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Encyclopedia > Greed (game show)
Greed
Image:Greed.jpg
Genre Game show
Running time 60 min
Starring Chuck Woolery
Country of origin United States
Original channel FOX
Original run November 4, 1999July 14, 2000
No. of episodes

44 Image File history File links Greed. ... A game show involves members of the public or celebrities, sometimes as part of a team, playing a game, perhaps involving answering quiz questions, for points or prizes. ... Charles Herbert Chuck Woolery (born on March 16, 1941) is a popular game show host, best known for hosting the dating game show Love Connection, from its debut in 1983 to its ending in 1994. ... The Fox Broadcasting Company, usually referred to as just Fox (the company itself prefers the capitalized version FOX), is a television network in the United States and Canada. ... November 4 is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 57 days remaining. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... July 14 is the 195th day (196th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 170 days remaining. ... This article is about the year 2000. ...

IMDb profile
TV.com summary

Greed (or Greed: The Series) was a short-lived American television game show where a team of contestants answered a series of multiple-choice trivia questions for a potential prize of up to $2 million (later $4 million during the five Super Greed episodes). A game show involves members of the public or celebrities, sometimes as part of a team, playing a game, perhaps involving answering quiz questions, for points or prizes. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 3. ...

Contents

Broadcast history

Greed, produced by Dick Clark and hosted by Chuck Woolery, debuted on November 4, 1999. It was widely considered as Fox's answer to ABC's prime-time hit Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. After being renewed for the summer with a possible return the following season, Fox abruptly canceled Greed on July 14, 2000. Repeats of Greed have aired on GSN (formerly Game Show Network) since January 2002 and these repeats are also being aired in Australia on Fox8 since May 2006. Dick Clark redirects here. ... Charles Herbert Chuck Woolery (born on March 16, 1941) is a popular game show host, best known for hosting the dating game show Love Connection, from its debut in 1983 to its ending in 1994. ... November 4 is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 57 days remaining. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Fox Plaza, the company headquarters. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... In the United States, Who Wants to Be a Millionaire (also known simply as Millionaire) is a television game show which offers a maximum cash prize of one million dollars for correctly answering successive multiple-choice questions of increasing difficulty. ... July 14 is the 195th day (196th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 170 days remaining. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... The Game Show Network (now known as GSN - The Network for Games) is an American cable television and direct broadcast satellite channel dedicated to game shows, reality shows, and interactive television games. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... FOX8 is a general entertainment channel available on Australias Foxtel, Austar and Optus Television pay television services. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Greed has also been exported to other countries by FremantleMedia. Jerry Springer hosted a British version of the show in 2001 on five. Kerri-Anne Kennerley hosted a version in Australia in 2002, and is still on in South Africa with Revin John as host. The show also aired on ZDF in Germany under the title "Ca$h" with Ulla Kock am Brink as host. FremantleMedia (formerly All-American Television and Pearson Television) is a division of RTL Group which holds the rights to the Goodson/Todman game show library which includes such classic game shows as The Price is Right, Match Game, Ive Got a Secret, and Family Feud, as well as non... Talk show host Jerry Springer :This article is about the talk show host. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... Five, formerly known as Channel 5, is the United Kingdoms fifth national analogue terrestrial TV channel. ... Kerri-Anne Kennerly Australian Televison Presenter Kerri-Anne Kennerly (born ??) has an inimicable television style that could be described as a very individual talent. Having hosting mutliple shows including Midday with Kerri-Anne (90s) and the original Good Morning Australia (80s) (also known as GMA), Kerri-Anne continues... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Zweites Deutsches Fernsehen (Second German Television), ZDF, is a public service German-language television channel based in Mainz. ...


Rules of the game

The object of Greed was to complete a climb up the "Tower of Greed," which consisted of eight multiple-choice questions, with the value of each question increasing with the level of difficulty. Anyone who correctly answered all eight questions won or shared the $2 million grand prize. As answers were selected, they were highlighted in blue. As long as an answer was highlighted in green, meaning it was correct, the game continued. Once an answer was highlighted in red, meaning it was the wrong one, the game ended and the players would lose all prize money earned as a team.


Qualifying round

Six players competed in a qualifying round that determined who made the team. The host asked a question that always had a numerical answer. After all the contestants locked in their answers, the host would reveal the answer (always between 10 and 999). The contestant who was closest to the correct answer became the captain of the team. The remaining players were ranked based on how close they were to the correct answer. If there was a tie, the player who answered the fastest got the higher ranking. The player who was furthest away from the correct answer (or was left in case the remaining two tied) was the only one who did not qualify. Players who did not make it to the team could return later for another qualifying question, though this rarely ever happened.


The first four questions

Each contestant, except for the captain, was given a multiple-choice trivia question to answer. Once the contestant answered it, the captain had the option to accept or reject that answer. The first two questions (worth $25,000 and $50,000) had four possible answers; the second two (worth $75,000 and $100,000) had five possible answers. To determine which contestant would answer each of the first four questions, they were asked in the order they scored in the Qualifying round, starting with the lowest ranked contestant; the one whose answer was the farthest away from the correct answer.


A correct answer gave the team that much hypothetical money, all of which to be evenly distributed between them should they leave the game with it. After each question resolved (including the higher-level questions explained below), the host would ask the captain if he or she wanted to end the game, or if he or she "felt the need for greed." Leaving the game gave all players their share of the winnings. Going on meant going to the next question and risking all of the money currently earned.


After the fourth question is correctly answered, the host will give the team a category that has something to do with the fifth question (see the high-level questions section below). Based on that category, the captain would decide if he or she "felt the need for greed" while the rest of the team and the audience voiced their opinions.


The Terminator

If the captain decided to continue past 4 questions, the Terminator round began. The host activated the "Terminator," which randomly selected a team member (and to whom Chuck would announce, "The Terminator has chosen you"). That player then had the opportunity to challenge another team member and take their share of winnings. To induce players into challenges, they were offered $10,000 that was theirs to keep, win or lose. In addition, challenging and defeating the Team Captain would give them the captain position.


If the contestant opted to challenge, the two players competed in a "one-question showdown". Chuck would read a general-knowledge question, with no multiple choices. Either contestant could buzz in (locking out the other contestant) and answer the question. If the contestant answered correctly, they eliminated the other contestant from the game and took their share of the prize money. If the contestant answered incorrectly or didn't answer at all within a matter of seconds, they would be eliminated and the non-buzzing player would get their share instead.


During the first few weeks of the show's run, contestants were required to wait for the question to be completely read before buzzing in; buzzing in too early immediately eliminated the contestant, just as if a wrong answer had been given. For the remainder of the show's run, contestants were allowed to buzz in at any time, though Chuck would immediately stop reading the question at that point (so a contestant buzzing in early ran a risk of misinterpreting the question).


The Terminator Round was activated before each of the high-level questions except the $2 Million ($4 Million in Super Greed) question and starting at the $200,000 question, pending the team survived that far and "felt the need for greed."


Higher-level questions

Once the first Terminator round was over, the next set of four questions began. Each of these high-level questions had four correct answers instead of just one. The number of possible choices depended on the value of the question: the $200,000 question had six choices, the $500,000 question had seven, and the $1 million question had eight. Before the $200,000 question, the captain of the team was given a single "Freebie" in the form of a card that he or she could use on any one question from that point onward. The "Freebie" eliminated one of the predetermined incorrect answers from the question that it was used for.


Each member of the team had to give one answer (unless of course there were 3 or less members left, in which case the captain can elect himself or one of the remaining players to give in answers). After the team gave its four guesses, the captain was given the opportunity to change only one of them if he or she desired. The answers were then revealed, one at a time. If three of the four guesses were correct, the host offered the captain a cash incentive (usually one-tenth of the value of that question) to end the game and split between the players except for the last question (the only occurrence of the last question had no incentive offered). This was done partially as an intimidation, but mostly to see if the captain felt unsure about the last unrevealed answer. If the captain refused the money, the fourth answer was revealed. If the fourth answer was correct, the team won the money for that round and was allowed to continue. On the $1,000,000 question, each player made their own decision to take an individualized bribe (usually a car with money in the trunk) or go on with the team.


Like with the end of the fourth question, subsequent questions had their category revealed before the captain decided to walk away with the money, or "feel the need for greed" and continue on to the next highest question.


The $2 million question

If the team correctly answered the $1 million question, it was up to each remaining player to determine if he or she wanted to go for the $2 million or stop and take their share of the prize money currently, leaving the other players behind to try for more, if they wished.


The $2 million question had nine possible choices for the four correct answers. In Greed's nine-month run on Fox (not counting the Super Greed portion), only one contestant ever made it to this level, by himself. Since he was alone, he was given 30 seconds to think about his choices, and then 10 seconds to read them off. If four answers were not given within the time limit, the player would lose everything. It is unknown how the format would have differed if more than one contestant tried their hand at $2 million.


It occurred on only the fourth episode of the show. Daniel Avila (later called Dan Avila or Danny Avila) was given a question on which odors were the most recognizable based on a Yale University study, and three of his choices -- peanut butter, coffee, and Vicks Vaporub -- were correct answers. However, he guessed "tuna" as his fourth choice, and lost; the fourth answer was "chocolate." Daniel Avila was a contestant on the television game show Greed , and also the only contestant to ever reach the 2 Million Dollar-Question on his own, or with anyone for that matter. ... JUNIOR Odor receptors on the antennae of a Luna moth An odor (American English) or odour (Commonwealth English) is the object of perception of the sense of olfaction. ... Yale redirects here. ... Peanut Butter in a jar Peanut butter is a food made of roasted and ground peanuts, usually salted and sweetened. ... A cup of coffee Coffee is a popular beverage prepared from the roasted seeds (not beans, though they are almost always called coffee beans) of the coffee plant. ... Vicks (VapoRub) In Germany, the brand name is written Wick, as Wichs(pronounced vicks) is German slang for semen. ... Species See text Tuna, sometimes called tunafish, are several species of ocean-dwelling fish in the family Scombridae, mostly in the genus Thunnus. ... Chocolate most commonly comes in dark, milk, and white varieties, with cocoa solids contributing to the brown coloration. ...


Rule changes

In the first month of Greed's run, the top prize was worth $2 million plus an additional $50,000 for each game where the top prize was not won. The jackpot reached $2,550,000 in the first month. When it became a permanent series, the top prize was set to $2,000,000 permanently.


Toward the end of Greed's run, the qualifying round was eliminated, and the five contestants for the team were given their positions randomly in a backstage drawing.


Special episodes

Million Dollar Moment

In February 2000, eight previous Greed contestants were brought back for a "Million-Dollar Moment," different "Moments" taking place at the end of different shows. The players were all players who got very close to the big $2 million question, but never made it. Two players faced off with a Terminator-style sudden-death question, and the winner was given a $1 million question. The contestant had 30 seconds to study the question, then 10 seconds to lock in the four right answers to win the money. As usual, missing any part of the question meant that the money was not won. Curtis Warren successfully answered a question about movies based on TV shows and became the biggest U.S. game show winner of all time - along with the biggest Greed contestant winner - with $1,410,000. His U.S. game show record was beaten within a week as David Legler won $1,765,000 on NBC's Twenty One. Curtis has since been surpassed by others as well (Kevin Olmstead, Ed Toutant, Ken Jennings, and Brad Rutter in that order). 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in February, 2000. ... Curtis Warren was a contestant on several American game shows and once held the all-time game show winnings record, with $1,410,000. ... David Legler was a contestant on the television game show Twenty-One between February 9th, 2000 and February 16th, 2000. ... NBC, (Formerly an acronym for the National Broadcasting Company until 2004), is an American television and radio network based in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... Twenty One was one of the most infamous American game shows on record — a popular, yet thoroughly rigged, quiz show that spawned the single most popular contestant of the quiz show era, and which nearly caused the demise of the entire genre in the wake of Senate investigations. ... Dr. Kevin Olmstead (born March 20, 1959) is an environmental engineer from Ann Arbor, Michigan. ... Ed Toutant was a contestant on Who Wants to Be a Millionaire in the United States in 2001. ... Ken Jennings on Jeopardy! Kenneth Wayne Jennings III (born May 23, 1974) holds the record for the longest winning streak on the U.S. syndicated game show Jeopardy!, as well as other records. ... Brad Rutter is congratulated for his first place finish by Jeopardy! host Alex Trebek, at the Ultimate Tournament of Champions. ...


Super Greed

Greed became Super Greed for a month in May 2000. The qualifying question was eliminated, and the values for the top three questions were doubled, making the eighth question worth a potential $4 million. In addition, any team that went for the seventh or eighth question was guaranteed $200,000 regardless of the outcome of the game. Two teams reached the $2 million question, and one team was able to answer all four parts correctly. Also in Super Greed, the contestants were each offered a Jaguar convertible with $75,000 in the trunk (later $150,000 cash) to quit the game if three of the four answers were correct on the seventh question. 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in May, 2000. ... Jaguar Cars Limited is a British luxury carmaker, owned by the Ford Motor Company with headquarters at Browns Lane, Coventry, England. ...


Highest winners of the U.S. version

Original airing dates (as listed at [1]) are included. Note: Teams that earned $500,000 or more were paid through an annuity.

  • Curtis Warren; $1,410,000; November 18, 1999 and February 11, 2000 (combined winnings from both shows)
  • Lauren Griswold; $810,000; May 12, 2000 (Super Greed)
  • David Juliano; $800,000; May 12, 2000 (Super Greed)
  • Monique Jones; $610,000; May 19, 2000 (Super Greed)
  • George Elias; $600,000; May 2, 2000 (Super Greed)
  • Melissa Skirboll; $410,000; November 18, 1999
  • Phyllis Harris; $400,000; May 12, 2000 (Super Greed)
  • Madeleine Ali; $320,000; December 10, 1999
  • Robert Abramoff; $310,000; November 4, 1999 (tie with Annemarie Buchta)
  • Annemarie Buchta; $310,000; February 18, 2000 (tie with Robert Abramoff)
  • Jeff Ester; $310,000; February 18, 2000
  • Evan Benner; $310,000; June 23, 2000
  • Jill Schilstra; $310,000; June 30, 2000
  • John Epperson; $155,000 and a Jaguar XK8 convertible valued at $75,000 (Super Greed); April 28, 2000
  • Jeff Gouda; $100,000 (Super Greed); April 28, 2000

Curtis Warren was a contestant on several American game shows and once held the all-time game show winnings record, with $1,410,000. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 3. ... Melissa Skirboll was an office temp from New York City and a contestant on the television game show Greed. ...

External links

  • Greed rules and episode guide (unofficial)
  • UK Gameshows Page: Greed
  • Australian Game Show Homepage: "Greed"

  Results from FactBites:
 
Bambooweb: Greed (183 words)
Greed is a desire to obtain more money or material possessions than one is considered to need.
However, greed has become more acceptable (and the word less frequent) in Western culture, where the desire to acquire wealth is an important part of capitalism.
Greed in the Buddhist sense is a form of attachment, a deluded view that exaggerates the positive aspects of an object.
Greed (game show) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2004 words)
Greed (or Greed: The Series) was a short-lived American television game show where a team of contestants answered a series of multiple-choice trivia questions for a potential prize of up to $2 million (later $4 million during the five Super Greed episodes).
Repeats of Greed have aired on GSN (formerly Game Show Network) since January 2002 and also these repeats are being aired in Australia on Fox8 since May 2006.
Toward the end of Greed's run, the qualifying round was eliminated, and the five contestants for the team were given their positions randomly in a backstage drawing.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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