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Encyclopedia > Green Dragon (drink)

Green Dragon is an alcoholic beverage made by leaching the leaves of the cannabis plant in a high-proof alcohol, most commonly vodka. The THC dissolves into the alcohol resulting in a dark green or brown liquid. Sugar is often also dissolved in the alcohol to mask the extremely bitter taste of the dissolved cannabinoids. This does not cite its references or sources. ... Alcoholic beverages An alcoholic beverage is a drink containing ethanol, commonly known as alcohol, although in chemistry the definition of alcohol includes many other compounds. ... Leaching is the process of extracting a substance from a solid by dissolving it in a liquid. ... This article is about the plant genus Cannabis. ... Alcoholic proof is a measure of how much ethanol is in an alcoholic beverage, and is approximately twice the percentage of alcohol by volume (ABV, the unit that is commonly used at present). ... Vodka bottling machine, Shatskaya Vodka Shatsk, Russia Vodka (Polish: wódka, Russian: водка) is one of the worlds most popular distilled beverages. ... “THC” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Green (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Brown (disambiguation). ... This article is about sugar as food and as an important and widely traded commodity. ... Cannabinoids are a group of terpenophenolic compounds present in Cannabis (Cannabis sativa L). ...

Contents

Preparation

Green Dragon is a method for extracting the active ingredients found in cannabis buds. These chemicals, mainly tetrahydrocannabinol or THC, are insoluble in water, but much more soluble in organic solvents such as alcohol. In addition, the chemicals responsible for the bitter and "grassy" taste of cannabis buds are insoluble in alcohol, but more soluble in water. The best results are obtained by using an extremely concentrated alcohol, such as vodka or, if available, a near-pure grain alcohol such as 195-proof Everclear. “THC” redirects here. ... Insoluble Not soluble ... A solvent is a liquid that dissolves a solid, liquid, or gaseous solute, resulting in a solution. ... Grain alcohol redirects here. ... Bitter can refer to: Look up bitter in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... Everclear may refer to: Everclear (alcohol), a brand of grain alcohol Everclear (band), a rock band founded in 1992 Everclear (album), an album by indie rock group American Music Club This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ...


There are two methods for extracting the cannabinoids from the buds. The first involves heating the alcohol to improve its power as a solvent. The cannabis buds are stewed in about 25cl of spirit, preferably heated in a water bath to reduce the possibility (probability, in the case of heating high-proof alcohols such as Everclear) of ignition of the alcohol vapours. The temperature of the spirit should be maintained below the boiling point of ethanol (78.4º C)(173ºF) to prevent the buildup of fumes. The majority of the soluble cannabinoids will be extracted by this method after about 20 minutes of heating. For other uses, see Solvent (disambiguation). ... A water bath can refer to : a Bain-marie a heated bath Category: ... Grain alcohol redirects here. ...


The second method, which is considerably more low-tech, involves leaving cannabis buds, leaves, and stems in the spirit for several weeks or months. Over time the cannabinoids will leach from the plant matter in much the same way as in the heating method. It is common to simply open a new bottle of spirit, poke several cannabis buds into the bottle (it may be necessary to pour off or drink some of the spirit first) and reseal. The bottle must be kept tightly sealed to prevent the alcohol evaporating from the spirit. The bottle must be kept in a dark place because tetrahydrocannabinol decomposes under the influence of light. The term low-technology is a description of those crafts and tools whose inception (typically) predates the Industrial Revolution. ... “Vaporization” redirects here. ...


There is some evidence to suggest that baking (as in "drying") the dry buds and leaves prior to adding them to the alcohol in either method increases the potency of the resulting preparation[1][2]. This is because the baking process converts insoluble tetrahydrocannabinol acids into soluble THC (see decarboxylation). Some examples of baked food. ... A Decarboxylation is any chemical reaction in which a carboxyl group (-COOH) is split off from a compound as carbon dioxide (CO2). ...


Uses

Although Green Dragon can be consumed by itself, it is more often served mixed with other drinks, such as soft drinks, flavored waters and vanilla extract. A popular [3][4] recipe involves mixing 3 parts lemon-lime soda, 1 part Green Dragon and a dash of honey or sugar. For other uses, see Honey (disambiguation). ... This article is about sugar as food and as an important and widely traded commodity. ...


Another preparation, known colloquially as Green Monster, is prepared from two parts Mountain Dew, two parts Green Squall Powerade, and one part Everclear Green Dragon. Assuming a proof of 195 on the spirits, the resulting beverage is still 40 proof, so caution should be exercised.


References

  1. ^ http://www.cannabis-med.org/english/faq/12-heating.htm
  2. ^ http://cannabisculture.com/articles/2794.html
  3. ^ http://www.cannabis.net/faq/cannabis-consumption-faq.html section 3.2
  4. ^ http://www.xs4all.nl/~4david/drinking.html

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