released in 1962 during the height of the US civil rights movement in the South, this movie and his role were Peck's favorites. In 2003, Atticus Finch was named the top film hero of the past 100 years by the American Film Institute. Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Harper Lee Nelle Harper Lee (born April 28, 1926) is an American novelist known for her Pulitzer Prize–winning 1960 novel To Kill a Mockingbird, her only major work to date. ... This article is about the literary concept. ... To Kill a Mockingbird is a 1962 film directed by Robert Mulligan and based on the novel of the same name by Harper Lee. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The civil rights movement in the United States has been a long, primarily nonviolent struggle to bring full civil rights and equality under the law to all citizens of United States. ... The U.S. Southern states or the South, also known colloquially as Dixie, constitute a distinctive region covering a large portion of the United States, with its own unique heritage, historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ...

Gregory Peck in the Designing Woman trailer.
Gregory Peck in the Designing Woman trailer.

In 1949, Peck founded The La Jolla Playhouse, at his birthplace, along with his friends Jose Ferrer and Dorothy McGuire. This local community theater and landmark (now in a new home at the University of California, San Diego) still thrives today. It has attracted Hollywood film stars on hiatus both as performers and enthusiastic supporters since its inception. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Designing Woman is a 1957 Academy Award winning romantic comedy about the world of fashion. ... La Jolla Playhouse is a not-for-profit, professional theatre-in-residence on the campus of the University of California, San Diego. ... José Vicente Ferrer de Otero y Cintron, known as José Ferrer (January 8, 1912-January 26, 1992), was an actor and director, born in Santurce, Puerto Rico. ... Dorothy McGuire and Kent Smith in The Spiral Staircase Dorothy Hackett McGuire (June 14, 1916 – September 13, 2001) was an American actress. ... The University of California, San Diego (popularly known as UCSD, or sometimes UC San Diego) is a public, coeducational research university located in La Jolla, a seaside resort community of San Diego, California. ... ...


He served as the president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in 1967, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the American Film Institute from 1967 to 1969, Chairman of the Motion Picture and Television Relief Fund in 1971, and National Chairman of the American Cancer Society in 1966. He was a member of the National Council on the Arts from 1964 to 1966. Pickford Center for Motion Picture Study in Hollywood, California Founded on May 11, 1927 in California, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) is a professional honorary organization dedicated to the advancement of the arts and sciences of motion pictures. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... A Chairman is the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... The American Cancer Society (ACS) is a medical organization with a corporate attitude in the United States. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ...


Though so well known, he was not above all criticism. Pauline Kael described him as "competent but always a little boring".[1] Even those greatly admiring him would admit stiffness in certain roles. Yet these qualities may have been a necessary trade-off for the iconic status he reached, and he may have known it. His few attempts at playing villainous characters were not critically acclaimed. Pauline Kael (June 19, 1919 – September 3, 2001) was an American film critic who wrote for The New Yorker magazine. ...


A physically powerful man, he was known to do a majority of his own fight scenes, rarely using body or stunt doubles. In fact, Robert Mitchum, his on-screen opponent in Cape Fear, often said that Peck once accidentally punched him for real during their final fight scene in the movie. He said that he felt the impact of the punch for days afterwards and said "I don't feel sorry for anyone dumb enough who picks a fight with him."[citation needed] Robert Charles Durman Mitchum (August 6, 1917 – July 1, 1997) was an American film actor and singer. ... This article contains a trivia section. ...


Later work

At the Cannes Film Festival in 2000.
At the Cannes Film Festival in 2000.

In the 1980s, Peck moved to television, where he starred in the mini-series The Blue and the Gray, playing Abraham Lincoln. He also starred with Barbara Bouchet in the TV film The Scarlet and The Black, about a real-life Roman Catholic priest in the Vatican who smuggled Jews and other refugees away from the Nazis during World War II. ImageMetadata File history File links Gregory. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Gregory. ... The Cannes Film Festival (French: le Festival de Cannes), founded in 1939, is one of the worlds oldest, most influential and prestigious film festivals. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Barbara Bouchet, born Barbara Goutscher on August 15, 1943 in Reichenberg, (now Liberec), Sudetenland, Czechoslovakia (now Czech Republic]. She has acted in more than 80 films and television episodes. ... The Scarlet and the Black is a 1983 made for TV movie starring Gregory Peck and Christopher Plummer. ... Nazism, or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the totalitarian ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Peck retired from active film-making in 1991. Like Cary Grant before him, Peck spent the last few years of his life touring the world doing speaking engagements in which he would show clips from his movies, reminisce, and answer questions from the audience. This article is about the British actor. ...


He came out of retirement to appear in the 1998 remake of one of his most famous films, Moby Dick, portraying "Father Mapple" (played by Orson Welles in the 1956 version), with Patrick Stewart playing Captain Ahab, the role Peck made famous in the 1956 film. Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Moby-Dick in popular culture. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the actor. ... Moby-Dick book cover Moby-Dick - the official title of the first edition - is a novel by Herman Melville. ...


Before his death he spent his final afternoons combining two of his life's greatest passions, making a positive impact on youth's minds and animation, as he babysat over 200 kids in his mansion on weekday afternoons, watching cartoons with them all.[citation needed] The bouncing ball animation (below) consists of these 6 frames. ...


Politics

In 1947, while many Hollywood figures were being blacklisted for similar activities, he signed a letter deploring a House Un-American Activities Committee investigation of alleged communists in the film industry. A blacklist is a list or register of entities who, for one reason or another, are being denied a particular privilege, service, or mobility. ... HUAC hearings House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC or HCUA) (1938–1975) was an investigative committee of the United States House of Representatives. ...


President Richard Nixon placed Peck on his enemies list due to his liberal activism.[2] Peck was always proud of this fact, but he lost five movie deals because of Nixon's list.[citation needed] Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... Nixons Enemies List is the informal name of what started as a list of the Nixon administrations major political opponents compiled by Charles Colson and sent in memorandum form to John Dean on September 9, 1971. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of...


A lifelong supporter of the Democratic Party, Peck was suggested in 1970 as a possible Democratic candidate to run against Ronald Reagan for the office of Governor of California. Gregory Peck encouraged one of his sons, Carey Peck, to run for political office. Carey was defeated both times he tried for Congress, in 1978 and in 1980, by Republican Congressman Robert K. Dornan, both times by slim margins. The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger (left) and Governor Gray Davis (right) with President George W. Bush in 2003 The Governor of California is the highest executive authority in the state government, whose responsibilities include making yearly State of the State addresses to the California State Legislature, submitting the budget, and ensuring that... Robert Kenneth Bob Dornan (born April 3, 1933) is a former Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from California. ...


In an interview with the Irish media, Peck revealed that former President Lyndon Johnson had told him that, had he sought re-election, he intended to offer Peck the post of U.S. ambassador to Ireland — a post Peck, due to his Irish ancestry, said he might well have taken, saying "it would have been a great adventure".[citation needed] Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ...


He was outspoken against the Vietnam War, while remaining supportive of his son, Stephen, who was fighting there. In 1972, Peck produced the film version of Daniel Berrigan's play The Trial of the Catonsville Nine about the prosecution of a group of Vietnam protesters for civil disobedience. Despite his initial reluctance to portray the controversial General Douglas MacArthur on screen, he did so in 1977 and ended up with a great admiration for the man. Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Daniel Berrigan at the Third Annual Staten Island Freedom & Peace Festival, Oct. ... The Catonsville Nine were nine Roman Catholics who burned draft files to protest the Vietnam War. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the American general; for the municipality in the Philippines, see General MacArthur, Eastern Samar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ...


In 1987, Peck led a charge opposing President Ronald Reagan's Supreme Court nomination of Robert Bork. Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... The supreme court functions as a court of last resort whose rulings cannot be challenged, in some countries, provinces and states. ... Robert Heron Bork (born March 1, 1927) is a conservative American legal scholar who advocates the judicial philosophy of originalism. ...


Personal life

Peck owned the thoroughbred steeplechase racehorse Different Class[3] which raced in England. The horse was the favorite for the 1968 Grand National but finished 3rd. Peck was close friends with French president Jacques Chirac [4] and singer Michael Jackson. For the processor with the same codename , see Athlon. ... A steeplechase race The steeplechase is a form of horse racing (primarily conducted in the United Kingdom, United States, and Ireland) and derives its name from early races in which orientation of the course was by reference to a church steeple, jumping fences and ditches and generally traversing the many... Horse-racing is an equestrian sporting activity which has been practiced over the centuries; the chariot races of Roman times were an early example, as was the contest of the steeds of the god Odin and the giant Hrungnir in Norse mythology. ... “UK” redirects here. ... The Grand National is the most valuable National Hunt handicap horse race in the United Kingdom. ... “Chirac” redirects here. ... Michael Joseph Jackson (August 29, 1958), commonly known as MJ as well as the King of Pop, is an American musician, entertainer, and pop icon whose successful career and controversial personal life have been a part of pop culture for the last three decades. ...


In October of 1943, Peck married Greta Kukkonen with whom he had three sons. Greta was awarded the Rose of Finland, equivalent to a Medal of Freedom. They were divorced on December 30, 1955 and maintained a very good relationship as parents. Their sons are Jonathan, Stephen and Carey Peck. Jonathan Peck, a television news reporter, committed suicide in 1975. Stephen Peck is active in support of American veterans from the Vietnam war and Stephen's first wife Kimi Peck is an accomplished screenplay writer. Gregory supported Carey's political ambitions when running for a California Representative. Carey's wife Lita Albuquerque is an outstanding artist.[citation needed]


On December 31, 1955, he married his second wife, Veronique Passani, a Paris news reporter who had interviewed him in 1953 before he went to Italy to film Roman Holiday. He asked her to lunch six months later and they became inseparable. They had a son Anthony Peck, and a daughter Cecelia Peck. Roman Holiday is a 1953 romantic comedy. ...


Peck had many grandchildren from both marriages. Stephen has a daughter named Marisa, and a younger son named Ethan. Carey has four children, three daughters Marisa, Isabelle, and Jasmine, and a son Christopher.


Death

Gregory Peck's tomb in Los Angeles

In early 2003 Gregory Peck was offered the role of Grandpa Joe in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. He said he'd seriously consider it. He was looking forward to playing Grandpa Joe, which he considered "the greatest swan song of them all",[citation needed] but he died before he could accept. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1521x1055, 676 KB) Summary Photo of Gregory Pecks tomb in the Crypt Mausoleum of the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1521x1055, 676 KB) Summary Photo of Gregory Pecks tomb in the Crypt Mausoleum of the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles. ... Grandpa Joe is a fictional character in the Roald Dahl childrens books Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator. ... Not to be confused with the 1971 film Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory. ...


On June 12, 2003, Peck died in his sleep from cardiorespiratory arrest, and bronchial pneumonia, at the age of 87 at Torrance Memorial Medical Center in Torrance, California. His wife of 48 years was at his side. Peck is buried in the mausoleum of the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, California. is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Location of Torrance in the County of Los Angeles Country State County Los Angeles County, California Government  - Mayor Frank Scotto Area  - City 20. ... St. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Nickname: Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: , State County Settled 1781 Incorporated April 4, 1850 Government  - Type Mayor-Council  - Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa  - City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo  - Governing body City Council Area  - City  498. ...


Awards

Peck was nominated for five Academy Awards, winning once. He was nominated in 1946 for The Keys of the Kingdom, in 1947 for The Yearling, in 1948 for Gentleman's Agreement, and in 1950 for Twelve O'Clock High. He won the Oscar in 1963 for To Kill a Mockingbird. In 1948, he was awarded with the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award. Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Keys of the Kingdom is a 1944 film which tells the story of a young priest who struggles to establish a mission in China. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Yearling is a 1946 family film drama made by MGM. It was directed by Clarence Brown and produced by Sidney Franklin. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gentlemans Agreement is a 1947 film about a journalist (played by Gregory Peck) who falsely represents himself as a Jew to research anti-semitism in the affluent community of Darien, Connecticut. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Twelve OClock High is a 1949 film about the United States Army Air Forces crews who flew daylight bombing missions against Germany and occupied France during World War II. The movie was adapted by Sy Bartlett, Henry King (uncredited) and Beirne Lay Jr. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... To Kill a Mockingbird is a 1962 film directed by Robert Mulligan and based on the novel of the same name by Harper Lee. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award is awarded periodically (although not every year) at the Academy Award ceremonies for outstanding contributions to humanitarian causes. ...


Peck received many Golden Globe awards. He won in 1947 for The Yearling, in 1963 for To Kill a Mockingbird, and in 1999 for Moby Dick. He was nominated in 1978 for The Boys from Brazil. He received the Cecil B. DeMille Award in 1969, and was given the Henrietta Award in 1951 and 1955 for World Film Favorite — Male. The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Yearling is a 1938 novel written by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... To Kill a Mockingbird is a 1962 film directed by Robert Mulligan and based on the novel of the same name by Harper Lee. ... This article is about the year. ... For other uses, see Moby-Dick in popular culture. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... The Boys from Brazil is a 1978 thriller made by Incorporated Television Company (ITC) and Lew Grade and distributed by 20th Century Fox. ... The Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievement in motion pictures has been given annually since 1952 by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association at the Golden Globe Award ceremonies in Hollywood, California. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ...


In 1969, Lyndon Johnson honored Peck with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian award. Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... The Presidential Medal of Freedom The Presidential Medal of Freedom is one of the two highest civilian awards in the United States and is bestowed by the President of the United States (the other award which is considered its equivalent is the Congressional Gold Medal, which is bestowed by an...


In 1971, the Screen Actors Guild presented Peck with the SAG Life Achievement Award. In 1989, the American Film Institute gave Peck the AFI Life Achievement Award. He received the Crystal Globe award for outstanding artistic contribution to world cinema in 1996. Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... The Screen Actors Guild (S.A.G.) is the labor union representing over 120,000 film actors in the United States. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Crystal Globe is the main award at the prestigious Karlovy Vary International Film Festival first given out in 1946. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...


In 2000, Peck was made a Doctor of Letters by the National University of Ireland. He was a founding patron of the University College Dublin School of Film, where he persuaded Martin Scorsese to become an honorary patron. Peck also became chair of the American Cancer Society for a short time. The National University of Ireland (NUI) is a federal university system of constituent universities, previously called constituent colleges, and recognised colleges set up under the Irish Universities Act, 1908, and significantly amended by the Universities Act, 1997. ... University College Dublin - National University of Ireland, Dublin - more commonly University College Dublin (UCD) - is Irelands largest university, with over 20,000 students. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (born November 17, 1942) is an American film director, writer and producer and founder of the World Cinema Foundation. ...


For his contribution to the motion picture industry, Gregory Peck has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6100 Hollywood Blvd. In November, 2005, the star was stolen. It has since been replaced. Buskers perform on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. ... Look up November in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Filmography

Awards
Preceded by
Ray Milland
for The Lost Weekend
Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Drama
1947
for The Yearling
Succeeded by
Ronald Colman
for A Double Life
Preceded by
Broderick Crawford
for All the King's Men
NYFCC Award for Best Actor
1950
for Twelve O'Clock High
Succeeded by
Arthur Kennedy
for Bright Victory
Preceded by
Maximilian Schell
for Judgment at Nuremberg
Academy Award for Best Actor
1962
for To Kill a Mockingbird
Succeeded by
Sidney Poitier
for Lilies of the Field
Preceded by
Maximilian Schell
for Judgment at Nuremberg
Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Drama
1963
for To Kill a Mockingbird
Succeeded by
Sidney Poitier
for Lilies of the Field
Preceded by
George Bagnall
Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award
1967
Succeeded by
Martha Raye
Preceded by
Kirk Douglas
Cecil B. DeMille Award
1969
Succeeded by
Joan Crawford
Preceded by
-
Donostia Award, San Sebastian International Film Festival
1986
Succeeded by
Glenn Ford
Preceded by
Jack Lemmon
AFI Life Achievement Award
1989
Succeeded by
David Lean
Preceded by
George C. Scott
for 12 Angry Men
Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor in a Series, Miniseries or Motion Picture Made of Television
1999
for Moby Dick
Succeeded by
Peter Fonda
for The Passion of Ayn Rand

Days of Glory is a 1944 film which tells the story of a group of guerrillas fighting back against impossible odds during the 1941 Nazi invasion of Russia. ... The Keys of the Kingdom is a 1944 film which tells the story of a young priest who struggles to establish a mission in China. ... The Valley of Decision is a 1945 film which tells the story of a young house maid who falls in love with the son of the local coal mine owner. ... Spellbound is a 1945 psychological thriller and mystery film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ... The Yearling is a 1946 family film drama made by MGM. It was directed by Clarence Brown and produced by Sidney Franklin. ... Duel in the Sun is a 1946 Western film which tells the story of a half-Hispanic girl who goes to live with her Anglo relatives, becoming involved in prejudice and forbidden love. ... Gentlemans Agreement is a 1947 film about a journalist (played by Gregory Peck) who falsely represents himself as a Jew to research anti-semitism in the affluent community of Darien, Connecticut. ... The Paradine Case was a 1947 courtroom drama movie, directed by Alfred Hitchcock, produced by David O. Selznick. ... Yellow Sky is a 1948 American western movie directed by William A. Wellman. ... Twelve OClock High is a 1949 film about the United States Army Air Forces crews who flew daylight bombing missions against Germany and occupied France during World War II. The movie was adapted by Sy Bartlett, Henry King (uncredited) and Beirne Lay Jr. ... The Gunfighter was a 1950 film starring Gregory Peck and directed by Henry King. ... (released in the US without the R.N.) is a naval adventure movie of 1951 based upon the Horatio Hornblower novels of C. S. Forester, specifically (in order of publication) The Happy Return, A Ship of the Line, and Flying Colours. ... David and Bathsheba is a 1951 film about King David. ... Cover of book For the book, see: The Snows of Kilimanjaro (book). ... The World in His Arms is a 1952 seafaring adventure film made by Universal International Pictures. ... The Million Pound Note is a 1953 film starring Gregory Peck External Links IMDB Profile Category: ... Roman Holiday is a 1953 romantic comedy. ... The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit, by Sloan Wilson, is a novel about the American search for purpose in world dominated by business. ... Moby Dick is a 1956 adaptation of Herman Melvilles novel Moby-Dick. ... Designing Woman is a 1957 Academy Award winning romantic comedy about the world of fashion. ... The Bravados is a 1958 western film directed by Henry King and starring Gregory Peck, Joan Collins, Stephen Boyd, Henry Silva, Albert Salmi and Lee Van Cleef. ... The Big Country was a 1958 American movie starring Gregory Peck, Jean Simmons, Carroll Baker, Charlton Heston, Burl Ives, Charles Bickford, and Chuck Connors. ... Pork Chop Hill DVD cover Pork Chop Hill is a war film released in 1959, directed by Lewis Milestone and starring Gregory Peck and Woody Strode. ... Frasier, see Beloved Infidel. ... On the Beach is a 1959 movie based on Nevil Shutes novel of the same name featuring Gregory Peck (USS Sawfish captain Dwight Lionel Towers), Ava Gardner (Moira Davidson), Fred Astaire (scientist Julian – John in the novel – Osborne) and Anthony Perkins (Australian naval officer Peter Holmes). ... This article is about the film, for the novel see The Guns of Navarone (novel) The Guns of Navarone is a 1961 film based on a well-known 1957 novel about World War II by Scottish thriller writer Alistair MacLean. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... How the West Was Won is an epic 1962 western film which follows four generations of a family (starting as the Prescotts) as they move ever westward, from western New York state to the Pacific Ocean. ... To Kill a Mockingbird is a 1962 film directed by Robert Mulligan and based on the novel of the same name by Harper Lee. ... Captain Newman, M.D. is a 1963 film with Bobby Darin. ... Behold A Pale Horse is a film loosely based on the life of the Spanish anarchist guerrilla, Francisco Sabaté Llopart‎. Released in 1964, the film stars Gregory Peck and Anthony Quinn. ... This article is about mirage, an optical phenomenon. ... Arabesque is a 1966 film starring Gregory Peck & Sophia Loren. ... Pähkähullu Suomi (Insane Finland) is a 1967 comedy by Spede Pasanen. ... Mackennas Gold is a 1969 western film directed by J. Lee Thompson, starring Gregory Peck, Omar Sharif and Camilla Sparv. ... The Chairman is a 1969 film, a spy thriller starring Gregory Peck. ... Marooned is a 1969 movie directed by John Sturges and staring Gregory Peck, Richard Crenna and Gene Hackman. ... I Walk the Line is a 1970 film directed by John Frankenheimer and starring Gregory Peck and Tuesday Weld. ... In an ice hockey shoot out, each coach selects five players from their team to take a breakaway against the opposing goalie. ... The Dove is an American film released in 1974 and directed by Charles Jarrott. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... MacArthur is a film made in 1981 based on the William Manchester biography of Gen. ... The Boys from Brazil is a 1978 thriller made by Incorporated Television Company (ITC) and Lew Grade and distributed by 20th Century Fox. ... The Scarlet and the Black is a 1983 made for TV movie starring Gregory Peck and Christopher Plummer. ... Amazing Grace and Chuck is a 1987 film in which a 12-year-old boy protests the existence of nuclear weapons by refusing to play baseball, which results in the forfeit of a Little League Baseball game by his team. ... Old Gringo is a 1989 film, starring Jane Fonda and Gregory Peck. ... The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject. ... Cape Fear is a 1991 film which is a remake of a 1962 film of the same name. ... Ray Milland (January 3, 1905 – March 10, 1986) was a successful Welsh actor and director who worked primarily in the United States. ... For The Cosby Show episode, see The Lost Weekend (The Cosby Show). ... The Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture - Drama was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association as a separate category in 1951. ... The Yearling is a 1938 novel written by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings. ... Ronald Colman (February 9, 1891 – May 19, 1958) was an Oscar-winning British actor. ... A Double Life is a 1947 film noir film which tells the story of an actor whose personal life takes on the characters that he is portraying. ... Crawford in Black Angel William Broderick Crawford (born December 9, 1911; died April 26, 1986) was an American actor. ... All the Kings Men is a 1949 film based on the Robert Penn Warren novel of the same name. ... The New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor is one of the awards given by the New York Film Critics Circle to honor the finest achievements in filmmaking. ... Twelve OClock High is a 1949 film about the United States Army Air Forces crews who flew daylight bombing missions against Germany and occupied France during World War II. The movie was adapted by Sy Bartlett, Henry King (uncredited) and Beirne Lay Jr. ... Arthur Kennedy in Champion. ... Bright Victory is a 1951 film, adapted by Robert Buckner from Baynard Kendricks novel Lights Out by Baynard Kendrick. ... Maximilian Schell (left) in the film Judgment at Nuremberg Maximilian Schell (born December 8, 1930) is a Swiss-Austrian actor. ... Maximilian Schell and Richard Widmark in Judgment at Nuremberg Judgment at Nuremberg is a 1961 film which gives a fictionalized account of the post-World War II Nuremberg Trials. ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... To Kill a Mockingbird is a 1962 film directed by Robert Mulligan and based on the novel of the same name by Harper Lee. ... Sir Sidney Poitier KBE, (IPA pronunciation: ) (born February 20, 1927), is an Academy Award-winning Bahamian American actor, film director, and activist. ... Lilies of the Field is a 1962 book by William E. Barrett, which was made into a 1963 film. ... Maximilian Schell (left) in the film Judgment at Nuremberg Maximilian Schell (born December 8, 1930) is a Swiss-Austrian actor. ... Maximilian Schell and Richard Widmark in Judgment at Nuremberg Judgment at Nuremberg is a 1961 film which gives a fictionalized account of the post-World War II Nuremberg Trials. ... The Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture - Drama was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association as a separate category in 1951. ... To Kill a Mockingbird is a 1962 film directed by Robert Mulligan and based on the novel of the same name by Harper Lee. ... Sir Sidney Poitier KBE, (IPA pronunciation: ) (born February 20, 1927), is an Academy Award-winning Bahamian American actor, film director, and activist. ... Lilies of the Field is a 1962 book by William E. Barrett, which was made into a 1963 film. ... The Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award is awarded periodically (although not every year) at the Academy Award ceremonies for outstanding contributions to humanitarian causes. ... Martha Raye (August 27, 1916 – October 19, 1994) was an American comic actress and singer who performed in movies, and later on television. ... Kirk Douglas (born Issur Danielovitch Demsky December 9, 1916) is an iconic American actor and film producer known for his gravelly voice and his recurring roles as the kinds of characters Douglas himself once described as sons of bitches. He is also father to Hollywood actor and producer Michael Douglas. ... The Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievement in motion pictures has been given annually since 1952 by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association at the Golden Globe Award ceremonies in Hollywood, California. ... Joan Crawford (March 23, 1905 – May 10, 1977),[1] was an acclaimed, iconic, Academy Award-winning American actress, arguably one of the greatest from the Golden Age of Hollywood from the 1920s through 1940s. ... The San Sebastian International Film Festival was founded in 1953 in San Sebastian, Spain. ... Gwyllyn Samuel Newton Glenn Ford (May 1, 1916 – August 30, 2006) was an acclaimed Canadian-born actor from Hollywoods Golden Era with a career that spanned seven decades. ... John Uhler Lemmon III (February 8, 1925 – June 27, 2001), better known as Jack Lemmon, was a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor and comedian. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Sir David Lean, KBE (March 25, 1908 – April 16, 1991) was an English film director and producer, best remembered for big-screen epics such as Lawrence of Arabia, The Bridge on the River Kwai, and Doctor Zhivago . ... George Campbell Scott (October 18, 1927 - September 22, 1999) was a stage and film actor, director, and producer. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... For other uses, see Moby-Dick in popular culture. ... Peter Henry Fonda (born February 23, 1940) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... The Passion of Ayn Rand is a 1999 film directed by Christopher Menaul. ...

See also

This is a list of well-known recipients of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, grouped by the aspect of life in which they are/were renowned. ...

Further reading

  • Michael Freedland, Gregory Peck. A Biography. New York 1980
  • Gary Fishgall, Gregory Peck. A Biography. New York 2002
  • Lynn Haney, Gregory Peck. A Charmed Life. New York 2004

Lynn Haney is an American biographer. ...

References

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Gregory Peck
  1. ^ a b Gregory Peck Medal of Freedom.
  2. ^ Oscar Winner Gregory Peck dies at age 87.
  3. ^ Pedigree Query.
  4. ^ Communiqué de la Présidence, Champs Elysées (French).

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ...

External links

Persondata
NAME Peck, Gregory
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Peck, Eldred Gregory
SHORT DESCRIPTION actor
DATE OF BIRTH April 5, 1916
PLACE OF BIRTH La Jolla, California, U.S.
DATE OF DEATH June 12, 2003
PLACE OF DEATH Los Angeles, California, U.S.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Gregory Peck - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1542 words)
Born Eldred Gregory Peck in La Jolla, California, he was the son of Bernice Ayres (a Missouri-born convert to Catholicism) and Gregory Peck (a chemist/pharmacist of Irish-Catholic maternal descent and English paternal ancestry).
Gregory's paternal grandmother, Catherine Ashe, was related to the Irish patriot Thomas Ashe, who took part in the Easter Rising in the year of Peck's birth and died while on a hunger strike in 1917.
Peck's acting abilities were in high demand during World War II, since he was exempt from military service owing to a back injury suffered while receiving dance and movement lessons from Martha Graham as part of his acting training.
Gregory Peck - MSN Encarta (370 words)
Peck enjoyed greater freedom in his choice of roles because, unlike most motion-picture actors of the time, he did not sign an exclusive contract with any individual motion-picture studio.
Peck costarred with actor Audrey Hepburn in Roman Holiday (1953), appeared as a downed war pilot in The Purple Plain (1954), and had the role of Captain Ahab in Moby Dick (1956), which was directed by John Huston.
Peck won the 1962 Academy Award for best actor for his performance in To Kill a Mockingbird (1962), in which he played Atticus Finch, a small-town Southern lawyer of quiet courage and unimpeachable moral convictions.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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