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Encyclopedia > Green chile
This article is part
of the Cuisine series
Preparation techniques and cooking items
Techniques - Utensils
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Other ingredients Image File history File links Title_Cuisine_2. ... A cuisine (from French cuisine, meaning cooking; culinary art; kitchen; itself from Latin coquina, meaning the same; itself from the Latin verb coquere, meaning to cook) is a specific set of cooking traditions and practices, often associated with a place of origin. ... Cooking is the act of applying heat to food in order to prepare it to eat. ... This is a list of food preparation utensils, also known as kitchenware. ... // United States measures Note that the measurements in this section are in U.S. customary units. ... Herbs: basil Herbs (IPA: hə(ɹ)b, or əɹb; see pronunciation differences) are plants grown for culinary, medicinal, or in some cases even spiritual value. ... Screen shot of Spice OPUS, a fork of Berkeley SPICE SPICE (Simulation Program with Integrated Circuits Emphasis) is a general purpose analog circuit simulator. ... For the computer protocol, see SAUCE In cooking, a sauce is a liquid or sometimes solid based selection of various ingredients served on or used in the preparation of food. ... Soup is a savoury liquid food that is made by combining ingredients, such as meat, vegetables and beans in stock or hot water, until the flavor is extracted, forming a broth. ... A selection of desserts Dessert is a course that typically comes at the end of a dinner, usually consisting of sweet food but sometimes of a strongly-flavored one, such as some cheeses. ... Cheese is a solid food made from the milk of cows, goats, sheep, and other mammals. ... Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Tea leaves in a Chinese gaiwan. ... A salad of vegetables and cheese. ...

Regional cuisines
Asia - Europe - Caribbean
South Asian - Latin America
Mideast - North America - Africa
Other cuisines...
See also:
Famous chefs - Kitchens - Meals
Wikibooks: Cookbook

New Mexican food is a type of regional cuisine originating in the US state of New Mexico; it is a subset of Mexican-American cuisine. Although many New Mexican dishes are similar to Mexican and Tex-Mex offerings such as enchiladas and burritos, New Mexican food has a distinct style. The most important difference is the type of chile pepper used. New Mexico chiles comes in two varieties, referred to as either "green chiles" or "red chiles" depending on the stage of ripeness in which they were picked. Asian cuisine is a term for the various cuisines of South, East and Southeast Asia and for fusion dishes based on combining them. ... ÊÂòàÈ€ū¹ ² ³ ÁHello ... Caribbean cuisine is a fusion of Spanish, French, African, Amerindian and Indian cuisine. ... South Asian cuisine includes the cuisines of the South Asia. ... See the individual entries for: Argentine cuisine Brazilian cuisine Mexican cuisine South American cuisine . ... The term Middle Eastern cuisine refers to the various cuisines of the Middle East. ... North American cuisine is a term used for foods native to or popular in countries of North America. ... Cuisine of Africa reflects indigenous traditions, as well as influences from Arabs, Europeans, and Asians. ... This is a list of famous and notable chefs. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... For the coarsely ground flour, see flour. ... A U.S. state is any one of the 50 states which have membership of the federation known as the United States of America (USA or U.S.). The separate state governments and the U.S. federal government share sovereignty. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... Tex-Mex is a term used to describe Americanized Mexican food. ... Enchiladas with mole sauce An enchilada is a traditional Mexican dish. ... A large burrito. ... The chile pepper, chili pepper, or chilli pepper, or simply chile, is the fruit of the plant Capsicum from the nightshade family, Solanaceae. ...


Green chile is perhaps the defining ingredient of New Mexican food compared to neighboring styles, though heavier use of cilantro and relaxed use of cumin are also important. In the past few years, green chile has grown increasingly more common outside of New Mexico, and it is a popular ingredient in everything from enchiladas and burritos to cheeseburgers and bagels within the state's borders. Binomial name Coriandrum sativum Coriander (Coriandrum sativum) is an annual herb commonly used in Middle Eastern, Mediterranean, Indian, Latin American and Southeast Asian cooking. ... Binomial name Cuminum cyminum L. Cumin (Cuminum cyminum) is a flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native to the eastern Mediterranean region east to India. ... A McDonalds cheeseburger A cheeseburger is a hamburger which additionally contains a slice of cheese. ... A plain bagel For other uses, see Bagel (disambiguation). ...


History

New Mexican cuisine began as a blend of the styles of ancestral Mexicans of the region (who made use of local plant variants, animal availability, etc., and ergo are likely to have already had a cooking style notably divergent from that of central Mexico) and nearby Native Americans such as the Navajo, Zuñi and Ute. This native style has been strongly influenced by incoming American tastes since the end of the Mexican-American War. Over time, the style diverged increasingly from similar styles in California and Texas (all of which, like New Mexico, were formerly part of Mexico). This divergence has accelerated in the last few decades, perhaps as a protective response to the "invading" popularity of heavily Americanized "Mexican" food products and fast food. A Hupa man. ... The Navajo (also Navaho) people of the southwestern United States call themselves the Diné (pronounced ), which roughly means the people. They speak the Navajo language, and many are members of the Navajo Nation, an independent government structure which manages the Navajo reservation in the Four Corners area of the United... Zuni girl with jar, 1903 The Zuñi or Ashiwi are a Native American tribe, one of the Pueblo peoples, who live in the Pueblo of Zuñi on the Zuñi River, a tributary of the Little Colorado River, in western New Mexico. ... The Utes (/juːts/; yoots) are an ethnically related group of American Indians now living primarily in Utah and Colorado. ... The Cuisine of the United States is characterized by the broad diversity of the possible foods, but more importantly the willingness of the country as a whole to integrate widely divergent foods. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia Strength 7,000 - 43,000 18,000 - 40,000 Casualties KIA: 1,733 Total dead: 13,283 Wounded: 4,152 25,000 killed or wounded (Mexican government... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Texas is the gayest motherfucking state out there they can suck my big black balls. ...


Today, New Mexican cuisine differs from Mexican, Tex-Mex and Mexican-Californian in numerous ways besides chile, including spice balance, ingredients, general definitions of what certain dishes are and how to prepare them, use of sauces and condiments, etc. For example, New Mexican food uses, on average, more beef than Mexican cooking, usually uses a different kind of oregano, and often handles tortillas differently; it does not make use of Tex-Mex style chili con carne and uses less cumin and fewer jalapeños than the Texas style; and it does not make nearly as much use of rice and mixed vegetables as the California style, nor as much avocado (which is not native to the semi-arid New Mexico region). Screen shot of Spice OPUS, a fork of Berkeley SPICE SPICE (Simulation Program with Integrated Circuits Emphasis) is a general purpose analog circuit simulator. ... For the computer protocol, see SAUCE In cooking, a sauce is a liquid or sometimes solid based selection of various ingredients served on or used in the preparation of food. ... Salt, sugar and pepper are the most essential condiments in Western cuisine. ... A cut of beef. ... Binomial name Origanum vulgare L. Oregano or Pot Marjoram (Origanum vulgare) is a species of Origanum, native to Europe, the Mediterranean region and southern and central Asia. ... A staple of Mexican and Central American cuisine, a tortilla is a kind of unleavened bread, made from maize corn or wheat flour. ... A bowl of chili con carne with beans and tortilla chips Chili con carne (In America shortened to chili) is a spicy stew-like dish, the essential ingredients of which are beef, pork, venison, or other mature meat, and chili peppers. ... Binomial name Cuminum cyminum L. Cumin (Cuminum cyminum) is a flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native to the eastern Mediterranean region east to India. ... Binomial name Capsicum annuum The Jalapeño is a small to medium-sized chile pepper that is prized for the hot, burning sensation that it produces in the mouth when eaten. ... Species Oryza glaberrima Oryza sativa Rice is two species (Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima) of grass, native to tropical and subtropical southern & southeastern Asia and to Africa, which together provide more than one fifth of the calories consumed by humans[1]. (The term wild rice can refer to wild species... Vegetables on a market Vegetable is a nutritional and culinary term denoting any part of a plant that is commonly consumed by humans as food, but is not regarded as a culinary fruit, nut, herb, spice, or grain. ... Binomial name Persea americana Mill. ... Semi-arid generally describes regions that receive low annual rainfall (25 to 50 cm /10 to 20 in) and generally have scrub or grass vegetation. ...


List of New Mexican cuisine terms

  • Albondigas: meatballs.
  • Atole: a thick, hot gruel made from corn.
  • Biscochitos: an anise-flavored cookie.
  • Burrito: a small-to-medium white flour tortilla, filled with meat, beans, cheese, salsa, or a combination of these, and rolled. Often served smothered with chile sauce and melted cheese; the California-style variant is usually much larger (often twice as large or more), includes rice, and may use colored and flavored tortillas.
  • Capirotada: a raisin and walnut pudding.
  • Carne adovada: cubes of pork that have been marinated and cooked in red chile, garlic and oregano.
  • Chalupa: a corn tortilla, fried into a bowl shape and filled with shredded chicken or other meat, and/or beans, and usually topped with guacamole and salsa. (Contrast with the larger and vegetable-laden California-style equivalent known as taco salads; compare with tostadas.)
  • Chicharrones: pork skin ("pork rinds"), fried crisp into a potato chip-like snack; often spiced heavily.
  • Chile or chile sauce: A sauce made from red or green chiles by a variety of recipes, and served hot over many (perhaps any) New Mexican dish. Chile does not use vinegar, unlike most salsas, picantes and other hot sauces. Green chile is made with chopped roasted chiles, while red chile is made with chiles dried and ground to a powder. Thickeners like flour, and various spices are often added, especially ground cumin, coriander and oregano. Chile is one of the most definitive differences between New Mexican and other Mexican and Mexican-American cuisines. Mexican and Californian tend to use various specialized sauces for different dishes, while Tex-Mex leans toward the use of salsa picante and chili con carne (and even Cajun-style Louisiana hot sauce). New Mexican cuisine uses chile sauce as taco sauce, enchilada sauce, burrito sauce, etc. (though any given meal may use both red and green varieties for different dishes). A thicker version of green chile, with larger pieces of the plant, plus onions and other additions, is called green chile stew and is popular in Albuquerque-style New Mexican food; it is used the same way as green chile sauce, as a topping for virtually anything, including American dishes. The term "Christmas" is commonly used in New Mexico when both red and green chiles are used for one dish.
  • Chiles: Peppers of the capsicum species. New Mexico chile is a local cultivar of the species or subspecies otherwise represented as jalapeños, Anaheim peppers and many other varieties. The large, flavorful New Mexican variety gives the region's cuisine much of its distinctive style. Green chiles are those that are picked unripe; they are fire-roasted, then peeled before further use. Unlike the ultra-mild canned supermarket green chiles, New Mexico green chiles can range from mild to (occasionally) hotter than jalapeños, and come in grades of spiciness at markets that cater to chile aficionados. Red chiles are the ripe form of the same plant (though particular strains are bred for intended use as red or green chile). Generally more piquant than green chiles, they too can be roasted, but are usually dried; they can be added whole, to spice an entire stew, or more often are ground into powder or sometimes flakes. Freshly dried red chiles are sold in string-bound bundles called ristras, which are a common decorative sight on porches and in homes and businesses throughout the Southwest. Chiles may be referred to as chile peppers, especially if the sentence requires them to be distinguished from the chile sauce made out of them. The bulk of, and allegedly the best of, New Mexico chiles are grown in and around Hatch, in southern New Mexico.
  • Chile con queso: chile and melted cheese mixed together into a dip. (Not to be confused with chili con queso, which is Tex-Mex-style chili con carne stew topped with cheese); 'chile' and 'chili' are pronounced slightly differently by knowledgeable English speakers in New Mexico, especially if the difference would be semantically important; the prononuciation of 'chile' leans at least slightly toward the Spanish source, e.g. "chillay", at least when necessary.)
  • Chiles rellenos: roasted, peeled green chiles stuffed (usually with cheese), dipped in batter and fried, often to a crispy-battered texture (like fish & chips or fried chicken); the California version substitutes milder, thinner Anaheim peppers, and they are usually under-fried to have a spongy batter texture. In New Mexican English, the first "s" is usually silent (to the consternation of local Spanish speakers).
  • Chimichanga: a small deep-fried meat and (usually) bean burrito, also containing (or smothered with) chile sauce and cheese; popularized by the Allsup's convenience store chain with a series of humorous commercials in the 1980s with candid footage of people attempting and failing to pronounce the name correctly. Chimichangas, like flautas and taquitos, are a fast-food adaptation of traditional dishes in a form that can be stored frozen and then quickly fried as needed; they are also rigid and easily hand-held, and thus easy to eat by people while walking or driving.
  • Chorizo: a spicy pork sausage, seasoned with garlic and red chile, usually used in ground or finely chopped form as a breakfast side dish or quite often as an alternative to ground beef or shredded chicked in other dishes; New Mexican chorizo is said to be noticeably different in its spice blend from that of Mexico and California.
  • Cilantro: a pungent green herb (also called Mexican or Chinese parsley, the seeds of which are known as coriander) used fresh in salsas, and as a topping for virtually any dish; one of the defining tastes of New Mexican cuisine, especially Santa Fe style.
  • Empanada: a turnover, filled usually with a sweetened meat mixture or fruit.
  • Enchiladas: corn tortillas filled with meat, beans or cheese, and either rolled, or stacked, and covered with chile sauce and cheese. In California-style Mexican-American food, enchiladas are invariably each a discrete item; New Mexico-style enchiladas are often prepared fused together on a pan or in a casserole dish and tend to be served in a manner reminiscent of lasagna, though the California style is becoming more common, especially in upscale restaurants.
  • Fajita: strips of grilled steak or chicken that come with flour tortillas, sauteed bell peppers and onions, and other side dishes, on a hot metal plate, to make do-it-yourself burritos.
  • Flan: caramel custard dessert.
  • Flauta: a small, tightly rolled, fried enchilada; contrast chimichangas and taquitos.
  • Frijoles: beans, usually kidney or (in more recent times) black beans
  • Guacamole: mashed, spiced avocado, usually with chopped onion, tomatoes, garlic, lime and chile.
  • Horno: an outdoor, beehive-shaped oven.
  • Huevos rancheros: flour tortillas, topped with eggs, usually pan-fried, smothered with chile sause or salsa, and cheese. Traditional Mexican huevos rancheros always use corn tortillas, and this variant is in fact sometimes to be found in New Mexican breakfasts. The term is virtually always plural. The name means "ranch-style eggs".
  • Jalapeño: a small, fat chile pepper, ranging from mild to painfully hot, frequently used chopped (fresh) in salsa, sliced (pickled) on nachos, or split (fresh) and stuffed with cheese (outside of New Mexico, cream cheese is more common). Jalapeños are common to all Mexican and Mexican-American cuisines. Their use in New Mexican food tends to be lesser, in favor of green chile; they are used mainly to provide additional piquancy when desired.
  • Natilla: soft custard dessert.
  • Oregano: A flavorful herb used in many cuisines, and most closely associated with Italian food. It's heavy use in American cuisine in general has supplanted the use of the unrelated but somewhat similar Mexican oregano spice in New Mexican (as well as Californian and Tex-Mex) cuisine, though some cooks prefer to use Mexican oregano, which is remains easily obtainable in New Mexico.
  • Pico de gallo: cold salsa with thick-chopped fresh chiles, tomatoes, onions and cilantro (does not have a tomato paste base like commercial packaged salsas, and never any vinegar); the name, curiously, means "chicken beak".
  • Posole: a thick stew made with hominy corn simmered for hours with pork and green chile plus other vegetables such as onions. Red chile and chicken recipes also exist, but are not traditional. The heavy use of New Mexico-style green chiles makes this posole quite different from the ancestral Mexican variant.
  • Quesadilla: a turnover made of a flour tortilla, filled with cheese (and often other ingredients), then toasted, pan-fried or baked. It is also commonly made round, using two tortillas instead of folding one, and is usually served topped with salsa or pico de gallo and sometimes sour cream.
  • Refritos or refried beans: pre-cooked beans that have been mashed and fried, traditionally in lard but more commonly in vegetable oil today; often an ingredient, but if served as a side dish typically topped with cheese. Traditionally always made with pinto beans, but the California influence is making black bean (frijole negro) refritos more common.
  • Salsa: generally an uncooked mixture of chiles/peppers, tomatoes, onions, and frequently blended or mixed with tomato paste to produce a more sauce-like texture than pico de gallo; usually contains vinegar in noticeable quantities (contrast chile and pico de gallo). The green chile variant usually uses cooked tomatillos instead of tomatoes or omits both, and does not use avocado (which is very common in California green salsa). Differs from Mexican, Texan and Californian styles principally in the use of green chile in place of or in addition to jalapeño peppers (and all styles' mild versions are created simply by substituting a lot of green bell pepper for the hotter varieties). The New Mexico and California styles share a typically large amount of cilantro added to the mix. The word simply means "sauce" in Spanish.
  • Salsa picante or picante sauce: A thin, vinegary, piquant (thus its name) sauce of pureéd red peppers and tomatoes with spices, reminiscent of a combination of New Mexico-style chile sauce and Louisiana style tabasco pepper sauce. (Note: American commercial food producers have appropriated the term to refer simply to spicy packaged salsa). Picante's place in Mexican, Tex-Mex and Californian food, where it is extremely common, especially as a final condiment to add more "heat", has largely been supplanted by chile, especially red chile, in New Mexican cuisine.
  • Sopaipilla: a puffed, fried bread, that is eaten split or with a corner bitten off and filled with honey or sometimes honey-butter (as accompaniment in place of tortillas, or as a dessert), or sometimes stuffed with meat, beans, cheese and chile sauce.
  • Taco: a corn tortilla fried into a trough shape and filled with meats, cheese, or beans, and fresh chopped lettuce, onions, tomatoes and cheese; increasingly may also refer to the burrito-like uncooked, rolled flour tortilla variant, by way of the influence of Taco Bell and its popularization of the California-style "soft taco". A corn tortilla is always fried in New Mexico cuisine if to be used in a taco, in stark contrast to Mexico-style tacos which are usually flat and served on two uncooked corn tortillas.
  • Tamale: meat, usually shredded pork, rolled in cornmeal masa, wrapped traditionally in corn husks (paper is more common today), and steamed, and served most often with red chile sauce. New Mexican tamales do not, as a style, differ appreciably from those made elsewhere other than the sauce, which varies from region to region, but they are a major component of New Mexico cuisine.
  • Taquito or taquita: a tightly rolled, deep-fried variant of the taco; contrast chimichangas and flautas.
  • Tortilla: a flatbread made predominantly either of unbleached white wheat flour or of cornmeal. New Mexico-style flour tortillas are about the same as those of Mexico, while California has popularized colorful flavored and whole wheat versions. Mexican corn tortillas are usually made of white corn, but New Mexico favors yellow corn, and the Santa Fe local style leans toward the more exotic (though allegedly less flavorful) blue corn. Tortillas are the foundation or wrapping for a great number of dishes, and can also serve as snacks in the form of corn chips (sliced and fried corn tortillas, served with chile, salsa or pico de gallo).
  • Tostada: an open-face fried corn tortilla covered with (typically) refried beans, salsa, cheese, and chopped lettuce and tomato. Compare with chalupas.

See MeatballWiki for the article about the wiki about communities. ... Traditional cornstarch-based Mexican hot drink. ... Porridge (also known in American English as hot cereal), is a simple dish made by boiling oats (normally crushed oats, occasionally oatmeal) or another meal in water and/or milk. ... Binomial name Pimpinella anisum L. Anise or Aniseed, less commonly anís (stressed on the first syllable) (Pimpinella anisum) is a flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native to the eastern Mediterranean region and southwest Asia. ... A large burrito. ... Traditional tortilla making. ... Binomial name Allium sativum L. Garlic (Allium sativum) is a perennial plant in the family Alliaceae and genus Allium, closely related to the onion, shallot, and leek. ... Binomial name Origanum vulgare L. Oregano or Pot Marjoram (Origanum vulgare) is a species of Origanum, native to Europe, the Mediterranean region and southern and central Asia. ... Chalupa boats at Xochimilco. ... Guacamole Guacamole is an avocado-based relish or dip from the time of the Aztecs. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... The taco salad is a delicious mexican inspired dish whereby the classic taco taste is enjoyed in an alternate form. ... Chicharrones is a dish from Mexico although they are also popular in the rest of Latin America (the singular form, chicharrón, is also used as a mass noun). ... Binomial name Cuminum cyminum L. Cumin (Cuminum cyminum) is a flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native to the eastern Mediterranean region east to India. ... Binomial name Coriandrum sativum L. Percentages are relative to US RDI values for adults. ... Binomial name Origanum vulgare L. Oregano or Pot Marjoram (Origanum vulgare) is a species of Origanum, native to Europe, the Mediterranean region and southern and central Asia. ... A bowl of chili con carne with beans and tortilla chips Chili con carne (In America shortened to chili) is a spicy stew-like dish, the essential ingredients of which are beef, pork, venison, or other mature meat, and chili peppers. ... Cajun cuisine originates from the French-speaking Acadian or Cajun immigrants in Louisiana, USA. It is what could be called a rustic cuisine — locally available ingredients predominate, and preparation is simple. ... There are hundreds of varieties of hot sauce A hot sauce is any spicy condiment sauce. ... Species C. annuum (incl. ... This Osteospermum Pink Whirls is a successful cultivar. ... Hatch is a village located in Doña Ana County, New Mexico. ... Tex-Mex is a term used to describe Americanized Mexican food. ... Chiles Rellenos is a mexican dish made with a roasted big bell pepper or a Chile Poblano filled with cheese and/or minced meat, the pepper is then covered in an egg batter and fried, it is finally covered with a red sauce. ... The Chimichanga, or chivichanga, (pronounced chimmy·CHAHN·guh ) is a deep-fried burrito that originated in Northern Mexico (Ciudad Juarez in Chihuahua) and later became popular across the border, especially in Arizona. ... Allsups is a convenience store located in New Mexico, Texas, and Oklahoma. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Binomial name Coriandrum sativum Coriander (Coriandrum sativum) is an annual herb commonly used in Middle Eastern, Mediterranean, Indian, Latin American and Southeast Asian cooking. ... Peruvian empanadas In Spain, Portugal, the Caribbean, Latin America, and the Philippines, an empanada (Portuguese empada) is essentially a stuffed pastry. ... Enchiladas with mole sauce An enchilada is a traditional Mexican dish. ... Lasagna in the crinkly American style Lasagna, also lasagne, (pronounced ), is both a form of pasta in sheets (often rippled in North America and other countries, though seldom so in Italy) and also a dish, sometimes named Lasagne al forno (meaning Lasagne in the oven) made with alternate layers of... A fajita (pronounced , similar to fa-he-tah) is a generic term used in Tex-Mex cuisine, referring to grilled meat served on a flour or corn tortilla with condiments. ... Binomial name Capsicum annuum L. For green peppercorns, see Black pepper. ... Flan may refer to any of the following: In British English usage, flan may be various kinds of tart or cake with a sweet or savoury filling, often custard-based. ... A piece of caramel confectionery. ... Custard is a range of preparations based on milk and eggs, thickened with heat. ... o love mexicans porque theyre muy calente ... This article is on the plant. ... Guacamole Guacamole is an avocado-based relish or dip from the time of the Aztecs. ... Binomial name Persea americana Mill. ... Percentages are relative to US RDI values for adults. ... Horno is a mud adobe built outdoor oven used by the indians and early settlers. ... Huevos rancheros is a classic Mexican breakfast dish which has become popular throughout much of the Americas. ... Binomial name Capsicum annuum The Jalapeño is a small to medium-sized chile pepper that is prized for the hot, burning sensation that it produces in the mouth when eaten. ... Binomial name Origanum vulgare L. Oregano or Pot Marjoram (Origanum vulgare) is a species of Origanum, native to Europe, the Mediterranean region and southern and central Asia. ... Pico de gallo Pico de gallo (from Spanish, literally roosters beak), is generally known as a fresh condiment made from chopped tomato, onion, and chiles (typically serranos or jalapeños). ... Pozole (from Spanish pozole, from Nahuatl potzolli) is a traditional pre-Columbian soup or stew made of hominy with pork (or other meat), chili, and other seasonings and garnish (lettuce, oregano, cilantro, avocado, radish, etc. ... Hominy or nixtamal is dried, treated maize (corn) kernels. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Refried beans (frijoles refritos) is a dish of cooked and mashed beans and a traditional staple of Mexican cuisine, Central American cuisine, and the cuisine of the Southwestern United States. ... Binomial name Physalis ixocarpa Brot. ... There are hundreds of varieties of hot sauce A hot sauce is any spicy condiment sauce. ... A sopapilla is a kind of fried pastry or quick bread. ... Chinese fried bread Fried bread is bread, sliced or baked especially for the purpose, fried and served as part of, or as an accompaniment to, a food dish. ... Tacos with barbacoa. ... For the restaurants of a similar name, see Taco Bill. ... A meal of a tamale and squash soup A tamale or tamal (from Nahuatl tamalli) is a traditional Mexican food that begins with a corn meal dough called masa (or a masa mix such as Maseca) mixed with water. ... Masa, or masa nixtamalera, is a fine maize dough made from masa harina, ground hominy flour. ... One of many brands of taquitos which can be found in the frozen food section of a typical American grocery store. ... Traditional tortilla making. ... Species T. aestivum T. boeoticum T. compactum T. dicoccoides T. dicoccon T. durum T. monococcum T. spelta T. sphaerococcum References:   ITIS 42236 2002-09-22 For the indie rock group see: Wheat (band). ... Look up flour in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Cornmeal is flour ground from dried maize (corn) with usage ranging from bread to pesticides. ... A corn chip is a snack food, of which maize corn is the main ingredient, as well as oil, salt and water. ... Tostada is a Spanish word translating to toasted in English and, in Mexican cuisine, refers to a flat tortilla that is toasted or deep fried. ...

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Chile Recipes (552 words)
The "ristras" that decorate Southwest in the fall are strings of red chiles sun-drying for preservation and later use in sauces.
Green chile should have the tough, transparent outer skin removed before it is used.
NOTE: Reconstituted dried green chile may be substituted for fresh green chile in sauce or stew recipes.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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