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Encyclopedia > Greek deities and their Roman and Etruscan counterparts

Roman mythology was strongly influenced by Greek mythology and Etruscan mythology. The following is a list of most credited cult equivalences between the respective systems. Note however that many mythographers dismiss both the equivalences made in ancient times and those proposed by modern scholars. The written form of the names are in their original form, e.g. Greek or Latin one, not in the modern English form. Image File history File links Merge-arrows. ... Interpretatio graeca is a Latin term for the common tendency of ancient Greek writers to equate foreign divinities to members of their own pantheon. ... A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... The Etruscans were a race of unknown origin from North Italy who were eventually integrated into Rome. ... This article does not discuss cult in its original meaning. ... A mythographer, or a mythologist, according to a strict dictionary definition, is a compiler of myths. ...


The Greek deities are listed by both their Greek alphabet forms and their common modern English names, and an additional Latinization is provided in parentheses where there is a significant difference between the common English name and the original Greek. Likewise, where the modern Anglicization of a Roman god differs significantly from the original Latin spelling, the modern English form will be provided in an additional column (in italics if translated into English). The Greek alphabet (Greek: ) is an alphabet consisting of 24 letters that has been used to write the Greek language since the late 8th or early 9th century BC. It was the first alphabet in the narrow sense, that is, a writing system using a separate symbol for each vowel...


Equivalent Deities

Greek Greek (Anglicized) Roman Roman (Anglicized) Etruscan
Άδωνις Adonis     Atunis
Αμφιτρίτη Amphitrite Salacia    
Aνάγκη Ananke Necessitas    
Άνεμοι Anemoi Venti Winds  
Aφροδίτη Aphrodite Venus   Turan
Απόλλων (Apollōn) /
Φοίβος (Phoibos)
Apollo / Phoebus Apollo / Phoebus   Aplu
Άρης Ares Mars   Maris
Άρτεμις Artemis Diana   Artume
Ασκληπιός (Asklēpios) Asclepius Aesculapius / Veiovis    
Αθηνά Athena / Athene Minerva   Menrva
Άτροπος Atropos Morta   Leinth
Βορέας Boreas Aquilo / Aquilon   Andas
Χάριτες (Kharites) Charites Gratiae Graces  
Χάρων (Kharōn) Charon Charon   Charun
Χλώρις (Khlōris) Chloris Flora    
Κλωθώ (Klōthō) Clotho Nona    
Κρόνος (Kronos) Cronus Saturnus Saturn  
Κυβέλη (Kubelē) Cybele Magna Mater    
Δημήτηρ Demeter Ceres    
Διόνυσος (Diōnusos) /
Βάκχος (Bakkhos)
Dionysus / Bacchus Liber / Bacchus   Fufluns
Ενυώ Enyo Bellona    
Ηώς Eos Aurora / Matuta   Thesan
Ερινύαι Erinies Dirae / Furiae Furies  
Έρις Eris Discordia    
Έρως Eros Cupido / Amor Cupid  
Εύρος (Euros) Eurus Vulturnus    
Γαία Gaia / Gaea Terra / Tellus    
  Galanthis / Galinthias Galinthis    
Άδης (Hadēs) /
Πλούτων (Plouton)
Hades / Pluto Dis Pater / Pluto / Orcus   Aita
Ήβη Hebe Iuventas Juventas  
Εκάτη (Hekatē) Hecate Trivia    
Ήλιος Helios Sol   Aplu
Ήφαιστος (Hḗphaistos) Hephaestus Vulcanus Vulcan Sethlans
Ήρα Hera Iuno Juno Uni
Ηρακλής (Hēraklē̂s) Heracles Hercules   Hercle
Ερμής Hermes Mercurius Mercury Turms
Έσπερος (Hesperos) Hesperus Vesper    
Εστία Hestia Vesta    
Υγεία Hygeia Salus    
Ύπνος Hypnos Somnus    
Ειρήνη (Eirēnē) Irene Pax    
    Ianus Janus Ani
Λάχεσις (Lakhesis) Lachesis Decima    
Λητώ Leto Latona    
Μοίραι (Moirai) Moirae / Moerae Parcae / Fatae Fates  
Μούσαι (Mousai) Musae Camenae Muses  
Νίκη Nike Victoria    
Νότος (Notos) Notus Auster    
Νυξ (Nuks) Nyx Nox    
Οδυσσεύς Odysseus Ulixes / Ulysses   Uthuze
Παλαίμων (Palaimōn) Palaemon Portunes    
Πάν Pan Faunus    
      Silvanus Selvans
Περσεφόνη Persephone Proserpina    
Φήμη Pheme Fama    
Φώσφορος (Phōsphoros) Phosphorus Vesper    
Ποσειδών Poseidon Neptunus Neptune Nethuns
Πρίαπος (Priapos) Priapus Mutinus Mutunus    
Ρέα Rhea Magna Mater / Ops
(See Cybele, above)
   
Σάτυροι (Saturoi) / Πάνες Satyrs / Panes
(See Pan, above)
Fauni Fauns  
Σελήνη Selene Luna    
Σεμέλη Semele Stimula   Semla
θάνατος Thanatos Mors   Leinth, Charun
Θέμις Themis Iustitia Justitia  
Τύχη (Tukhe) Tyche Fortuna   Nortia
Ουρανός (Ouranos) Uranus Caelus    
    Vertumnus   Voltumna
Ζέφυρος (Zephuros) Zephyrus / Zephyr Favonius    
Ζεύς Zeus Iuppiter / Iovis Jupiter / Jove Tinia

In Greek mythology Adonis (Greek: , also: Άδωνις) is an archetypal life-death-rebirth deity of Semitic origin, and a central cult figure in various mystery religions. ... Mosaic from Herculaneum depicting Poseidon and Amphitrite In ancient Greek mythology, Amphitrite (not to be confused with Aphrodite) was a sea-goddess. ... In Greek mythology, Ananke (Greek ) was the personification of destiny, unalterable necessity and fate. ... Zephyrus, the Greek god of the west wind and the goddess Chloris, from a 1875 engraving by William-Adolphe Bouguereau In Greek mythology, the Anemoi (in Greek, Άνεμοι — winds) were wind gods who were each ascribed a cardinal direction, from which their respective winds came, and were each associated with various... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... Marble Venus of the Capitoline Venus type, Roman (British Museum) Venus was a major Roman goddess principally associated with love and beauty, the rough equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. ... In Etruscan mythology, Turan was the goddess of love and vitality and patroness of Vulci (cur: Volci). ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... Phoebus is the Latin form of Greek Phoibos Shining-one, a by-name used in classical mythology for the god Apollo. ... Etruscan mythology, Aplu was a thunder and lightning god. ... This article is about the ancient Greek god; for other uses, see Ares (disambiguation). ... Mars was the Roman god of war, the son of Juno and either Jupiter or a magical flower. ... Maris was the Etruscan god of agriculture later associated with the Roman war/agricultual god Mars. ... For other uses, see Artemis (disambiguation). ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... In Etruscan mythology, Artume or Aritimi was the goddess of night, the moon and death, as well as nature, forests and fertility. ... Asclepius (Greek also rendered Aesculapius in Latin and transliterated Asklepios) was the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology, according to which he was born a mortal but was given immortality as the constellation Ophiuchus after his death. ... In Roman mythology Veiovis, or Vediovis, was an old Italian or Etruscan deity. ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... Head of Minerva by Elihu Vedder, 1896 For other uses, see Minerva (disambiguation). ... In Etruscan mythology, Menrva was the goddess of wisdom, war, art, schools and commerce. ... Atropos is also a British entomological journal - see Atropos (journal). ... In Roman mythology, Morta was the goddess of death. ... Zephyrus, the Greek god of the west wind and the goddess Chloris, from a 1875 engraving by William-Adolphe Bouguereau In Greek mythology, the Anemoi (in Greek, Άνεμοι — winds) were wind gods who were each ascribed a cardinal direction, from which their respective winds came, and were each associated with various... For the game of graces, see Game of graces. ... Michelangelos rendering of Charon. ... A typical depiction of Charun. ... As she talks, her lips breathe spring roses: I was Chloris, who am now called Flora. ... In Roman mythology, Flora was a goddess of flowers and the season of spring. ... In Greek mythology, Clotho or Klotho, the Greek word Κλωθώ for spinner, was the youngest of the Moirae (the Fates). ... Cronus is not to be confused with Chronos, the personification of time. ... Saturnus, Caravaggio, 16th c. ... Originally a Phrygian goddess, Cybele (Greek: Κυβέλη) was a deification of the Earth Mother who was worshipped in Anatolia from Neolithic times. ... In Roman mythology, Magna Mater deorum Idaea (great Idaean mother of the gods) was the name for the originally Phrygian goddess Cybele, as well as Rhea. ... This article is about the grain goddess Demeter. ... In Roman mythology, Ceres was the goddess of growing plants (particularly cereals) and of motherly love. ... This article is about the ancient deity. ... In very ancient Etruscan mythology, Fufluns (or Puphluns) was a god of plant life, happiness and health and growth in all things. ... In Greek mythology, Enyo (horror) was an ancient goddess known by the epithet Waster of Cities and frequently depicted as being covered in blood and carrying weapons of war. ... Eos, by Evelyn De Morgan (1850 - 1919), 1895 (Columbia Museum of Art, Columbia, SC): for a Pre-Raphaelite painter, Eos was still the classical pagan equivalent of an angel Eos (dawn) was, in Greek Mythology, the Titan goddess of the dawn, who rose from her home at the edge of... Aurora, by Guercino, 1621-23 (ceiling fresco in the Casino Ludovisi, Rome), a classic example of Baroque illusionistic painting Aurora was the ancient Roman equivalent of Eos, the ancient Greek goddess of the dawn. ... In Etruscan mythology, Thesan was the goddess of the dawn and was associated with the generation of life. ... Eris (ca. ... This article is about the Greek god Eros. ... It has been suggested that Cupid (holiday character) be merged into this article or section. ... Zephyrus, the Greek god of the west wind and the goddess Chloris, from a 1875 engraving by William-Adolphe Bouguereau In Greek mythology, the Anemoi (in Greek, Άνεμοι — winds) were wind gods who were each ascribed a cardinal direction, from which their respective winds came, and were each associated with various... For other uses, see Gaia. ... Terra Mater or Tellus Mater was a goddess personifying the Earth in Roman mythology. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Hades, Greek god of the underworld, enthroned, with his bird-headed staff, on a red-figure Apulian vase made in the 4th century BC. For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ... Pluto, lord of the underworld. ... Dis Pater, or Dispater, was a Roman and Celtic god of the underworld, later subsumed by Pluto or Jupiter. ... In Roman mythology, Orcus was a god of the underworld, punisher of broken oaths, more equivalent to Pluto than to the Greek Hades, and later identified with Dis Pater. ... Hebe by Antonio Canova In Greek mythology, Hêbê (Greek: ) was the goddess of youth (Roman equivalent: Juventas). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Trivia in Roman mythology was the equivalent of the Greek goddess Hecate, the goddess of witchcraft, crossroads, and the harvest moon. ... For other uses, see Helios (disambiguation). ... Standards Of Learning SOL stands for The Standards Of Learning. ... Etruscan mythology, Aplu was a thunder and lightning god. ... Hephæstos (pronounced or ; Greek HÄ“phaistos) was the Greek god whose Roman equivalent was Vulcan; he was the god of technology, blacksmiths, craftsmen, artisans, sculptors, metals and metallurgy, and fire. ... The Forge of Vulcan by Diego Velasquez, (1630). ... For other uses, see Hera (disambiguation). ... IVNO REGINA (Queen Juno) on a coin celebrating Julia Soaemias. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Alcides redirects here. ... For other uses, see Hercules (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hermes (disambiguation). ... A sculpture of the Roman god Mercury by 17th-century Flemish artist Artus Quellinus. ... In Greek mythology, Hesperos (Greek (The Evening Star), sometimes Latinized as Hesperus) and (H)eosphoros (Morning Star) Latinized as Eosphorus (see Lucifer) are sons of the dawn goddess Eos (Roman Aurora). ... In Greek mythology, virginal Hestia (ancient Greek ) is the goddess of the hearth, of the right ordering of domesticity and the family, who received the first offering at every sacrifice in the household. ... Vesta was the virgin goddess of the hearth, home, and family in Roman mythology. ... In Greek mythology, Hygieia (Roman equivalent: Salus) was a daughter of Asclepius. ... In Greek mythology, Hypnos was the personification of sleep; the Roman equivalent was known as Somnus . ... Horae in Meyers, 1888 In Greek mythology, the Horae were three goddesses controlling orderly life. ... In Roman mythology, Pax (Latin for peace) (she had the greek equivalent Eirine) was recognized as a goddess during the rule of Augustus. ... Roman bust of Janus, Vatican. ... In Etruscan mythology, Ani was the sky god, perhaps equivalent to the Roman Janus. ... In Greek mythology, Lachesis (also Lakhesis: Gk. ... For other uses, see Leto (disambiguation). ... For other meanings, see Fate, a disambiguation page. ... In Roman mythology, the Camenae were originally goddesses of springs, wells and fountains, or water nymphs of Venus . ... In Greek mythology, the Muses (Greek , Mousai: perhaps from the Proto-Indo-European root *men- think[1]) are a number of goddesses or spirits who embody the arts and inspire the creation process with their graces through remembered and improvised song and stage, writing, traditional music and dance. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Victoria on the reverse of this coin by Constantine II. In Roman mythology, Victoria was the goddess of victory. ... Zephyrus, the Greek god of the west wind and the goddess Chloris, from a 1875 engraving by William-Adolphe Bouguereau In Greek mythology, the Anemoi (in Greek, Άνεμοι — winds) were wind gods who were each ascribed a cardinal direction, from which their respective winds came, and were each associated with various... In Greek mythology, Nyx (, Nox in Roman translation) was the primordial goddess of the night. ... For other meanings, see Odysseus (disambiguation) Ulysses redirects here. ... Palaemon 1 This was the birth name given to the Greek hero Herakles and the name he used until the Pythoness at Delphi first addressed him as Herakles when he sought a cure for his madness. ... In Roman mythology, Portunes (alternatively spelled Portumnes or Portunus) was a god of keys and doors and livestock. ... Pan (Greek , genitive ) is the Greek god of shepherds and flocks, of mountain wilds, hunting and rustic music: paein means to pasture. ... Proserpine by Dante Gabriel Rossetti, 1874) (Tate Gallery, London In Greek mythology, Persephone (Greek Περσεφόνη, PersephónÄ“) was the Queen of the Underworld of epic literature. ... Rape of Proserpina, by Luca Giordano Proserpine, 1873-1877, at Tate Gallery, London. ... In Greek mythology, Pheme (Φημη) (Roman equivalent: Fama) was the personification of fame and renown. ... In Greek mythology, Hesperos (Greek (The Evening Star), sometimes Latinized as Hesperus) and (H)eosphoros (Morning Star) Latinized as Eosphorus (see Lucifer) are sons of the dawn goddess Eos (Roman Aurora). ... Vesper can refer to Hesperus, a Greek mythological figure Vesper Lynd, a fictional character of Ian Flemings James Bond novel Casino Royale Vesper, Saskatchewan, formerly a village Southwest of Swift Current, Saskatchewan Vesper (cocktail), a Martini style Alcoholic beverage recipe created by Ian Fleming Vesper or Shaken, not stirred... Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... In Etruscan mythology, Nethuns was the god of wells, later expanded to all water, including the sea. ... Bronze sculpture of Priapus making an offering to his phallus, House of the Vettii, Pompeii Fresco of Priapus, House of the Vettii, Pompeii. ... Rhea (or Ria meaning she who flows) was the Titaness daughter of Uranus and of Gaia. ... In Roman mythology, Magna Mater deorum Idaea (great Idaean mother of the gods) was the name for the originally Phrygian goddess Cybele, as well as Rhea. ... OPS can also refer to a baseball term, On-base plus slugging. ... A bald, bearded, horse-tailed satyr balances a winecup on his erect penis, a trick worthy of note, on an Attic red-figured psykter, ca. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Pan (mythology). ... A faun, as painted by Hungarian painter Pál Szinyei Merse In Roman mythology, fauns are place-spirits (genii) of untamed woodland. ... This article is about the lunar spacecraft. ... Stimula redirects here. ... Semla is the Etruscan name for the Greek goddess Semele from which she derives. ... In Greek mythology, Thanatos (in Ancient Greek, θάνατος – Death) was the Daimon personification of Death and Mortality. ... In Roman mythology, Mors is the personification of death and equivalent to the Greek Thanatos. ... A typical depiction of Charun. ... In Greek mythology, Hesiod mentions Themis among the six sons and six daughters—of whom Cronos was one—of Gaia and Ouranos, that is, of Earth with Sky. ... Lady Justice Lady Justice (Iustitia, the Roman Goddess of Justice and sometimes, simply Justice) is an allegorical personification of the moral force that underlies the legal system. ... Tyche on the reverse of this coin by Gordian III. In Greek mythology, Tyche (Roman equivalent: Fortuna) was the presiding tutelary deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. ... Fortuna governs the circle of the four stages of life, the Wheel of Fortune, in a manuscript of Carmina Burana In Roman mythology, Fortuna (equivalent to the Greek goddess Tyche) was the personification of luck, hopefully of good luck, but she could be represented veiled and blind, as modern depictions... In Etruscan mythology, Nortia was the goddess of fate and chance. ... For other uses, see Uranus (disambiguation). ... Caelus was the Latin name that the Romans used for the Greek sky god Uranus. ... In Roman mythology, Vertumnus (Vortumnus, Vertimnus) was the god of seasons, change and plant growth, as well as gardens and fruit trees. ... In Etruscan mythology, Voltumna was the chthonic (earth) god, later to become the supreme god. ... Zephyrus, the Greek god of the west wind and the goddess Chloris, from a 1875 engraving by William-Adolphe Bouguereau In Greek mythology, the Anemoi (in Greek, Άνεμοι — winds) were wind gods who were each ascribed a cardinal direction, from which their respective winds came, and were each associated with various... Look up zephyr in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... Jupiter et Thétis - by Jean Ingres, 1811. ... In Etruscan mythology, Tinia was the highest god of the skies, husband to Thalna or Uni. ...

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