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Encyclopedia > Greenwich Village
The Washington Square Arch
The Washington Square Arch

Greenwich Village (IPA pronunciation: [ˌgrɛnɪtʃ 'vɪlɪdʒ]), also called simply the Village, is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City named after Greenwich, London. Today Greenwich Village is a cosmopolitan neighborhood north of Lower Manhattan, home to celebrities and many young adults. Image File history File links Stanford White Arch Source: http://emon. ... Image File history File links Stanford White Arch Source: http://emon. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about Greenwich in England. ... Woolworth Building, looking south along Broadway Lower Manhattan, from the Brooklyn Bridge, 2005 Rigid airship the USS Akron over Lower Manhattan Lower Manhattan is the southernmost part of the island of Manhattan, the main island and center of business and government of the City of New York. ...

Contents

Location

Greenwich Village street scene
Greenwich Village street scene

The neighborhood is bounded by Broadway on the east, the Hudson River on the west, Houston Street on the south, and 14th Street on the north. The neighborhoods surrounding it are the East Village to the east, SoHo to the south, and Chelsea to the north. The East Village, which was formerly known as the Bowery or considered a bona fide part of the Lower East Side, is sometimes (incorrectly) referred to as part of Greenwich Village, but it is actually its own neighborhood. This area directly east of Greenwich Village was named the East Village in the 1960s in order to capitalize on the cachet of Greenwich Village. Many New Yorkers argue that the East Village is still a subsection of the Lower East Side. Contrarily, the West Village is actually part of Greenwich Village; it is that part of the Village west of 6th Avenue. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 371 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) TYpical Greenwich village street scene on the corner of MacDougal street and Minetta Lane File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 371 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) TYpical Greenwich village street scene on the corner of MacDougal street and Minetta Lane File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia... A view of Broadway in 1909 Broadway, as the name implies, is a wide avenue in New York City, and is the oldest north-south main thoroughfare in the city, dating to the first New Amsterdam settlement. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and... Houston Street looking east, from The Bowery Houston Street looking west, from The Bowery Houston Street (pronounced ) is a major east-west thoroughfare in downtown New York City. ... A compass rose with South highlighted South is most commonly a noun, adjective, or adverb indicating direction or geography. ... 14th Street looking west from Fifth Avenue 14th Street is an important east-west thoroughfare in Manhattan in New York City. ... Compass rose with north highlighted and at top Look up North in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Looking south from 6th Street down Second Avenue, one of the main thoroughfares through the East Village. ... Cast-iron architecture in Greene Street SoHo is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan. ... Converted townhouses along 23rd Street. ... Looking south from 6th Street down Second Avenue, one of the main thoroughfares through the East Village. ... The Bowery is a well-known street in Manhattan that more or less marks the boundary between Chinatown and Little Italy on one side and the Lower East Side on the other—running from Chatham Square in the south to Astor Place in the north. ... Categories: Manhattan neighborhoods | Stub ... // For the West Village development in Dallas, Texas, see West Village, Dallas The West Village is west of the Greenwich Village neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan, bounded by the Hudson River and roughly Sixth Avenue, extending from 14th Street down to Houston Street. ...


Greenwich Village was better known as Washington Square--based on the major landmark Washington Square Park[1] or Empire Ward[2] in the 19th century. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Washington Square North. ...


Layout

The intersection of West 4th and West 12th Streets in Greenwich Village (W. 12th St., which runs east-west, runs left-right in this picture)
The intersection of West 4th and West 12th Streets in Greenwich Village (W. 12th St., which runs east-west, runs left-right in this picture)

As Greenwich Village was once a rural hamlet, entirely separate from New York, its street layout does not coincide with most of Manhattan's more formal grid plan (based on the Commissioners' Plan of 1811). Greenwich Village was allowed to keep its street pattern in areas west of Greenwich Lane (now Greenwich Avenue) and Sixth Avenue that were already built up when the plan was implemented, which has resulted in a neighborhood whose streets are dramatically different, in layout, from the ordered structure of newer parts of town. Many of the neighborhood's streets are narrow and some curve at odd angles. Additionally, unlike most of Manhattan, streets in the Village typically are named rather than numbered. While some of the formerly named streets (including Factory, Herring and Amity Streets) are now numbered, even they do not always conform to the usual grid pattern when they enter the neighborhood. For example, West 4th Street, which runs east-west outside of the Village, turns and runs north, crossing West 10th, 11th, 12th, and 13th Streets. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 123 KB) [edit] Summary Image by en:User:WindowsWizard12. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 123 KB) [edit] Summary Image by en:User:WindowsWizard12. ... A hamlet is (usually — see below) a small settlement, too small or unimportant to be considered a village. ... A simple grid plan road map (Windermere, Florida). ... An 1807 version of the Commissioners Grid plan for Manhattan, a few years before it was adopted in 1811. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...


A large section of Greenwich Village, made up of more than 50 northern and western blocks in the area up to 14th Street, is considered part of a Historic District by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission. Redevelopment in that area is severely restricted, and developers must preserve the main facade and aesthetics of the buildings even during renovation. Most parts of Greenwich Village comprise mid-rise apartments, 19th-century row houses and the occasional one-family walk-up, a sharp contrast to the hi-rise landscape in Mid- and Downtown Manhattan. Midtown Manhattan viewed from the World Trade Center. ... The term Downtown Manhattan may have different meanings to different people, especially depending on what part of New York City they live in. ...

Map of old Greenwich Village. A section of Bernard Ratzer's map of New York and its suburbs, made circa 1766 for Henry Moore, Royal Governor of New York, when Greenwich was more than two miles from the city.
Map of old Greenwich Village. A section of Bernard Ratzer's map of New York and its suburbs, made circa 1766 for Henry Moore, Royal Governor of New York, when Greenwich was more than two miles from the city.

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 521 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1000 × 1151 pixel, file size: 290 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Map of old Greenwich Village. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 521 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1000 × 1151 pixel, file size: 290 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Map of old Greenwich Village. ... Sir Henry Moore, 1st Baronet (1713 - 11 September 1769) was a British colonial leader who served as royal Governor of New York from 1765 to 1769. ...

History

Greenwich Village is located on what was once marshland. In the 16th century Native Americans referred to it as Sapokanikan ("tobacco field"). The land was cleared and turned into pasture by Dutch settlers in the 1630s who named their settlement Noortwyck. The English conquered the Dutch settlement of New Netherland in 1664 and Greenwich Village developed as a hamlet separate from the larger (and fast-growing) New York City to the south. It officially became a village in 1712 and is first referred to as Grin'wich in 1713 Common Council records. In 1822, a yellow fever epidemic in New York encouraged residents to flee to the healthier air of Greenwich Village, and afterwards many stayed. Map based on Adriaen Blocks 1614 expedition to New Netherland, featuring the first use of the name. ...


Greenwich Village is generally known as an important landmark on the map of bohemian culture. The neighborhood is known for its colorful, artistic residents and the alternative culture they propagate. Due in part to the progressive attitudes of many of its residents, the Village has traditionally been a focal point of new movements and ideas, whether political, artistic, or cultural. This tradition as an enclave of avant-garde and alternative culture was established by the beginning of the 20th century when small presses, art galleries, and experimental theater thrived. The term bohemian was first used in the nineteenth century to describe the non-traditional lifestyles of marginalized and impoverished artists, writers, musicians, and actors in major European cities. ... A work similar to Marcel Duchamps Fountain Avant garde (written avant-garde) is a French phrase, one of many French phrases used by English speakers. ... Alternative culture is a catch-all phrase used predominately by the media and the marketing industry to refer to a variety of separate sub-cultures – (which are either loosely related or near-totally unrelated) – and are perceived by the general public as being outside or on the edge of so...


During the golden age of bohemianism, Greenwich Village became famous for such eccentrics as Joe Gould (profiled at length by Joseph Mitchell) and Maxwell Bodenheim, the dancer Isadora Duncan, as well as greats on the order of Eugene O'Neill. Political rebellion also made its home here, whether serious (John Reed) or frivolous (Marcel Duchamp and friends set off balloons from atop Washington Square arch, proclaiming the founding of "The Independent Republic of Greenwich Village"). In Christmas 1949, The Weavers played at the Village Vanguard. Joe Goulds Secret is a 1965 book by Joseph Mitchell. ... Joseph Mitchell (July 27, 1908 - May 24, 1996) was a American writer who wrote for The New Yorker. ... Maxwell Bodenheim (May 26, 1891 – February 6, 1954) was an American poet and novelist. ... Isadora Duncan Isadora Duncan (May 27, 1877 – September 14, 1927) was an American dancer. ... Eugene Gladstone ONeill (October 16, 1888 – November 27, 1953) was a Nobel- and four-time Pulitzer Prize-winning American playwright. ... John Reeds signature John Jack Silas Reed (October 22, 1887 – October 19, 1920) was an American journalist, poet, and communist activist, famous for his first-hand account of the Bolshevik Revolution, Ten Days that Shook the World. ... Marcel Duchamp (pronounced ) (July 28, 1887 – October 2, 1968) was a French artist (he became an American citizen in 1955) whose work and ideas had considerable influence on the development of post-World War II Western art, and whose advice to modern art collectors helped shape the tastes of the... The Weavers were an immensely popular and influential folk music quartet from Greenwich Village, New York, United States. ... The Village Vanguard is a famous jazz club, located at 178 Seventh Avenue (just below W 11th St. ...


The Village again became important to the bohemian scene during the 1950s, when the Beat Generation focused their energies there. Fleeing from what they saw as oppressive social conformity, a loose collection of writers, poets, artists, and students (later known as the Beats) moved to Greenwich Village, in many ways creating the East-Coast predecessor to the Haight-Ashbury hippie scene of the next decade. The Village (and surrounding New York City) would later play central roles in the writings of, among others, Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, William S. Burroughs, and Dylan Thomas, who collapsed while drinking at the White Horse Tavern on November 9, 1953. The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... “Beats” redirects here. ... “Beats” redirects here. ... Categories: US geography stubs | San Francisco neighborhoods ... Jack Kerouac (pronounced ) (March 12, 1922 – October 21, 1969) was an American novelist, writer, poet, and artist. ... Irwin Allen Ginsberg (IPA: ) (June 3, 1926 – April 5, 1997) was an American poet. ... William Seward Burroughs II (February 5, 1914) - August 2, 1997; pronounced ), more commonly known as William S. Burroughs, was an American novelist, essayist, social critic, painter and spoken word performer. ... Dylan Thomas Dylan Marlais Thomas (October 27, 1914 – November 9, 1953) was a Welsh poet and writer. ... The White Horse Tavern, located in New York Citys borough of Manhattan at Hudson Street and 11th Street, is famous for its 1950s and 60s Bohemian culture. ...


Greenwich Village played a major role in the development of the folk music scene of the 1960s. Three of the four members of The Mamas and the Papas met there. Village resident Bob Dylan was one of the foremost popular songwriters in the country, and often developments in New York City would influence the simultaneously occurring folk rock movement in San Francisco, and vice versa. Dozens of other cultural and popular icons got their start in the Village's nightclub, theater, and coffeehouse scene during the 1950s, 1960s, and early 1970s, notably Peter, Paul, and Mary, Simon and Garfunkel, Joan Baez, Tom Paxton, Phil Ochs and Nina Simone. The Greenwich Village of the 1950s and 1960s was at the center of Jane Jacobs's book The Death and Life of Great American Cities, which defended it and similar communities, while critiquing common urban renewal policies of the time. Folk music can have a number of different meanings, including: Traditional music: The original meaning of the term folk music was synonymous with the term Traditional music, also often including World Music and Roots music; the term Traditional music was given its more specific meaning to distinguish it from the... The Mamas & the Papas (credited as The Mamas and the Papas on the debut album cover) were a leading vocal group of the 1960s. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde on Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Peter, Paul and Mary (often PP&M) was one of the most successful folk-singing groups of the 1960s. ... The duo of Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel are American popular musicians known collectively as Simon and Garfunkel. ... Joan Chandos Baez (born January 9, 1941) is an American folk singer and songwriter known for her highly individual vocal style. ... Thomas R. Paxton was born October 31, 1937 in Chicago, Illinois, the youngest child of Burton and Esther Paxton. ... Philip David Ochs (December 19, 1940–April 9, 1976) was a U.S. protest singer (or, as he preferred, a topical singer), songwriter, musician and recording artist who was known for his sharp wit, sardonic humor, earnest humanism, political activism, insightful and alliterative lyrics, and haunting voice. ... Eunice Kathleen Waymon, better known by her stage name Nina Simone (February 21, 1933 – April 21, 2003), was an American singer, songwriter, pianist, arranger and civil rights activist. ... Jane Jacobs Jane Jacobs, OC, O.Ont (May 4, 1916 – April 25, 2006) was an American-born Canadian urbanist, writer and activist. ... The Death and Life of Great American Cities, by Jane Jacobs, is arguably the most influential book written on urban planning in the 20th century. ... 1999 photograph looking northeast on Chicagos now demolished Cabrini-Green housing project, one of many urban renewal efforts. ...


Greenwich Village was also home to one of the many safe houses used by the radical anti-war movement known as the Weather Underground. On March 6, 1970, however, their safehouse was destroyed when an explosive they were constructing was accidentally detonated, costing three Weathermen (Ted Gold, Terry Robbins, and Diana Oughton) their lives. The global peace movement refers to a sense of common purpose among organizations that seek to end wars and minimize inter-human violence, usually through pacifism, non-violent resistance, diplomacy, boycott, moral purchasing and demonstrating. ... John Jacobs and Terry Robbins at the Days of Rage, Chicago, October 1969 (Photo credit: David Fenton; publicity photo for film Weather Underground) Weatherman, known colloquially as the Weathermen and later the Weather Underground Organization, was a U.S. Radical Left organization consisting of splintered-off members and leaders of... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Theodore Ted Gold (December 13, 1947 – March 6, 1970) was an American political activist and member of the Weathermen. ... Diana Oughton (January 26, 1942 - March 6, 1970) was the daughter of Illinois State Senator James Oughton and a member of the 1960s group The Weathermen. ...


In recent days, the Village has maintained its role as a center for movements which have challenged the wider American culture: for example, its role in the gay liberation movement. It contains Christopher Street and the Stonewall Inn, important landmarks, as well as the world's oldest gay and lesbian bookstore, Oscar Wilde Bookshop, founded in 1967. Gay Liberation (or Gay Lib) is the name used to describe the radical lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered movement of the late 1960s and early to mid 1970s in North America, Western Europe, and Australia and New Zealand. ... Christopher Street is a street in New Yorks West Village that was at the center of the gay rights movement in the late 1970s. ... LGBT rights Around the world · By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Persecution Violence This box:      The Stonewall Inn in January 2003 The Stonewall Inn was the site of the famous Stonewall riots of 1969, which have come to symbolize the beginning of...


See also Category:Greenwich Village


Present day

Jefferson Market Library, once a courthouse, now serves as a branch of the New York Public Library.
Jefferson Market Library, once a courthouse, now serves as a branch of the New York Public Library.
Greenwich Village
Greenwich Village

Currently, artists and local historians bemoan the fact that the bohemian days of Greenwich Village are long gone, because of the extraordinarily high housing costs in the neighborhood. The artists have fled to Williamsburg and Bushwick in Brooklyn, Long Island City, and DUMBO. Nevertheless, residents of Greenwich Village still possess a strong community identity and are proud of their neighborhood's unique history and fame, and its well-known liberal live-and-let-live attitudes. Indeed, its cultural uniqueness and apartness are felt so strongly, and so many of its residents' lives are so locally focused, that it is sometimes said thereabouts that "upstate" New York is anywhere north of 14th Street. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 469 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1704 × 2176 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 469 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1704 × 2176 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Jefferson Market Branch, New York Public Library is located along the Avenue of the Americas (6th Avenue) in Greenwich Village, New York City on a triangular plot formed by Greenwich Avenue and West 10th Street. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Download high resolution version (768x1024, 677 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (768x1024, 677 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The term bohemian was first used in the nineteenth century to describe the non-traditional lifestyles of marginalized and impoverished artists, writers, musicians, and actors in major European cities. ... Williamsburg is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, bordering Greenpoint, Bed-Stuy, and Bushwick. ... Bushwick is a neighborhood in the northeastern part of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... Long Island City, New York, often abbreviated L.I.C., is an area in the borough of Queens in New York City. ... A view of part of DUMBO with Manhattan in the distance Newly built apartment tower DuMBo (an acronym for Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass) is the popular name of a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. ...


Greenwich Village is now home to many celebrities, including actresses/actors Julianne Moore, Liv Tyler, Uma Thurman, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Amy Sedaris, and Barbara Pierce Bush, the daughter of U.S. President George W. Bush, who both live on West Ninth Street.[3] Julianne Moore (born December 3, 1960) is an Emmy Award-winning American actress. ... Liv Tyler (born Liv Rundgren, on July 1, 1977 at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, New York[1]) is an American actress best known for her roles of Grace Stamper in Armageddon and Arwen in The Lord of the Rings trilogy. ... Uma Karuna Thurman (born April 29, 1970) is an Academy Award-nominated American actress. ... Philip Seymour Hoffman (born July 23, 1967) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Amy Sedaris (born March 29, 1961, in Endicott, New York) is an American actress, author, and comedian. ... For the wife of George H.W. Bush, see Barbara Bush. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


Greenwich Village includes the primary campus for New York University (NYU), The New School, and Yeshiva University's Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law. Cooper Union is also located in Greenwich Village, near Lafayette and Bleecker, but on the border near the East Village. New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... The New School is an institution of higher learning in New York City, located around Greenwich Village in Lower Manhattan. ... Yeshiva University is a private Jewish university in New York City whose first component was founded in 1886. ... The Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law is the law school of Yeshiva University, located in the New York City borough of Manhattan. ... The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art is a privately funded college in Lower Manhattan of New York City. ...


The historic Washington Square Park is the center and heart of the neighborhood, but the Village has several other, smaller parks: Father Fagan, Minetta Triangle, Petrosino Square, Little Red Square, and Time Landscape. There are also city playgrounds, including Desalvio, Minetta, Thompson Street, Bleecker Street, Downing Street, Mercer Street, and William Passannante Ballfield. Perhaps the most famous, though, is "The Cage", officially known as the West 4th Street Courts. Sitting on top of the West Fourth Street–Washington Square subway station at Sixth Avenue, the courts are easily accessible to basketball and American handball players from all over New York. The Cage has become one of the most important tournament sites for the city-wide "Streetball" amateur basketball tournament. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Washington Square North. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... West Fourth Street–Washington Square is a station on the IND Sixth Avenue and IND Eighth Avenue Lines of the New York City Subway, located at the intersection of West Fourth Street and Sixth Avenue in Greenwich Village, Manhattan. ... This article is about the sport. ... American (or court) handball, usually referred to simply as handball, is an American form of fives played against one or more walls. ... Streetballers at the Venice Beach basketball courts, California, USA. Streetball is an urban form of basketball, played on playgrounds and in gymnasiums across the world. ...


The Village also has a bustling performing arts scene. It is home to many Off-Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway theaters; for instance, Blue Man Group has taken up residence in the Astor Place Theater. The Village Vanguard hosts some of the biggest names in jazz on a regular basis. Other music clubs include The Bitter End, and Lion's Den. The village also has its own orchestra aptly named the Greenwich Village Orchestra. Comedy clubs dot the Village as well, including The Boston and Comedy Cellar, where many American stand-up comedians got their start. Off-Broadway plays or musicals are performed in New York City in smaller theatres than Broadway, but larger than Off-Off-Broadway, productions. ... Off-Off-Broadway refers to theatrical productions including plays, musicals or performance art pieces performed in New York City in smaller theatres than Broadway productions or off-Broadway productions. ... Blue Man Group (Blue Man, BMG) is a creative organization founded by Phil Stanton, Chris Wink, and Matt Goldman; it is centered on a trio of mute performers, called Blue Men, who present themselves in blue grease paint, latex bald caps, and black clothing. ... The Village Vanguard is a famous jazz club, located at 178 Seventh Avenue (just below W 11th St. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... The Bitter End is arguably the most famous nightclub in New York Citys Greenwich Village. ... Lions Den is a music club located at 214 Sullivan Street, between Bleecker Street and West 3rd Street, in the Greenwich Village section of New York City. ... The Greenwich Village Orchestra (GVO) is a semi-professional orchestra based in the heart of Greenwich Village. ... The Comedy Cellar is a famous comedy club in Manhattan, where many top New York comedians perform. ... Stand-up comedy is a style of comedy where the performer speaks directly to the audience, with the absence of the theatrical fourth wall. ...


Each year on October 31, it is home to New York's Village Halloween Parade, a mile-long ad hoc pageant of masqueraders, mummers, drag queens, exhibitionists, drunkards, druggies, puppets and pets that draws an audience of two million from throughout the region, the largest Halloween event in the country. The delighted and high-spirited throngs include everyone from the smallest children dressed in the simplest homemade or store-bought costumes on up to adults bedecked in the most elaborate and ingenious guises and disguises that professional and amateur costume designers and makeup artists can conceive and create with a year's notice. // Volunteers costumed as a deck of playing cards shuffle up Sixth Avenue in New Yorks Village Halloween Parade, directed by artist and producer Jeanne Fleming. ...


Several publications have offices in the Village, most notably the newsweekly The Village Voice. This article is about a New York newspaper. ...


Sullivan St. was home to Genovese Family godfather Vincent Gigante. A lifelong resident, shortly before his death in federal prison he told a fellow inmate 'Greenwich Village is the greatest place in the U.S.' [4] The Genovese Family is one of the five Mafia Families in New York City. ... Vincent the Chin Gigs Gigante (March 29, 1928– December 19, 2005) was an Italian-American Mafioso who headed the Genovese crime family for years, at times while in prison. ...


In fiction and drama

  • Henry James's novel Washington Square takes place, for the most part, in Greenwich Village.
  • The musical RENT takes place in Greenwich Village, with the character Tom Collins teaching at NYU
  • My Sister Eileen was about the odd characters living in Greenwich Village.
  • For most of its run in the mid-1980s, the title characters on the CBS sitcom Kate & Allie shared a brownstone in Greenwich Village.
  • The Marvel Comics superhero Doctor Strange hails from Greenwich Village.
  • The 19942004 NBC sitcom Friends is set in the Village (Central Perk was apparently on Mercer or Houston Street, down the block from the Angelika Film Center[5], and Phoebe lived at 5 Morton Street[6]), though it was filmed and produced in Burbank, California. The exterior shot of Chandler, Joey, Rachel, and Monica's apartment building is actually located at Grove Street and Bedford Street in the West Village.
  • The movie 13 Going on 30, which involves a girl who wishes to be older on her birthday, includes a scene where the main character wishes to find a boy from her past. When asking her secretary where the boy currently lives, she replies "The Village" which confuses the main character (still stuck in her 30-year-old body), and the secretary clarifies by saying "...Greenwich...Village."
  • Kinky Friedman resided in the Village, both in his novels and in real life.
  • RUEHL no. 925 based its store theme on a German Leatherman who created his workshop in Greenwich Village at address #925. The store's story of course, is fiction.
  • The Village was also used in the short story The Last Leaf by O. Henry.
  • In the final draft of the screenplay of the Alfred Hitchcock film, Rear Window, noted the setting as being Greenwich Village, although it is not mentioned in the film.
  • In The Princess Diaries novels by Meg Cabot, Princess Mia Thermopolis lives with her Bohemian artist mom, Helen Thermopolis, in a loft apartment in Greenwich Village, at 1001 Thompson Street. Mia's best friend Lilly Moscovitz also lives in the Village, but on 5th Avenue.
  • The novel Found in the Street by Patricia Highsmith is set in the Greenwich Village, which plays an important part in the story.
  • In the musical Funny Face, a photo shoot for Quality Magazine was relocated to a "dark and gloomy bookshop" in Greenwich Village to make the model look more "intelligent". The magazine staff went off and picked a book shop that looked "dark and gloomy enough" and here they discovered the "QUALITY WOMAN", a storekeeper with a "funny face" (Audrey Hepburn).
  • In Barefoot in the Park (play and screenplay by Neil Simon), newlyweds (portrayed by Robert Redford and Jane Fonda) live in a tiny apartment in the Village and important scenes occur in Washington Square Park. The setting was important in establishing the clash between conformity and bohemianism. Filming was done on location in the Village.
  • In the television series Mad About You, newlyweds Paul Buchman and his wife, Jamie, live together in an apartment in the Greenwich Village area.

Rent can refer to: Renting, a system of payment for the temporary use of something owned by someone else. ... New York University (NYU) is a large research-oriented university in New York City, and is among the most prestigious post-secondary institutions in the United States. ... My Sister Eileen is the name of several works based on short stories by Ruth McKenney about her adventures in Greenwich Village with her sister, Eileen McKenney. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... Kate & Allie was a television situation comedy, airing on CBS from 1984 to 1989. ... This article is about the building material and the dwelling. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... For the upcoming parody of superhero films, see Superhero!. Batman and Superman, two of the most recognizable and iconic superheroes. ... This article is about the Marvel comics superhero. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the television network. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... For the use of the word in a general sense, see Friendship. ... Burbank is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Matt LeBlanc as Joey Tribbiani in Joey Joseph Joey Francis Tribbiani is a fictional character on the popular US television sitcom Friends (1994–2004), played by Matt LeBlanc. ... Information Gender Female Age 24 (start of series) 34 (by end of series) Occupation Former Waitress at Central Perk, Former Buyer and Personal Shopper at Bloomingdales, Executive at Ralph Lauren Family Leonard Greene(father) Sandra Greene {mother) Amy Greene (sister) Jill Greene (sister) Ida Spuds Greene (Paternal Grandmother) Spouse... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... // The West Village is part of the Greenwich Village neighborhood in the New York City Bourough of Manhattan, bounded by the Hudson River and roughly 6th Avenue, extending from 14th Street down to Houston Street. ... 13 Going On 30 (also known as Suddenly 30 in Australia and 13 Love 30 In Japan) is a 2004 comedy movie starring Jennifer Garner. ... For other uses, see Secretary (disambiguation). ... Kinky Friedman contemplates a question from the audience at a campaign rally in Bastrop, Texas Richard S. Kinky Friedman (born October 31, 1944) is an American singer, songwriter, novelist, humorist, politician and former columnist for Texas Monthly. ... A new concept store by New Albany, Ohio headqaurted. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 – April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... For the 1998 remake, see Rear Window (1998 film). ... Hepburn, Crenna, Arkin and Weston Wait Until Dark is a 1966 film which tells the story of a blind woman terrorized by three criminals searching for drugs in her apartment. ... Audrey Hepburn (4 May 1929 - 20 January 1993) was an Academy Award and Tony Award winning Anglo-Dutch actress of film and theatre, Broadway stage performer, ballerina, fashion model, and humanitarian. ... Funny Face (TV series). ... Audrey Hepburn (4 May 1929 - 20 January 1993) was an Academy Award and Tony Award winning Anglo-Dutch actress of film and theatre, Broadway stage performer, ballerina, fashion model, and humanitarian. ... Barefoot in the Park is a 1963 Tony-nominated comedy play by Neil Simon, about a young couple and their odd neighbors in their small apartment building in Greenwich Village, New York. ... Mad About You is an American sitcom that aired on NBC from September 23, 1992, to May 24, 1999. ... The Pope of Greenwich Village is a 1984 film starring Mickey Rourke and Eric Roberts. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Education

Greenwich Village residents are zoned to schools in the New York City Department of Education. The Official Seal of the City of New York The New York City Department of Education is the branch of municipal government in New York City that manages the citys public school system. ...


Residents are jointly zoned to two elementary schools: P.S. 3 Melser Charrette School and P.S. 41 Greenwich Village school. Residents are zoned to Simon Baruch Middle School 104. Simon Baruch Middle School 104 is a public secondary school located in Lower Manhattan in the New York City borough (New York City) of Manhattan. ...


Residents must apply to New York City high schools.


Famous residents

Notable current and former residents of Greenwich Village include:

Joan Chandos Baez (born January 9, 1941) is an American folk singer and songwriter known for her highly individual vocal style. ... For the wife of George H.W. Bush, see Barbara Bush. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom since 1788. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... David Byrne may be: David Byrne (politician) (born 1947), Irish & European official David Byrne (musician) (born 1952), musician and former Talking Heads frontman David Byrnes self-titled album David Byrne (footballer) (born 1961), football player David Byrne (web designer) (born 1981), Australian Web / Graphic Designer David Byrne (soccer), (born... E. E. Cummings Edward Estlin Cummings (October 14, 1894 – September 3, 1962), popularly known as E. E. Cummings, was an American poet, painter, essayist, and playwright. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ... Philip David Ochs (December 19, 1940–April 9, 1976) was a U.S. protest singer (or, as he preferred, a topical singer), songwriter, musician and recording artist who was known for his sharp wit, sardonic humor, earnest humanism, political activism, insightful and alliterative lyrics, and haunting voice. ... Thomas R. Paxton was born October 31, 1937 in Chicago, Illinois, the youngest child of Burton and Esther Paxton. ... The duo of Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel are American popular musicians known collectively as Simon and Garfunkel. ... Blue Man Group (Blue Man, BMG) is a creative organization founded by Phil Stanton, Chris Wink, and Matt Goldman; it is centered on a trio of mute performers, called Blue Men, who present themselves in blue grease paint, latex bald caps, and black clothing. ... Amel Larrieux is an American R&B and soul singer and songwriter. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... Yoko Ono Lennon (小野 洋子 Ono Yōko (ONO Yōko), born February 18, 1933) is a Japanese-American artist and musician. ... Jane Jacobs Jane Jacobs, OC, O.Ont (May 4, 1916 – April 25, 2006) was an American-born Canadian urbanist, writer and activist. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sarah Jessica Parker (born March 25, 1965) is an American actress producer, with a portfolio of television, movie, and theater performances. ... Amy Sedaris (born March 29, 1961, in Endicott, New York) is an American actress, author, and comedian. ... Edgard Victor Achille Charles Varèse (December 22, 1883 – November 6, 1965) was a French-born composer. ... Anna Wintour (born November 3, 1949, in London) has been the editor-in-chief of American Vogue since 1988. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ...

See also

Christopher Street is a street in New Yorks West Village that was at the center of the gay rights movement in the late 1970s. ... Gay Street, a short street that marks off one block of New York Citys West Village, is described on New York Songlines as follows: This street, originally a stable alley, was probably named for an early landowner, not for the sexuality of any denizens. ... This article is about a New York newspaper. ... Looking south from 6th Street down Second Avenue, one of the main thoroughfares through the East Village. ... // Volunteers costumed as a deck of playing cards shuffle up Sixth Avenue in New Yorks Village Halloween Parade, directed by artist and producer Jeanne Fleming. ... The Church of the Ascension (Manhattan) is an Episcopal church in the Diocese of New York, located at Fifth Avenue and Tenth Street in New York Citys historic Greenwich Village neighborhood. ... Village Care of New York (VCNY) is a community-based, not-for-profit organization in New York City. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission is the New York City agency charged with administering New Yorks Landmarks Preservation Law. ... Anna Alice Chapin (1880-1920) was an American author, born in New York City. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ...

References

  1. ^ The Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation -- Village History
  2. ^ Harris, Luther S. 'Around Washington Square' An Illustrated History of Greenwich Village Johns Hopkins University Press (2003). Retrieved January 22, 2007.
  3. ^ [1]
  4. ^ GangLandNews.com This Bud's For Who? by Jerry Capeci
  5. ^ The Angelika Film Center was said to be "up the block" from Central Perk in "The One Where Ross Hugs Rachel", the sixth season's second episode, placing the coffee house on Mercer Street or Houston.
  6. ^ This address was given "The One With All The Kissing", the fifth season's second episode.

Coordinates: 40°44′N, 74°00′W Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 221 KB) Summary The top floors of the Chrysler building seen from the east on 42nd Street in morning light. ... Community Boards of Manhattan are local government bodies in the New York City borough of Manhattan, which are appointed by the Borough President. ... The Manhattan Community Board 1 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhoods of Tribeca and Lower Manhattan in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 2 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhoods of Greenwich Village, West Village, NoHo, SoHo, Lower East Side, Chinatown, and Little Italy in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 3 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhoods of Tompkins Square, East Village, Lower East Side, Chinatown and Two Bridges, in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 4 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhoods of Clinton and Chelsea in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 5 is a local government unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of Midtown in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 6 is a local government unit of the City of New York, encompassing the East Side of Manhattan from 14th to 59th Streets. ... The Manhattan Community Board 7 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of Manhattan Valley, Upper West Side, and Lincoln Square in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 8 is a local government unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of Upper East Side, LenoxHill, Yorkville, and Roosevelt Island in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 9 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of Hamilton Heights, Manhattanville, and Morningside Heights in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 10 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of Harlem and Polo Grounds in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 11 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of East Harlem, El Barrio/Spanish Harlem, Wards and Randalls Island in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 12 is a local government unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of Inwood and Washington Heights in the borough of Manhattan. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
American Masters . Greenwich Village | PBS (471 words)
For nearly all of the 20th century Greenwich Village was a central location for artists and innovators from around the world.
One of the first great venues was the Greenwich Village Follies, where dancers and musicians such as Martha Graham and Cole Porter got their start.
By the 1950s and 1960s, Greenwich Village was attracting the furthest ranges of diverse creative minds, among whom composer John Cage, artists Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns, and dancers Merce Cunningham, Alwin Nikolais, and Murray Louis were only a few.
New York (city)/Greenwich Village - Wikitravel (1072 words)
Greenwich Village (often simply referred to as "the Village") is a well-known, largely residential district in Manhattan, one of the boroughs of New York.
The neighborhoods surrounding it are the East Village to the east, SoHo to the south, and Chelsea to the north.
Greenwich Village is also the main setting for the TV series Friends as Monica's apartment has a Grove St. address, and there are numerous references to nearby areas such as Bleecker St. and SoHo (although the series was actually filmed in the Warner Brother studios in Los Angeles).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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