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Encyclopedia > Green Lantern
Green Lantern

Cover to Green Lantern: Rebirth #6, art by Ethan Van Sciver. Featured left to right are Guy Gardner, Kyle Rayner, Hal Jordan, John Stewart and Kilowog.
Publisher DC Comics
First appearance All-American Comics #16 (1940)
Created by Bill Finger
Martin Nodell
Characters Alan Scott
Hal Jordan
Guy Gardner
John Stewart
Kyle Rayner
Jade
See also Green Lantern Corps
List of Green Lanterns
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Green Lantern is the name of several fictional characters, superheroes appearing in comic books published by DC Comics. The first (Alan Scott) was created by writer Bill Finger and artist Martin Nodell in All-American Comics #16 (July 1940). The best-known is Hal Jordan, created by John Broome and Gil Kane in Showcase #22 (Oct. 1959). This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Image File history File links Greenlanternrebirth6. ... Ethan Van Sciver (born 1975) is an American comic book artist, currently doing interior art for the DC Comics title Green Lantern. ... Guy Gardner is a fictional character, a comic book superhero published by DC Comics. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... John Stewart is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC Universe, and a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps. ... Kilowog is a fictional superhero from DC Comics, and a member of the Green Lantern Corps. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... All-American Comics was the flagship title for its publisher, also called All-American Comics. ... William Bill Finger (February 8, 1914–January 18, 1974) was an American writer best known as the uncredited co-creator, with Bob Kane, of the DC Comics character Batman, as well as the co-architect of the series development. ... Martin Nodell (born 15 November 1915) is a cartoonist and commercial artist, best known as the creator of the comic book superhero Green Lantern. ... For other uses, see Allan Scott. ... Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... Guy Gardner is a fictional character, a comic book superhero published by DC Comics. ... John Stewart is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC Universe, and a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... Jade is the codename of Jennie-Lynn Hayden, a fictional character, a superhero from DC Comics. ... The fictional Green Lantern Corps is an intergalactic police force featured in DC Comics, particularly featuring the superhero Green Lantern, Earth’s member of the group. ... The Green Lantern Corps has at least 7200 members, two per sector (originally 3600 — one per sector), in addition to assorted other members who fulfill roles other than patrolling. ... A fictional character is any person, persona, identity, or entity whose existence originates from a work of fiction. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... For other uses, see Allan Scott. ... William Bill Finger (February 8, 1914–January 18, 1974) was an American writer best known as the uncredited co-creator, with Bob Kane, of the DC Comics character Batman, as well as the co-architect of the series development. ... Martin Nodell (born 15 November 1915) is a cartoonist and commercial artist, best known as the creator of the comic book superhero Green Lantern. ... All-American Comics was the flagship title for its publisher, also called All-American Comics. ... Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... John Broome (aka: pen names John Osgood and Edgar Ray Meritt) was a writer-contributor to DC Comics. ... Showcase #22 (Oct. ... Showcase has been the title of several anthology series published by DC Comics. ...


Each Green Lantern possesses a power ring that gives the user great control over the physical world as long as the wielder has sufficient willpower and strength to wield it. While the ring of the Golden Age Green Lantern (Alan Scott) was magically powered, the rings worn by all subsequent Lanterns were technological creations of the Guardians of the Universe, who granted such rings to worthy candidates. These individuals made up the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps. This article is about the Green Lantern Corps weapon. ... Superman, catalyst of the Golden Age: Superman #14 (Feb. ... The Guardians of the Universe are fictional characters in the DC Comics universe. ... For other uses, see Police (disambiguation). ... The fictional Green Lantern Corps is an intergalactic police force featured in DC Comics, particularly featuring the superhero Green Lantern, Earth’s member of the group. ...


After World War II, when sales of superhero comic books generally declined, DC ceased publishing new adventures of the Alan Scott Green Lantern. At the beginning of the Silver Age of Comic Books, DC editor Julius Schwartz had writer John Broome and artist Gil Kane revive the Green Lantern character, this time as test pilot Hal Jordan, who became a founding member of the Justice League of America. In the early 1970s, writer Denny O'Neil and artist Neal Adams teamed Green Lantern with archer Green Arrow in groundbreaking, socially conscious, and award-winning stories that pitted the sensibilities of the law-and-order-oriented Lantern with the populist Green Arrow. Several cosmically themed series followed, as did occasional different individuals in the role of Earth's Green Lantern. Most prominent of these are John Stewart, Guy Gardner, and Kyle Rayner. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Showcase #4 (Oct. ... Julius Julie Schwartz (June 19, 1915 – February 8, 2004) was a comic book and pulp magazine editor, and a science fiction agent and prominent fan. ... John Broome (aka: pen names John Osgood and Edgar Ray Meritt) was a writer-contributor to DC Comics. ... Showcase #22 (Oct. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Dennis Denny ONeil is a comic book writer and editor, principally for Marvel Comics and DC Comics in the 1970s, 80s, and 90s, and Group Editor for the Batman family of books until his retirement. ... Neal Adams (born June 6, 1941, Governors Island, Manhattan, New York City) is an American comic book and commercial artist best known for his highly naturalistic style of illustration. ... This article is about the first Green Arrow, Oliver Queen. ... Look up Populism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... John Stewart is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC Universe, and a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps. ... Guy Gardner is a fictional character, a comic book superhero published by DC Comics. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ...


Each of Earth's Green Lanterns has been a member of the Justice Society of America or the Justice League, and John Stewart was featured as one of the main characters in both the Justice League and the Justice League Unlimited animated series. The Green Lanterns are often depicted as being close friends of the various men who have been the Flash, the most notable friendships having been between Alan Scott and Jay Garrick (the Golden Age Green Lantern/Flash), Hal Jordan and Barry Allen (the Silver Age Green Lantern and Flash), and Kyle Rayner and Wally West (the modern age Green Lantern and Flash), as well as Jordan being friends with West. The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... Justice League is an American animated television series about a team of superheroes which ran from 2001 to 2004 on Cartoon Network. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... The Flash redirects here. ... For other uses, see Allan Scott. ... Jay Garrick is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the first to use the name Flash. ... Barry Allen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the second Flash. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... For the science fiction author, see Wallace West. ...

Contents

Publication history

Golden Age

Green Lantern (sometimes called The Green Lantern in the early days) was created by Martin Nodell (using the name Mart Dellon) and Bill Finger. He first appeared in the Golden Age of comic books in All-American Comics #16 (July 1940), published by All-American Publications, one of three companies that would eventually merge to form DC Comics. The collector market for original copies of this issue is strong, with a sale in October 2007 selling on an online vintage comic trading site, ComicConnect.com, for $29,250.[1] This Green Lantern was Alan Scott, an engineer who had come into possession of a magic lantern. From this, he crafted a magic ring which gave him a wide variety of powers. The limitations of the ring were that it had to be "charged" every 24 hours by touching it to the lantern for a time, and that it did not work on wood. Martin Nodell (born 15 November 1915) is a cartoonist and commercial artist, best known as the creator of the comic book superhero Green Lantern. ... William Bill Finger (February 8, 1914–January 18, 1974) was an American writer best known as the uncredited co-creator, with Bob Kane, of the DC Comics character Batman, as well as the co-architect of the series development. ... Superman, catalyst of the Golden Age: Superman #14 (Feb. ... All-American Comics was the flagship title for its publisher, also called All-American Comics. ... The All-American logo, used on their titles during the 1945 split with National All-American Publications is one of three American comic book companies that combined to form the modern-day DC Comics, one of the worlds two largest comics publishers. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Comics (or, less commonly, sequential art) is a form of visual art consisting of images which are commonly combined with text, often in the form of speech balloons or image captions. ... For other uses, see Allan Scott. ... Magic ring is an article of jewlery that appears frequently in fantasy and fairytale. ...


Nodell had originally planned to give Green Lantern the alter ego "Alan Ladd," this being a linguistic twist on Aladdin, who had a magic lamp and magic ring of his own. DC considered the wordplay distracting and foolish, and the character's name was changed before publication to "Alan Scott." In May 1942, the film This Gun for Hire suddenly made the journeyman actor of the same name a movie star. Nodell would always joke that they'd missed a great opportunity.[2] For other uses, see Aladdin (disambiguation). ... This article is about motion pictures. ... This Gun for Hire is a 1942 film noir, directed by Frank Tuttle and based on the novel by Graham Greene. ... For other uses, see Journeyman (disambiguation). ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... Alan Walbridge Ladd (September 3, 1913 – November 7, 1964) was an American film actor. ... A movie star or film star is a celebrity who is a person known for his or her roles in motion pictures. ...

Green Lanterns of two worlds: Hal Jordan (left) meets Alan Scott in Green Lantern #40 (Oct. 1965). Cover art by Gil Kane & Murphy Anderson.
Green Lanterns of two worlds: Hal Jordan (left) meets Alan Scott in Green Lantern #40 (Oct. 1965). Cover art by Gil Kane & Murphy Anderson.

Green Lantern was a popular character in the 1940s, featured in both All-American Comics and in his own title and co-starring in Comic Cavalcade along with Flash and Wonder Woman. He was a charter member of the Justice Society of America, whose adventures ran in All Star Comics. After World War II, the popularity of superheroes declined. The Green Lantern comic book was cancelled with issue #40 (October 1949). All Star Comics #57 (1951) was the character's last Golden Age appearance. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (889x1314, 692 KB) Summary Cover, Green Lantern #40, DC, October 1965, Cover Credits: Gil Kane (Pencils) Murphy Anderson (inks) Source: http://comics. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (889x1314, 692 KB) Summary Cover, Green Lantern #40, DC, October 1965, Cover Credits: Gil Kane (Pencils) Murphy Anderson (inks) Source: http://comics. ... Showcase #22 (Oct. ... Murphy Anderson (born 1926) is an American comic book penciller and inker who has worked for companies such as DC Comics for over 50 years, starting in the 1930s-40s Golden Age of Comic Books. ... The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... Green Lanterm, Wonder Woman and the Flash do their bit for the war: Comic Cavalcade #6 (Spring 1944), cover art by Paul Reinman. ... The Flash redirects here. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... This article is about the 1940s comic book series. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... This article is about the 1940s comic book series. ...


Silver Age revival

In the late 1950s, DC Comics successfully revived superheroes, ushering in what became known as the Silver Age of comic books. Rather than bringing back the same Golden Age heroes — as Atlas Comics, the 1950s precursor of Marvel Comics, unsuccessfully attempted — DC reimagined them as new characters for the modern age. Following the successful revival of the Flash in Showcase #4 (Oct. 1956), a new Green Lantern was introduced in Showcase #22 (September-October 1959). The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... Showcase #4 (Oct. ... Atlas Comics is the 1950s comic book publishing company that would evolve into Marvel Comics. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... The Flash redirects here. ... Showcase Comics was a series used to try out new characters by DC Comics. ... Showcase Comics was a series used to try out new characters by DC Comics. ...


This Green Lantern was Hal Jordan, a test pilot who was given a power ring by a dying alien, Abin Sur, and who became a member of the Green Lantern Corps, an interstellar organization of police overseen by the Guardians of the Universe. The Corps' rings were powerless against anything colored yellow, due to a necessary impurity in the ring. Jordan's creation was motivated by a desire to make him more of a science fiction hero, editor Julius Schwartz having been a longtime fan of that genre and literary agent who saw pop-culture tastes turning in that direction. Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... Test pilots are aviators who fly new and modified aircraft in specific maneuvers, allowing the results to be measured and the design to be evaluated. ... This article is about the Green Lantern Corps weapon. ... Green people redirects here. ... Abin Sur is a fictional character and a superhero from the DC Comics universe. ... The fictional Green Lantern Corps is an intergalactic police force featured in DC Comics, particularly featuring the superhero Green Lantern, Earth’s member of the group. ... The Guardians of the Universe are fictional characters in the DC Comics universe. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Julius Julie Schwartz (June 19, 1915 – February 8, 2004) was a comic book and pulp magazine editor, and a science fiction agent and prominent fan. ... Popular culture (or pop culture) is the widespread cultural elements in any given society that are perpetuated through that societys vernacular language or lingua franca. ...


The Silver Age Green Lantern was unique in several ways. He was the first DC superhero with a family.{Green Lantern #9 'Green Lantern's Brother Act'} Written by John Broome and drawn by Gil Kane, these stories have been reprinted in deluxe hardback editions. John Broome (aka: pen names John Osgood and Edgar Ray Meritt) was a writer-contributor to DC Comics. ... Showcase #22 (Oct. ...


This Green Lantern was a founding member of the Justice League of America and starred in his own title as well; in issue #40 (Oct. 1965), he met his Golden Age predecessor, who was established to live on the parallel world of Earth-Two, separate from Jordan's Earth-One. The two Lanterns struck up a close friendship and have periodically come to each other's aid. Hal Jordan's Green Lantern also became close friends with Barry Allen, and the two heroes appeared frequently in each other's comics to team up. For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... A depiction of several alternate Earths within the Multiverse and the different variations of the Flash inhabiting each Earth. ... First appearance of Earth-Two Earth-Two was a fictional reality within the stories of DC Comics. ... Barry Allen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the second Flash. ...


Later developments

"My ward is a junkie!" Green Lantern vol. 2, #86 (Nov. 1971). Cover art by Neal Adams.
"My ward is a junkie!" Green Lantern vol. 2, #86 (Nov. 1971). Cover art by Neal Adams.

With issue #76 (April 1970), the series made a radical stylistic departure. Editor Schwartz, in one of the company's earliest efforts to provide more than light fantasy, worked with the writer-artist team of Denny O'Neil and Neal Adams to spark new interest in the comic and address a perceived need for social "relevance" — a general pop-culture catchphrase of the time. They added the character Green Arrow (with the cover though not the official name retitled Green Lantern Co-Starring Green Arrow) and had the pair travel through America encountering "real world" issues, to which they reacted in different ways — Green Lantern as fundamentally a lawman, Green Arrow as a liberal iconoclast. Additionally during this run, the groundbreaking "Snowbirds Don't Fly" story was published (issues #85 and #86) in which Green Arrow's teen sidekick Speedy (the later grownup hero Arsenal) developed a heroin addiction that he was forcibly made to quit. The stories were critically acclaimed, with publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and Newsweek citing it as an example of how comic books were "growing up".[3] However, the O'Neil/Adams run was not a commercial success, and after only 14 issues, the two left the title, which was cancelled. Image File history File links GreenLantern86. ... Image File history File links GreenLantern86. ... Neal Adams (born June 6, 1941, Governors Island, Manhattan, New York City) is an American comic book and commercial artist best known for his highly naturalistic style of illustration. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... Dennis Denny ONeil is a comic book writer and editor, principally for Marvel Comics and DC Comics in the 1970s, 80s, and 90s, and Group Editor for the Batman family of books until his retirement. ... Neal Adams (born June 6, 1941, Governors Island, Manhattan, New York City) is an American comic book and commercial artist best known for his highly naturalistic style of illustration. ... Popular culture, or pop culture, (literally: the culture of the people) consists of the cultural elements that prevail (at least numerically) in any given society, mainly using the more popular media, in that societys vernacular language and/or an established lingua franca. ... A catch phrase is a phrase or expression that is popularized, usually through repeated use, by a real person or fictional character. ... This article is about the first Green Arrow, Oliver Queen. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... This article belongs in one or more categories. ... Speedy is the name of two DC Comics superheroes, both of whom have served as teenaged sidekicks for the Green Arrow (a. ... Roy Harper is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... For other uses, see Heroin (disambiguation). ... This article is about the concept of addiction. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ...


The title would know a number of revivals and cancellations. Its title would change to Green Lantern Corps at one point as the popularity rose and waned. During a time there were two regular titles, each with a Green Lantern, and a third member in the Justice League. A new character, Kyle Rayner, was created to become the feature while Hal Jordan first became the villain Parallax, then died and came back as the Spectre. The Spectre is a fictional cosmic entity and superhero who has appeared in numerous comic books published by DC Comics. ...


In the wake of The New Frontier, Geoff Johns returned Hal Jordan as Green Lantern in Green Lantern: Rebirth (2004-05). Johns began to lay groundwork for a 2009 story to be entitled The Blackest Night, viewing it as the third part of the trilogy started by Rebirth. Expanding on the Green Lantern mythology with the second part, The Sinestro Corps War (2007), Johns with artist Ethan van Sciver found wide critical acclaim and financial success with the series, which promised the introduction of a spectrum of coloured "lanterns". Currently, all four "current" Green Lanterns have stories being told in simultaneously published series, Green Lantern and Green Lantern Corps respectively. Ethan Van Sciver (born 1975) is an American comic book artist, currently doing interior art for the DC Comics title Green Lantern. ...


Awards

The series and its creators have received several awards over the years, including the 1961 Alley Award for Best Adventure Hero/Heroine with Own Book; and Academy of Comic Book Arts' Shazam Award for Best Continuing Feature in 1970, for Best Individual Story ("No Evil Shall Escape My Sight", Green Lantern vol. 2, #76, by Dennis O'Neil and Neal Adams), and in 1971 for Best Individual Story ("Snowbirds Don't Fly", Green Lantern vol. 2, #85 by O'Neil and Adams). Look up Award in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Alley Awards are comic book awards originally sponsored by Alter-Ego magazine, edited by Jerry Bails, Roy Thomas, Ronn Foss, and, in 1978, Mike Friedrich. ... The Academy of Comic Book Arts is an American professional organization of the 1970s that was designed to be the comic book industry analog of such groups as the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. ... The Academy of Comic Book Arts is an American professional organization of the 1970s that was designed to be the comic book industry analog of such groups as the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. ... Dennis Denny ONeil is a comic book writer and editor, principally for Marvel Comics and DC Comics in the 1970s, 80s, and 90s, and Group Editor for the Batman family of books until his retirement. ... Neal Adams (born June 6, 1941, Governors Island, Manhattan, New York City) is an American comic book and commercial artist best known for his highly naturalistic style of illustration. ...


Writer O'Neil received the Shazam Award for Best Writer (Dramatic Division) in 1970 for his work on Green Lantern, Batman, Superman, and other titles, while artist Adams received the Shazam for Best Artist (Dramatic Division) in 1970 for his work on Green Lantern and Batman. Inker Dick Giordano received the Shazam Award for Best Inker (Dramatic Division) for his work on Green Lantern and other titles. Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Richard Joseph Dick Giordano (born July 20, 1932) is an American comic book artist and editor best known for introducing Charlton Comics Action Heroes stable of superheroes, and serving as editor of then industry-leader DC Comics. ...


In Judd Winick's first regular writing assignment on Green Lantern, he wrote a storyline in which an assistant of Kyle Rayner's emerged as a gay character in Green Lantern #137 (June 2001). In Green Lantern #154 (November 2001) the story entitled "Hate Crime" gained media recognition when Terry was brutally beaten in a homophobic attack. Winick was interviewed on Phil Donahue's show on MSNBC for that storyline on August 15, 2002 and received two GLAAD awards for his Green Lantern work. Judd Winick (born in 1970 on Long Island, New York City) is an American comic book and comic strip writer/artist famous for his 1994 stint on MTVs The Real World: San Francisco, as well for his work on such comic books as Green Lantern, Green Arrow, and Pedro...


Fictional character biographies

Alan Scott, the original Green Lantern. Promotional cover art for JSA # 77, by Alex Ross.
Alan Scott, the original Green Lantern. Promotional cover art for JSA # 77, by Alex Ross.

Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Golden Age Green Lantern

Alan Scott

Main article: Alan Scott

Alan Scott's Green Lantern history traditionally began thousands of years ago when a mystical "green flame" fell to Earth. The voice of the flame prophesied that it would act three times: once to bring death, once to bring life, and once to bring power. By 1940, the flame had been fashioned into a metal lantern, which fell into the hands of Alan Scott, a young engineer. Following a railroad bridge collapse, the flame instructed Scott how to fashion a ring from its metal, to give him fantastic powers as the superhero Green Lantern. He adopted a colorful costume and became a crimefighter. Alan was a founding member of the Justice Society of America. He is also an honorary member of the Green Lantern Corps. However, two subsequent stories threw this separation of Alan Scott from Corps history into question. For other uses, see Allan Scott. ... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... The fictional Green Lantern Corps is an intergalactic police force featured in DC Comics, particularly featuring the superhero Green Lantern, Earth’s member of the group. ...


At least one story during one of the earliest cross-over adventures of the Justice League with their pre-Crisis Earth-2 counterparts, the Justice Society, showed Hal Jordan and Alan Scott charging their rings from the same Power Battery, an impossibility if the source of the two rings' power was different and incompatible. Thirty years later, a post-Crisis Tales of the Green Lantern Corps story brought Scott even closer to the Corps' ranks. It was revealed that Hal Jordan was predated as Earth's Green Lantern by a citizen of ancient China. Not only was the Corps' now-familiar green, black and white uniform motif not yet adopted, but this ancient Chinese GL altered the basic red of his uniform to more closely resemble the style worn by his countrymen. Power ultimately corrupted this early GL and the Guardians allowed his ring to manifest a weakness to wood, the material from which most Chinese weapons of the time were fashioned. This allowed the locals to ultimately defeat their corrupted “champion." His ring and lantern were burned and it was during this process that the “intelligence” inhabiting the ring and the lantern, and linking them to the Guardians, was damaged.


Centuries later, it was explained, when Scott found the mystical lantern, it had no memory of its true origins, save a vague recollection of the uniform of its last master. This was the origin of Scott’s distinctive costume. Due to the damaged link to the Guardians, those immortals presumed the ring and lantern to be lost in whatever cataclysm overcame their last owner of record. Thus it was that Scott was never noticed by the Guardians and went on to carve a history of his own separate and apart from that of the Corps, still sporting a ring with an artificially induced weakness against anything made of wood. Honoring this separate history, the Guardians never moved to force Scott to relinquish the ring, formally join the Corps, or adopt its colors.


Silver Age Green Lantern

Hal Jordan

Main article: Hal Jordan
Hal Jordan, Silver Age Green Lantern. Promotional cover art for Green Lantern vol. 4, #1, by Carlos Pacheco & Jesús Merino.
Hal Jordan, Silver Age Green Lantern. Promotional cover art for Green Lantern vol. 4, #1, by Carlos Pacheco & Jesús Merino.

The next Green Lantern to see publication was Harold "Hal" Jordan, a second-generation test pilot, having followed in the footsteps of his father, Martin Jordan. He was given the power ring and battery (lantern) by a dying alien named Abin Sur, whose spaceship crashed on Earth. Abin Sur used his ring to seek out an individual who was "utterly honest and born without fear" to take his place as Green Lantern. Jordan became a founding member of the Justice League of America and as of the mid-2000s is, along with John Stewart, one of the two active-duty Lanterns in Earth's sector of space. Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Test pilots are aviators who fly new and modified aircraft in specific maneuvers, allowing the results to be measured and the design to be evaluated. ... Green people redirects here. ... Abin Sur is a fictional character and a superhero from the DC Comics universe. ... One of the fictional ships called the Starship Enterprise from Star Trek, one of the most famous fictional starships. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ...


Jordan was also a member of the Green Lantern Corps, which was modeled after the "Lensmen" from the science fiction novel series written by E.E. Smith. The early 1980s miniseries "Green Lantern Corps" honors this with two characters in the corps: Eddore of Tront and Arisia. A different interpretation of Jordan and the Corps appears in Superman: Red Son. This article is about the author. ... Spoiler warning: Superman: Red Son is a comic book published by DC Comics unveiled under their Elseworlds imprint in April, 2003. ...


Following the rebirth of Superman and the destruction of Green Lantern's hometown of Coast City in the early 1990s, Hal Jordan seemingly went insane and destroyed the Green Lantern Corps and the Central Power Battery. Now calling himself Parallax, Hal Jordan would devastate the DC Universe off and on for the next several years. However, after Earth's sun was threatened by a Sun-Eater, Jordan sacrificed his life expending the last of his vast power to reignite the dying star. Jordan subsequently returned from beyond the grave as the Spectre, the divine Spirit of God's Vengeance, whom Jordan attempted to transform into a Spirit of Redemption, which ended in failure. The Spectre is a fictional cosmic entity and superhero who has appeared in numerous comic books published by DC Comics. ...


In Green Lantern: Rebirth it is revealed that Jordan was under the influence of a creature known as Parallax when he turned renegade. Parallax was a creature of pure fear that had been imprisoned in the Central Power Battery by the Guardians of the Universe in the distant past. Imprisonment had rendered the creature dormant and it was eventually forgotten, becoming known merely as the "yellow impurity" in the power rings. Sinestro was able to wake Parallax and encourage it to seek out Hal Jordan as a host. Although Parallax had been trying to corrupt Jordan (via his ring) for some time, it was not until after the destruction of Coast City that it was able to succeed. It took advantage of Jordan's weakened emotional state to lure him to Oa and cause him to attack anyone who stood in his way. When Jordan finally entered the Central Power Battery and absorbed all the power, he unwittingly freed the Parallax entity and allowed it to graft onto his soul. Parallax is a fictional character, a supervillain from DC Comics. ... Sinestro is a fictional character, an alien supervillain in the DC Comics Universe. ...


The Spectre bonded with Jordan in the hopes of freeing the former Green Lantern's soul from Parallax's taint but was not strong enough to do so. In "Green Lantern Rebirth" Parallax began to assert control of the Parallax-Spectre-Jordan composite. Thanks to a supreme effort of will Jordan was able to free himself from Parallax, rejoin his soul to his body and reclaim his power ring. The newly revived (and youthened) Jordan awoke just in time to save Kyle Rayner and Green Arrow from Sinestro. After the Korugarian's defeat Jordan was able to successfully lead his fellow Green lanterns in battle against Parallax and imprison it in the Central Power Battery once more. This article is about the DC Comics character. ... This article is about the first Green Arrow, Oliver Queen. ...


Hal Jordan is once again a member of the Green Lantern Corps, and along with John Stewart is one of the two Corps members assigned to Sector 2814.


Bronze Age Green Lanterns

Guy Gardner

Main article: Guy Gardner (comics)
Guy Gardner. Promotional interior art for Green Lantern Corps: Recharge #1 (Nov 2005), by Patrick Gleason.
Guy Gardner. Promotional interior art for Green Lantern Corps: Recharge #1 (Nov 2005), by Patrick Gleason.

In the late 1960s, Guy Gardner appeared as the second choice to replace Abin Sur as Green Lantern of sector 2814. This placed him as the "backup" Green Lantern for Jordan. During Crisis on Infinite Earths, the Guardians split into factions, one of which appointed Gardner their champion. He has gone through many changes, including wielding Sinestro's Qwardian power ring, then gaining and losing Vuldarian powers, and readmission to the Corps during Green Lantern: Rebirth. He later became part of the Green Lantern Honor Guard, and oversees new Green Lanterns' training. Guy Gardner is a fictional character, a comic book superhero published by DC Comics. ... Image File history File links GL_guy_bg. ... Image File history File links GL_guy_bg. ... Sinestro is a fictional character, an alien supervillain in the DC Comics Universe. ... This article is about the Green Lantern Corps weapon. ... Vuldarians are a fictional alien race from the DC Comics Universe. ...


John Stewart

Main article: John Stewart (comics)
John Stewart. Promotional cover art for Green Lantern vol. 3, #156, by Ariel Olivetti.
John Stewart. Promotional cover art for Green Lantern vol. 3, #156, by Ariel Olivetti.

In the early 1970s, John Stewart, an unemployed architect, was selected by the Guardians to replace Guy Gardner as the backup Green Lantern for Jordan. When Jordan resigned from the Corps for an extended period of time, Stewart served as the regular Lantern for that period. Since then, Stewart was in and out of action due to various circumstances, even joining the Darkstars when the Green Lantern Corps was destroyed by Parallax. After that he took over being Green Lantern for Kyle Rayner when he left Earth, also taking his place in the JLA. Now he has begun serving with Jordan as one of his sector's two designated regular-duty Lanterns. John Stewart is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC Universe, and a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (511x780, 84 KB)Cover to Green Lantern #156. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (511x780, 84 KB)Cover to Green Lantern #156. ... For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ... Guy Gardner is a fictional character, a comic book superhero published by DC Comics. ... Darkstars Issue 1 A fictional intergalactic squadron of cosmic cops that no one had heard of before 1992 in DC Comics. ... Parallax is a fictional character, a supervillain from DC Comics. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ...


Modern Age Green Lantern

Kyle Rayner

Main article: Kyle Rayner
Kyle Rayner. Promotional cover art for Green Lantern vol. 3, #151, by Jim Lee & Scott Williams.
Kyle Rayner. Promotional cover art for Green Lantern vol. 3, #151, by Jim Lee & Scott Williams.

Kyle Rayner was a struggling freelance artist when he was approached by the last Guardian of the Universe, Ganthet, to become a new Green Lantern with the last power ring. Ganthet's reasons for choosing Rayner remained a secret for quite some time. Despite not being cut from the same cloth of bravery and fearlessness as Hal Jordan — or perhaps because of that — Rayner proved to be popular with readers and his fellow characters. Having continually proven himself on his own and with the JLA, he became known amongst the Oans as "The Torch Bearer". He was responsible for the rebirth of the Guardians and the re-ignition of the Central Power Battery, essentially restoring all that Jordan had destroyed as Parallax. Rayner later began operating as the Green Lantern known as Ion. This article is about the DC Comics character. ... Image File history File links Glkyle. ... Image File history File links Glkyle. ... Ganthet is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ...


Kyle Rayner was chosen to wield the last ring because he knew fear, and Parallax had been released from the Central Power Battery. Ganthet knew this and chose Kyle because his experiences dealing with fear enabled him to resist Parallax. Because Parallax is fear, and yellow, none of the other Green Lanterns, including Hal, could harm Parallax and, therefore, came under his control. Kyle taught them to feel and overcome fear so they could defeat Parallax and incarcerate him in the Central Power Battery once again.


Kyle became Ion, who is later revealed to be the manifestation of willpower in the same way Parallax is fear. During the Sinestro Corps War between the Green Lantern Corps and the Sinestro Corps, Ion was imprisoned while Parallax possesses Kyle. The Sinestro Corps War is an ongoing comic book storyline across DC Comics Green Lantern and Green Lantern Corps titles. ...


In Green Lantern #24 Parallax consumes Hal Jordan. Hal Jordan entered into Kyle's prison, and with his help Kyle finally escaped Parallax.


Afterward, Ganthet and Sayd trapped Parallax in the Lanterns of the four Green Lanterns of Earth. Ganthet asked Kyle to give up his right to be Ion and become a Green Lantern again. Kyle accepted, and Ganthet gave Kyle a power ring. Kyle was outfitted with a new costume including a mask that looks like the one from his first uniform. Kyle is now a member of the Green Lantern Corps Honor Guard, and has been partnered with Guy Gardner.
Ganthet is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Sayd is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ...


Others who have Green Lantern Powers

Jade

Main article: Jade (comics)

The daughter of Alan Scott, the Golden Age Green Lantern, Jennie-Lynn Hayden would discover she shared her father's mystical connection to the Starheart, which gave her the abilities of a Green Lantern. Choosing to follow in her father's footsteps, she became the superheroine Jade. She would later fight a manifestation of the Starheart and lose those abilities. Jade is the codename of Jennie-Lynn Hayden, a fictional character, a superhero from DC Comics. ... For other uses, see Allan Scott. ...


After Jade was stripped of her powers, Kyle Rayner gave her a copy of Hal Jordan's power ring. When Rayner left to restart the Green Lantern Corps, Jade donned the classic Green Lantern uniform and served as Earth's Green Lantern until losing the ring during a battle with the villain Fatality. When the ring was later returned to her, she changed to a modified version of Rayner's Green Lantern uniform. Jade continued to function as a Green Lantern until Rayner, as Ion, used his power to restore her connection to the Starheart. During Infinite Crisis, she died while trying to stop Alexander Luthor, Jr. from destroying the universe to create a new multiverse. Upon her death, Jade returned all her Starheart powers to Rayner. Fatality is a fictional character from the DC Comics universe. ... Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... Alexander Luthor, Jr. ...


Powers and abilities

Main article: Power ring (weapon)

Each Green Lantern wields a power ring that can generate a variety of effects, sustained purely by the ring wearer's strength of will. The greater the user's willpower, the more effective the ring. The limits of the power ring's abilities are not clearly defined and it has been referred to as "the most powerful weapon in the universe" on more than one occasion. Across the years, the ring has been shown capable of accomplishing anything within the imagination of the ring bearer. Stories in 2006 retconned the ring's long-established lack of effect on yellow objects, stating that the ring-wielder need only feel fear and overcome it in order to affect yellow objects. In one issue Kyle Rayner blows up an entire yellow sun in order to destroy a group of hundreds of unpopulated planets that held deadly sicknesses by manipulating the sun's energy to destroy itself. This article is about the Green Lantern Corps weapon. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... This article is about the Green Lantern Corps weapon. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Power rings as used by various wielders have exhibited (but are not limited to) the following effects:

  • Constructs of green 'solid-energy,' often of tremendous size and/or complexity.
  • Flight, including flight at speeds beyond that of light.
  • Plasma bolts.
  • Ability to walk through walls by travelling through 'the Fourth Dimension' [Alan Scott]
  • The rings can act as semi-sentient computers, including accessing the Book of Oa, a massive database of everything from the laws of the Guardians and the Corps to the history of the universe.
  • Time travel.
  • The rings are still reliant on the lantern-shaped power batteries, but no longer limited to 24 hours' charge as they originally were. Kyle Rayner's ring was the first ring to absorb more power than originally thought, having stored the main power battery's energy following its explosion on Oa.
  • Telepathic powers.
  • Translation of virtually all languages.
  • Force field generation.
  • Radiation, including simulated kryptonite radiations.
  • Generate "earplugs" to block out all telepathic communication and manipulation.[4]
  • Render user invisible.[5]
  • Green Lantern: Rebirth revealed that only a certain type of willpower can use the ring effectively, as evidenced when Green Arrow's "cynical" willpower barely allows him to generate a single arrow and leaves him exhausted after this feat.

For other uses, see Flight (disambiguation). ... Faster-than-light (also superluminal or FTL) communications and travel are staples of the science fiction genre. ... For other uses of Oa and oa, see OA. Oa is a fictional planet located at the center of the DC Comics Universe. ... Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ... For other uses of Oa and oa, see OA. Oa is a fictional planet located at the center of the DC Comics Universe. ... Telepathy, from the Greek τῆλε, tele, remote; and πάθεια, patheia, to be effected by, describes the hypothetical transfer of information on thoughts or feelings between individuals by means other than the five classical senses. ... In science fiction and fantasy literature, a force field is a physical barrier made up of energy to protect a person or object from attacks or intrusions. ... For other uses, see Radiation (disambiguation). ... This article is about the fictional substance. ... An example of how an object could appear to be invisible through the use of mirrors Invisibility is the state of an object which cannot be seen. ...

In other media

Main article: Green Lantern in other media

The DC Comics superhero Green Lantern (alter ego: Hal Jordan) has appeared in numerous media over the years. ...

Green Lantern oath

Green Lantern is famous for the oath he recites when he charges his ring. Originally, the oath was simple:

...and I shall shed my light over dark evil.
For the dark things cannot stand the light,
The light of the Green Lantern!

—Alan Scott

(This oath was later given as an in-joke to Tomar-Re, Green Lantern of sector 2813 and the first Lantern Hal Jordan met after Abin Sur.) Tomar Re is a fictional DC Comics character. ... Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ...


In the mid-1940s, this was revised into the form that became famous during the Hal Jordan era:

In brightest day, in blackest night,
No evil shall escape my sight
Let those who worship evil's might,
Beware my power...Green Lantern's light!

—Hal Jordan/All Current Lanterns

The word "blackest" was often replaced with "darkest" to avoid racist connotations. The above is the most popular version of Green Lantern's oath. Science fiction writer Alfred Bester, who wrote many Green Lantern stories in the 1940s, has been credited as the creator of this oath. However, in an interview with journalist F. Gwynplaine MacIntyre at the 1979 World Science Fiction Convention in Brighton, England, Bester stated that the brightest-day oath was already in place before he began writing for the character. Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Alfred Bester (December 18, 1913 - September 30, 1987) was a science fiction author and the winner of the first Hugo Award in 1953 for his novel The Demolished Man. ... F. Gwynplaine MacIntyre (center) is seen here at the London offices of The Spectator with (left) Boris Johnson, Member of Parliament for Henley-on-Thames, and (right) Arthur Wellesley, Marquess of Douro OBE, chairman of Richemont Holdings UK. Fergus (also Feargus) Gwynplaine MacIntyre. ... Worldcon, a. ...


The Pre-Crisis version of Hal Jordan has created the oath when he had three early adventures that inspired him on how he can defeat any attempt to elude him. For instance, he captured robbers who used a powerfully bright flare to blind everyone in an area by using his ring as a radar to find them (In brightest day). The second was when he tracked criminals hiding in a dark cave with a fog like dust suspension that reflected back any external light. Jordan solved the problem by making certain elements of the criminals' bodies grow from within the fog, allowing the Lantern to target them. (In blackest night). Finally, Jordan tracked down safecrackers after an inefficient aerial reconnaissance by detecting the faint shockwaves from the explosives use by the criminals and tracing it back (No evil shall escape my sight). Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12 issue comic book mini-series produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to clean up their 50-year-old, convoluted and confusing continuity. ... For other uses, see Radar (disambiguation). ...


It had been established in the past that each Green Lantern has his, her, or its own oath. For example, Medphyl, the Green Lantern of the planet J586 (seen in Swamp Thing # 61, "All Flesh is Grass"), a planet where a sentient plant species lives, has the following oath: The Green Lantern Corps has at least 7200 members, two per sector (originally 3600 — one per sector), in addition to assorted other members who fulfill roles other than patrolling. ... For other uses, see Swamp Thing (disambiguation). ...

In forest dark or glade beferned
No blade of grass shall go unturned
Let those who have the daylight spurned
Tread not where this green lamp has burned.

Other notable oaths include that of Jack T. Chance: Jack T. Chance is a fictional character featured in comic books published by DC Comics he is a Green Lantern from the world of Garnet also known as Hellhole. ...

You who are wicked, evil and mean
I'm the nastiest creep you've ever seen!
Come one, come all, put up a fight
I'll pound your butts with Green Lantern's light!
Yowza.

and that of Rot Lop Fan, a Green Lantern whose species lacks sight, and thus has no concepts of brightness, darkness, day, night, color, or lanterns: The Green Lantern Corps has at least 7200 members, two per sector (originally 3600 — one per sector), in addition to assorted other members who fulfill roles other than patrolling. ...

In loudest din or hush profound
My ears catch evil's slightest sound
Let those who toll out evil's knell
Beware my power, the F-Sharp Bell!

Since Green Lantern: Rebirth and the restart of the Green Lantern Corps, the only oath used has been the Brightest Day, Blackest Night version. For other uses, see Evil (disambiguation). ... In music, a scale is a group of musical notes that provides material for part or all of a musical work. ... A bell is a simple sound-making device. ...


In Green Lantern 27, the Alpha Lanterns are revealed to have their own oath:

In Days of peace, in nights of war
Obey the Laws forever more
Misconduct must be answered for,
Swear us the chosen: The Alpha Corps!

Duck Dodgers' oath

In the animated TV series Duck Dodgers, Duck Dodgers temporarily becomes a Green Lantern after accidentally picking up Hal Jordan's laundry. In the first part of the episode, he forgets the real quote and makes up his own version: Duck Dodgers is the fictional star of a series of cartoons produced by Warner Bros. ...

In blackest day or brightest night
Watermelon, cantaloupe, yadda yadda
Erm...superstitious and cowardly lot
With liberty and justice for all!

Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... The Pledge of Allegiance is a promise or oath of allegiance to the United States and the its national flag. ...

Green Lantern parodies/references

Comics

  • Doctor Spectrum - There are five versions of the character in Marvel Comics comicbooks, from both different alternate realities and from mainstream Marvel continuity. Some are :
    • The version of Dr. Spectrum that had the most development was a member of the Squadron Supreme. Dr. Spectrum used to be an astronaut, adventurer and something of a playboy. On one of his space missions, he saved the life of a benevolent alien of the Skrull race. In gratitude for rescuing him, the Skrull gave Joe Ledger the Power Prism, an energy synthesizer his people had created.
    • The version of Dr. Spectrum in Supreme Power series is a rebooted version of this character. In this version, Joseph (Joe) Daniel Ledger is a Colonel in the United States Army, who perform covert operations missions. He is considered the perfect soldier: an army man who follows any and all orders and is a natural killer. Joe Ledger was the only candidate who was focused and single minded enough to be able to control the power prism found in Hyperion's space ship.
    • An evil version of Dr. Spectrum was a member of the Squadron Sinister. Although the Squadron Sinister Dr. Spectrum preceded the Squadron Supreme version in appearance, the former is considered the original as the latter was revealed to be just a copy.
  • The Beacon - from Big Bang Comics.
    • Beacon of Earth A, corresponding to the 1960s version: Dr. Julia Gardner
    • Beacon of Earth B, corresponding to the 1940s version: Scott Martin
  • The Green Ghost - from Invincible series.
  • Green Lambkin - a funny animal version, first appearing in Captain Carrot and his Amazing Zoo Crew #14, April 1983. Given his ring by the Goat-Guardians of the planet Uh-Oh, the Green Lambkin was a member of Just'a Lotta Animals, fighting evil alongside heroes such as Batmouse and Super-Squirrel on the parallel world Earth C-Minus.
  • In issue #10 of Warren Ellis' Planetary, "Magic and Loss", there is a race of red-robed beings providing blue lanterns to those worthy of being "Policemen." One noble alien is selected, and a glowing blue lantern (a "mind-powered weapon") is placed within his chest. The alien, now capable of space-travel, heads to Earth where he is captured, vivisected, and has the blue lantern extracted by Dr. Randall Dowling of the Four, after having his powers nullified through the use of red-hued light. Following this, Lamplight gained the power of the lantern and joins the group Stormwatch, a multi-national superhero organization sponsored by the United Nations.
  • Christian Walker becomes a member of the Millennium Guard, an agency similar in jurisdiction to the Green Lantern Corps, in Powers.

Dr. Spectrum is a comic book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe, and a member of the Squadron Supreme. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... Parallel universe, alternate reality, etc. ... The Squadron Supreme is a team of comic book superheroes in the Marvel Comics universe, a thinly disguised version of DC Comics Justice League of America. ... The Skrulls are a fictional race of extraterrestrial shapeshifters that appear in the Marvel Universe. ... Supreme Power is a comic book limited series published under Marvel Comics MAX imprint from 2003 to 2005. ... Covert operations are military or political activities that are not only clandestine (undertaken in a manner that disguises the identity of the perpetrators) but also covert, i. ... Hyperion is a character in the Marvel Comics series Supreme Power, published under the mature-readers imprint MAX Comics, written by J. Michael Straczynski and drawn by Gary Frank. ... The Squadron Supreme is a team of comic book superheroes in the Marvel Comics universe, a thinly disguised version of DC Comics Justice League of America. ... Beacon is the name of two fictional characters published by Big Bang Comics. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Invincible is a comic book created by writer Robert Kirkman and artist Cory Walker, published monthly by Image Comics. ... Justa Lotta Animals is a fictional superhero team that appeared in stories published by DC Comics. ... Bugs Bunny, a typical funny animal character Funny animal is a cartooning term for the genre of comics and animated cartoons in which the main characters are humanoid or talking animals. ... Captain Carrot and His Amazing Zoo Crew is a DC Comics comic book about a team of funny animal superheroes called the Zoo Crew. ... Justa Lotta Animals is a fictional superhero team that appeared in stories published by DC Comics. ... This article is about the comic book author. ... Planetary is an adjective meaning relating to a planet or planets. ... Etymologically, Vivisection refers to the dissection of, or any cutting or surgery upon, a living organism. ... The Four are a group of fictional supervillains from the comic book Planetary by Warren Ellis and John Cassaday. ... Stormwatch is a fictional United Nations-sponsored superhero team in the Wildstorm Universe. ... UN redirects here. ... Christian Walker is a character from the comic book Powers created by writer Brian Michael Bendis, artist Michael Avon Oeming. ... Powers is an American comic book series by writer Brian Michael Bendis, artist Michael Avon Oeming. ...

Television

  • In the ReBoot TV series there is a group know as the Guardians. Their mission is to "mend and defend," they have Keytools, devices that are capable of almost infinite feats by just changing their configurations, thus showing a great similarity to the Power Rings. In the latest movie, the Keytool Glitch gain energy-based powers that work just like the Power Rings.
  • The American sitcom Seinfeld made references to Green Lantern in three episodes: "The Barber" (November 11, 1993), "The Stand In" (Feb. 25, 1994) and "The Strong Box" (Feb. 5, 1998).
  • The comic book read by Walt on the TV series Lost is Green Lantern/Flash: Faster Friends #1.
  • In the Warner Brothers animated series Freakazoid!, villain Armando Guitierrez, upon discovering that Freakazoid is not vulnerable to kryptonite, attempts to menace him with a yellow piece of paper. Freakazoid shakes his head and says "That's the Green Lantern."
  • The Green Swoosh as portrayed by the Johnny Bravo. His power does not come from a ring, but instead superpowered boots.
  • In the UK comedy series Coupling (2001), there is a short reference to Green Lantern and his ring in the episode "Her Best Friend's Bottom"
  • In an episode of Dexter's Laboratory titled "You Vegeta-believe It!", Dexter builds a gardening tool called the Green Thumb 1, which has several functions parodying the powers of Green Lantern's power ring.
  • In an episode of Duck Dodgers, Duck Dodgers has his dry cleaning mixed with the Green Lanterns and joins the Green Lantern Corps.
  • On the reality animated TV parody show Drawn Together, Captain Hero (when he is under stress) makes a reference that he wishes that the Green Lantern were there because "he always knew how to help me relax"
  • In 2007, ls:tv (Leeds Student Television, a member of the National Student Television Association) aired a short sketch series entitled "The Green Intern" in a comedy program called "Bits".
  • Bradin Westerly on the TV series Summerland is a Green Lantern fan. In an episode[citation needed], he argues with another character about who knows more about Green Lantern.
  • In The Simpsons Movie, when asked by Marge about the significance of "EPA," Comic Book Guy mistakes it for the scream made by Green Lantern when thrown into a vat of acid by Sinestro.
  • In the English TV series Whoops Apocalypse, the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, the Chancellor of the Exchequer and the Home Secretary briefly dress up as Green Lantern, Hawkman and the Flash.
  • In the Challenge of the Superfriends series, he was seen in every episode and had spoken lines in fifteen out of the sixteen episodes of the series. His arch enemy was Sinestro. It should also be noted that he was one of the three most powerful members of the Justice League, as mentioned in the episode: "Secret Origins of the Superfriends." That episode itself, told the story on how Green Lantern (Hal Jordan version) got his powers.

This article is about the television program ReBoot. ... Seinfeld is an Emmy Award-winning American sitcom that originally aired on NBC from July 5, 1989 to May 14, 1998, running a total of 9 seasons. ... The Barber is an episode of NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... The Stand In is an episode of NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... The Strong Box is the fourteenth episode of the ninth season of Seinfeld. ... LOST redirects here. ... Steven Spielberg presents Freakazoid! is an American animated television series, produced by Amblin Entertainment and Warner Bros. ... This article is about the fictional substance. ... Johnny Bravo is an American animated television series created by Van Partible. ... Coupling is a British television sitcom written by Steven Moffat that aired on BBC2 from May 2000 to 2004 . ... Dee Dee redirects here. ... Duck Dodgers is the fictional star of a series of cartoons produced by Warner Bros. ... Drawn Together is an American animated television series that uses a sitcom format with a TV reality show setting. ... This article is about the Drawn Together character. ... The National Student Television Association or NaSTA is an organisation headquartered at Leicester University Student Television (or LUST for short) composing the majority of British student television stations. ... Summerland is an American television series which aired on the now defunct The WB. The series ran from June 1, 2004 to July 18, 2005. ... The Simpsons Movie is a 2007 animated comedy film based on the animated television series The Simpsons, directed by David Silverman, and scheduled to be released worldwide by July 27, 2007. ... Marjorie Marge Simpson (née Bouvier) is a fictional character featured in the animated television series The Simpsons and is voiced by Julie Kavner. ... EPA redirects here. ... Jeff Albertson, better known as Comic Book Guy, is a fictional character in the animated television series The Simpsons. ... Sinestro is a fictional character, an alien supervillain in the DC Comics Universe. ... Whoops Apocalypse was originally a six-part 1982 sitcom by Andrew Marshall and David Renwick, made by London Weekend Television for ITV. Marshall and Renwick later reworked the concept as a 1986 movie with almost completely different characters and plot, although one or two of the original actors returned in... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British Cabinet minister responsible for all economic and financial matters. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department, commonly known as the Home Secretary, is the minister in charge of the United Kingdom Home Office and is responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, and for immigration and citizenship for the whole United Kingdom (including Scotland and Northern Ireland). ... Challenge Of The Super Friends is an American animated television series about a team of superheroes which ran from 1978 to 1979. ... Sinestro is a fictional character, an alien supervillain in the DC Comics Universe. ...

Music

  • Green Lantern is mentioned in the hit 1966 song "Sunshine Superman" by Scottish folk musician Donovan.
  • The New Zealand band the Mutton Birds has a song called "Green Lantern", about someone whose status in life has diminished. The refrain has the narrator assuring the subject, "you're still the Green Lantern to me."
  • The German rock band Blue Harvest composed a song called Green Lantern, which named and described all the Earthborn Lanterns from Alan Scott to Kyle Rayner. The song is listed as track 15 on their album "Rub the Slave"
  • Hardcore band, Kids Like Us have a song called Lantern Corps, in which they recite the Green Lantern Oath.

Sunshine Superman is a song written and recorded by Scottish singer-songwriter Donovan. ... Folk song redirects here. ... For other uses, see Donovan (disambiguation). ... The Mutton Birds are a band from New Zealand formed in 1991 by Don McGlashan, Ross Burge, and David Long. ...

Movie

Warner Bros. plans to make a movie based on Green Lantern that will feature Hal Jordan becoming the Green Lantern and his first assginment as the Green Lantern , with a tentative release in 2010 (this is very likely to change). The director assigned to direct the movie is Greg Berlanti. It is unknown who will play Green Lantern, Hal Jordan. Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ...


Green Lantern John Stewart, Hal Jordan's backup Green Lantern, was going to be in Warner Bros.' 2009 live action Justice League movie, before being shelved in April 2008.[6] Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ...


Other

  • The Hurricane - World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE)'s character. Gregory Helms is a comics fan and has a Green Lantern tattoo on his right shoulder. His love of comics was turned into a wrestling character or "gimmick". His favorite Lantern is Kyle Rayner.
  • The Star Knights in the Mutants and Masterminds Role-playing game are a homage to the Green Lantern Corps.
  • The protagonist of No More Magic, a novel by Avi, is an avid reader of comic books, and in particular, a fan of the Green Lantern series.
  • Green Lantern is a featured character in the short fan films Losing Lois Lane and Grayson. Although these fan films are based respectively on the Superman and Batman mythos, Green Lantern is presumably featured for his long-time membership in the Justice League of America).
  • Liberal pundit and blogger Matthew Yglesias has ascribed to conservative advocates of U.S. military intervention in the Middle East the "Green Lantern Theory of Geopolitics." Yglesias characterized adherents to this "theory" as people who believe "American military might" is like a Green Lantern's power ring, "that, roughly speaking, we can accomplish absolutely anything in the world through the application of sufficient military force. The only thing limiting us is a lack of willpower." [1] [2] "The Green Lantern Theory" has since become an meme among liberal bloggers.[3]
  • In the movie I Am Legend the bottom of a Green Lantern movie poster can be seen in the background accompanied by a Teen Titans movie poster above the "Box Sets" shelves behind a family of mannequins (a woman in white, a man in brown and two children) and a second Green Lantern poster can be seen on a column above two female mannequins as Will Smith is walking out of a store. (since the movie is set in the future this was put in as an easter egg by the director as possible movies to be made[citation needed])
  • In the videogame Astroseries, the Rubitek warriors wear green clothing and have power rings capable of causing several different attacks.

Gregory Shane Helms (July 12, 1974) is an American professional wrestler from Smithfield, North Carolina, who is currently working for World Wrestling Entertainment on its SmackDown! brand. ... World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... Mutants & Masterminds (abbreviated M&M or MnM) is a superhero role-playing game written by Steve Kenson and published by Green Ronin Publishing based on a variant of the d20 System by Wizards of the Coast. ... This article is about games in which one plays the role of a character. ... For a description of the medieval homage ceremony see commendation ceremony Homage is generally used in modern English to mean any public show of respect to someone to whom you feel indebted. ... Edward Irving Wortis (born December 23, 1937), better known by the pen name Avi,[1][2] is a prominent American author of young adult and childrens literature. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... The Justice League is a DC Comics superhero team. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Conservatism is a term used to describe political philosophies that favor tradition and gradual change, where tradition refers to religious, cultural, or nationally defined beliefs and customs. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... The Hampster Dance [sic] is one of the first widely distributed Internet memes and illustrates the characteristic silliness of much of the genre. ... Teen Titans redirects here. ... The first easter egg. ...

See also

The Green Lantern Corps has at least 7200 members, two per sector (originally 3600 — one per sector), in addition to assorted other members who fulfill roles other than patrolling. ... The fictional Green Lantern Corps is an intergalactic police force featured in DC Comics, particularly featuring the superhero Green Lantern, Earth’s member of the group. ... This article is about the Green Lantern Corps weapon. ... Dr. Spectrum is a comic book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe, and a member of the Squadron Supreme. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... The Sinestro Corps is a group of fictional characters, a villainous analogue to the Green Lantern Corps in the DC Universe led by the supervillain Sinestro. ... This is a list of fictional characters from DC Comics who are or have been enemies of the Green Lantern. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Collectors Society Message Boards: ComicConnect.com progress update: All-American #16 sells for
  2. ^ Monitor Duty (Feb. 13, 2006): "Alan Kistler's Profile On: Green Lantern!"
  3. ^ Wright, Bradford W. Comic Book Nation. Johns Hopkins, 2001. Pg. 227
  4. ^ 52, Week #13. Writers Geoff Johns, Grant Morrison, Greg Rucka and Mark Waid Artists Todd Nauck and Marlo Alquiza.
  5. ^ Identity Crisis #2
  6. ^ http://screenrant.com/archives/justice-league-is-mortal-as-in-1584.html

52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ... Geoff Johns (born 25 January 1973 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American comic book writer, best known for his work for DC Comics. ... Grant Morrison (born January 31, 1960) is a Scottish comic book writer and artist. ... Greg Rucka is an American writer of novels and comic books. ... Mark Waid (born March 21, 1962 in Hueytown, Alabama) is an American comic book writer. ... Todd Nauck (born March 16, 1971 in Texas) is an American comic book artist and writer. ... This article is about the DC Comics series. ...

References

External links

  • The Emerald Warrior
  • Profile by Alan Kistler
  • Classic Comic Books: The Golden Age Green Lantern
  • Classic Comic Books: The Silver Age Green Lantern
This article is about the DC Comics character. ... The fictional Green Lantern Corps is an intergalactic police force featured in DC Comics, particularly featuring the superhero Green Lantern, Earth’s member of the group. ... The fictional Green Lantern Corps is an intergalactic police force featured in DC Comics, particularly featuring the superhero Green Lantern, Earth’s member of the group. ... Alexandra Alex DeWitt was the girlfriend of Kyle Rayner before he received the Green Lantern power ring from Ganthet. ... Carol Ferris is a fictional comic book character published by DC Comics. ... Charles Doiby Dickles was the comic sidekick to the golden age Green Lantern Alan Scott. ... This article is about the first Green Arrow, Oliver Queen. ... Roy Harper is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... Jade is the codename of Jennie-Lynn Hayden, a fictional character, a superhero from DC Comics. ... For the Jokers sidekick, see Harley Quinn Harlequin is the name of four clown-themed DC Comics characters. ... Obsidian is a fictional superhero published by DC Comics. ... Rose and Thorn are the two personalities of a character in DC comic books. ... Terry Berg is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe who first appeared in the pages of Green Lantern in 2000. ... Thomas Kalmaku is a character in DC Comics, associated with Green Lantern. ... This is a list of fictional characters from DC Comics who are or have been enemies of the Green Lantern. ... For other uses, see Black Hand (disambiguation). ... Doctor Polaris is a DC Comics supervillain, mainly to the Green Lantern // Once a researcher working for the betterment of mankind, Neal Emerson became one of the deadliest metahumans on Earth. ... Effigy is the name of a DC Comics supervillain who fought against Green Lantern Kyle Rayner using the Flame Powers gained from the Controllers. ... Evil Star is the name of two fictional characters appearing in DC Comics. ... Fatality is a fictional character from the DC Comics universe. ... Goldface is a DC Comics fictional character, originally a foe of the Hal Jordan Green Lantern. ... For the Jokers sidekick, see Harley Quinn Harlequin is the name of four clown-themed DC Comics characters. ... Hector Hammond is a fictional character, a DC Universe supervillain who is primarily an enemy of Green Lantern. ... Major Force (Clifford Zmeck) is a fictional character, a comic book supervillain in the DC Comics universe. ... Nekron, Lord of the Unliving is a fictional character, an extra-dimensional villain in the DC Comics universe. ... Nero is the name of a DC Comics supervillain who fought against Green Lantern Kyle Rayner wielding a Qwardian Power Ring Forged by the Weaponers of Qward. ... Rose and Thorn are the two personalities of a character in DC comic books. ... Shark is the name of three fictional characters in DC Comics publications. ... Solomon Grundy is a DC Comics character, a large, strong zombie supervillain. ... Star Sapphire is the name of several female supervillains in DC Comics, all connected in origin. ... Sonar is the name of a DC Comics supervillain. ... The Tattooed Man is the name of two of Green Lanterns greatest enemies, as well as of one related character. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and to make a clear distinction between fact and fiction, this article may require cleanup. ... The Sinestro Corps is a group of fictional characters, a villainous analogue to the Green Lantern Corps in the DC Universe led by the supervillain Sinestro. ... The Anti-Monitor is a fictional comic book supervillain, the antagonist of the 1985 DC Comics miniseries Crisis on Infinite Earths. ... The Cyborg was created by Dan Jurgens as a way to use the Supermans Death story-line as an arc to the Four Supermen Story. ... The Manhunters are a fictional race of robot warriors that exists within the universe of DC Comics. ... Parallax is a fictional character, a supervillain from DC Comics. ... Sinestro is a fictional character, an alien supervillain in the DC Comics Universe. ... Superman Prime (formerly known as Superboy Prime) is a fictional character, a superhero turned supervillain in the DC Universe. ... The Sinestro Corps is a group of fictional characters, a villainous analogue to the Green Lantern Corps in the DC Universe led by the supervillain Sinestro. ... Coast City was a fictional city that appeared in stories published by DC Comics. ... For other uses of Oa and oa, see OA. Oa is a fictional planet located at the center of the DC Comics Universe. ... Qward is a fictional world existing within an antimatter universe that is part of the DC Comics universe. ... Emerald Twilight is the name for the story that was detailed in Green Lantern Vol. ... Rann-Thanagar War #1; cover by Ivan Reis and Marc Campos. ... The Sinestro Corps War is an ongoing comic book storyline across DC Comics Green Lantern and Green Lantern Corps titles. ... This article is about the Green Lantern Corps weapon. ... Emotional Manifestations are cosmic entities which are featured in the DC Universe, namely in the Green Lantern comic books. ... The DC Comics superhero Green Lantern (alter ego: Hal Jordan) has appeared in numerous media over the years. ...

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