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Encyclopedia > Greenock
Greenock
Gaelic - Grianaig
Scots - Greenock


View west over Greenock with the Golden Princess at Clydeport Ocean Terminal Greenock can refer to: Greenock, a town in Inverclyde, Scotland Greenock, a historic township in Brockton, Ontario, Canada Greenock, a town in Pennsylvania, USA Greenock, a former UK Parliament constituency Greenock and Inverclyde, a constiutuency of the Scottish Parliament Lord Greenock, a courtesy title held by the heir to the... Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... Scots refers to the Anglic varieties spoken in parts of Scotland. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2178x1198, 213 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Greenock ... The Golden Princess is a cruise ship for Princess Cruises. ...

Population 45,467 (2001 Census)
OS grid reference NS275764
Council area Inverclyde
Lieutenancy area Renfrewshire
Constituent country Scotland
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town GREENOCK
Postcode district PA15, PA16
Dialling code 01475
Vehicle code SA-SJ (Glasgow)
Police Strathclyde
Fire Strathclyde
Ambulance Scottish
Scottish Parliament Greenock and Inverclyde
UK Parliament Inverclyde
European Parliament Scotland
List of places: UKScotland

Coordinates: 55°56′59″N 4°45′51″W / 55.94957, -4.76415 Image File history File links Size of this preview: 451 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1154 × 1535 pixel, file size: 661 KB, MIME type: image/png) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... For local government purposes, Scotland is divided into 32 areas designated as Council Areas of Scotland which are all governed by unitary authorities designated as Councils which have the option under the Local Government (Gaelic Names) (Scotland) Act 1997 (as chosen by Na h-Eileanan an Iar) of being known... Inverclyde (Inbhir Chluaidh in Gaelic) is one of 32 council areas in Scotland. ... The Lieutenancy areas of Scotland are the areas used for the ceremonial lords-lieutenant, the monarchs representatives, in Scotland. ... Renfrewshire (Siorrachd Rinn Friù in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary authority regions in Scotland. ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping; thus the OECD has used the phrase in reference to the former Yugoslavia[1], the Soviet Union and European institutions such as the Council of... This article is about the country. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The PA postcode area, also known as the Paisley postcode area[1], is a group of postal districts around Appin, Bishopton, Bridge of Orchy, Bridge of Weir, Cairndow, Campbeltown, Colintraive, Dalmally, Dunoon, Erskine, Gourock, Greenock, Inveraray, Isle of Bute, Isle of Coll, Isle of Colonsay, Isle of Gigha, Isle of... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... British car number plates are vehicle registration plates (more commonly known as number plates) which have existed in the United Kingdom since 1904. ... The following are the vehicle number plate identifiers used in Great Britain since the 2001 changes to British vehicle number plates. ... Strathclyde Police is the police force for the Scottish council areas of Argyll and Bute, City of Glasgow, East Ayrshire, East Dunbartonshire, East Renfrewshire, Inverclyde, North Ayrshire North Lanarkshire, Renfrewshire, South Ayrshire, South Lanarkshire and West Dunbartonshire. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... Strathclyde Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service for the area of Strathclyde, Scotland, it is the largest fire and rescue service in the Scotland, and one of the largest in Europe. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Two Mercedes-Benz Sprinter-based ambulances of the Scottish Ambulance Service The Scottish Ambulance Service serves all of Scotland and is a special health board funded directly by the health department of the Scottish Executive. ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... Greenock and Inverclyde is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood). ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Inverclyde is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... Scotland constitutes a single constituency of the European Parliament. ... List of burghs in Scotland List of cities in the United Kingdom Lists of places within Scottish regions List of places in Orkney List of places in Shetland List of places in the Borders region of Scotland List of places in the Central region of Scotland List of places in... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Greenock (Grianaig in Scottish Gaelic) is a large town and former burgh of barony in the Inverclyde Council Area in western Scotland, forming part of a contiguous urban area with Gourock to the west and Port Glasgow to the east. // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... A burgh of barony is a type of Scottish town (burgh). ... Inverclyde (Inbhir Chluaidh in Gaelic) is one of 32 council areas in Scotland. ... The 32 council areas of Scotland form the local government areas of Scotland, all of them unitary authorities. ... This article is about the country. ... Gourock (Guireag in Scottish Gaelic which means pimple shaped or rounded hill in reference to the many hills surrounding the area,) is a burgh in Inverclyde, Scotland. ... Port Glasgow is a burgh in Inverclyde, Scotland on the River Clyde. ...


Greenock's population was recorded as being 45,467 in the 2001 census, a decrease from about 78,000 in 1966. It lies on the south bank of the Clyde at the "Tail of the Bank" where the River Clyde expands into the Firth of Clyde, and is in what was the county of Renfrewshire. UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... Looking north from Greenock over the Tail of the Bank today, the cranes of the container terminal can be seen to the right, while on the other side of the Firth of Clyde the waters of the Gare Loch are just visible beyond the tail of the Rosneath peninsula. ... The River Clyde opening out at Newark Castle, Port Glasgow past Clydeport Ocean Terminal, Greenock, to the Firth of Clyde on the left, and to the right past Ardmore Point to the Gare Loch. ... Map of the Firth of Clyde and area The Firth of Clyde forms a large area of coastal water, sheltered from the Atlantic ocean by the Kintyre peninsula which encloses the outer firth in Argyll and Ayrshire, Scotland. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Renfrewshire was a county of Scotland until their abolition in 1975. ...

Contents

History

Name

The origin of the town's name is uncertain. It is generally accepted, however, that the town is named after the Gaelic word for 'sun', grian, either as grian-aig (sunny bay) or grian-cnoc (sunny hill). The suggestion that the town's name comes from the words "Green Oak" is unfounded, but the image has been taken as a logo for the town's main shopping centre, The Oak Mall and was once emblazoned on the local Co-operative Society emblem. The story that 'Greenock' derives from 'Green Oak' is also perpetrated in a local song (The Green Oak Tree) and in the fact that the local dialect makes virtually no distinction between the syllables -ock and -oak. Significantly, no green oak appears on the town's coat of arms which features three sugar caskets, a sailing ship in full sail and three herring above the motto God Speed Greenock. // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... In the UK, the Co-Op refers to supermarkets, convenience stores, funeral directors, a small number of department stores and other businesses owned by a variety of independent Co-operative societies but largely marketed and operated in a co-ordinated way. ... A dialect (from the Greek word διάλεκτος, dialektos) is a variety of a language characteristic of a particular group of the languages speakers. ... This article discusses the unit of speech. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... Species Clupea alba Clupea bentincki Clupea caspiopontica Clupea chrysotaenia Clupea elongata Clupea halec Clupea harengus Clupea inermis Clupea leachii Clupea lineolata Clupea minima Clupea mirabilis Clupea pallasii Clupea sardinacaroli Clupea sulcata Herrings are small oily fish of the genus Clupea found in the shallow, temperate waters of the North Atlantic...


Early history

Greenock was founded as a fishing village sometime prior 1592 when it split from the Inverkip parish. After the Act of Union 1707, Greenock's facilities made it the main port on the West Coast and it prospered due to trade with the Americas, importing sugar from the Caribbean. In 1827 Loch Thom was constructed as a reservoir with The Cut aqueduct bringing water to power industry. Greenock Central railway station at Cathcart Street opened in 1841, for the first time providing a fast route to the coast to catch Clyde steamer services without having to take the steamer all the way from Glasgow. In 1869 the Caledonian Railway was bypassed by the rival Glasgow and South Western Railway opening a station on the waterfront at Princes Pier. Inverkip is a village and parish (which was also known as Innerkip) in Inverclyde, Scotland. ... The Acts of Union were twin Acts of Parliament passed in 1707 (taking effect on 26 March) by the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland. ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World consisting of the continents of North America[1] and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... This article is about sugar as food and as an important and widely-traded commodity. ... “West Indian” redirects here. ... Loch Thom is a reservoir in Inverclyde, Scotland. ... For other uses, see Aqueduct (disambiguation). ... Greenock Central station is one of eight stations serving the town of Greenock in western Scotland. ... Henry Bells PS Comet started a rapid expansion of steam services on the Firth of Clyde, and within four years a steamer service was in operation on the inland Loch Lomond, a forerunner of the lake steamers that still grace the Swiss lakes. ... The Caledonian Railway was a Scottish railway company which was grouped into the London Midland and Scottish Railway by the Railways Act 1921 in 1923. ... Glasgow and South Western Railway formed part of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway. ...


The Greenock Custom House building was designed by William Burn in 1818 and considered by many to be the finest in Britain. It underwent refurbishment which was completed in 1989 and now houses a customs and excise museum which is open to the public on weekdays. Custom House is an area of the London Borough of Newham. ... William Burn (1789-1870) was a Scottish architect. ... Customs is an authority or agency in a country responsible for collecting customs duties and for controlling the flow of animals and goods (including personal effects and hazardous items) in and out of a country. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        Excise tax, sometimes called an excise duty, is a type of... The Louvre Museum in Paris, one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ...


Victoria Tower

The Municipal Buildings with the Victoria Tower and "Cowan's Corner", and the Mid Kirk spire of 1781 to the left.
The Municipal Buildings with the Victoria Tower and "Cowan's Corner", and the Mid Kirk spire of 1781 to the left.

Greenock's increasing importance and wealth was manifested in the construction of the Italianate Municipal Buildings, whose Victoria Tower, completed in 1886, stands 245 feet (74.7 metres) tall. Begun five years previously in a competition won by architects H. & D. Barclay, it audaciously trumps the tower of the contemporaneous Glasgow City Chambers by more than a metre. It remains uncompleted, however. A local businessman called Robert Cowan refused to sell his building in front of the tower for less than his own price, preventing completion of the right hand façade of the southern elevation. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1589x2152, 401 KB) Summary Greenock Municipal Buildings featuring the Victoria Tower photograph taken in 21 March 2006 by User:Dave souza. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1589x2152, 401 KB) Summary Greenock Municipal Buildings featuring the Victoria Tower photograph taken in 21 March 2006 by User:Dave souza. ... The front of the City Chambers, from George Square. ... West façade of the Notre-Dame de Strasbourg Cathedral A facade (or façade) is the exterior of a building – especially the front, but also sometimes the sides and rear. ...


Prosperity

Further evidence of this wealth can be seen in the large villas of Greenock's west end, one time home to the shipowners, industrialists and investors. The area is fronted by the mile long (1.6 km) sweep of the Esplanade with its views across the Clyde to Kilcreggan which almost convinces the visitor that no heavy industry could have been anywhere nearby. Kilcreggan is a village situated on the north shore of the Firth of Clyde at the end of the Rosneath Peninsula, between the Gareloch and Loch Long, about 25 miles (40 km) west of the centre of Glasgow by boat, though 38 miles (60 km) by road. ...


To regain custom, the Caledonian Railway extended the Inverclyde Line west to Gourock, having to keep it inland running through deep cuttings and tunnels to avoid disturbance to the west end villas. At Fort Matilda railway station the tunnel emerged near the coast, and the excavated material was used as landfill to the west of the old coastal gun emplacement of Fort Matilda, forming a level area which became the playing fields of Battery Park. In 1907 the Admiralty compulsory purchased part of this land and constructed the Clyde Torpedo Factory which opened in 1910 with 700 workers transferred from Woolwich Arsenal. The factory carried out design and manufacture of torpedoes which were tested in Loch Long, then during the Second World War work switched entirely to manufacturing torpedoes. The original gun battery site was occupied by the Navy Buildings just to the east of the torpedo factory. The Inverclyde Line is a railway line running from Glasgow Central station through Paisley (Gilmour Street) and a series of stations to the south of the River Clyde and the Firth of Clyde, terminating at Gourock and Wemyss Bay, where it connects to Caledonian MacBrayne ferry services. ... Fort Matilda railway station lies at the far western edge of the town of Greenock on the Inverclyde Line. ... Flag of the Lord High Admiral The Admiralty was formerly the authority in the United Kingdom responsible for the command of the Royal Navy. ... The Woolwich Arsenal was an armaments manufacturing facility on the south bank of the River Thames in Woolwich in south-east London. ... Loch Long is a body of water in Argyll and Bute, Scotland. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


Second World War

Greenock suffered badly during the Second World War and its anchorage at the Tail of the Bank became the base for the Home Fleet as well as the main assembly point for Atlantic convoys. On 30 April 1940 the French Vauquelin class destroyer Maillé Brézé blew up off Greenock with heavy loss of life following an accident involving two of her own torpedoes. Although this disaster occurred before the Free French Naval Forces were established, many people tend to regard the Cross of Lorraine on Lyle Hill as a memorial to the loss of the Maillé Brézé as well as to the later losses of the Free French naval vessels which sailed from the town. On the nights of 6 May and 7 May 1941 around 300 Luftwaffe aircraft attacked the town in the Greenock Blitz. A large building housing a drapery business constructed on Cowan's property at the corner of the Municipal Buildings was badly damaged and was demolished, leaving the blank brick corner area still known as "Cowan's Corner". Looking north from Greenock over the Tail of the Bank today, the cranes of the container terminal can be seen to the right, while on the other side of the Firth of Clyde the waters of the Gare Loch are just visible beyond the tail of the Rosneath peninsula. ... The Home Fleet is the traditional name of the fleet of the Royal Navy that protects the United Kingdoms territorial waters. ... The Atlantic Ocean is Earths second-largest ocean, covering approximately one_fifth of its surface. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Vauquelin-class large destroyers (contre-torpilleurs) of the French navy were laid down in 1930 and commissioned in 1931. ... Flag De Jure territory Capital Paris Capital-in-exile London, Algiers Government Republic Leader Charles de Gaulle Historical era World War II  - de Gaulles appeal June 18, 1940  - Liberation of Paris August, 1944 The Free French Forces (French: , FFL) were French fighters in World War II, who decided to... Cross of Lorraine The Cross of Lorraine, ‡, is a heraldic cross. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... The Deutsche Luftwaffe or   (German: air force, literally Air Weapon, pronounced lufft-va-fa, IPA: ) is the commonly used term for the German air force. ... The Greenock Blitz is the name given to two nights of intensive bombing of the town of Greenock by the Luftwaffe in May 1941. ...


Postwar years

Greenock thrived in the post-war years but as the heavy industries declined in the 1970s and 1980s unemployment became a major problem, and it has only been in the last ten years with reinvestment and the redevelopment of large sections of the town that the local economy has started to revive. Tourism has also appeared as an unexpected bonus with the development of the Clydeport Container Terminal as an Ocean Terminal for cruise ships crossing the Atlantic. Students who do not travel further afield for study often attend the James Watt College of Further and Higher Education. James Watt College, taken from above Greenock West Railway Station. ...


Greenock reached its population peak in 1921 (81,123) and was once the sixth largest town in Scotland.


Greenock is the northern terminus of Euroroute E05 which heads south through England, France and Spain, ending at the Spanish port of Algeciras which also possesses a container terminal. European Route Sign The international E-road network is a network of roads in Europe, numbered E1 and up. ... Map of E5 within Great Britain, France and Spain. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Algeciras is a port city in the south of Spain, near the British colony/Overseas Territory of Gibraltar, slightly to the north from Tarifa, which is the southernmost town of the peninsular Spain and Europe (, ). Both cities are situated on the Strait of Gibraltar; Algeciras also faces the Mediterranean. ...


Governance

Until 1974 Greenock was a parliamentary burgh in its own right. It was merged with Port Glasgow to form Greenock and Port Glasgow constituency. In 1997 it became Greenock and Inverclyde. After the redistribution of Scottish seats it was merged into an enlarged Inverclyde constituency- the first time in political history that Greenock has not been named in a parliamentary seat. Greenock and Inverclyde remains a Scottish Parliament constituency. Greenock was a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1832 until 1974, when its name was changed to Greenock and Port Glasgow. ... A burgh constituency is a type of parliamentary constituency in Scotland. ... Greenock and Port Glasgow was a burgh constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1974 until 1997, electing one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election. ... Greenock was a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1832 until 1974, when its name was changed to Greenock and Port Glasgow. ... Inverclyde is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Greenock and Inverclyde is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood). ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ...


Geography

Areas and suburbs

Arran View, Bogston, Bow Farm, Braeside, Branchton, Bridgend, Broomhill, Cartsburn, Cornhaddock, Fancy Farm, Fort Matilda, Gibshill, Greenock West, Grieve Hill, Hole Farm, Larkfield, Lyle Hill, Lynedoch Overton, Pennyfern, Strone, Strone Farm, and Whinhill. Bogston railway station is on the Inverclyde Line, between the towns of Port Glasgow and Greenock in Inverclyde, Scotland. ... Braeside is a council estate situated on the far west side of Greenock. ... Perhaps the most slum like area of the whole town. ... Fort Matilda railway station lies at the far western edge of the town of Greenock on the Inverclyde Line. ... Gibshill (also spelt sometimes as Gibbshill) is the eastern-most housing estate in Greenock and adjoins Port Glasgow, both in the Inverclyde Council Area, Scotland. ... Greenock West: The Middle class area of Greenock. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Gourock and the Clyde from Lyle Hill, Greenock. ... Shaws Water Works compensation reservoir and water engineers house overlooking the houses of Overton. ... Whinhill railway station is a railway station in the town of Greenock, Inverclyde, Scotland. ...


Economy

Historically, the town relied on shipbuilding, sugar refining and wool manufacturing for employment. In more recent years the town relied heavily on electronics manufacture. However this has given way mostly to call centre business and shipping export. Men from Francisco de Orellanas expedition building a small brigantine, the San Pedro, to be used in the search for food Shipbuilding is the construction of ships. ... This article is about sugar as food and as an important and widely-traded commodity. ... Long and short hair wool at the South Central Family Farm Research Center in Boonesville, Arizona Wool is the fiber derived from the fur of animals and people of the Caprinae family, principally sheep, but the hair of certain species of other mammals such as goats and rabbits and oxes... This article is about the engineering discipline. ... A very large collections call centre in Lakeland, FL. A call centre or call center (see spelling differences) is a centralised office used for the purpose of receiving and transmitting a large volume of requests by telephone. ...


Shipbuilding

Greenock waterfront from Victoria Harbour to Ocean Terminal, the skyline dominated by Victoria Tower.
Greenock waterfront from Victoria Harbour to Ocean Terminal, the skyline dominated by Victoria Tower.

In the early 17th century, the first pier was built in Greenock. Shipbuilding was already an important employer by this time. The first proper harbour was constructed in 1710 and the first well-known shipbuilders, Scott's, was established the following year. It was the oldest shipbuilding business in the world and gained numerous contracts with the Royal Navy from 1806, building ships such as the Prince of Wales. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2254x953, 419 KB) Summary Greenock waterfront: view from call centre car park, site formerly Scott Lithgows shipyard, showing from left to right; Victoria harbour with Clyde Marine ferry boats, Victoria tower of Municipal Buildings, Custom House at Custom House Quay... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2254x953, 419 KB) Summary Greenock waterfront: view from call centre car park, site formerly Scott Lithgows shipyard, showing from left to right; Victoria harbour with Clyde Marine ferry boats, Victoria tower of Municipal Buildings, Custom House at Custom House Quay... For the type of foundation, see Deep foundation. ... A harbor (or harbour) or haven is a place where ships may shelter from the weather or are stored. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... Seven ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Prince of Wales, after the Prince of Wales. ...


Scott's was nationalised in 1969 and merged with Lithgow's (founded 1874, later the largest privately owned yard in the world) the same year becoming Scott Lithgow. Other yards included Cartsburn, Cartsdyke, and Klondyke - all of which closed during the 1970s and 1980s due to competition from South Korea and Japan. Nationalization is the act of taking assets into state ownership. ...


The site of the Scott's yard is now occupied by a T-Mobile call centre. T-Mobile logo T-Mobile is a multinational mobile phone operator. ...


Ship repair work continues at the Garvel dry dock.


Shipping

Ocean Terminal seen from the esplanade.
Ocean Terminal seen from the esplanade.

Freight traffic is handled at the container cranes of Greenock's Ocean Terminal, at Prince's Pier which was constructed for the Glasgow and South Western Railway. The same terminal is also a regular port of call for cruise liners visiting the west of Scotland. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2046x1407, 224 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Greenock User talk:Robdurbar/Archive 2 ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2046x1407, 224 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Greenock User talk:Robdurbar/Archive 2 ... Container ship Rita being loaded at Copenhagen by a portainer crane A portainer (also known as a gantry crane, container crane, container handling gantry crane, quay crane, ship-to-shore crane, STS crane or a dockside crane) is a very large crane used to load and unload container ships, and... Glasgow and South Western Railway formed part of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway. ... Legend of the Seas moored at San Diego, California A cruise ship, or less commonly cruise liner, is a passenger ship used for pleasure voyages, where the voyage itself and the amenities of the ship are considered an essential part of the experience. ...


Greenock's Great Harbour is one of the three main ports providing marine services support to the Royal Navy, in dual site operation with Faslane at HMNB Clyde on the Gare Loch. This formerly came under the Royal Maritime Auxiliary Service, but is currently operated by Serco Denholm, who are preferred bidders for the next contract. This facility means that "Admiralty" boats and tugs are a common sight on the Clyde. Faslane Naval Base, officially HMS Neptune, is a Royal Navy base situated on Gare Loch, which connects to the River Clyde in Scotland. ... Location of Faslane and RNAD Coulport Faslane Naval Base, HMNB Clyde Her Majestys Naval Base (HMNB) Clyde (HMS Neptune), is one of three operating bases for the Royal Navy (the others being HMNB Devonport and HMNB Portsmouth). ... The Gare Loch should not be confused with the Loch Gairloch or the village of Gairloch. ... Royal Maritime Auxiliary Service ensign The Royal Maritime Auxiliary Service is a British Government agency which runs a variety of small support vessels for the Royal Navy. ...


Greenock's attractive esplanade provides a gently curving riverside walk just over a mile (1.6 km) long extending to the west from Ocean Terminal to the Royal West Boat Club sailing and rowing facilities and clubhouse at the corner of the Navy Buildings which house a main Her Majesty's Coastguard centre as well as a Royal Naval Reserve establishment, HMS Dalriada. Her Majestys Coastguard is the agency of the government of the United Kingdom concerned with co-ordinating rescue at sea. ... “RNR” redirects here. ...


Sugar

The Sugar Warehouse dominates the James Watt Dock
The Sugar Warehouse dominates the James Watt Dock

Sugar refining began in Greenock in 1765.[1] John Walker began a sugar refinery in Greenock in 1850 followed by the prominent local cooper and shipowner Abram Lyle who, with four partners, purchased the Glebe Sugar Refinery in 1865. Another 12 refineries were active at one point. The most famous of these (and successful, being the only survivor until August 1997) was Tate & Lyle. It was formed from a merger in 1921 between Abram Lyle, who had expanded into Plaistow, and Henry Tate, who had set up a sugar refinery in Liverpool and had also expanded into London. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2272x1342, 242 KB) Summary The Sugar Warehouse at Greenocks James Watt Dock is now a listed building, awaiting possible conversion. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2272x1342, 242 KB) Summary The Sugar Warehouse at Greenocks James Watt Dock is now a listed building, awaiting possible conversion. ... Assembly of a barrel in progress A cooper readies, or rounds off, the end of a barrel using a coopers hand adze at the Van Ryn Brandy Cellar near Stellenbosch, South Africa Traditionally, a cooper is someone who makes wooden staved vessels of a conical form, of greater length than... Abram Lyle (1820–1891) is noted for founding the sugar refiners Abram Lyle & Sons which merged with a rival to become Tate & Lyle in 1921. ... A tin of Lyles Golden Syrup Tate & Lyle PLC is a UK based multinational food manufacturer and is listed on the London Stock Exchange under the symbol TATE. It is a major producer of refined sugar, starches, animal feed and other food ingredients with global operations. ... Plaistow is a place in the London Borough of Newham in East London. ... Sir Henry Tate (March 11, 1819 - December 5, 1899) was an English sugar merchant, noted for establishing the Tate Gallery in London. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


By the end of the 19th century, around 400 ships a year were transporting sugar from Caribbean holdings to Greenock for processing in the 14 sugar refineries. Tobacco from the Americas also arrived here. Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ...


When Tate and Lyle finally closed its Greenock refinery in 1997 it brought to an end the town's 150-year old connections with sugar manufacture. A newly built sugar warehouse continued shipping operations at Greenock's Ocean Terminal. The former sugar warehouse at the James Watt Dock was by then scheduled as a grade A listed building as a fine example of early industrial architecture, with an unusual feature of a colonnade of cast iron columns forming a sheltered unloading area next to the quayside. This building has since lain empty, with various schemes being proposed for conversion and restoration. The photographs show the building still intact in February 2006, but a fire on the evening of 12 June 2006 caused severe damage to much of the building before being brought under control in the early hours of 13 June. The local council confirmed that parts of the building will have to be taken down to ensure public safety, but promised an investigation and emphasised the importance of this world heritage building.[2][3] The Forth Bridge, designed by Sir Benjamin Baker and Sir John Fowler, opened in 1890, and now owned by Network Rail, is designated as a Category A listed building by Historic Scotland. ... Enormous colonnade of the Kazan Cathedral in St Petersburg. ... A quay, pronounced key, kay, is a wharf or bank where ships and other vessels are loaded. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Electronics

Since IBM arrived in the town in 1951, electronics and light manufacturing have, until recently, been the mainstay of local employment. National Semiconductor has also run a silicon wafer manufacturing plant in the town since 1970. For other uses, see IBM (disambiguation) and Big Blue. ... Categories: Electronics companies of the United States | Companies based in California | Corporation stubs ... Not to be confused with Silicone. ...


However, with manufacturing moving to Eastern Europe and Asia, work has shifted to the service sector, especially call centres. T-Mobile and IBM both have major call centre operations in Greenock, while the Royal Bank of Scotland has a facility dealing with all the groups' UK mortgage calls. Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current national boundaries: Russia (dark orange), other countries of the former USSR (medium orange),members of the Warsaw pact (light orange), and other former Communist regimes not aligned with Moscow (lightest orange). ... The tertiary sector of industry, also called the service sector or the service industry, is one of the three main industrial categories of a developed economy, the others being the secondary industry (manufacturing and primary goods production such as agriculture), and primary industry (extraction such as mining and fishing). ... The Royal Bank of Scotland plc (Scottish Gaelic: [1]) is one of the retail banking subsidiaries of Royal Bank of Scotland Group plc, which together with NatWest, provides branch banking facilities in the UK. Royal Bank of Scotland has around 700 branches, mainly in Scotland though there are branches in...


IBM have in recent years curtailed their operations greatly in the area. Sanmina, another electronics company, took over much of the IBM installation. As of 2006, Sanmina have themselves announced major cuts, with 370 jobs being moved to Hungary. [1] Sanmina-SCI Corporation (NASDAQ: SANM), is a global electronics manufacturing services (EMS) provider headquartered in San Jose, California that serves original equipment manufacturers in technology-related industries such as communications and computer hardware. ...


Samina has now shut and the remaining workers are being re-loacated.


Trade and commerce

Greenock's main shopping throughfare was Hamilton Street, which connected West Blackhall Street in the west to Clyde Square in the east. In 1975 it disappeared along with several other streets as the area was pedestrianised as Hamilton Way. In the 1990s it was refurbished again, and The Oak Mall indoor shopping centre now forms the central feature of the town, and provides most of the major retail shops in Inverclyde, with approximately 85 units, with main anchor stores including Marks and Spencer, Woolworths, Boots, Primark and a newly opened New Look store.[4] Both Marks and Spencer and Woolworths are in their original buildings (Marks and Spencer dating from 1936) which were simply built round during the first phase of pedestrianisation.[5] Three major supermarkets, two Tesco and one Morrisons, are sited close to the mall. A further shopping estate of large shops is located nearby, in front of the Waterfront swimming pool and leisure centre, and the streets around the mall provide a large number of smaller shops. Small groups of shops in most of the areas of the town provide for day to day needs, but most of the specialist shops are in the town centre. Car-free zones (also known as auto-free zones and pedestrianised zones) are areas of a city or town in which automobile traffic is prohibited. ... For the traditional meaning of the word mall, see pedestrian street or promenade. ... Marks and Spencer plc (known also as M&S and sometimes colloquially as Marks and Sparks) is the largest retailer in the United Kingdom by sales. ... This article is about the British Woolworths Group plc, and its stores. ... This article is about a former British company which has now merged to form Alliance Boots, as a result, information on this page may be out of date. ... “Penneys” redirects here. ... New Look is a chain of high street shops in Britain, popular at first with girls in the 12-24 age bracket but has recently diversified into mens clothing. ... For other uses, see Tesco (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Morrison. ...


Culture

The town has a daily evening newspaper, The Greenock Telegraph. It is one of the oldest daily local newspapers in the United Kingdom. The Greenock Telegraph is a local daily newspaper serving Inverclyde, Scotland. ...


Greenock is fictionalised as 'Gantock' by Robin Jenkins in his 1979 novel Fergus Lamont (The Gantocks are in fact a rocky shoal in the Firth of Clyde nearby, just off Dunoon). Alasdair Gray's 1984 novel 1982, Janine is set in a Greenock hotel room. Greenock has featured in several of the poems of Douglas Dunn. Born Cardiff, South Wales, UK July 27, 1973. ... Look up Shoal in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Map of the Firth of Clyde and area The Firth of Clyde forms a large area of coastal water, sheltered from the Atlantic ocean by the Kintyre peninsula which encloses the outer firth in Argyll and Ayrshire, Scotland. ... Dunoon, looking North from the Castle hill with the old Victorian pier to the right and The Queens Hall on the left The Holy Loch seen across the Firth of Clyde with Dunoon on the left The PS Waverley leaves Dunoon Pier, to sail up the Firth of Clyde. ... Alasdair Gray (born December 28, 1934) is a Scottish writer and artist. ... The cover of the hardback edition; the background of Ys is a reference to sexual practices described in the book 1982, Janine is a novel by the Scottish author Alasdair Gray. ... Douglas Eaglesham Dunn, OBE, (born October 23, 1942) is a Scottish poet, academic and critic. ...


The Victorian landscape artist John Atkinson Grimshaw depicted a somewhat idealised Greenock in several of his paintings. Victorian can refer to: people from or attributes of places called Victoria (disambiguation page), including Victoria, Australia, people who lived during the British Victorian era of the 19th century, and aspects of the Victorian era, for example: Victorian architecture Victorian fashion Victorian morality Victorian literature This is a disambiguation page... Nightfall on the Thames, 1880 John Atkinson Grimshaw (1836-1893) was a Victorian-era painter, born in Leeds, England. ...


Greenock has featured as the backdrop to several films: the television films Just a Boy's Game (1979), [2] and Down Among the Big Boys (1993) [3] and the theatrical films Sweet Sixteen (2002) and [4] and Dear Frankie (2004).[5]


Notable residents

A statue at the original James Watt College building marks the site of his birthplace.
A statue at the original James Watt College building marks the site of his birthplace.

Greenock's most noted son is the engineer James Watt. He is remembered in the name of the local college, at the library instituted in his memory and by the original James Watt Memorial College building on the site of his birth place in William Street which incorporates a commemorative statue. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (543x1084, 129 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): James Watt User talk:Derek Ross Greenock Wikipedia:Scottish Wikipedians notice board/New images... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (543x1084, 129 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): James Watt User talk:Derek Ross Greenock Wikipedia:Scottish Wikipedians notice board/New images... For other persons named James Watt, see James Watt (disambiguation). ...


Other famous Greenockians include: the composers Hamish MacCunn and William Wallace, musician John McGeoch, poets Denis Devlin, W. S. Graham and Jean Adam, merchant Matthew Algie, actors Richard Wilson, Stella Gonet and Martin Compston, comedian Charles 'Chic' Murray, Antarctic explorer Henry Robertson 'Birdie' Bowers and pirate Captain Kidd were born in the town. Hamish MacCunn (March 22, 1868 – August 2, 1916), Scottish romantic composer, was born in Greenock, the son of a shipowner, and was educated at the Royal College of Music, where his teachers included Parry and Stanford. ... Sir William Wallace (1860-1940) was a Scottish classical composer. ... John McGeoch, (May 28, 1955 – March 4, 2004), was a Scottish guitarist who played with some of the biggest bands of the post-punk era, including: Magazine, Visage, The Armoury Show, Public Image Ltd. ... Denis Devlin (April 15, 1908 - August 21, 1959) was, along with Samuel Beckett and Brian Coffey, one of the generation of Irish modernist poets to emerge at the end of the 1920s. ... William Sydney Graham (November 19, 1918 - January 9, 1986) was a Scottish poet who is often associated with Dylan Thomas and the neo-romantic group of poets. ... Jean Adam (or Adams) (April 30, 1704 - April 3, 1765) was a Scottish poet. ... Matthew Algie was born in Greenock, a port on the River Clyde, in 1810. ... Richard Wilson, OBE (born July 9, 1936) is a Scottish actor and theatre director, best known for playing Victor Meldrew in the popular BBC situation comedy One Foot in the Grave. ... Stella Gonet (born 8 May 1963 in Greenock, Scotland) is a Scottish actress who is best known for playing Bea in the television series The House Of Eliott. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Charles Murray is the name of several notable people: Charles Murray, the Libertarian and author of The Bell Curve. ... Lieutenant Henry Robertson (Birdie) Bowers (July 29, 1883 - March 29, 1912) was one of Robert Falcon Scotts polar party on the ill-fated Terra Nova expedition in 1910-1912 who all died during their return from the South Pole. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ...


The novelist John Galt, noted for founding Guelph, Ontario in 1827, lived in the town and based some of his work, most notably Annals of the Parish (1821), on Greenock and surrounding towns. He is buried in the Inverkip Street Cemetery. John Galt (May 2, 1779 – April 11, 1839) was a Scottish novelist. ... Nickname: Motto: Faith, Fidelity and Progress Coordinates: , Country Canada Province Ontario County Wellington County City Wards There are 6 Wards Founded April 23, 1827 Incorporated April 23, 1879 Government  - Mayor Karen Farbridge (elected November 2006)  - Governing Body Guelph City Council  - MPs Brenda Chamberlain (LPC)  - MPPs Liz Sandals (OLP) Area  - City...


Lawrence Tynes, kicker for the New York Giants an American Football team in the NFL, originates from Greenock and has several family members still in the town. The British painter, William Scott (1913-1989) was born in Greenock and lived there with his family until 1924 when the family moved to Enniskillen, Northern Ireland. The Oscar winning screenwriter, Neil Paterson (1916-1995) was born in Greenock, as was the radio and television presenter Jimmy Mack (1934-2004). Lawrence James Henry Tynes (born May 3, 1978 in Greenock, Scotland) is an American football placekicker who currently plays for the New York Giants of the NFL. He formerly played for the Kansas City Chiefs. ... This article is about the current National Football League team. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... , Enniskillen (from the Irish: Inis Ceithleann meaning Kathleens Island) is the county town (and largest town) in County Fermanagh and the west of Northern Ireland. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: ) is a part of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Screenwriters, scenarists or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies and television programs are made. ... Neil Paterson (31 December 1916-19 April, 1995) was an Academy Award winning screenwriter. ... Jimmy Mack MBE (1934-2004, born James F. McRitchie) was a Scottish broadcaster, best known for his work on BBC Radio Scotland and Radio Clyde. ...


Mary Campbell, Robert Burns's Highland Mary, is buried in Greenock Cemetery where there is a monument to her memory. Greenock is also home to the world's first Burns club, The Mother Club, which was founded in 1801. For the chain gang fugitive and author from Georgia, see Robert Elliott Burns. ...


Its most infamous resident is Abdel Basset al-Megrahi, the Libyan intelligence officer and former head of Libyan Arab Airlines, who was convicted on 31 January 2001 of murder after causing a bomb to be placed on board Pan Am Flight 103, which exploded over Lockerbie, Scotland on 21 December 1988 with the loss of 270 lives. Megrahi was moved in February 2005 from solitary confinement in Barlinnie Prison in Glasgow to Greenock Prison, where he is expected to serve the rest of his 27-year sentence. Abdel Basset Ali al-Megrahi (born April 1, 1952) is a former Libyan intelligence officer, head of security for Libyan Arab Airlines, and director of the Center for Strategic Studies in Tripoli. ... Libyan Arab Airlines (Arabic: الخطوط الجوية العربية الليبية; transliterated: al-Khutut al-Jawiyah al-Arbiyah al-Libiyah) is the national flag carrier airline of Libya. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... PA 103 redirects here. ... Lockerbie Town Hall, 2006. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... HMP Greenock serves designated courts in the West of Scotland by holding male prisoners (both adult and under 21s) on remand, and short-term convicted prisoners. ...


Sam Turner is a famous recording artist from Greenock, he now works in the IT industry.


Another famous local resident was recently covered in an article by The Daily Telegraph and is known as "The Catman". He is a man of around 60 who lives wild.[citation needed] This article concerns the British newspaper. ...


Sports

Morton F.C.[6], are the local football side, playing at Cappielow Park. Greenock also has a rugby team, Greenock Wanderers RFC[7], and is also home to Greenock Cricket Club[8]. Greenock Morton Football Club are an Association football club, whose first team currently plays in the Bells Scottish Football League Second Division. ... Look up Football in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ...


Gallery

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Haste ye back!
Haste ye back!
  1. ^ Online encyclopedia from Britannica 1911
  2. ^ Inverclyde Now
  3. ^ Picture Gallery
  4. ^ Welcome to Oak Mall shopping centre, Greenock
  5. ^ Greenock from Old Photographs, 1984

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 694 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Greenock ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 694 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Greenock ...

Further reading

  • Monteith, J (2004) Old Greenock
  • Snoddy, TG (1937) Round About Greenock
  • Weir, D (1827, r. 2004) History of the Town of Greenock

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