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Encyclopedia > Green Zone

Coordinates: 33.307577° N 44.390259° E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Baghdad International Airport and the Green Zone.
Baghdad International Airport and the Green Zone.

The Green Zone (also known as the Emerald City[1]) is a 10 km² (4 mile²) area in central Baghdad that was the center of the Coalition Provisional Authority and remains the center of the international presence in the city. Its official name beginning under the Iraqi Interim Government is the International Zone, though "Green Zone" remains the most commonly used term. The contrasting Red Zone particularly refers to parts of Baghdad immediately outside the perimeter, but is also loosely applied to all unsecured areas outside the off-site military posts. Both terms (Red and Green Zone) originated as military designations. Image File history File linksMetadata Baghdad_-_airport_and_green_zone. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Baghdad_-_airport_and_green_zone. ... Inside view of the terminal, showing an abandoned FIDS in front of empty check-in desks and passport control. ... Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Governorate. ... The Seal of the CPA in Iraq The Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA) was established as a transitional government following the invasion of Iraq by the United States, United Kingdom and the other members of the multinational coalition which was formed to oust the government of Saddam Hussein in 2003. ... The Iraqi Interim matt chokes on cock Government was created by the United States and its coalition allies as a caretaker government to govern Iraq until the Iraqi Transitional Government was installed following the Iraqi National Assembly election conducted on January 30th, 2005. ... Red Zone is a term designating unsafe areas in Iraq after the 2003 invasion by the United States, Britain, and other allies. ...


The area was originally home to the villas of government officials, several government ministries, and a number of palaces of Saddam Hussein and his family. The largest of these was the Republican Palace that was Saddam's primary seat of power. The region was taken by American forces in April 2003, in some of the heaviest fighting in Baghdad. Few American soldiers were killed, but many Iraqis died. In the lead up to invasion Saddam and most of the other residents of the area fled fearing arrest by Coalition forces or reprisals by Iraqis. Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (28 April 1937 – 30 December 2006) was the fifth President of Iraq and Chairman of the Iraqi Revolutionary Command Council from 1979 until his overthrow by US forces in 2003. ... View of the front of the Iraq Republican Palace prior to removal of the Saddam the Warrior bronze heads from the rooftop. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


While most of the ministry buildings had been destroyed by airstrikes, this left a sizeable number of buildings in central Baghdad abandoned. The Coalition Provisional Authority administrators who arrived on the heels of the invading forces decided this left them ideal for use by Coalition administrators. Jay Garner, head of the reconstruction team, set up his headquarters in the Republican Palace; other villas were taken by groups of government officials and private contractors. Eventually some five thousand officials and civil contractors settled in the area. Jay Montgomery Garner (born April 15, 1938) is a retired United States Army general who was appointed in 2003 as Director of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance for Iraq following the 2003 invasion of Iraq but was soon replaced by L. Paul Bremer. ... View of the front of the Iraq Republican Palace prior to removal of the Saddam the Warrior bronze heads from the rooftop. ...

Green Zone Bazaar as it appeared in the summer prior to the October 14, 2004 bombings.

The abandoned buildings were not only attractive to Coalition forces, but also to homeless Iraqis. Among these were individuals who had lost their homes in the conflict, but most were urban poor who had been homeless or in slums before the war and saw moving into the abandoned houses as a sizeable increase in their standard of living. They felt that since they were not Ba'athist, they had as much right to the houses as the Coalition authorities to the vacated houses. There continue to be some five thousand of these Iraqis living in the Green Zone. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 401 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The entrance to the bazaar in the Green Zone, Baghdad, Iraq, summer 2004. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 401 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The entrance to the bazaar in the Green Zone, Baghdad, Iraq, summer 2004. ... A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows his find. ...


The Green Zone is also home to a small garrison of American troops who guard it and man the checkpoints leading to it. They are typically a battalion of soldiers at FOB Prosperity, under the command of the Multi-National Division-Baghdad. Additionally, a battalion of coalition soldiers from the Republic of Georgia live in the International Zone and man some of its checkpoints. Some of the original inhabitants who did not flee also continue to live in the area. Many are undocumented squatters in the area referred to as the "215 Apartments".


The Green Zone is completely surrounded by high concrete blast walls, T-Walls and barbed wire and access was available through a handful of entry control points, all of which were controlled by Coalition troops. This has led the insurgents to frequently shell the Green Zone with mortars and rockets, though these attacks cause few casualties. In October 2004 it was hit by two suicide bombings, which destroyed the bazaar and the Green Zone Cafe. On April 12, 2007, a bomb went off in the Iraqi Parliament cafeteria, killing one person and injuring 22 including the vice president. Among the dead was Mohammed Awad, a member of the Sunni National Dialogue Front. A Bremer wall is a term for the twelve-foot-high portable, steel-reinforced concrete walls used for blast protection throughout Iraq. ... A Bremer wall is a term for the twelve-foot-high portable, steel-reinforced concrete walls used for blast protection throughout Iraq. ... A selection of forms of barbed wire. ... US soldier loading a M224 60-mm mortar. ... A Soyuz rocket, at Baikanur launch pad. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A suicide bombing is an attack using a bomb in which the individual(s) carrying the explosive materials composing the bomb intend(s) and expect(s) to die upon detonation (see suicide). ... The Green Zone Cafe was a restaurant in the northeast corner of the Green Zone (International Zone) in Baghdad, Iraq. ... Mohammed Awad was a political party member of the Iraqi National Dialogue Council that represented them in the National Assembly of Iraq. ...


Since the handover of sovereignty to Iraqis, many of the facilities in the Green Zone have been turned over to the new Iraqi government. It is still the base for western private military contractors, and home to the U.S. and British embassies. The permanent U.S. embassy is currently being built in the southern Green Zone, overlooking the Tigris River. A private military company (PMC) is a for-profit enterprise, sometimes a corporation or a limited liability partnership, which provides specialised services and expertise related to military and similar activities. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... A diplomatic mission is a group of people from one nation state present in another nation state to represent the sending state in the receiving State. ... U.S. Ambassador to Iraq John D. Negroponte, right, shows honors to the colors as U.S. Marine Security Guards lift the U.S. flag on the grounds of the new U.S. Embassy in Iraq on July 1, 2004. ... The Tigris (Old Persian: Tigr, Syriac Aramaic: Deqlath, Arabic: دجلة, Dijla, Turkish: Dicle; biblical Hiddekil) is the eastern member of the pair of great rivers that define Mesopotamia, along with the Euphrates, which flows from the mountains of Anatolia through Iraq. ...

Contents

Notable sites in the Green Zone

The Seal of the CPA in Iraq The Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA) was established as a transitional government following the invasion of Iraq by the United States, United Kingdom and the other members of the multinational coalition which was formed to oust the government of Saddam Hussein in 2003. ... The Al-Rashid Hotel is an 18-story hotel in Baghdad, Iraq, favored by journalists and media personnel. ... Image of Hands of Victory arches The Swords of Qādisiyyah, also called the Hands of Victory, is a pair of triumphal arches in central Baghdad, Iraq. ... The Green Zone Cafe was a restaurant in the northeast corner of the Green Zone (International Zone) in Baghdad, Iraq. ... Looking west through Assassins Gate, spring of 2004. ... U.S. Army Nurse at the bedside of a young Iraqi boy injured in a roadside blast in Sadr City. ... U.S. Ambassador to Iraq John D. Negroponte, right, shows honors to the colors as U.S. Marine Security Guards lift the U.S. flag on the grounds of the new U.S. Embassy in Iraq on July 1, 2004. ...

Bibliography

Rajiv Chandrasekaran (2006) Imperial Life in the Emerald City Rajiv Chandrasekaran is an American journalist. ... Imperial Life in the Emerald City: Inside Iraqs Green Zone by Rajiv Chandrasekaran is a critical look at the civilian leadership of the American reconstruction project in Iraq. ...


References

  1. ^ John H. Brown. "They're Supersizing the Baghdad Embassy", The Washington Post, July 11, 2004. Retrieved on 2007-04-14.  The name was used in the title of a 2006 book, Imperial Life in the Emerald City, by Rajiv Chandrasekaran.

The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... April 14 is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 261 days remaining. ... Imperial Life in the Emerald City: Inside Iraqs Green Zone by Rajiv Chandrasekaran is a critical look at the civilian leadership of the American reconstruction project in Iraq. ... Rajiv Chandrasekaran is an American journalist. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
FRONTLINE: the lost year in iraq: analysis: inside the green zone | PBS (3279 words)
I would sometimes go into the Green Zone after a particularly rough day outside, because it was a place you could go in and sort of feel happy.
The complaints you hear in the Green Zone are the cable TV channels aren't very good; somebody is showing German chess matches at night on one of the cable channels.
People, particularly the journalists who were based in Baghdad, tended to think that the only information we had was the people in the Green Zone, because they're the only people they saw, because the journalists didn't travel out to the provinces.
Welcome to the Green Zone (15625 words)
Saddam's Green Zone residence was a little farther downriver, and is not to be confused with the massive 258-room Republican Palace, which was his workplace, and is currently the headquarters of the American occupation.
People in the Green Zone talked about democracy, and they believed in it in the long run, but for many of them the more immediate operative belief was that the potential for personal wealth and comfort could be made to prevail over all other forces in Iraqi society.
One twist in the Green Zone's culture is that even as the residents learned not to overreact to the inbound rounds, they grew increasingly fearful of the enemy that was firing them.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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