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Encyclopedia > Green Party of Canada
Green Party of Canada
Parti vert du Canada
Active Federal Party
Founded 1983
Leader Elizabeth May
President Melanie Ransom
Headquarters Box 997
Station B
Ottawa, Ontario
K1P 5R1
Political ideology Green
International alignment Global Greens
Colours Green
Website http://www.greenparty.ca/

The Green Party of Canada is a Canadian federal political party founded in 1983. With around 9,000 registered members as of November 2007,[citation needed] the Greens are the largest federal party in Canada without representation in Parliament. The Greens, as their name indicates, advocate green politics and are the largest party in Canada to focus primarily on green politics, though other parties have included environmental stances in their platforms. The image at the top of this page is licensed under the GNU LGPL. This library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU Lesser General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation; either version 2. ... This article is about the leader of the Green Party of Canada. ... Melanie Ransom is a consultant, research analyst, and former dance instructor. ... This article is about the capital city of Canada. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... Green politics or Green ideology is the ideology of the Green Parties, mainly informed by environmentalism, ecosophy and sustainable economics and aimed at developing a sustainable society. ... The Global Greens (or formally: the Global Green Network) are an organization of cooperating Green parties. ... For other uses, see Green (disambiguation). ... Political Parties redirects here. ... See also: 1982 in Canada, other events of 1983, 1984 in Canada and the Timeline of Canadian history. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Senate Chamber of Parliament Hill in Ottawa. ... Green politics or Green ideology is the ideology of the Green Parties, mainly informed by environmentalism, ecosophy and sustainable economics and aimed at developing a sustainable society. ...


The party's support has ranged between 4.5% and 14% since the 2006 federal election and has not polled below 6% in any opinion poll in 2007.[1] In mid-November 2007 the Greens placed third ahead of both the Bloc and the NDP in a Strategic Counsel poll.[2] In the 2006 election, the Green Party of Canada received 4.5% of the total vote but did not win any seats.[3] Rendition of party representation in the 39th Canadian parliament decided by this election. ...


Elizabeth May is the current leader of the party. She was elected on the first ballot by 65% of voting party members on August 26, 2006. This article is about the leader of the Green Party of Canada. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

History

The Green Party of Canada was founded at a conference held at Carleton University in Ottawa in 1983.[citation needed] Under its first leader, Dr. Trevor Hancock, the party ran 60 candidates in the 1984 Canadian federal election.[citation needed] About one month before the 1980 federal election, eleven candidates, mostly from ridings in the Atlantic provinces, issued a joint press release declaring that they were running on a common platform. ... Dr. Trevor Hancock was the first leader of the Green Party of Canada. ... The Canadian federal election of 1984 was called on July 4, 1984, and held on September 4 of that year. ...

The Green Party of Canada is independent of other green parties around the world but remains philosophically aligned with them. The Green Party begins with the basic premise that all life on the planet is interconnected and that humans have a responsibility to protect and preserve the natural world. The Green Party of Canada, like its provincial counterparts in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and Nova Scotia, supports green economics, progressive social planning and responsible and accountable governance. Image File history File links Copyright-problem_paste. ... This article is about computer text editing. ...


Since its inception, the party has been developing as an organization, expanding its membership and improving its showing at the polls. In the 2000 Canadian federal election, the party fielded 111 candidates, up from 78 in 1997. (Redirected from 2000 Canadian federal election) The 2000 Canadian federal election was held on November 27, 2000. ...


During the 2004 Canadian federal election the Green Party of Canada made history when it became only the fourth federal political party ever to run candidates in all 308 ridings. It also earned the more dubious distinction of being the only party running a full slate to be excluded from the televised leaders’ debate.[citation needed] When the ballots were counted, the Green Party secured 4.3 percent of the popular vote, thereby surpassing the 2 percent threshold required for party financing under new Elections Canada rules.[4] A Canadian federal election (more formally, the 38th general election) was held on June 28, 2004. ... Elections Canada is the non-partisan agency of the Government of Canada responsible for the conduct of federal elections and referendums. ...


Momentum continued to build around the Green Party of Canada and in the 2006 Canadian federal election the Green Party again ran 308 candidates and increased its share of the popular vote to 4.5 percent, once again securing federal financing as a result. The 2006 Canadian federal election (more formally, the 39th General Election) was held on January 23, 2006, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ...


A leadership vote was held at the party's August 2006 convention. On April 24, 2006, Jim Harris announced his intention not to stand for re-election as party leader.[5]. Three candidates officially entered the leadership race: David Chernushenko, Elizabeth May, and Jim Fannon. May won the leadership with 65% of the vote on the first ballot. In Canadian politics, a leadership convention is held by a political party when the party needs to choose a leader due to a vacancy or a challenge to the incumbent leader. ... Jim Harris 2006 election campaign photo. ... David Chernushenko at the June 21, 2006, leadership debate of the Green Party of Canada. ... This article is about the leader of the Green Party of Canada. ... The Green Party of Canada is intending to run a full slate of 308 candidates in the 2006 Canadian federal election. ...


Later that year, the party’s new federal leader, Elizabeth May, made Green Party history when she finished second in a by-election in the riding of London North Centre. May earned 25.8% of the vote, the best ever result for a Green Party of Canada candidate at that time, finishing ahead of the Conservative and NDP candidates in the process.[6] This article is about the leader of the Green Party of Canada. ... London North Centre (formerly known as London—Adelaide) is a federal electoral district in the province of Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 1997. ...


Policies

The GPC had originally adopted a form of the Ten Key Values originally authored by the United States Green Party. In American politics, the Green Party is a third party which has been active in some areas since the 1980s, but first gained widespread public attention for Ralph Naders presidential runs in 1996 and 2000. ... In American politics, the Green Party is a third party which has been active in some areas since the 1980s, but first gained widespread public attention for Ralph Naders presidential runs in 1996 and 2000. ...


The August 2002 Convention adopted the Six Principles of the Charter of the Global Greens, as stated by the Global Greens Conference held in Canberra, Australia in 2001. These principles are the only ones included in the GPC constitution. The Global Greens Charter is a document that 800 delegates from the Green parties of 70 countries decided upon a first gathering of the Global Greens in Canberra, Australia in April 2001. ... The Global Greens Charter is a document that 800 delegates from the Green parties of 70 countries decided upon a first gathering of the Global Greens in Canberra, Australia in April 2001. ... The Global Greens (or formally: the Global Green Network) are an organization of cooperating Green parties. ...


An emphasis on a green tax shift in the 2004 platform which favoured partially reducing income and corporate taxes (while increasing taxes on polluters and energy consumers,) created questions as to whether the Green Party was still on the left of the political spectrum, or was taking a more eco-capitalist approach by reducing progressive taxation in favour of regressive taxation. Green Party policy writers have challenged this interpretation by claiming that any unintended "regressive" tax consequences from the application of a Green Tax Shift would be intentionally offset by changes in individual tax rates and categories as well as an 'eco-tax" refund for those who pay no tax. A green tax shift is a fiscal policy which lowers the taxes on income including wages and profit, and raises taxes on consumption, particularly the unsustainable consumption of non-renewable resources. ... Left wing redirects here. ... Eco-capitalism is one of several strategies of the green movement and Green Parties. ... A progressive tax, or graduated tax, is a tax that is larger as a percentage of income for those with larger incomes. ... A regressive tax is a tax which takes a larger percentage of income from people whose income is low. ...


As early as 2000, the party had published platform comparisons indicating the reasons why supporters of any of the five other Canadian federal political parties should consider voting Green. The Greens have always had right-wing, leftist and centrist factions that have been ascendant at different times in the party's history. Many Greens also claim that this traditional left-right political spectrum analysis does not accurately capture the pragmatic ecological orientation of an evolving Green Party.[7]


The ecumenical approach (expressing affinities with all Canadian political tendencies and making cases to voters on all parts of the left-right spectrum) has been advocated by those who believe their success can be measured by the degree to which other parties adopt Green Party policies. It has however not been discerned the degree to which this process has contributed to phenomena like the Liberal Party of Canada adopting several key items which also appear in the Green program, such as accelerated Capital Cost Allowance deductions restricted to sustainable technology only, and the adoption of the ecological and social indicators and green procurement rules Greens have long advocated. Neither have the relative degrees of influence been discerned which non-partisan environmental groups and the party's own Green wing have in developing the policies of the Green Party. Capital Cost Allowance is the means by which Canadian businesses may claim deduct depreciation expense. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Sustainable design. ... The Genuine Progress Indicator (GPI) is a concept in green economics and welfare economics that has been suggested as a replacement metric for gross domestic product (GDP) as a metric of economic growth. ... Green procurement means the procurement of products and services that have less impact on the environment than their traditional counterparts. ...


Under Elizabeth May's leadership, the Green Party has begun to receive more mainstream media attention on other party policy not directly related to the environment - for example, supporting labour rights[8] and poppy legalization in Afghanistan.[9]


Leadership

Green leader Elizabeth May.
Green leader Elizabeth May.

Long-time environmental activist and lawyer Elizabeth May won the leadership of the federal Green party at a convention in Ottawa on August 26, 2006. She won with 2,145 votes, or 65.3 per cent of the valid ballots cast and the second-place finisher David Chernushenko, an environmental consultant, collected 1,096 votes or 33.3 per cent of the total.[10] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 398 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1807 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 398 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1807 pixel, file size: 1. ... This article is about the leader of the Green Party of Canada. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... David Chernushenko at the June 21, 2006, leadership debate of the Green Party of Canada. ...


On November 21, 2006, May appointed outgoing Green Party of British Columbia leader Adriane Carr and Quebec television host Claude Genest as Deputy Leaders of the Party [11]. David Chernushenko, who ran against Elizabeth May for the party leadership, is currently the Senior Deputy to the Leader. is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Green Party of British Columbia is a political party in British Columbia, Canada. ... Adriane Carr in 2005. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Claude William Genest is one of two deputy leaders of the Green Party of Canada. ... Deputy Leader in the Westminster system is the second-in-command of a political party, behind the party leader. ... David Chernushenko at the June 21, 2006, leadership debate of the Green Party of Canada. ... This article is about the leader of the Green Party of Canada. ...


Previous leader Jim Harris was first elected to the office with over 80% of the vote and the support of the leaders of all of the provincial level Green parties. He was re-elected on the first ballot by 56% of the membership in a leadership challenge vote in August 2004. Tom Manley placed second with over 30% of the vote. A few months after the 2004 convention, Tom Manley was appointed Deputy Leader. On September 23, 2005, Manley left the party to join the Liberal Party of Canada. Jim Harris 2006 election campaign photo. ... Tom Manley (born 1960 in Berwick, Ontario) is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ...


Party leaders

Dr. Trevor Hancock was the first leader of the Green Party of Canada. ... Seymour Trieger was the second leader of the Green Party of Canada. ... Kathryn Cholette served as leader of the Green Party of Canada from 1988 to 1990. ... Chris Lea is a politician and political activist in Canada. ... Wendy Priesnitz is a Canadian alternative education advocate. ... Harry Garfinkle is a Green politician in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... An interim leader, in Canadian politics, is a party leader who is appointed by the partys legislative caucus or the partys executive to temporarily act as leader when there is a gap between the resignation or death of a party leader and the election of his or her... Joan Elizabeth Russow is a noted Canadian peace activist and former leader of the Green Party of Canada. ... Christopher John (Chris) Bradshaw (born 1944 in Vancouver, British Columbia) is a Canadian politician and business person. ... An interim leader, in Canadian politics, is a party leader who is appointed by the partys legislative caucus or the partys executive to temporarily act as leader when there is a gap between the resignation or death of a party leader and the election of his or her... Jim Harris 2006 election campaign photo. ... This article is about the leader of the Green Party of Canada. ...

Federal election results

Election # of candidates nominated # of seats won # of total votes % of popular vote
1997 79 0 55 583 0.4%
2000 111 0 104 402 0.8%
2004 308 0 582 247 4.3%
2006 308 0 664 068 4.5%

Source: Elections Canada 36th Parliament The Canadian federal election of 1997 was held on June 2, 1997, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The 2000 Canadian federal election was held on November 27, 2000, to elect 301 Members of Parliament to the House of Commons of Canada. ... The Canadian federal election, 2004 (more formally, the 38th general election), was held on June 28, 2004 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Rendition of party representation in the 39th Canadian parliament decided by this election. ...


Electoral status

The Green Party fielded candidates in all 308 of the nation's ridings in the last two federal elections. In the 2006 federal election, the Green Party received 4.5% of the popular vote, only slightly more than in 2004, despite having received public funding (over $1 million CAD per year) for the first time and receiving more media coverage. An electoral district is a geographically-based constituency upon which Canadas representative democracy is based. ... Rendition of party representation in the 39th Canadian parliament decided by this election. ... “C$” redirects here. ...


No Green Party candidate has yet been elected to the federal or provincial level of government in Canada. Members of the party have achieved municipal offices, though most were elected as individuals and not on Green Party slates or labels in local (at least officially) non-partisan municipal elections. However, some people have been elected with a Green Party affiliation identified directly on the ballot. The first two were elected in the 1999 municipal elections (20 November 1999):

  • Art Vanden Berg, elected as a City Councillor in Victoria, British Columbia, and
  • Roslyn Cassells, elected to the Vancouver Parks Board on the same day.[12]

Current Greens in office include:

Andrea Reimer was elected as a trustee on the Vancouver School Board in 2002 as a Green. Former Councillor Elio Di Iorio was narrowly defeated in his 2006 reelection bid in Richmond Hill, Ontario and former Councillor Rob Strang did not run for reelection in Orangeville, Ontario. The late Richard Thomas served as reeve of Armour Township, Ontario from 2003 until his death in 2006. There are about 16 other Greens elected to local governments in BC. Location of Whistler within the Squamish-Lillooet District in British Columbia, Canada Coordinates: , Country Canada Province British Columbia Regional District Squamish-Lillooet Settled 1914 by Mrytle and Alex Philip Incorporated 1975 Government  - Mayor Ken Melamed  - Manager Bill Barratt  - Governing body Whistler Town Council  - MP Blair Wilson  - MLA Joan McIntyre Area... Jane Sterk is the leader of the Green Party of British Columbia, a position she was elected to on October 22, 2007. ... The Township of Esquimalt is a municipality at the southern tip of Vancouver Island, in British Columbia, Canada. ... This article is about the city of Victoria. ... Rick Goldring is a financial planner and member of the Burlington City Council in Burlington, Ontario, Canada. ... Motto: Stand By Coordinates: , Country Canada Province Ontario Region Halton Regional Municipality Established 1874 Government  - Mayor Cam Jackson  - Governing Body Burlington City Council  - MPs Mike Wallace (CPC), Garth Turner (Liberal)  - MPPs Joyce Savoline (PC), Ted Chudleigh (PC) Area  - City 187 km²  (72 sq mi) Population (2006)  - City 164,415 (Ranked... Motto: En la rose, je fleuris (French for Like the rose, I flourish) Map showing Richmond Hills location in York Region Country Canada Province Ontario Region York Region Incorporated 1873 Government  - Mayor Dave Barrow  - Governing Body Richmond Hill Town Council  - MPs Lui Temelkovski, Bryon Wilfert Population (2006)[1]  - City... Motto: Template:Unhide = A great place to work if you really want to live Location City Information Established: 1863 Area: 15. ... Richard Thomas driving his alcohol fuelled car Richard Thomas is a Canadian actor, broadcaster, environmentalist and politician. ... Armour is a township in the Canadian province of Ontario. ...


Exclusion from debates

In the 2004 election, the consortium of Canadian television networks did not invite Jim Harris to the televised leaders debates. The primary reason given for this was the party's lack of representation in the House of Commons. There were unsuccessful legal actions by the party, a petition by its supporters to have it included, and statements by non-supporters such as Ed Broadbent who believed it should be included. In jurisdictions which use the Westminster system of government or a similar system, leaders debates are often held, usually during a general election campaign. ... John Edward Ed Broadbent, PC, CC, Ph. ...


The Green Party was also not included in the leaders' debates for the 2006 election.[13] The same reason was given[14], although some also believed the party's lack of visibility and meaningful input into Canadian federal budgets and bills was a factor. Rendition of party representation in the 39th Canadian parliament decided by this election. ...


The Green Party continues to campaign for these measures.


Internet innovation

While the organizing and election planning was centralized, policy development was to be decentralized. In February 2004, the Green Party of Canada Living Platform was initiated by the Party's former Head of Platform and Research, Michael Pilling, to open the party's participatory democracy to the public to help validate its policies against broad public input. It also made it easy for candidates to share their answers to public interest group questionnaires, find the best answers to policy questions, and for even rural and remote users, and Canadians abroad, to contribute to Party policy intelligence. Participatory democracy is a broadly inclusive term for many kinds of consultative decision making which require consultation on important decisions by those who will carry out the decision. ...


Membership exclusions

In 1998, the party adopted a rule that forbids membership in any other federal political party. This was intended to prevent the party from being taken over.


In the past, some Green Party members have been comfortable openly working with members of other political parties. For instance, GPC members Peter Bevan-Baker and Mike Nickerson worked with Liberal MP Joe Jordan to develop the Canada Well-Being Measurement Act that called upon the government to implement Genuine Progress Indicators (GPI). While the act was introduced into the House of Commons as a private members bill, it never became law. A small number of Greens who advocate the more cooperative approach to legislation object to the new rule not to hold cross-memberships, a tool they occasionally employed. Peter Bevan-Baker is a candidate for the Leglslative assembly for the Canadian province of Prince Edward Island, for the Green Party of Prince Edward Island in the district of Kellys Cross-Cumberland. ... The Green Party of Canada is intending to run a full slate of 308 candidates in the 2006 Canadian federal election. ... Joe Louis Jordan (born November 19, 1958 in Pembroke, Ontario) is a Canadian politician. ... Canada Well-Being Measures Act was a measure proposed by Member of Parliament Marlene Jennings in 2001. ... The Genuine Progress Indicator (GPI) is a concept in green economics and welfare economics that has been suggested as a replacement metric for gross domestic product (GDP) as a metric of economic growth. ... Type Lower House Speaker Peter Milliken, Liberal since January 29, 2001 Leader of the Government in the House of Commons Peter Van Loan, Conservative since January 4, 2007 Opposition House Leader Ralph Goodale, Liberal since January 23, 2006 Members 308 Political groups Conservative Party Liberal Party Bloc Québécois...


Peace and Ecology Party of Canada

In 2005, some members of the Green Party of Canada who disagreed with what they considered to be the right-wing direction taken by leader Jim Harris founded the Peace and Ecology Party of Canada. This left-wing political party was devoted to issues such as labour, the environment, and bioregionalism. The party was never registered with Elections Canada, and did not run candidates in the 2006 federal election. Peace and Ecology Party Website Jim Harris 2006 election campaign photo. ... Elections Canada is the non-partisan agency of the Government of Canada responsible for the conduct of federal elections and referendums. ... Rendition of party representation in the 39th Canadian parliament decided by this election. ...


Cooperation with the Liberal Party

With Stéphane Dion winning the Liberal leadership on a largely environmentalist platform, and both the Liberals and Greens having a shared interested in both defeating the Conservatives, whose environmental policies have come under criticism from members of both parties, some political observers questioned if an alliance of some sort between the two parties might take place. Stéphane Maurice Dion, PC, MP, Ph. ...


When May made the announcement that she would run in Central Nova, currently held by Peter MacKay, local Liberals would "neither confirm nor deny" that they had had discussions with May over ways to de-seat MacKay.[15] On March 21st, Dion said, "Madame May and I have conversations about how we may work together to be sure that this government will stop to do so much harm to our environment". The speculation was confirmed when Dion and May agreed not to run candidates in each other's ridings. [16] Central Nova in relation to the other Nova Scotia ridings Central Nova is a federal electoral district in Nova Scotia, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 2004. ... Peter Gordon MacKay, Conservative, QC, MP (born September 27, 1965) serves as the member of Parliament (MP) for Central Nova, Nova Scotia, Canadas Minister of National Defence and Minister for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency. ...


May earlier attempted to broker a deal with the NDP, by contacting Stephen Lewis to set up a meeting with party leader Jack Layton, who both rejected the notion outright. When the May-Dion deal was announced, it was criticized by the Conservatives and NDP.[17] [18] [19] This article is about the Canadian politician and broadcaster. ... John Gilbert Jack Layton, PC, MP, PhD (born July 18, 1950) is a social democratic Canadian politician and current leader of Canadas New Democratic Party (since 2003). ...

Part of the Politics series on Green politics

For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... Green politics or Green ideology is the ideology of the Green Parties, mainly informed by environmentalism, ecosophy and sustainable economics and aimed at developing a sustainable society. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (645x641, 612 KB) I needed to work with a close cropped version of this image. ...

Topics

Green movement
Green party
List of Green topics “Greens” redirects here. ... A Green party is a formally organized political party based on the principles of Green politics. ... This list of Green topics includes people, parties, organizations, and ideas associated with Green politics. ...

Schools

Green anarchism
Ecofeminism
Eco-socialism
Green syndicalism
Green liberalism
Green conservatism Theory and practice Issues History Culture By region Lists Related Anarchism Portal Politics Portal ·        Green anarchism is a school of thought within anarchism which puts an emphasis on the environment. ... Ecofeminism is a minor social and political movement which unites environmentalism and feminism[1], with some currents linking deep ecology and feminism. ... Eco-socialism or Green socialism is an ideology fusing Green movement values with socialism. ... Green syndicalism has been used as a name for the philosophy of the green guild or sustainable trades movement. ... Green Liberalism is a term used to refer to liberal who have incorporated green concerns into their ideology. ... Green conservatism is a term that is used for a brand of conservatism that espouses and incorporates green concerns. ...

Organizations

Global Greens · Africa · Americas · Asia-Pacific · Europe The Global Greens (or formally: the Global Green Network) are an organization of cooperating Green parties. ... The Federation of Green Parties of Africa is the organization of Green parties in Africa. ... The Federation of the Green Parties of the Americas is the organization of Green parties in North America and South America. ... The Asia-Pacific Green Network is a federation of national Green parties in countries in the Pacific Ocean and Asia, and is a member of the Global Greens. ... European Greens (or the European Green Party) is the name of the European Green Party, a political party at European level. ...

Principles

Four Pillars
Global Greens Charter: ecological wisdom
social justice
participatory democracy
nonviolence
sustainability
respect diversity
The worldwide green parties are committed to the following Four Pillars: Ecology (sometimes Ecological Wisdom or Ecological Sustainability) Social Justice (sometimes Social Equality and Economic Justice) Grassroots Democracy Non-Violence In German, they are known as Die Grünen: ökologisch, sozial, basisdemokratisch, gewaltfrei. ... The Global Greens Charter is a document that 800 delegates from the Green parties of 70 countries decided upon a first gathering of the Global Greens in Canberra, Australia in April 2001. ... The term ecological wisdom, or ecosophy, is a philosophy of ecological harmony or equilibrium. ... Social justice refers to the concept of an unjust society that refers to more than just the administration of laws. ... Participatory democracy is a broadly inclusive term for many kinds of consultative decision making which require consultation on important decisions by those who will carry out the decision. ... Nonviolence (or non-violence), whether held as a moral philosophy or only employed as an action strategy, rejects the use of physical violence in efforts to attain social, economic or political change. ... The Earth Day flag includes a NASA photo. ... The prerogative to respect diversity, often said to begin with biodiversity of non-human life, is basic to some 20th century studies such as cultural ecology, Queer studies, and anthropological linguistics. ...


Politics Portal ·  v  d  e 

References

General references

Footnotes

  1. ^ Tories lead Grits by three points in Canada
  2. ^ http://www.theglobeandmail.com/bnfiles/pdf/novpoll.pdf
  3. ^ Official voting results
  4. ^ "Financial summary," Elections Canada website
  5. ^ "Harris to give up on Green leadership," Globe and Mail, April 24, 2006.
  6. ^ "GPC History"
  7. ^ Martin, Chip. Left, right support Green London Free Press
  8. ^ [1]
  9. ^ [2]
  10. ^ Canadian Press, May wins Green Party leadership
  11. ^ Elizabeth May Announces Prominent Greens Adriane Carr and Claude William Genest as Deputy Leaders of federal Green Party Green Party of Canada press release, November 21, 2006.
  12. ^ City of Vancouver, Election Summary Report November 20, 1999
  13. ^ "Leaders' Debate," Green Party of Canada press release, November 30, 2005.
  14. ^ CBC ombudsman's review, 2006
  15. ^ [3]
  16. ^ http://www.cbc.ca/canada/story/2007/04/12/dion-may.html
  17. ^ Globe and Mail. "Dion, May confirm election deal", April 13, 2007. 
  18. ^ New Democratic Party. "Jack Layton on the Liberal – Green deal", April 13, 2007. 
  19. ^ Allan Woods, "Green party strategist resigns over pact," Toronto Star, April 17, 2007.

The Globe and Mail is a large Canadian English language national newspaper based in Toronto. ...

See also

This article lists political parties in Canada. ... The Young Greens of Canada is the youth arm of the Green Party of Canada and was formed at the 2006 leadership convention. ... The Green Party of Canada ran a full slate of 308 candidates in the 2006 Canadian federal election. ... The Green Party of Canada ran a full slate of 308 candidates in the 2004 federal election. ... The Green Party of Canada fielded a number of candidates in the 1997 federal election, none of whom were elected. ... The Green Party of Canada ran a number of candidates in the 1993 federal election, none of whom were elected. ... The Green Party of Canada under its constitution holds a leadership convention every 2 years. ... On March 29, 2006 it was announced, in accordance with the Green Party of Canada constitution that there would be a leadership contest held August 24-27, 2006 in Ottawa. ...

External links

Green parties in Canada
Federal: Green Party of Canada
Provincial: Alberta - British Columbia - Manitoba
Nova Scotia - Ontario - Prince Edward Island - Quebec - Saskatchewan
Municipal: Winnipeg

  Results from FactBites:
 
Green Party of Canada - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1866 words)
The Green Party of Canada is a federal political party in Canada.
In the fall of 2005, Sonya Chandler was elected to the Victoria, BC council as a Green.
The GPC is a member of the Federation of Green Parties of the Americas and recognized by the Global Greens as representing Canadian Greens federally.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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