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Encyclopedia > Greetings

A spoken greeting (often imprecisely called a verbal greeting) is a customary or ritualised word or phrase used to introduce oneself or to greet someone. Greeting habits are highly culture- and situation-specific and may change within a culture depending on social status.


In English, some common verbal greetings are:

  • "Hello", "hi" - General verbal greetings. The abbreviated version is less formal.
  • "Hey" is another less formal greeting.
  • "Good morning", "good afternoon", "good evening" - More formal verbal greetings used at the appropriate time of day. Note that the similar "good night" and "good day" are more commonly used as phrases of parting rather than greeting, although in Australian English "G'Day" is a very common greeting.
  • "What's up?", "How's it going?" and "What's happening?" - informal greetings used frequently

Verbal greetings in other languages may also be found at common phrases in different languages.


  Results from FactBites:
 
greeting: Definition, Synonyms and Much More From Answers.com (648 words)
Greetings are social customs or rituals to show attention or to confirm friendship or social status between individuals or groups of people meeting each other.
Greeting habits are highly culture- and situation-specific and may change within a culture depending on social status.
Spoken greetings are customary or ritualised words or phrases used to introduce oneself or to greet someone.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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