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Encyclopedia > Greece
Ελληνική Δημοκρατία
Ellinikí Dimokratía
Hellenic Republic
Flag of Greece Coat of Arms of Greece
Flag Coat of Arms
MottoΕλευθερία ή θάνατος
Eleftheria i thanatos  (transliteration)
"Freedom or Death"
AnthemΎμνος εις την Ελευθερίαν
Ýmnos eis tīn Eleutherían
Hymn to Liberty1
Location of  Greece  (dark green)

– on the European continent  (light green & dark grey)
– in the European Union  (light green)  —  [ Legend] Greece may be: Ancient Greece Greece, country in southeast Europe, also known as Hellas or Ellas Greece (CDP), New York Greece (town), New York This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Hellas is the Greek name for Greece Hellas Pils is the name of a Greek beer Hellas Planitia is a vast impact crater on Mars This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... The Groupement de recherche et détudes sur la culture européenne (Study and research group reagrding European Culture), also knowns as GRECE (French for Greece) is a far-right think-tank, founded in 1969 by the journalist and writer Alain de Benoist. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Flag Ratio: 2:3 (Naval Flag 1822-1828, Sea Flag 1828-1969; 1975-1978 (Flag Ratio 7:12), National Flag 1969-1975; 1978 to date) The flag of Greece (Greek: , popularly referred to as the Γαλανόλευκη or the Κυανόλευκη, the blue-white) is based on nine equal horizontal stripes of blue alternating... The National Emblem of Greece consists of a blue escutcheon with a white cross totally surrounded by two laurel branches. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... Greek flag Eleftheria i thanatos (Greek: , pron. ... Transliteration is the practice of transcribing a word or text written in one writing system into another writing system. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: All verses in Greek The Hymn to Liberty (Ύμνος εις την Ελευθερίαν Ímnos is tin Eleftherían) is a poem written by Dionýsios Solomós in 1823 that consists of 158 stanzas, set to music by Nikolaos Mantzaros. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 721 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2056 × 1710 pixel, file size: 177 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 721 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2056 × 1710 pixel, file size: 177 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Capital
(and largest city)
Athens
38°00′N, 23°43′E
Official languages Greek
Demonym Greek
Government Parliamentary republic
 -  President Karolos Papoulias
 -  Prime Minister Kostas Karamanlis
Modern statehood
 -  Independence from
the Ottoman Empire

25 March 1821 
 -  Recognized 3 February 1830, in the London Protocol 
 -  Current constitution 1975, "Third Republic" 
EU accession January 1, 1981
Area
 -  Total 131,990 km² (96th)
50,944 sq mi 
 -  Water (%) 0.8669
Population
 -  2008 estimate 11,216,708[1] (74th)
 -  2001 census 10,964,020[2] 
 -  Density 84/km² (88th)
218/sq mi
GDP (PPP) 2008 IMF estimate
 -  Total $342.886 billion (32nd)
 -  Per capita $30,745 (30th)
GDP (nominal) 2008 IMF estimate
 -  Total $361.577 billion (27th)
 -  Per capita $32,421 (27th)
Gini (2000) 35.42 (low
HDI (2005) 0.926 (high) (24th)
Currency Euro ()3 (EUR)
Time zone EET (UTC+2)
 -  Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3)
Internet TLD .gr4
Calling code +30
1 Also the national anthem of Cyprus.
2 UNU/Wider World Income Inequality Database.
3 Before 2001: Greek Drachma.
4 The .eu domain is also used, as it is shared with other European Union member states.

Greece (Greek: Ελλάδα, Elláda, IPA[ɛˈlaða], or Ελλάς, Ellás, [ɛˈlas]), officially the Hellenic Republic [Ελληνική Δημοκρατία (ɛliniˈkʲi ðimokraˈtia)],[3] is a country in southeastern Europe, situated on the southern end of the Balkan Peninsula. It has borders with Albania, Bulgaria and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia to the north, and Turkey to the east. The Aegean Sea lies to the east and south of mainland Greece, while the Ionian Sea lies to the west. Both parts of the Eastern Mediterranean basin feature a vast number of islands. Not to be confused with capitol. ... The Demographics of Greece refer to the demography of the population that inhabits the Greek peninsula, a region where the Greek language has been continuously spoken for over 3500 years. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... An official language is a language that is given a special legal status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Parliamentary republics around the world, shown in Orange (Parliamentary republics with a non-executive President) and Green (Parliamentary republics with an executive President linked to Parliament). ... This is a list of presidents of Greece. ... Karolos Papoulias Karolos Papoulias (Greek: Κάρολος Παπούλιας) is the President of the Hellenic Republic, former minister and member of the Hellenic parliament. ... Note on Greek names: There is no firm convention for the rendering of Greek personal names into English. ... This article is about the Greek Prime Minister whose term began in 2004. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... London Protocol is a name used to describe several different documents. ... In the modern history of Greece, starting from the Greek War of Independence, the Constitution of 1975/1986/2001 is the last in a series of democratically adopted Constitutions (with the exception of the Constitutions of 1968 and 1973 imposed by a dictatorship). ... Austria Poland Belgium Bulgaria Cyprus Czech   Rep. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here surface areas between 100,000 km² and 1,000,000 km². ... This is a list of the countries of the world sorted by area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... A percentage is a way of expressing a proportion, a ratio or a fraction as a whole number, by using 100 as the denominator. ... Map of countries by population for the year 2007 This is a list of countries ordered according to population. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Population density by country, 2006 List of countries and dependencies by population density in inhabitants/km². The list includes sovereign states and self-governing dependent territories that are recognized by the United Nations. ... PPP of GDP for the countries of the world (2003). ... IMF redirects here. ... The international dollar is a hypothetical unit of currency that has the same purchasing power that the U.S. dollar has in the United States at a given point in time. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... There are three lists of countries of the world sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) (the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year). ... Look up Per capita in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article includes two lists of countries of the world[1] sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) at purchasing power parity (PPP) per capita, the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year divided by the average population for the same year. ... IMF redirects here. ... USD redirects here. ... World map of GDP (Nominal and PPP). ... Look up Per capita in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Map of countries by 2006 GDP (nominal) per capita (IMF, October 2007). ... Graphical representation of the Gini coefficient The Gini coefficient is a measure of inequality of income distribution or inequality of wealth distribution. ... This page talks about Human Development Index, for other HDIs see HDI (disambiguation) World map indicating Human Development Index (2007). ... This talks about the countries in the Human Development Index, for information on the Human Development Index, please Click Here World map indicating Human Development Index (2007) (Colour-blind compliant map) For red-green color vision problems. ... For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ... The euro (€; ISO 4217 code EUR) is the currency of twelve of the twenty-five nations that form the European Union (and four outside it, as well as Montenegro and Kosovo), which form the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU). ... ISO 4217 is the international standard describing three letter codes (also known as the currency code) to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries not observing daylight saving Eastern European Time (EET) is one of the names of UTC+2 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... UTC redirects here. ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern European Time (EET) is the time zone 2 hours ahead of UTC. Time zones of Europe, Blue WET or GMT or UTC , Red CET/MET, Green EET, Khaki MSK During summertime, DST (Daylight Saving Time) is in effect in some countries such as Finland and all other member states... UTC redirects here. ... A country code top-level domain (ccTLD) is a top-level domain used and reserved for a country or a dependent territory. ... .gr is the country code top-level domain (ccTLD) for Greece. ... This is a list of country calling codes defined by ITU-T recommendation E.164. ... This is a list of dialing codes in Greece. ... Drachma, pl. ... For other uses, see Country (disambiguation). ... Balkan redirects here. ... Motto: Anthem: Today Over Macedonia (Macedonian: Денес Над Македонија, Denes Nad Makedonija) Capital Skopje Largest city Skopje Official language(s) Macedonian1 Government President Prime Minister Parliamentary republic Branko Crvenkovski Vlado Bučkovski Independence Declared From Yugoslavia September 8, 1991 Area  â€¢ Total  â€¢ Water (%)   25,333 km² (146th) 1. ... Look up Aegean Sea in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Ionian Sea. ... Mediterranean redirects here. ...


Greece lies at the juncture of Europe, Asia and Africa. It is heir to the heritages of ancient Greece, the Roman and Byzantine Empires,[4] and nearly four centuries of Ottoman rule.[5] Greece is the birthplace of democracy,[6] Western philosophy,[7] the Olympic Games, Western literature and historiography, political science, major scientific and mathematic principles, and Western drama[8] including both tragedy and comedy. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... The term ancient Greece refers to the periods of Greek history in Classical Antiquity, lasting ca. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Byzantine redirects here. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Historiography studies the processes by which historical knowledge is obtained and transmitted. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Drama (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Tragedy (disambiguation). ... A comedy is a dramatic performance of a light and amusing character, usually with a happy conclusion to its plot. ...


Greece is a developed country, a member of the European Union since 1981,[9] a member of the Economic and Monetary Union of the European Union since 2001, NATO since 1952[10], the OECD since 1961,[11] the WEU since 1995 and ESA since 2005.[12] Athens is the capital; Thessaloniki, Patras, Heraklion, Volos, Ioannina, Larissa and Kavala are some of the country's other major cities. World map indicating Human Development Index (as of 2004). ... For the concept in general, see economic and monetary union. ... This article is about the military alliance. ... The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), (in French: Organisation de coopération et de développement économiques; OCDE) is an international organisation of thirty countries that accept the principles of representative democracy and a free market economy. ...  â€¢  â€¢  â€¢ Membership 10 member states 6 associate member states 5 observer countries 7 associate partner countries Establishment Treaty of Brussels  -  Signed 17 March 1948  The Western European Union (WEU) is a partially dormant European defence and security organization, established on the basis of the Treaty of Brussels of 1948 with the... ESA redirects here. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... Thessaloniki or Salonica (Greek: ) is Greeces second-largest city and the capital of Macedonia, the largest Region of Greece. ... Patras (Demotic Greek: Πάτρα, Pátra, IPA: , Classical Greek: Πάτραι, Pátrai, Latin: ) is Greeces third largest city and the capital of the prefecture of Achaea, located in northern Peloponnese, 215 kilometers west of Athens. ... For other uses, see Heraklion (disambiguation). ... This article is about Volos, Greece. ... This article is about the Greek city. ... Larissa (Greek: Λάρισα, Lárisa) is the capital city of the Thessaly periphery of Greece, and capital of the Larissa Prefecture. ... Kavala (also seen as Kavála, Kavalla, (Greek) (2001 pop. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Greece

The shores of the Aegean sea saw the emergence of the first advanced civilizations in Europe, the Minoan civilization in Crete and the Mycenean civilization on the mainland. Later, city-states emerged across the Greek peninsula and spread to the shores of Black Sea, South Italy and Asia Minor reaching great levels of prosperity that resulted in an unprecedented cultural boom, expressed in architecture, drama, science and philosophy, and nurtured in Athens under a democratic environment. Athens and Sparta led the way in repelling the Persian Empire in a series of battles. Both were later overshadowed by Thebes and eventually Macedon, with the latter under the guidance of Alexander the Great uniting and leading the Greek world to victory over the Persians, to presage the Hellenistic era, itself brought only partially to a close two centuries later with the establishment of Roman rule over Greek lands in 146 BC. This article covers the Greek civilization. ... From [1], in the public domain - Altered by User:TroyDavis to remove the moire from the sky. ... From [1], in the public domain - Altered by User:TroyDavis to remove the moire from the sky. ... The Parthenon west façade For other uses, see Parthenon (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... The Minoan civilization was a bronze age civilization which arose on the island of Crete. ... A clay tablet with writing in Linear B from Mycenae. ... A city-state is a region controlled exclusively by a city. ... For other uses, see Black Sea (disambiguation). ... Magna Graecia (Latin for Greater Greece, Megalê Hellas/Μεγάλη Ελλάς in Greek) is the name of an area in ancient southern Italy and Sicily that was colonised by ancient Greek settlers in the 8th century BCE. Originally, Magna Graecia was the name used by the Romans to describe the greater... Anatolia (Greek: ανατολη anatole, rising of the sun or East; compare Orient and Levant, by popular etymology Turkish Anadolu to ana mother and dolu filled), also called by the Latin name of Asia Minor, is a region of Southwest Asia which corresponds today to the Asian portion of Turkey. ... The Parthenon west façade For other uses, see Parthenon (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Drama (disambiguation). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Democracy (disambiguation) and Democratic Party. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... For modern day Sparta, see Sparti (municipality). ... Persia redirects here. ... Persian Wars redirects here. ... Two important places in antiquity were called Thebes: Thebes, Greece – Thebes of the Seven Gates; one-time capital of Boeotia. ... Macedons regions and towns Macedon or Macedonia (from Greek ; see also List of traditional Greek place names) was the name of an ancient kingdom in the northern-most part of ancient Greece, bordering the kingdom of Epirus on the west and the region of Thrace to the east[1... For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... The Persians of Iran (officially named Persia by West until 1935 while still referred to as Persia by some) are an Iranian people who speak Persian (locally named Fârsi by native speakers) and often refer to themselves as ethnic Iranians as well. ... The term Hellenistic (established by the German historian Johann Gustav Droysen) in the history of the ancient world is used to refer to the shift from a culture dominated by ethnic Greeks, however scattered geographically, to a culture dominated by Greek-speakers of whatever ethnicity, and from the political dominance... This article is about the state which existed from the 6th century BC to the 1st century BC. For the state which existed in the 18th century, see Roman Republic (18th century). ...


The subsequent mixture of Roman and Hellenic cultures took form in the establishment of the Byzantine Empire in 330 AD around Constantinople, which remained a major cultural and military power for the next 1,123 years, until its fall at the hands of Ottomans in 1453. On the eve of the Ottoman era the Greek intelligentsia migrated to Western Europe, playing a significant role in the Western European Renaissance through the transferring of works of Ancient Greeks to Western Europe.[13] Nevertheless, the Ottoman millet system contributed to the ethnic cohesion of Orthodox people by segregating the various peoples within the Ottoman Empire based on religion as the latter played an integral role in the formation of modern Greek identity. Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Hellenic may refer to: the Hellenic Republic (the modern Greek state) the Hellenes, itself a term for either ancient or modern Greeks anything related to Greece in general or Ancient Greece in particular. ... Byzantine redirects here. ... This article is about the city before the Fall of Constantinople (1453). ... Combatants  Byzantine Empire Ottoman Sultanate Commanders Constantine XI †, Loukas Notaras, Giovanni Giustiniani †[1] Mehmed II, ZaÄŸanos Pasha Strength 80,000[2] 80,000[1]-200,000[1][3] Casualties 4,000 dead[4] [5][6] unknown The Fall of Constantinople refers to the capture of the Byzantine Empires... The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power Imperial motto El Muzaffer Daima The Ever Victorious (as written in tugra) Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital İstanbul ( Constantinople/Asitane/Konstantiniyye ) Sovereigns Sultans of the Osmanli Dynasty Population ca 40 million Area 12+ million km² Establishment 1299 Dissolution October 29, 1923... A current understanding of Western Europe. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... Ancient Greece is the term used to describe the Greek_speaking world in ancient times. ... A current understanding of Western Europe. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320...


After the Greek War of Independence, successfully fought against the Ottoman Empire from 1821 to 1829, the nascent Greek state was finally recognized under the London Protocol. In 1827, Ioannis Kapodistrias, a noble Greek from the Ionian Islands, was chosen as the first governor of the new Republic. However, following his assassination, the Great Powers soon installed a monarchy under Otto, of the Bavarian House of Wittelsbach. In 1843, an uprising forced the King to grant a constitution and a representative assembly. Due to his unimpaired authoritarian rule, he was eventually dethroned in 1863 and replaced by Prince Vilhelm (William) of Denmark, who took the name George I and brought with him the Ionian Islands as a coronation gift from Britain. In 1877, Charilaos Trikoupis, a dominant figure of the Greek political scene who is attributed with the significant improvement of the country's infrastructure, curbed the power of the monarchy to interfere in the assembly by issuing the rule of vote of confidence to any potential prime minister. Belligerents Greek revolutionaries United Kingdom France Russian Empire Ottoman Empire Egyptian Khedivate Commanders Theodoros Kolokotronis Alexander Ypsilanti Andreas Miaoulis Georgios Karaiskakis â€  Omer Vryonis Mahmud Dramali Pasha ReÅŸid Mehmed Pasha Ibrahim Pasha. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... London Protocol is a name used to describe several different documents. ... statue of John Capodistria in Panepistimiou Street, Athens John Capodistria, (in Greek Ioannis Kapodistrias or Ιωάννης Καποδίστριας, and in Italian Giovanni Capo dIstria, Count Capo dIstria) (February 11, 1776 - October 9, 1831), Greek-born diplomat of the Russian Empire and later first head of state of independent Greece... The Ionian Islands (Modern Greek: Ιόνια νησιά, Ionia nisia; Ancient Greek: , Ionioi NÄ“soi) are a group of islands in Greece. ... In the context of international relations and diplomacy, power (sometimes clarified as international power, national power, or state power) is the ability of one state to influence or control other states. ... Capital Athens Language(s) Greek Religion Greek Orthodox Government Constitutional Monarchy King  - 1832-1862 Otto  - 1863-1913 George I  - 1913-1917 Constantine I  - 1917-1920 Alexander  - 1920-1922 Constantine I  - 1922-1924 George II Historical era Enlightenment Era  - London Protocol August 30, 1832  - Military junta April 21, 1967 The Kingdom... King Otto or Othon of Greece, (Greek: , Othon, Vasileus tis Ellados) also Prince of Bavaria (June 1, 1815 – July 26, 1867) was made the first modern king of Greece in 1832 under the Convention of London, whereby Greece became a new independent kingdom under the protection of the Great Powers... The Wittelsbach family is an European royal family and a German dynasty from Bavaria. ... George I, King of the Hellenes (Greek: , Georgios A Vasileus ton Ellinon; December 24, 1845 – March 18, 1913) was King of Greece from 1863 to 1913. ... The Ionian Islands (Modern Greek: Ιόνια νησιά, Ionia nisia; Ancient Greek: , Ionioi NÄ“soi) are a group of islands in Greece. ... Charilaos Trikoupis - Athens, Photographic Archive of Hellenic Literary and Historical Museum Charilaos Trikoupis (July 11, 1832 (O.S.) – 1896) was a Greek politician who served as a Prime Minister of Greece seven times from 1875 until 1895. ... A Motion of Confidence is a motion of support proposed by a government in a parliament to give members of parliament a chance to register their confidence for a government by means of a parliamentary vote. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ...

March 25, 1821: Germanos of Patras, blessing the Greek flag at Agia Lavra. Theodoros Vryzakis, 1865.
March 25, 1821: Germanos of Patras, blessing the Greek flag at Agia Lavra. Theodoros Vryzakis, 1865.

As a result of the Balkan Wars, Greece successfully increased the extent of her territory and population, a challenging context both socially and economically. In the following years, the struggle between King Constantine I and charismatic prime minister Eleftherios Venizelos over the country's foreign policy on the eve of World War I dominated the country's political scene, and divided the country into two bitterly hostile factions. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (726x1000, 570 KB) el:Category:Ελληνική Επανάσταση του 1821 el:Category:Ελληνική ιστορία Licence File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Greek War of Independence Germanos of Patras Metadata This file contains additional... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (726x1000, 570 KB) el:Category:Ελληνική Επανάσταση του 1821 el:Category:Ελληνική ιστορία Licence File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Greek War of Independence Germanos of Patras Metadata This file contains additional... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Germanos was an Orthodox Metropolitan of Patras, who, on March 25, 1821, proclaimed national uprising. ... Flag ratio: 7:12 The Flag of Greece is based on nine equal horizontal stripes of blue alternating with white. ... Coordinates 38°2′ N 22°7′ E Country Greece Periphery West Greece Prefecture Achaea The monastery of Agia Lavra was built in 961 AD, on Helmos Mountain, at an altitude of 961 meters, and can be described as the birth-place of modern Greece, and her national regeneration a Hellenic... Combatants  Ottoman Empire Balkan League: Bulgaria Greece Serbia Montenegro Commanders Ottoman Empire: Nizam PaÅŸa, Zeki PaÅŸa, Esat PaÅŸa, Abdullah PaÅŸa, Ali Rıza PaÅŸa Bulgaria: Vladimir Vazov, Vasil Kutinchev, Nikola Ivanov, Radko Dimitriev Greece:Crown Prince Constantine, Panagiotis Danglis, Pavlos Kountouriotis Serbia:Radomir Putnik, Petar... Constantine I, King of the Hellenes (Greek: Κωνσταντίνος A, Βασιλεύς των Ελλήνων) (2 August 1868 - 11 January 1923) ruled Greece from 1913 to 1917 and from 1920 to 1922. ... For the Athens airport, see Athens International Airport. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The National Schism (Greek: , Ethnikos Dikhasmos, sometimes called The Great Division) is a historical event involving the disagreement between King Constantine and Prime Minister Eleftherios Venizelos over whether Greece should enter World War I. During the war Greece was of strategic importance due to its position in the link between...


In the aftermath of WW I, Greece fought against Turkish nationalists led by Mustafa Kemal, a war which resulted in a massive population exchange between the two countries under the Treaty of Lausanne. Instability and successive coup d'etats marked the following era, which was overshadowed by the massive task of incorporating 1.5 million Greek refugees from Asia Minor into Greek society. On 28 October 1940 Fascist Italy demanded the surrender of Greece, but the Greek dictator Ioannis Metaxas famously responded to the Italian ultimatum with the single word "OXI" ("No"). In the following Greco-Italian War, Greece repelled Italian forces into Albania, giving the Allies their first victory over Axis forces on land. The country would eventually fall to urgently dispatched German forces during the Battle of Greece, but the occupiers nevertheless met serious challenges from the Greek Resistance. Combatants Greece Turkish Revolutionaries Commanders Gen Leonidas Paraskevopoulos, Gen Anastasios Papoulas, Gen Georgios Hatzianestis Ali Fethi Okyar, Ä°smet Ä°nönü, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, Fevzi Çakmak Strength 200,000 men 120,000 men (plus village protectors) Casualties 23,500 dead; 20,820 captured 20,540 dead; 10,000 wounded The... “Mustafa Kemal” redirects here. ... Borders as shaped by the treaty The Treaty of Lausanne (July 24, 1923) was a peace treaty signed in Lausanne that settled the Anatolian part of the partitioning of the Ottoman Empire by annulment of the Treaty of Sèvres signed by the Ottoman Empire as the consequences of the... A coup détat, or simply a coup, is the sudden overthrow of a government, usually done by a small group that just replaces the top power figures. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Anthem Marcia Reale dOrdinanza (Royal March of Ordinance)¹ The Kingdom of Italy at the height of its power in 1940. ... Ioannis Metaxas (Greek Ιωάννης Μεταξάς, April 12, 1871 – January 29, 1941) was a Greek General and the Prime Minister of Greece from 1936 until his death in 1941. ... Belligerents Italy Albania Greece Commanders Sebastiano Visconti Prasca Ubaldo Soddu Ugo Cavallero Giovanni Messe Alexander Papagos Strength 529,000 men, 463 aircraft[1] Under 300,000 men, 77 aircraft[1] Casualties and losses 63,000[2][3][4] dead, 100,000+[2] wounded, 25,067 missing, 12,368 incapacitated by... This article is about the independent states that comprised the Allies. ... Black: Zenith of the Axis Powers Capital Not applicable Political structure Military alliance Historical era World War II  - Tripartite Pact September 27, 1940  - Anti-Comintern Pact November 25, 1936  - Pact of Steel May 22, 1939  - Dissolved 1945 This article is about the independent countries (states) that comprised the Axis powers. ... Belligerents Germany Italy Bulgaria Greece United Kingdom Australia New Zealand Commanders Wilhelm List Alexander Papagos, Henry Maitland Wilson, Bernard Freyberg Thomas Blamey Strength Germany:[1] 680,000 men, 1200 tanks 700 aircraft 1Italy:[2] 565,000 men 1Greece:[3] 430,000 men British Commonwealth:[4] 262,612 men 100 tanks... An ELAS fighter The Greek Resistance (Greek: , i. ...


After liberation, Greece experienced a bitter civil war between Royalist and Communist forces, which led to economic devastation and severe social tensions between its Rightists and largely Communist Leftists for the next 30 years.[14] The next 20 years were characterized by marginalisation of the left in the political and social spheres but also by a significant economic growth, propelled in part by the Marshall Plan. Combatants Hellenic Army, Royalist forces, Republicans United Kingdom Communist Party of Greece (ELAS, DSE) Commanders Alexander Papagos, Thrasyvoulos Tsakalotos, James Van Fleet Markos Vafiadis Strength 150,000 men 50,000 men and women Casualties 15,000 killed 32,000+ killed or captured The Greek Civil War (Ελληνικός εμφύλιος πόλεμος [ellinikos emfilios polemos]) was... Look up Royalist in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... In politics, right-wing, the political right, or simply the right, are terms which refer, with no particular precision, to the segment of the political spectrum in opposition to left-wing politics. ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... Map of Cold-War era Europe and the Near East showing countries that received Marshall Plan aid. ...


In 1965, a period of political turbulence led to a coup d’etat on April 21, 1967 by the US-backed Regime of the Colonels. On November 1973 the Athens Polytechnic Uprising sent shock waves across the regime, and a counter-coup established Brigadier Dimitrios Ioannides as dictator. On July 20, 1974, as Turkey invaded the island of Cyprus, the regime collapsed. is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... The Greek military junta of 1967-1974, alternatively The Regime of the Colonels (Greek: ), or in Greece The Junta (Greek: ) and The Seven Years (Greek: ) are terms used to refer to a series of right-wing military governments that ruled Greece from 1967 to 1974. ... An AMX 30 tank standing in front of the Athens Polytechnic. ... Brigadier (IPA pronunciation: ) is a military rank, the meaning of which has a considerable variation. ... Dimitrios Ioannides (right) toasting with George Papadopoulos (middle) and Phaedon Gkizikis (left) Ioannides and Gizikis overthrew Papadopoulos in a later coup. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants  Turkey  Cyprus  Greece On the 20th of July 1974, Turkey launched a military invasion by air, land and sea against Cyprus purportedly to restore constitutional order following an Athens orchestrated coup by the Cypriot National Guard against the President of Cyprus, Makarios III. Though Turkey had consistently refused to...

July 24, 1974: Konstantinos Karamanlis arrives in Athens courtesy of French President Valéry Giscard d'Estaing
July 24, 1974: Konstantinos Karamanlis arrives in Athens courtesy of French President Valéry Giscard d'Estaing

Ex-Premier Constantine Karamanlis was invited back from Paris where he had lived in self-exile since 1963, marking the beginning of the Metapolitefsi era. On the 14 August 1974 Greek forces withdrew from the integrated military structure of NATO in protest at the Turkish occupation of northern Cyprus.[15][16] In 1975 a democratic republican constitution was activated and the monarchy abolished by a referendum held that same year. Meanwhile, Andreas Papandreou founded the Panhellenic Socialist Party, or PASOK, in response to Constantine Karamanlis' New Democracy party, with the two political formations dominating Greek political affairs in the ensuing decades. Greece rejoined NATO in 1980.[17] Relations with neighbouring Turkey have improved substantially over the last decade, since successive earthquakes hit both nations in the summer of 1999 ( see Greek-Turkish earthquake diplomacy), and today Athens is an active supporter of the country's EU membership bid. Image File history File linksMetadata Karamanlisarrivesinathens. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Karamanlisarrivesinathens. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Constantine Karamanlis Constantine (Konstantinos) Karamanlis (Κωνσταντίνος Καραμανλής) (March 8, 1907 - April 23, 1998) is a towering figure of modern Greek politics and history. ... Valéry Marie René Giscard dEstaing (born 2 February 1926) is a French centre-right politician who was President of the French Republic from 1974 until 1981. ... This article is about the former Greek president who lived from 1907 to 1998. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... The Metapolitefsi (Greek: Μεταπολίτευση, translated as polity or regime change) refers to the period in Greek history after the fall of the Greek military junta of 1967-1974 and includes the transitional period from the fall of the dictatorship to the Greek legislative elections of 1974 as well as the democratic... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Andreas Georgiou Papandreou (Greek: ) (5 February 1919 – 23 June 1996) was a Greek economist, a socialist politician and a major figure in Greek politics. ... Party logo The Panhellenic Socialist Movement, better known as PASOK (Greek: Πανελλήνιο Σοσιαλιστικό Κίνημα, Panellinio Sosialistiko Kinima, ΠΑΣΟΚ), is a Greek social democratic political party. ... This article is about the former Greek president who lived from 1907 to 1998. ... Party logo New Democracy (ND, Greek: Νέα Δημοκρατία, Nea Dhimokratia), founded in 1974, is the main center-right liberal-conservative political party in Greece. ... This article is about the military alliance. ... The Greek-Turkish earthquake diplomacy was initiated after successive earthquakes hit both countries in the summer of 1999 and led to an improvement in Greco-Turkish relations. ...


Greece became the tenth member of the European Union on January 1, 1981 and ever since the nation has experienced a remarkable and sustained economic growth. Widespread investments in industrial enterprises and heavy infrastructure, as well as funds from the European Union and growing revenues from tourism, shipping and a fast growing service sector have raised the country's standard of living to unprecedented levels. The country adopted the Euro in 2001 and successfully organised the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens. is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ... (Redirected from 2004 Olympic Games) The Games of the XXVIII Olympiad, commonly known as the 2004 Summer Olympics were the 28th Summer Olympic Games. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ...


Government and politics

Great State Seal of the Presidency of the Republic
Great State Seal of the Presidency of the Republic
Eleftherios Venizelos (1864–1936), one of the greatest political figures of modern Greece.
Eleftherios Venizelos (1864–1936), one of the greatest political figures of modern Greece.

Greece is a parliamentary republic.[18] The head of state is the President of the Republic, who is elected by the Parliament for a five-year term.[19] The current Constitution was drawn up and adopted by the Fifth Revisionary Parliament of the Hellenes and entered into force in 1975 after the fall of the military junta of 1967-1974. It has been revised twice since, in 1986 and in 2001. The Constitution, which consists of 120 articles, provides for a separation of powers into executive, legislative, and judicial branches, and grants extensive specific guarantees (further reinforced in 2001) of civil liberties and social rights.[20] The Politics of Greece takes place in a large parliamentary representative democratic republic, whereby the Prime Minister of Greece is the head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. ... Under the current electoral system, a party needs to surpass a 3% threshold in the popular vote in order to enter parliament. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 405 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (973 × 1,440 pixels, file size: 558 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 405 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (973 × 1,440 pixels, file size: 558 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... For the Athens airport, see Athens International Airport. ... Image File history File links Kostas_Karamanlis. ... Image File history File links Kostas_Karamanlis. ... This article is about the Greek Prime Minister whose term began in 2004. ... Note on Greek names: There is no firm convention for the rendering of Greek personal names into English. ... Parliamentary republics around the world, shown in Orange (Parliamentary republics with a non-executive President) and Green (Parliamentary republics with an executive President linked to Parliament). ... For the comedy film of the same name, see Head of State (film). ... This is a list of presidents of Greece. ... The Hellenic Parliament (Greek: Βουλή των Ελλήνων; transliterated Vouli ton Ellinon; literally Council of the Greeks) is the parliament of Greece, located in Syntagma Square in Athens. ... The Greek military junta of 1967-1974, alternatively The Regime of the Colonels (Greek: ), or in Greece The Junta (Greek: ) and The Seven Years (Greek: ) are terms used to refer to a series of right-wing military governments that ruled Greece from 1967 to 1974. ... The Amendment of 2001 constituted the most important amendment of the Constitution of 1974. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Separation of powers is a term coined by French political Enlightenment thinker Baron de Montesquieu[1][2], is a model for the governance of democratic states. ... The executive is the branch of a government charged with implementing, or executing, the law and running the day-to-day affairs of the government or state. ... Chamber of the Estates-General, the Dutch legislature. ... The judiciary, also referred to as the judicature, consists of justices, judges and magistrates among other types of adjudicators. ... Civil liberties is the name given to freedoms that protect the individual from government. ... Social rights are generally considered an obligation a society places upon itself and its citizens to ensure to all people some specified standard of living, without discrimination. ...


According to the Constitution, executive power is exercised by the President of the Republic and the Government.[21] The Constitutional amendment of 1986 the President's duties were curtailed to a significant extent, and they are now largely ceremonial.[22] The position of Prime Minister, Greece's head of government, belongs to the current leader of the political party that can obtain a vote of confidence by the Parliament. The President of the Republic formally appoints the Prime Minister and, on his recommendation, appoints and dismisses the other members of the Cabinet.[23] The Prime Minister exercises vast political power, and the amendment of 1986 further strengthened his position to the detriment of the President of the Republic.[24] The Greek Constitutional amendment of 1986 was an amendment based on the previously increased responsbilities of the President of the Republic. ... Note on Greek names: There is no firm convention for the rendering of Greek personal names into English. ... The head of government is the chief officer of the executive branch of a government, often presiding over a cabinet. ... The Prime Minister of Greece (Πρωθυπουργός in Greek) is the head of government of the Hellenic Republic and the leader of the Greek cabinet. ... Under the current electoral system, a party needs to surpass a 3% threshold in the popular vote in order to enter parliament. ...


Legislative power is exercised by a 300-member elective unicameral Parliament.[25] Statutes passed by the Parliament are promulgated by the President of the Republic.[26] Parliamentary elections are held every four years, but the President of the Republic is obliged to dissolve the Parliament earlier on the proposal of the Cabinet, in view of dealing with a national issue of exceptional importance.[27] The President is also obliged to dissolve the Parliament earlier, if the opposition manages to pass a motion of no confidence.[28] For unicameral alphabets, see the article letter case. For The unicameral, see Nebraska Legislature. ... Elections in Greece gives information on election and election results in Greece. ... A motion of no confidence, also called a motion of non-confidence, a censure motion, a no-confidence motion, or simply a confidence motion, is a parliamentary motion traditionally put before a parliament by the opposition in the hope of defeating or embarrassing a government. ...


The Judiciary is independent of the executive and the legislature and comprises three Supreme Courts: the Court of Cassation (Άρειος Πάγος), the Council of State (Συμβούλιο της Επικρατείας) and the Court of Auditors (Ελεγκτικό Συνέδριο). The Judiciary system is also composed of civil courts, which judge civil and penal cases and administrative courts, which judge disputes between the citizens and the Greek administrative authorities. In Greece, the independence of the justice is safeguarded by the Constitution. ... The Court of Cassation is the Supreme Court of Greece. ... In Greece, the Counil of State (sometimes Counsel of State or State Council, Greek: Συμβούλιο της Επικρατείας) is, at the same time, an administrative organ (one of the three Big Bodies of the greek Public Administration) and the Supreme Administrative Court. ... In Greece, the Chamber of Accounts (or Court of Accounts or Court of Auditors or Audit Court, French: Cour des Comptes , Greek: Ελεγκτικό Συνέδριο) is, at the same time, an administrative organ (one of the three Big Bodies of the greek Public Administration) and a Supreme Administrative Court with a special jursdiction...


Since the restoration of democracy, the Greek two-party system is dominated by the liberal-conservative New Democracy and the social-democratic Panhellenic Socialist Movement (PASOK).[29] Non-negligible parties include the Communist Party of Greece, the Coalition of the Radical Left and the Popular Orthodox Rally. The current prime minister is Kostas Karamanlis, president of the New Democracy party and nephew of the late Constantine Karamanlis, who won a second term on September 16, 2007, acquiring a slimmer majority in the Parliament with only 152 out of 300 seats. Political parties Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A two-party system is a form of party system where two major political parties dominate voting in nearly all elections. ... Party logo New Democracy (ND, Greek: Νέα Δημοκρατία, Nea Dhimokratia), founded in 1974, is the main center-right liberal-conservative political party in Greece. ... The Panhellenic Socialist Movement, better known as PASOK (Greek: Πανελλήνιο Σοσιαλιστικό Κίνημα, Panellinio Sosialistiko Kinima, ΠΑΣΟΚ), is a Greek social democratic political party. ... The Communist Party of Greece (Greek: Κομμουνιστικό Κόμμα Ελλάδας, Kommounistikó Kómma Elládas), better known by its acronym, ΚΚΕ (usually pronounced koo-koo-eh or kappa-kappa-epsilon), is the communist party of Greece and the oldest party in the Greek political scene. ... SYRIZA symbol Coalition of the Radical Left (in Greek: Synaspismos tis Rizospastikis Aristeras or SYRIZA) is a coalition of left political parties in Greece. ... The Popular Orthodox Rally (Greek: Λαϊκός Ορθόδοξος Συναγερμός, Laïkós Orthódoxos Synagermós), often abbreviated to ΛΑ.Ο.Σ. (LA.O.S.) as a pun on the Greek word for people, is a Greek nationalist/radical right-wing populist political party, founded and led by controversial journalist Georgios Karatzaferis. ... This article is about the Greek Prime Minister whose term began in 2004. ... This article is about the former Greek president who lived from 1907 to 1998. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Peripheries and prefectures

Administratively, Greece consists of thirteen peripheries subdivided into a total of fifty-one prefectures (nomoi, singular nomos). There is also one autonomous area, Mount Athos (Agio Oros, "Holy Mountain"), which borders the periphery of Central Macedonia. The peripheries (περιφέρειες) are the subnational divisions of Greece. ... Greece consists of 13 administrative regions known as Peripheries of Greece, which are further subdivided into 51 prefectures (nomoi, singular - nomos, Greek: νομοί, νομός)): See also List of the prefectures of Greece by area List of the prefectures of Greece by population density List of the prefectures of Greece by population External... Communities and municipalities of Greece are one of several levels of government within the organizational structure of that country. ... Nomos (plural: Nomoi) can refer to: the prefectures of Greece, the administrative division immediately below the peripheries of Greece (Greek: νομός, νομοί) the subdivisions of Ancient Egypt, see Nome (subnational division) law (Greek: νόμος, νόμοι). It is the origin of the suffix -onomy. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Capital Karyes Largest city Karyes Official languages Greek, Church Slavonic, Bulgarian, Georgian, Romanian, Russian, Serbian Government  -  Head of State2 Dora Bakoyannis  -  Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I Area  -  Total 335. ... Central Macedonia is one of the thirteen peripheries of Greece, being the central part of Greek Macedonia. ...

Map Number Periphery Capital Area Population
1 Attica Athens 3,808 km² 3,761,810
2 Central Greece Lamia 15,549 km² 605,329
3 Central Macedonia Thessaloniki 18,811 km² 1,871,952
4 Crete Heraklion 8,259 km² 601,131
5 East Macedonia and Thrace Kavála 14,157 km² 611,067
6 Epirus Ioannina 9,203 km² 353,820
7 Ionian Islands Corfu 2,307 km² 212,984
8 North Aegean Mytilene 3,836 km² 206,121
9 Peloponnese Kalamata 15,490 km² 638,942
10 South Aegean Ermoupoli 5,286 km² 302,686
11 Thessaly Larissa 14.037 km² 753,888
12 West Greece Patras 11,350 km² 740,506
13 West Macedonia Kozani 9,451 km² 301,522
- Mount Athos (Autonomous) Karyes 390 km² 2,262

For other uses, see Number (disambiguation). ... The peripheries (περιφέρειες) are the subnational divisions of Greece. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Image File history File links Map showing the Peripheries of Greece File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Attica (in Greek: Αττική, Attike; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a periphery (subdivision) in Greece, containing Athens, the capital of Greece. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... The periphery of Continental Greece (Greek: - Stereá Elláda) or Central Greece (Greek: ) is one of the thirteen peripheries of Greece. ... Lamia (Greek: Λαμία) is a city in central Greece (population 75,000). ... Central Macedonia is one of the thirteen peripheries of Greece, being the central part of Greek Macedonia. ... Thessaloniki or Salonica (Greek: ) is Greeces second-largest city and the capital of Macedonia, the largest Region of Greece. ... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Heraklion (disambiguation). ... East Macedonia and Thrace is one of the thirteen peripheries of Greece, being the eastern part of Greek Macedonia along with Thrace. ... Kavala (also seen as Kavála, Kavalla, Cavalla, and Cavalle Greek: Καβάλα, Albanian: Kavalë), (2001 pop. ... Epirus (Greek: Ήπειρος, Ípiros), is a periphery in northwestern Greece. ... This article is about the Greek city. ... The Ionian Islands (Modern Greek: Ιόνια νησιά, Ionia nisia; Ancient Greek: , Ionioi NÄ“soi) are a group of islands in Greece. ... Corfu (Greek: Κέρκυρα - Kérkyra) is a city in north-western Greece. ... Categories: Greece geography stubs ... Mytilene (Greek: Μυτιλήνη - Mytilíni, Turkish: Midilli), also Mytilini, is the capital city of Lesbos (formerly known as Lesbos but the modern name is Mytilene), a Greek island in the Aegean Sea, and the Lesbos Prefecture as well. ... Peloponnese (Greek: Πελοπόννησος, Peloponnesos), is a periphery in southern Greece. ... Kalamata (Greek, Modern: Καλαμάτα, Ancient/Katharevousa: -ai), older forms: Kalamai is a city in southern Greece, on the Peloponnesos, by the Mediterranean. ... Categories: Greece geography stubs ... Ermoupoli (Greek: Ερμούπολη - Ermoúpoli), also known as Syros is a town in eastern Greece. ... Map showing Thessaly periphery in Greece Thessaly (Θεσσαλια; modern Greek Thessalía; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is one of the 13 peripheries of Greece, and is further sub-divided into 4 prefectures. ... Larissa (Greek: Λάρισα, Lárisa) is the capital city of the Thessaly periphery of Greece, and capital of the Larissa Prefecture. ... Categories: Greece geography stubs ... Patras (Demotic Greek: Πάτρα, Pátra, IPA: , Classical Greek: Πάτραι, Pátrai, Latin: ) is Greeces third largest city and the capital of the prefecture of Achaea, located in northern Peloponnese, 215 kilometers west of Athens. ... West Macedonia is one of the thirteen peripheries of Greece, consisting of the western part of Greek Macedonia. ... Kozani (Greek: ), is a city in northern Greece, capital of Kozani Prefecture and of West Macedonia periphery. ... Capital Karyes Largest city Karyes Official languages Greek, Church Slavonic, Bulgarian, Georgian, Romanian, Russian, Serbian Government  -  Head of State2 Dora Bakoyannis  -  Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I Area  -  Total 335. ... The building that houses the secular administration at Karyes Karyes is a settlement in Mount Athos. ...

Geography

Main article: Geography of Greece

Greece consists of a mountainous mainland jutting out into the sea at the southern end of the Balkans, the Peloponnesus peninsula (separated from the mainland by the canal of the Isthmus of Corinth), and numerous islands (around 2,000), including Crete, Euboea, Lesbos, Chios, the Dodecanese and the Cycladic groups of the Aegean Sea as well as the Ionian Sea islands. Greece has the tenth longest coastline in the world with 14,880 kilometres (9,246 mi); its land boundary is 1,160 kilometres (721 mi).-1... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Albania. ... Motto Ti Shqipëri më jep nder më jep emrin shqipëtar Anthem Rreth flamurit të përbashkuar (United Around the Flag) Albania() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital TiranÑ‘ Largest city Tiranë Official languages Albanian (Shqip) Demonym Albanian Government Parliamentary republic  -  President Bamir Topi  -  Prime Minister Sali Berisha Independence from... Image File history File links Flag_of_Macedonia. ... For an explanation of terms related to Macedonia, see Macedonia (terminology). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bulgaria. ... For other uses, see Bulgaria (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Turkey. ... This article is about the Republic of Turkey. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... Thessaloniki or Salonica (Greek: ) is Greeces second-largest city and the capital of Macedonia, the largest Region of Greece. ... Kavala (also seen as Kavála, Kavalla, (Greek) (2001 pop. ... Thasos or Thassos (Greek: Θάσος, Ottoman Turkish: طاشوز Taşöz, Bulgarian: ) is an island in the northern Aegean Sea, close to the coast of Thrace and the plain of the river Nestos (during the Ottoman times Kara-Su). ... Alexandroupoli (also Alexandroupolis, Greek: Αλεξανδρούπολη, Turkish: DedeaÄŸaç) is a city of Greece and the capital of the Evros Prefecture in Thrace. ... Coordinates 40°29′ N 25°31′ E Country Greece Periphery East Macedonia and Thrace Prefecture Evros Population 2,723 source (2001) Area 178. ... This article is about the Greek island Kerkyra known in English as Corfu or Corcyra. ... Igoumenitsa (Greek: Ηγουμενίτσα) (Albanian: Gumenicë) is a coastal city in northwestern Greece. ... Larissa (Greek: Λάρισα, Lárisa) is the capital city of the Thessaly periphery of Greece, and capital of the Larissa Prefecture. ... This article is about Volos, Greece. ... This article is about the Greek city. ... Coordinates 38°28′ N 23°36′ E Country Greece Periphery Central Greece Prefecture Euboea Population 53,584 source (2001) Area 30. ... Patras (Demotic Greek: Πάτρα, Pátra, IPA: , Classical Greek: Πάτραι, Pátrai, Latin: ) is Greeces third largest city and the capital of the prefecture of Achaea, located in northern Peloponnese, 215 kilometers west of Athens. ... Corinth, or Korinth (Greek: Κόρινθος, Kórinthos; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a Greek city-state, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece. ... Corinth, or Korinth (Greek: Κόρινθος, Kórinthos; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a Greek city-state, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece. ... Nafplion (Ναύπλιο; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a town on the Peloponnese in Greece. ... Nafplion (Ναύπλιο; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a town on the Peloponnese in Greece. ... For modern day Sparta, see Sparti (municipality). ... For modern day Sparta, see Sparti (municipality). ... Areopoli (Greek: Αρεόπολη) is the second largest town in Mani. ... Areopoli (Greek: Αρεόπολη) is the second largest town in Mani. ... It has been suggested that Kaminia (Piraeus), Greece be merged into this article or section. ... Eleusis redirects here. ... Laurium or Laurion (Λαύριον, Thoricum before early 1000s BC, Ergastiri throughout the medieval times and the mid to late 1000s, Ergastiri is Greek for Workplace) is a town in southeastern part of Attica, Greece and is one of the southernmost and the seat of the municipality of Laverotiki, famous in... For other uses, see Heraklion (disambiguation). ... This article is about the region of Greece. ... Thrace or Greek Thrace or West Thrace or Western Thrace (Greek Θράκη or Ελληνική Θράκη or Δυτική Θράκη, Thrákı or Ellınıki Thrákı or Dıtıki Thrákı; Turkish Trakya or Yunan Trakyası or Batı Trakya) is the part of Thrace located between the rivers Nestos and Evros in northeastern Greece. ... Epirus (Greek: Ήπειρος, Ípiros), is a periphery in northwestern Greece. ... Map showing Thessaly periphery in Greece Thessaly (Θεσσαλια; modern Greek Thessalía; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is one of the 13 peripheries of Greece, and is further sub-divided into 4 prefectures. ... For the Greek mythological figures see Euboea Euboea, or Negropont or Negroponte (Modern Greek: Εύβοια Évia, Ancient Greek Eúboia), is the second largest of the Greek Aegean Islands and the second largest Greek island overall in area and population (after Crete). ... Central Greece (Greek: Στερεά Ελλάδα - Stereá Elláda) is one of the thirteen peripheries of Greece. ... Greece and the Peloponnese The Peloponnese or Peloponnesus (Greek: Πελοπόννησος Peloponnesos; see also List of Greek place names) is a large peninsula in southern Greece, forming the part of the country south of the Gulf of Corinth. ... This article is about the Greek mountain. ... Lefkada, or Lefkas (Greek: Modern: Λευκάδα, Ancient/Katharevousa: -as) is a Greek island in the Ionian Sea, connected to the mainland by a long causeway and floating bridge, as well as the islands capital city. ... The island of Kefalonia, also known as Cephallenia, Cephallonia, Kefallinia, or Kefallonia (Ancient Greek: Κεφαλληνία; Modern Greek: Κεφαλλονιά or Κεφαλονιά; Italian: Cefalonia), is the largest of the Ionian Islands in western Greece, with an area of 350 sq. ... “Zante” redirects here. ... Lemnos (mod. ... Lesbos (Modern Greek: Lesvos (Λέσβος), Turkish: Midilli), is a Greek island located in the northeastern Aegean Sea. ... Chios (IPA: )[2] (Greek: , alternative transliterations Khios and Hios) is the fifth largest of the Greek islands, situated in the Aegean Sea seven kilometres (five miles) off the Turkish coast. ... Samos (Greek: Σάμος) is a Greek island in the Eastern Aegean sea, located between the island of Chios to the North and the archipelagic complex of the Dodecanese to the South and in particular the island of Patmos and off the coast of Turkey, on what was formerly known as Ionia. ... Andros, or Andro (Greek: Άνδρος), an island of the Greek archipelago, the most northerly of the Cyclades, approximately 10 km (6 miles) south east of Euboea, and about 3 km (about 2 miles) north of Tinos. ... Tinos (Greek: Τήνος; Italian: Tine) is a Greek island situated in the Aegean Sea. ... For other uses, see Mykonos (disambiguation). ... Icaria, also spelled Ikaria (Greek: ), locally Nikaria or Nicaria (Νικαριά), ancient name: Doliche (Δολίχη), is a Greek island 10 nautical miles (19 km) south-west of Samos. ... Skala viewed from the Monastery of Agios Ioannis Theologos, one of the UN World Heritage Sites. ... Naxos (Greek: Νάξος; Italian: Nicsia; Turkish: NakÅŸa) is a Greek island, the largest island (428 km²) in the Cyclades island group in the Aegean. ... Milos (formerly Melos and before Athenian massacre and recolonization in 416 BC, Malos — Greek, Μήλος — not related to the Modern Greek word μήλο – milo = apple, which has the same spelling excluding the trailing sigma) is a volcanic island in the Aegean Sea. ... Thera redirects here. ... Port and city view of Kos town on the island Kos. ... This article is about the Greek island of Rhodes. ... Karpathos (Greek: , Turkish: , Italian: , Latin: ; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is the second largest of the Greek Dodecanese islands, in the southeastern Aegean Sea. ... Kasos (also Kassos) is a Greek island in the Dodecanese. ... Kythira (Îœodern Hellenic: Κύθηρα), also known as Cerigo (Τσιρίγο), also spelt: Kithira, Kythera, Cythera, Cerigo or Tsirigo, is an hellenic island, historically part of the Ionian Islands. ... Gavdos (Greek: Γαύδος) is the southernmost Greek island, located to the south of its much bigger neighbour, Crete, of which it is administratively a part, in the prefecture of Chania. ... Look up Aegean Sea in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Aegean Sea in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Sea of Crete (Greek: Κρητικό Πέλαγος Kritiko Pelagos) is the sea south of the Aegean Sea, north of the island Crete, and south of the Cyclades. ... The Myrtoan Sea is often unmarked on modern maps. ... The Myrtoan Sea is often unmarked on modern maps. ... The Ionian Sea. ... The Ionian Sea. ... Mediterranean redirects here. ... Mediterranean redirects here. ... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... Aegean Sea Islands: map showing island groups. ... Aegean Sea Islands: map showing island groups. ... The Cyclades (Greek Κυκλάδες) are a Greek island group in the Aegean Sea, south-east of the mainland of Greece; and an administrative prefecture of Greece. ... The Dodecanese (Greek Δωδεκάνησα, Dodekánisa, Turkish Onikiada, both meaning twelve islands; Italian Dodecaneso) are a group of 12 larger plus 150 smaller Greek islands in the Aegean Sea, off the southwest coast of Turkey. ... The Ionian Islands (Modern Greek: Ιόνια νησιά, Ionia nisia; Ancient Greek: , Ionioi NÄ“soi) are a group of islands in Greece. ... The Ionian Islands (Modern Greek: Ιόνια νησιά, Ionia nisia; Ancient Greek: , Ionioi NÄ“soi) are a group of islands in Greece. ... Balkan redirects here. ... Greece and the Peloponnese The Peloponnese or Peloponnesus (Greek: Πελοπόννησος Peloponnesos; see also List of Greek place names) is a large peninsula in southern Greece, forming the part of the country south of the Gulf of Corinth. ... The Corinth Canal The Corinth Canal is a canal connecting the Gulf of Corinth with the Saronic Gulf in the Aegean Sea. ... The Isthmus of Corinth is the narrow landbridge which connects the Peloponnesos peninsula with the mainland of Greece, near the city of Corinth. ... This is a list of some of the 3000 islands of Greece: Chrysi Crete Dia Euboea Gavdos Koufonisi Ydra The Cyclades Amorgos Anafi Andros Antiparos Anydro Delos Donoussa Folegandros Gyaros Ios Irakleia Kea Keros Kimolos Kithnos Makronisos Milos Mykonos (Mikonos) Naxos Paros Pholegandros Santorini (also called Thira) Serifos Sifnos Sikinos... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... For the Greek mythological figures see Euboea Euboea, or Negropont or Negroponte (Modern Greek: Εύβοια Évia, Ancient Greek Eúboia), is the second largest of the Greek Aegean Islands and the second largest Greek island overall in area and population (after Crete). ... Lesbos (Modern Greek: Lesvos (Λέσβος), Turkish: Midilli), is a Greek island located in the northeastern Aegean Sea. ... Chios (IPA: )[2] (Greek: , alternative transliterations Khios and Hios) is the fifth largest of the Greek islands, situated in the Aegean Sea seven kilometres (five miles) off the Turkish coast. ... The Dodecanese (Greek Δωδεκάνησα, Dodekánisa, Turkish Onikiada, both meaning twelve islands; Italian Dodecaneso) are a group of 12 larger plus 150 smaller Greek islands in the Aegean Sea, off the southwest coast of Turkey. ... The Cyclades (Greek Κυκλάδες) are a Greek island group in the Aegean Sea, south-east of the mainland of Greece; and an administrative prefecture of Greece. ... Look up Aegean Sea in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Ionian Sea. ... This is a List of countries by length of coastline, in kilometers, based on data for the year 2005 by the CIA World Factbook. ...


Four fifths of Greece consist of mountains or hills, making the country one of the most mountainous in Europe. Western Greece contains a number of lakes and wetlands and it is dominated by the Pindus mountain range. Pindus has a maximum elevation of 2,636 m (8,648 ft) and it is essentially a prolongation of the Dinaric Alps. The Pindus (Greek: Πίνδος, Albanian: Pino) mountains are a range located in northern Greece, roughly 160 km (100 miles) long, with a maximum elevation of 2636 m (8650 ft), along the border of Thessaly and Epirus. ... Mt Orjen at the Bay of Kotor is the heaviest karstified range of the dinarids View of the central part of the Dinaric Alps (north=down) Valbona pass, northern Albania. ...


The range continues through the western Peloponnese, crosses the islands of Kythera and Antikythera and find its way into southwestern Aegean, in the island of Crete where it eventually ends. (the islands of the Aegean are peaks of underwater mountains that once constituted an extension of the mainland). Pindus is characterized by its high, steep peaks, often dissected by numerous canyons and a variety of other karstic landscapes. Most notably, the impressive Meteora formation consisting of high, steep boulders provides a breathtaking experience for the hundreds of thousands of tourists who visit the area each year. Greece and the Peloponnese The Peloponnese or Peloponnesus (Greek: Πελοπόννησος Peloponnesos; see also List of Greek place names) is a large peninsula in southern Greece, forming the part of the country south of the Gulf of Corinth. ... Kythira, also seen as Kythera, Cythera or Tsirigo, is an island, one of the Ionian Islands. ... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... Meteora is also an album by the band Linkin Park. ...

View of the rocky Meteora formation in central Greece.
View of the rocky Meteora formation in central Greece.
View of Mount Olympus (2,917 metres (9,570 ft)) from the town of Litochoro.
View of Mount Olympus (2,917 metres (9,570 ft)) from the town of Litochoro.

The Vikos-Aoos Gorge is yet another spectacular formation and a popular hotspot for those fond of extreme sports. Mount Olympus,a focal point of Greek culture throughout history is host to the Mytikas peak 2,917 metres (9,570 ft),the highest in the country. Once considered the throne of the Gods, it is today extremely popular among hikers and climbers. Moreover, northeastern Greece features yet another high-altitude mountain range, the Rhodope range, spreading across the periphery of East Macedonia and Thrace; this area is covered with vast, thick, ancient forests. The famous Dadia forest is in the prefecture of Evros, in the far northeast of the country. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 463 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 926 pixel, file size: 484 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Rousanou monastery in the foreground, Agios Nikolaos behind it and part of the Grand Meteora can be seen in the upper right hand corner of... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 463 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 926 pixel, file size: 484 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Rousanou monastery in the foreground, Agios Nikolaos behind it and part of the Grand Meteora can be seen in the upper right hand corner of... Meteora is also an album by the band Linkin Park. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Olympus_Litochoro. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Olympus_Litochoro. ... Mount Olympus (Greek: ; also transliterated as Mount Ólympos, and on modern maps, Óros Ólimbos) is the highest mountain in Greece at 2,919 meters high (9,576 feet)[1]. Since its base is located at sea level, it is one of the highest mountains in Europe, in real absolute altitude... Litochoro (Greek, Modern: Λιτόχωρο, Ancient/Katharevousa Λιτόχωρον, older form: Litochoron) is a town and municipality located in the southern part of the prefecture of Pieria, famous for beeing on the roots of Mount Olympus. ... Mount Olympus (Greek: ; also transliterated as Mount Ólympos, and on modern maps, Óros Ólimbos) is the highest mountain in Greece at 2,919 meters high (9,576 feet)[1]. Since its base is located at sea level, it is one of the highest mountains in Europe, in real absolute altitude... East Macedonia and Thrace is one of the thirteen peripheries of Greece, being the eastern part of Greek Macedonia along with Thrace. ... The Maritsa river is ca . ...


Expansive plains are primarily located in the prefectures of Thessaly, Central Macedonia and Thrace. They constitute key economic regions as they are among the few arable places in the country.Rare marine species such as the Pinniped Seals and the Loggerhead Sea Turtle live in the seas surrounding mainland Greece, while its dense forests are home to the endangered brown bear, the lynx, the Roe Deer and the Wild Goat. Map showing Thessaly periphery in Greece Thessaly (Θεσσαλια; modern Greek Thessalía; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is one of the 13 peripheries of Greece, and is further sub-divided into 4 prefectures. ... Central Macedonia is one of the thirteen peripheries of Greece, being the central part of Greek Macedonia. ... Thrace or Greek Thrace or West Thrace or Western Thrace (Greek Θράκη or Ελληνική Θράκη or Δυτική Θράκη, Thrákı or Ellınıki Thrákı or Dıtıki Thrákı; Turkish Trakya or Yunan Trakyası or Batı Trakya) is the part of Thrace located between the rivers Nestos and Evros in northeastern Greece. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The Loggerhead Sea Turtle (Caretta caretta) is a sea turtle and the only member of the genus Caretta. ... Bears are big and have big ass, thats why bears are hot, and thats why cats are not. ... For other uses, see Lynx (disambiguation). ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) The European Roe Deer (Capreolus capreolus) is a deer species of Europe, Asia Minor, and Caspian coastal regions. ...


Phytogeographically, Greece belongs to the Boreal Kingdom and is shared between the East Mediterranean province of the Mediterranean Region and the Illyrian province of the Circumboreal Region. According to the World Wide Fund for Nature and Digital Map of European Ecological Regions by the European Environment Agency, the territory of Greece can be subdivided into six ecoregions: the Illyrian deciduous forests, Pindus Mountains mixed forests, Balkan mixed forests, Rodope montane mixed forests, Aegean and Western Turkey sclerophyllous and mixed forests and Crete Mediterranean forests. Phytogeography is the branch of biogeography that is concerned with the geographic distribution of plant species. ... The Boreal Kingdom is a Floristic kingdom identified by botanist Ronald Good, which includes the temperate-to-arctic portions of North America and Eurasia. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... The World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) is an international non-governmental organization for the conservation, research and restoration of the natural environment, formerly named the World Wildlife Fund, which remains its official name in the United States and Canada. ... European Environment Agency (EEA), agency of the European Union devoted to establishing a monitoring network for the monitoring of the European environment. ... An ecoregion, sometimes called a bioregion, is a relatively large area of land or water that contains a geographically distinct assemblage of natural communities. ...


Climate

Main article: Climate of Greece
Greece enjoys a typical sunny and warm Mediterranean Climate (View from Fira, the capital of Santorini).
Greece enjoys a typical sunny and warm Mediterranean Climate (View from Fira, the capital of Santorini).

The climate of Greece can be categorised into three types (the Mediterranean, the Alpine and the Temperate) that influence well-defined regions of its territory.The Pindus mountain range strongly affects the climate of the country by making the western side of it (areas prone to the south-westerlies) wetter on average than the areas lying to the east of it (lee side of the mountains).The Mediterranean type of climate features mild, wet winters and hot, dry summers. The Cyclades, the Dodecanese, Crete, Eastern Peloponessus and parts of the Sterea Ellada region are mostly affected by this particular type of climate. Temperatures rarely reach extreme values although snowfalls do occur occasionally even in the Cyclades or the Dodecanese during the winter months. The climate in Greece is predominantly Mediterranean. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 535 pixelsFull resolution (3752 × 2508 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 535 pixelsFull resolution (3752 × 2508 pixel, file size: 2. ...  Areas with Mediterranean climate A Mediterranean climate is one that resembles the climate of the lands in the Mediterranean Basin, which includes over half of the area with this climate type world-wide. ... Fira is the modern capital of the Greek aegean island Santorini. ... Thera redirects here. ... Example image showing definitions of windward (upwind) and leeward (downwind). ... The Dodecanese (Greek Δωδεκάνησα, Dodekánisa, Turkish Onikiada, both meaning twelve islands; Italian Dodecaneso) are a group of 12 larger plus 150 smaller Greek islands in the Aegean Sea, off the southwest coast of Turkey. ... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... The Cyclades (Greek Κυκλάδες) are a Greek island group in the Aegean Sea, south-east of the mainland of Greece; and an administrative prefecture of Greece. ...


The Alpine type is dominant mainly in the mountainous areas of Northwestern Greece (Epirus, Central Greece, Thessaly, Western Macedonia) as well as in the central parts of Peloponnese, including the prefectures of Achaia, Arcadia and parts of Laconia, where extensions of the Pindus mountain range pass by). Finally, the Temperate type affects Central Macedonia and East Macedonia and Thrace; it features cold, damp winters and hot, dry summers. Athens is located in a transitional area featuring both the Mediterranean and the Temperate types.The city's northern suburbs are dominated by the temperate type while the downtown area and the southern suburbs enjoy a typical Mediterranean type. Epirus (Greek: Ήπειρος, Ípiros), is a periphery in northwestern Greece. ... Central Greece (Greek: Στερεά Ελλάδα - Stereá Elláda) is one of the thirteen peripheries of Greece. ... Map showing Thessaly periphery in Greece Thessaly (Θεσσαλια; modern Greek Thessalía; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is one of the 13 peripheries of Greece, and is further sub-divided into 4 prefectures. ... West Macedonia is one of the thirteen peripheries of Greece, consisting of the western part of Greek Macedonia. ... Greece and the Peloponnese The Peloponnese or Peloponnesus (Greek: Πελοπόννησος Peloponnesos; see also List of Greek place names) is a large peninsula in southern Greece, forming the part of the country south of the Gulf of Corinth. ... This article is about the modern Greek district Achaea. ... This article is about a region of Greece. ... Laconia (; see also List of traditional Greek place names), also known as Lacedaemonia, is a prefecture in Greece. ... Central Macedonia is one of the thirteen peripheries of Greece, being the central part of Greek Macedonia. ... East Macedonia and Thrace is one of the thirteen peripheries of Greece, being the eastern part of Greek Macedonia along with Thrace. ...


Economy

Greek 2 euro coin in commemoration of the 2004 Olympic Games.

Greece operates a mixed economy that produced a GDP of $305.595 billion in 2006. Its principal economic activities include tourism and shipping industries, banking and finance, manufacturing and construction and telecommunications. The country serves as the regional business hub for many of the world's largest multinational companies.[30] Greece has managed to achieve a strong economy that is growing fast after the implementation of stabilization policies in recent years. ... Topics of Greece Culture - Education Geography - History - Politics Greece Portal Greece attracts well over 16 million tourists a year contributing 15% of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of the nations Economy. ... Image File history File links €2_commemorative_coin_Greece_2004. ... Image File history File links €2_commemorative_coin_Greece_2004. ... Greek euro coins feature a unique design for every one of the eight coins. ... (Redirected from 2004 Olympic Games) The Games of the XXVIII Olympiad, commonly known as the 2004 Summer Olympics were the 28th Summer Olympic Games. ... An urban slang term derived from a bunch of Brooklyn desperados (Motion, Stew, Juan, Sar, and Co. ...


The people of Greece enjoy a high standard of living. Greece ranks 24th[31] in the 2006 HDI, 22nd on The Economist's 2005 world-wide quality-of-life index,[32] and, according to the International Monetary Fund it has an estimated average per capita income of $35,166[33] for the year 2007, comparable to that of Germany, France or Italy and approximately equal to the EU average. The standard of living refers to the quality and quantity of goods and services available to people and the way these services and goods are distributed within a population. ... This page talks about Human Development Index, for other HDIs see HDI (disambiguation) World map indicating Human Development Index (2007). ... The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London. ... IMF redirects here. ...


Greece's present prosperity is largely owed to the post-World War II "Greek economic miracle" (when GDP growth averaged 7% between 1950 and 1973), the implementation of a number of structural and fiscal reforms, combined with considerable European Union funding over the last twenty-five years and increasing private consumption and investments. The latter facts have contributed to a consistent annual growth of the Greek GDP that was surpassing the respective one of most of its other EU partners.[34] The term (modern) Greek economic miracle has been used to describe the impressive rate of economic and social development in Greece from the early 1950s to the mid-1970s. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: European Union The European Union On-Line Official EU website, europa. ...

The island of Mykonos is one of the top European tourism destinations.
The island of Mykonos is one of the top European tourism destinations.

Today, the service industry (74.4%) makes up the largest, most vital and fastest-growing sector of the Greek economy, followed by industry (20.6%) and agriculture (5.1%).[30] The tourism industry is a major source of foreign exchange earnings and revenue accounting for 15% of Greece’s total GDP[30] and employing (directly or indirectly) 659,719 people (or 16.5% of total employment). Additionally Greek banks have invested heavily in the Balkan region: most notably the National Bank of Greece in 2006 acquired 46% of the shares of Finansbank in Turkey and 99.44% of Serbia's Vojvođanska Bank.The manufacturing sector accounts for about 13% of GDP with the food industry leading in growth, profit and export potential. High-technology equipment production, especially for telecommunications, is also a fast-growing sector. Other important areas include textiles, building materials, machinery, transport equipment, and electrical appliances. Construction (10%GDP) and agriculture (7%) are yet two other significant sectors of the Greek economic activity.Greece is the leading investor in all of her Balkan neighbors. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1536x1024, 1104 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Mykonos ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1536x1024, 1104 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Mykonos ... For other uses, see Mykonos (disambiguation). ... The tertiary sector of industry (also known as the service sector or the service industry) is one of the three main industrial categories of a developed economy, the others being the secondary industry (manufacturing), and primary industry (extraction such as mining, agriculture and fishing). ... The National Bank of Greece (NBG; Greek: Εθνική Τράπεζα της Ελλάδος) (NYSE: NBG) (LSE: NBGA) is the oldest and, today, the largest commercial bank in Greece and heads the strongest financial group in the country. ... Finansbank is a Turkish private bank, founded on September 23, 1987 in Ä°stanbul by Hüsnü ÖzyeÄŸin, one of Turkeys leading bankers. ... VojvoÄ‘anska banka (full name: VojvoÄ‘anska banka a. ...


Maritime industry

Aerial view of Thessaloniki's central districts. Thessaloniki is Greece's second largest city and a major economic, industrial, commercial and cultural center.

The shipping industry is a key element of Greek economic activity dating back to ancient times.[35] Today, shipping is one of the country's most important industries. It accounts for 4.5% of GDP, employs about 160,000 people (4% of the workforce), and represents 1/3 of the country's trade deficit.[36] Shipping is arguably the oldest form of occupation of the Greeks. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Image File history File links Salonica-view-aerial2. ... Image File history File links Salonica-view-aerial2. ... Thessaloniki or Salonica (Greek: ) is Greeces second-largest city and the capital of Macedonia, the largest Region of Greece. ...


During the 1960s the size of the Greek fleet nearly doubled, primarily through the investment undertaken by the shipping magnates Onassis and Niarchos.[37] The basis of the modern Greek maritime industry was formed after World War II when Greek shipping businessmen were able to amass surplus ships sold to them by the United States Government through the Ship Sales Act of the 1940s.[37] According to the BTS, the Greek-owned maritime fleet is today the largest in the world, with 3,079 vessels accounting for 18% of the world's fleet capacity (making it the largest of any other country) with a total dwt of 141,931 thousand (142 million dwt).[38] In terms of ship categories, Greece ranks first in both tankers and dry bulk carriers, fourth in the number of containers, and fourth in other ships.[38] However, today's fleet roster is smaller than an all-time high of 5,000 ships in the late 70's.[35] Aristotelis Sokratis (also Ari) Onassis (in Greek, Αριστοτέλης Ωνάσης) (January 20, 1900 – March 15, 1975) was the most famous shipping magnate of the 20th century. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), as part of the United States Department of Transportation, compiles, analyzes, and makes accessible information on the nations transportation systems; collects information on intermodal transportation and other areas as needed; and enhances the quality and effectiveness of DOTs statistical programs through research... Dead weight tonnage refers to the weight, in long tons, that a ship can safely carry when fully loaded. ... Commercial crude oil supertanker AbQaiq. ... Main article: Merchant ship A bulk carrier, bulk freighter, or bulker is a merchant ship used to transport unpackaged bulk cargo such as cereals, coal, ore, and cement. ... Container ship in Istanbul Container ships are cargo ships that carry all of their load in truck-size containers, in a technique called containerization. ...


Science and technology

The Rio-Antirio bridge near the city of Patras is the longest cable-stayed bridge in Europe and second in the world. It connects the Peloponnese with mainland Greece.
The Rio-Antirio bridge near the city of Patras is the longest cable-stayed bridge in Europe and second in the world. It connects the Peloponnese with mainland Greece.

Because of its strategic location, qualified workforce and political and economic stability, many multinational companies such as Ericsson, Siemens, SAP, Motorola and Coca-Cola have their regional R&D Headquarters in Greece. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,272 × 1,704 pixels, file size: 675 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to nl. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,272 × 1,704 pixels, file size: 675 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to nl. ... The Rio-Antirio bridge (Greek: Γέφυρα Ρίου-Αντίρριου), officially called Charilaos Trikoupis bridge after the statesman who first envisaged it, is a cable-stayed bridge crossing the Gulf of Corinth near Patras, linking the town of Rio on the Peloponnese to Antirio on mainland Greece, thus connecting the peninsula with the rest of... Patras (Demotic Greek: Πάτρα, Pátra, IPA: , Classical Greek: Πάτραι, Pátrai, Latin: ) is Greeces third largest city and the capital of the prefecture of Achaea, located in northern Peloponnese, 215 kilometers west of Athens. ... A cable-stayed bridge is a bridge that consists of one or more columns (normally referred to as towers or pylons), with cables supporting the bridge deck. ... Greece and the Peloponnese The Peloponnese or Peloponnesus (Greek: Πελοπόννησος Peloponnesos; see also List of Greek place names) is a large peninsula in southern Greece, forming the part of the country south of the Gulf of Corinth. ... For other uses, see Ericsson (disambiguation). ... Siemens redirects here. ... SAP AG (ISIN: DE0007164600, FWB: SAP, NYSE: SAP) is the largest European software enterprise and the third largest in the world, with headquarters in Walldorf, Germany. ... Motorola Inc. ... The wave shape (known as the dynamic ribbon device) present on all Coca-Cola cans throughout the world derives from the contour of the original Coca-Cola bottles. ...


The General Secretariat for Research and Technology of the Hellenic Ministry of Development is responsible for designing, implementing and supervising national research and technological policy.


In 2003, public spending on R&D was 456,37 million Euros (12,6% increase from 2002). Total research and development (R&D) spending (both public and private) as a percentage of GDP has increased considerably since the beginning of the past decade, from 0,38% in 1989, to 0,65% in 2001. R&D spending in Greece remains lower than the EU average of 1,93%, but, according to Research DC, based on OECD and Eurostat data, between 1990 and 1998, total R&D expenditure in Greece enjoyed the third highest increase in Europe, after Finland and Ireland.


Greece's technology parks with incubator facilities include the Science and Technology Park of Crete (Heraklion), the Thessaloniki Technology Park,the Lavrio Technology Park and the Patras Science Park.Greece has been a member of the European Space Agency (ESA) since 2005.[12] Cooperation between ESA and the Hellenic National Space Committee began in the early 1990s. In 1994, Greece and ESA signed their first cooperation agreement. Having formally applied for full membership in 2003, Greece became ESA's sixteenth member on March 16 2005. As member of the ESA, Greece participates in the agency's telecommunication and technology activities, and the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security Initiative. ESA redirects here. ... Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) is a joint initiative of the European Commission and European Space Agency, adopted by EU Heads of States in Gothenburg Summit in 2001, and aimed at achieving by 2008 an autonomous and operational capability in the exploitation of geo-spatial information services. ...


Demographics

The Hermoupolis port in the island of Syros is the capital of the Cyclades.
The Hermoupolis port in the island of Syros is the capital of the Cyclades.

The official Statistical body of Greece is the National Statistical Service of Greece (NSSG). According to the NSSG, Greece's total population in 2001 was 10,964,020.[39] That figure is divided into 5,427,682 males and 5,536,338 females.[39] As statistics from 1971, 1981, and 2001 show, the Greek population has been aging the past several decades.[39] The birth rate in 2003 stood 9.5 per 1,000 inhabitants (14.5 per 1,000 in 1981). At the same time the mortality rate increased slightly from 8.9 per 1,000 inhabitants in 1981 to 9.6 per 1,000 inhabitants in 2003. In 2001, 16.71% of the population were 65 years old and older, 68.12% between the ages of 15 and 64 years old, and 15.18% were 14 years old and younger.[39] In 1971 the figures were 10.92%, 63.72%, and 25.36% respectively.[39] Greek society has also rapidly changed with the passage of time. Marriage rates kept falling from almost 71 per 1,000 inhabitants in 1981 until 2002, only to increase slightly in 2003 to 61 per 1,000 and then fall again to 51 in 2004.[39] Divorce rates on the other hand, have seen an increase – from 191.2 per 1,000 marriages in 1991 to 239.5 per 1,000 marriages in 2004.[39] Almost two-thirds of the Greek people live in urban areas. Greece's largest municipalities in 2001 were: Athens (745,514),[40] Thessaloniki (363,987),[40] Piraeus (175,697),[40] Patras (161,114),[40] Iraklio (133,012),[40] Larissa (124,786),[40] and Volos (82,439).[40] The Demographics of Greece refer to the demography of the population that inhabits the Greek peninsula, a region where the Greek language has been continuously spoken for over 3500 years. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3060x1357, 2117 KB) Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Syros ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3060x1357, 2117 KB) Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Syros ... Ermoupoli (Greek: Ερμούπολη - Ermoúpoli), also known with its formal name as Ermoupolis latinized Hermoupolis is a city in eastern Greece. ... Syros (Greek: Σύρος), or Siros or Syra is a Greek island in the Cyclades, in the Aegean Sea. ... The Cyclades (Greek Κυκλάδες) are a Greek island group in the Aegean Sea, south-east of the mainland of Greece; and an administrative prefecture of Greece. ... The National Statistical Service of Greece (NSSG) is a General Secretariat of the Greek Ministry of Economy and Finance with more than 1100 employees. ... For other uses, see Greek (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... Thessaloniki or Salonica (Greek: ) is Greeces second-largest city and the capital of Macedonia, the largest Region of Greece. ... It has been suggested that Kaminia (Piraeus), Greece be merged into this article or section. ... Patras (Demotic Greek: Πάτρα, Pátra, IPA: , Classical Greek: Πάτραι, Pátrai, Latin: ) is Greeces third largest city and the capital of the prefecture of Achaea, located in northern Peloponnese, 215 kilometers west of Athens. ... For the village in Corinthia, see Heraklion, Corinthia. ... Larissa (Greek: Λάρισα, Lárisa) is the capital city of the Thessaly periphery of Greece, and capital of the Larissa Prefecture. ... This article is about Volos, Greece. ...


Minorities

Main article: Minorities in Greece
Traditional non-Greek language zones in Greece. Note: Greek is the dominant language throughout Greece; inclusion in a non-Greek language zone does not necessarily imply that the relevant minority language is still spoken there, or that its speakers consider themselves an ethnic minority.[41]

The only minority in Greece that has a specially recognized legal status is the Muslim minority (Μουσουλμανική μειονότητα, Mousoulmanikí meionótita) in Thrace, which amounts to approximately 0.95% of the total population. Its members are predominantly of Turkish, Pomak and Roma ethnic origins. Other recognized minorities include approximately 35,000 Armenians and 5,500 Jews. Indigenous minorities in Greece are relatively small and the country is largely ethnically homogeneous. ... Map of the Greek Prefectures according to the 1991 census with the minority highlighted. ... The Pomaks (помаци pomaci) or Muslim Bulgarians (българи мюсюлмани bălgari mjusjulmani), also known locally as Ahryani, are an Islamized Slavic speaking people of the Rhodope region. ... Languages Romani, languages of native region Religions Christianity, Islam Related ethnic groups South Asians (Desi) The Romani people (as a noun, singular Rom, plural Roma; sometimes Rrom, Rroma) or Romanies are an ethnic group living in many communities all over the world. ... Languages Historical Jewish languages Hebrew, Yiddish, Ladino, others Liturgical languages: Hebrew and Aramaic Predominant spoken languages: The vernacular language of the home nation in the Diaspora, significantly including English, Hebrew, Yiddish, and Russian Religions Judaism Related ethnic groups Arabs and other Semitic groups For the Jewish religion, see Judaism. ...


There are also a number of linguistic minority groups, whose members speak a non-Greek language in addition to Greek and generally identify ethnically as Greeks.[42] These include the Arvanites, who speak a form of Albanian known as Arvanitika[43] and the Aromanians and Moglenites, also known as Vlachs, whose languages are closely related to Romanian. Arvanites (Greek: Αρβανίτες, see also below about names) are a population group in Greece who traditionally speak Arvanitika, a form of Albanian. ... Arvanitika or Arvanitic (native name: arbërisht, Greek: αρβανίτικα arvanitika) is the variety of Albanian traditionally spoken by the Arvanites, a population group in Greece. ... Aromanians (also called: Macedo-Romanians or Aroumans; in Aromanian they call themselves Armãnji, Rrãmãnji) are a people living throughout the southern Balkans, especially in northern Greece, Albania, the Republic of Macedonia and Bulgaria, and as an emigrant community in Romania (Dobruja). ... Map of Balkans with regions inhabited by Megleno-Romanians in dark yellow Megleno-Romanians (In Megleno-Romanian: Vlashi, in Greek: Βλαχομογλενίτες Vlachomoglenítes) is an exonym for a people inhabiting six villages in the Moglená (Μογλενά) region of Macedonia spanning the Pella and Kilkis prefectures of Macedonia, Greece, as well as the... Vlachs is a blanket term covering several modern Latin peoples descending from the Latinised population in Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe. ...


In northern Greece there are also Slavic-speaking groups, whose members identify ethnically as Greeks in their majority. Their dialects can be linguistically classified as forms of either Macedonian (locally called Slavomacedonian or simply Slavic), or Bulgarian (distinguished as Pomak in the case of the Bulgarophone Muslim Pomaks of Thrace).[44]  Countries where a West Slavic language is the national language  Countries where an East Slavic language is the national language  Countries where a South Slavic language is the national language The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages), a group of closely related languages of the Slavic peoples and a subgroup... Muslim Bulgarians (also Bulgarian Mohammedans, bul:Българи-мохамедани; local: Pomak, Ahrian, Poganets, Marvak, Poturnak) are descendants of Christian Bulgarians who were forcibly converted to Islam by the Turks, during the 16th and the 18th century. ... Thrace or Greek Thrace or West Thrace or Western Thrace (Greek Θράκη or Ελληνική Θράκη or Δυτική Θράκη, Thrákı or Ellınıki Thrákı or Dıtıki Thrákı; Turkish Trakya or Yunan Trakyası or Batı Trakya) is the part of Thrace located between the rivers Nestos and Evros in northeastern Greece. ...


Immigration

Due to the complexity of Greek immigration policy, practices and data collection, truly reliable data on immigrant populations in Greece is difficult to gather and therefore subject to much speculation. A study from the Mediterranean Migration Observatory maintains that the 2001 Census from the NSSG recorded 762,191 persons residing in Greece without Greek citizenship, constituting around 7% of total population and that, of these, 48,560 were EU or EFTA nationals and 17,426 Cypriots with privileged status. At the same time, Albanians constituted some 56% of total immigrants, followed by Bulgarians (5%), Georgians (3%) and Romanians (3%). Americans, Cypriots, British and Germans appeared as sizeable foreign communities at around 2% each of total foreign population. The rest were around 690,000 persons of non-EU or non-homogeneis (of non-Greek heritage) status. The European Free Trade Association (EFTA) was established on May 3, 1960 as an alternative for European states that were not allowed or did not wish to join the European Community (now the European Union). ...


The greatest cluster of non-EU immigrant population is in the Municipality of Athens –some 132,000 immigrants, at 17% of local population. Thessaloniki is the second largest cluster, with 27,000 – but reaching only 7% of local population. After this, the predominant areas of location are the Athens environs.


According to the same study, the foreign population (documented and undocumented) residing in Greece may in reality figure upwards to 8.5% or 10.3%, that is approximately meaning 1.15 million - if immigrants with homogeneis cards are accounted for.


Religion

Main article: Religion in Greece
Stavronikita monastery, a Greek Orthodox monastery in Athos peninsula, northern Greece.
Stavronikita monastery, a Greek Orthodox monastery in Athos peninsula, northern Greece.

The constitution of Greece recognizes the Greek Orthodox faith as the "prevailing" religion of the country, while guaranteeing freedom of religious belief for all.[18] The Greek Government does not keep statistics on religious groups and censuses do not ask for religious affiliation. According to the State Department, an estimated 97% of Greek citizens identify themselves as Greek Orthodox.[45] The Greek Orthodox Church is the religion of 95%[1]-98%[2] of the Greek population and is accorded the status of prevailing religion in the constitution. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2288x1712, 704 KB) Stavronikita monastery at Mount Athos, Greece as seen from the South-East. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2288x1712, 704 KB) Stavronikita monastery at Mount Athos, Greece as seen from the South-East. ... Stavronikita monastery, South-East view Stavronikita monastery (Greek: Μονή Σταυρονικήτα) is an orthodox christian monastery at the monastic state of Mount Athos in Greece, dedicated to St. ... Greek Orthodox Church can refer to any of several hierarchical churches within the larger group of mutually recognizing Eastern Orthodox churches: the Orthodox Church of Constantinople, headed by the Patriarch of Constantinople, who is also the first among equals of the Eastern Orthodox Communion. ... This article concerns the buildings occupied by monastics. ... Athos can mean: Athos – the Holy Mount Athos, one of the title characters in the novel The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas Athos, in Greek mythology, one of the Gigantes Mount Athos, a mountain and peninsula in Greece containing an ancient monastic state New Athos, a mountain and monastery in... Greek Orthodox Church (Greek: Hellēnorthódoxē Ekklēsía) can refer to any of several hierarchical churches within the larger group of mutually recognizing Eastern Orthodox churches. ...


In the Eurostat - Eurobarometer poll of 2005, 81% of Greek citizens responded that they believe there is a God,[46] whereas 16% answered that they believe there is some sort of spirit or life force,[46] and 3% that they do not believe there is a God, spirit, nor life force.[46] Greece's percentage of respondents asserting that they believe there is a God was the third highest among EU members behind Malta and Cyprus.[46] The Statistical Office of the European Communities (Eurostat) is the statistical arm of the European Commission, producing data for the European Union and promoting harmonisation of statistical methods across the member states. ...


Estimates of the recognised Muslim minority, which is mostly located in Thrace, range from 98,000 to 140,000,[45][47] (between 0.9% and 1.2%) while the immigrant Muslim community numbers between 200,000 and 300,000. Albanian immigrants to Greece are usually associated with the Muslim faith, although most are secular in orientation.[48] Map of the Greek Prefectures according to the 1991 census with the minority highlighted. ... This article concerns secularity, that is, being secular, in various senses. ...


Judaism has existed in Greece for more than 2,000 years. Sephardi Jews used to have a large presence in the city of Thessaloniki, but nowadays the Greek-Jewish community who survived the Holocaust is estimated to number around 5,500 people.[45][47] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... There have been organized Jewish communities in Greece for more than two thousand years. ... Language(s) Hebrew, Ladino, Judæo-Portuguese, Catalanic, Shuadit, local languages Religion(s) Judaism Related ethnic groups Ashkenazi Jews, Mizrahi Jews, other Jewish ethnic divisions, Arabs, Spaniards, Portuguese. ... Thessaloniki or Salonica (Greek: ) is Greeces second-largest city and the capital of Macedonia, the largest Region of Greece. ... “Shoah” redirects here. ...


Greek members of Roman Catholic faith are estimated at 50,000 [45][47] with the Roman Catholic immigrant community approximating 200,000.[45] Old Calendarists account for 500,000 followers.[47] The Jehovah's Witnesses report having 30,000 active members.[45][47] Protestants including Evangelicals stand at about 30,000.[47][45] Free Apostolic Church of Pentecost and other Pentecostals denominations are about 12,000.[49] Mormons can also be found with 420 followers.[45] The ancient Greek religion has also reappeared as Hellenic Neopaganism,[50] with estimates of approximately 2,000 adherents (comprising 0.02% of the general population).[51] Catholic Church redirects here. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... The Free Apostolic Church of Pentecost is a Greek pentecostal church founded by Dr. Leonidas Feggos in 1965, and now counting more than 140 churches, 200 assemblies and over than 20,000 believers spread in Greece, and also in Cyprus, Albania, Bulgaria, Germany, Belgium, Slovakia, United Kingdom, U.S.A... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Athanasius · Augustine · Constantine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Calvin · Luther · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Pentecostal... The term Mormon is a colloquial name, most-often used to refer to members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Hellenic polytheism. ...


Education

Main article: Education in Greece
The building of the Faculty of Education at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki.

Compulsory education in Greece comprises primary schools (Δημοτικό Σχολείο, Dimotikó Scholeio) and gymnasium (Γυμνάσιο). Nursery schools (Παιδικός σταθμός, Paidikós Stathmós) are popular but not compulsory. Kindergartens (Νηπιαγωγείο, Nipiagogeío) are now compulsory for any child above 4 years of age. Children start primary school aged 6 and remain there for six years.Attendance at gymnasia starts at age 12 and last for three years. Greece's post-compulsory secondary education consists of two school types: unified upper secondary schools (Ενιαίο Λύκειο, Eniaia Lykeia) and technical-vocational educational schools (Τεχνικά και Επαγγελματικά Εκπαιδευτήρια, "TEE"). Post-compulsory secondary education also includes vocational training institutes (Ινστιτούτα Επαγγελματικής Κατάρτισης, "IEK") which provide a formal but unclassified level of education. As they can accept both Gymnasio (lower secondary school) and Lykeio (upper secondary school) graduates, these institutes are not classified as offering a particular level of education. The Programme for International Student Assessment, coordinated by the OECD, currently ranks the Greek secondary education as the 38th in the world, being significantly below the OECD average.[3] Educational oversight Minister for National Education and Religious Affairs Ministry for National Education and Religious Affairs Evripidis Stylianidis National education budget 4,7 billion € (public) 2. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 536 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (576 × 644 pixel, file size: 114 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The building of the Faculty of Education at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 536 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (576 × 644 pixel, file size: 114 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The building of the Faculty of Education at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. ... The Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (often referred to in English as Aristotelian University), named after the philosopher Aristotle, is the largest university of Greece. ... A primary school in ÄŒeský Těšín, Czech Republic. ... A gymnasium (pronounced with or, in Swedish, as opposed to ) is a type of school providing secondary education in some parts of Europe, comparable to English Grammar Schools and U.S. High Schools. ... Child picking up book. ... For other uses, see Kindergarten (disambiguation). ... Secondary school is a term used to describe an institution where the final stage of compulsory schooling, known as secondary education, takes place. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... A vocational school, providing vocational education and also as referred to as a trade school or career college, and school is operated for the express purpose of giving its students the skills needed to perform a certain job or jobs. ... The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) is a triennial world-wide test of 15-year-old schoolchildrens scholastic performance, the implementation of which is coordinated by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). ... The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is an international organization of those developed countries that accept the principles of representative democracy and a free market economy. ...


Public higher education is divided into universities, "Highest Educational Institutions" (Ανώτατα Εκπαιδευτικά Ιδρύματα, Anótata Ekpaideytiká Idrýmata, "ΑΕΙ") and "Highest Technological Educational Institutions" (Ανώτατα Τεχνολογικά Εκπαιδευτικά Ιδρύματα, Anótata Technologiká Ekpaideytiká Idrýmata, "ATEI"). Students are admitted to these Institutes according to their performance at national level examinations taking place after completion of the third grade of Lykeio. Additionally, students over twenty-two years old may be admitted to the Hellenic Open University through a form of lottery. The Capodistrian university of Athens is the oldest university in the eastern Mediterranean. For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... The Open University of Greece (Hellas Open University - HOU) was founded in 1992 in Patra. ... The National and Capodistrian University of Athens (Greek: Εθνικόν και Καποδιστριακόν Πανεπιστήμιον Αθηνών), usually called just University of Athens, is the oldest university in modern Greece, and has been in continuous operation since it was founded, on 1837. ...


The Greek education system also provides special kindergartens, primary and secondary schools for people with special needs or difficulties in learning. Specialist gymnasia and high schools offering musical, theological and physical education also exist.


Some of the main universities in Greece include:


National and Capodistrian University of Athens • National Technical University of Athens  • University of Piraeus • Agricultural University of Athens  • University of Macedonia (in Thessaloniki)  • University of Crete  • Technical University of Crete  • Athens University of Economics and Business  • Aristotle University of Thessaloniki  • University of the Aegean (across the Aegean Islands)  • Democritus University of Thrace  • University of Ioannina  • University of Thessaly  • Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences  • University of Patras  • Charokopeio University of Athens • Ionian University (across the Ionian Islands) The National and Capodistrian University of Athens (Greek: Εθνικόν και Καποδιστριακόν Πανεπιστήμιον Αθηνών), usually called just University of Athens, is the oldest university in modern Greece, and has been in continuous operation since it was founded, on 1837. ... The National Technical University of Athens (Greek: Εθνικό Μετσόβιο Πολυτεχνείο, National Metsovion Polytechnic), sometimes simply known as Athens Polytechnic, is among the oldest and most prestigious higher education institutions of Greece. ... Front entrance of campus The University of Piraeus (Greek: Πανεπιστήμιο Πειραιώς) was founded in 1938 under the title of the “School for Industrial Studies”, by the Industrialists and Tradesmen Association. ... The Agricultural University of Athens (Greek Γεωπονικό Πανεπιστήμιο Αθηνών) is located in Athens, at the neighborhood of Votanikos. ... The University of Macedonia is located in Thessaloniki, Greece. ... The University of Crete is the principal higher education institution on the island of Crete, Greece. ... ECE Buidings in Universitys Campus The Technical University of Crete (Greek: Πολυτεχνείο Κρήτης Politexnio Kritis) (TUC) is a state University under the supervision of the Ministry of Education and was founded in 1977 in Chania, Crete. ... The Athens University of Economics and Business (AUEB, ASOEE, or OPA) was founded in 1920 in Athens, Greece. ... The Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (often referred to in English as Aristotelian University), named after the philosopher Aristotle, is the largest university of Greece. ... The University of the Aegean (Greek: ) is a university based in Mytilene, Greece. ... Aegean Sea Islands: map showing island groups. ... The Democritus University of Thrace is a university in Komotini, Greece which opened in 1973. ... University of Ioannina is a university lying in the plains 5 km southwest of the city centre of Ioannina, Greece. ... The University of Thessaly (greek: Πανεπιστήμιο Θεσσαλίας) was founded in 1984. ... Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences is a university located in Athens, Greece. ... University of Patras (Greek: Πανεπιστήμιο Πατρών Panepistimio Patron) is a university located 6 km northeast of downtown Patras, 3 km S of the Rio-Antirio bridge, 206 km W of Athens, 106 km NE of Pyrgos and 2 km east of Rhio, Greece. ... Ionian U. logo The Ionian University is a university located in the city of Corfu, Greece. ... The Ionian Islands (Modern Greek: Ιόνια νησιά, Ionia nisia; Ancient Greek: , Ionioi NÄ“soi) are a group of islands in Greece. ...


Culture

Hermes bearing the infant Dionysus, by Praxiteles, Olympia Archaeological Museum.
Hermes bearing the infant Dionysus, by Praxiteles, Olympia Archaeological Museum.

The culture of Greece has evolved over thousands of years, with its beginnings in the Mycenaean and Minoan Civilizations, continuing most notably into Classical Greece, through the influence of the Roman Empire and its Greek Eastern successor the Byzantine Empire. The Ottoman Empire too had a significant influence on Greek culture, but the Greek war of independence is credited with revitalizing Greece and giving birth to a single entity of its multi-faceted culture throughout the ages. The architecture and purpose of the Parthenon in Athens epitomises many facets of Greek culture, both ancient and modern. ... This is a list of Greek people. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 350 × 598 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,075 × 1,838 pixels, file size: 683 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 350 × 598 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,075 × 1,838 pixels, file size: 683 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... For other uses, see Hermes (disambiguation). ... This article is about the ancient deity. ... Praxiteles of Athens, the son of Cephisodotus, was the greatest of the Attic sculptors of the 4th century BC, who has left an imperishable mark on the history of art. ... The Olympia Archaeological Museum is one of the great museums of Greece and houses artifacts found in the archaeological place of Ancient Olympia. ... Mycenaean Greece, the last phase of the Bronze Age in ancient Greece, is the historical setting of the epics of Homer and much other Greek mythology. ... Parthenon This article is on the term Classical Greece itself. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... The term Greek East is used to define the territories of the Greek-speaking, Hellenized, Eastern Roman Empire, as opposed to the Latin West. ... Byzantine redirects here. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... Belligerents Greek revolutionaries United Kingdom France Russian Empire Ottoman Empire Egyptian Khedivate Commanders Theodoros Kolokotronis Alexander Ypsilanti Andreas Miaoulis Georgios Karaiskakis â€  Omer Vryonis Mahmud Dramali Pasha ReÅŸid Mehmed Pasha Ibrahim Pasha. ...


Cuisine

Main article: Greek cuisine
World famous Greek Salad
World famous Greek Salad

Greek cuisine is often cited as an example of the healthy Mediterranean diet. The cuisine of Greece has influences from Italian, Balkan and Middle Eastern cuisine. Greek cuisine incorporates fresh ingredients into a variety of local dishes such as moussaka, stifado, Greek Salad, spanakopita and the world famous Souvlaki. Throughout Greece people often enjoy eating from small dishes such as meze with various dips such as tzatziki, grilled octopus and small fish, feta cheese, dolmades (rice, currants and pine kernels wrapped in vine leaves), various pulses, olives and cheese. Olive oil is added to almost every dish. Sweet desserts such as galaktoboureko, and drinks such as ouzo, metaxa and a variety of wines including retsina. Greek cuisine differs widely from different parts of the mainland and from island to island. Typical Greek salad Greek cuisine (Greek: Ελληνική Κουζίνα) is Greeces traditional cuisine. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Greek salad (Greek χωριάτικη (choriatiki), meaning villagers salad) is a common salad characterized by its ingredients of Mediterranean (and particularly Greek) origin. ... Typical Greek salad Greek cuisine (Greek: Ελληνική Κουζίνα) is Greeces traditional cuisine. ... For cuisine, see Cuisine of the Mediterranean. ... The term Middle Eastern cuisine refers to the various cuisines of the Middle East. ... Musakka/Moussakas Moussaka ([musaka]; Greek: ; Romanian: ; Turkish: ; Bulgarian: ; South Slavic: мусака/​musaka; Armenian: ; Arabic: ‎ musaqqaa) is a traditional eggplant (aubergine)-based dish in the Balkans and the Middle East, but most closely associated with Greece and Turkey. ... Greek cuisine is the cuisine of Greece or perhaps of the Greeks. ... Greek salad (Greek χωριάτικη (choriatiki), meaning villagers salad) is a common salad characterized by its ingredients of Mediterranean (and particularly Greek) origin. ... Wikibooks Cookbook has more about this subject: Spanakopita Spanakopita is a Greek spinach pie, made with pre-cooked spinach, phyllo pastry, butter, olive oil, feta cheese, green onions, egg, and seasoning. ... Souvlaki (Greek: Σουβλάκι) is a popular Greek fast food consisting of small pieces of meat and sometimes vegetables grilled on a skewer. ... Meze goes well with ouzo/raki   It should be possible to replace this fair use image with a freely licensed one. ... Tzatziki in a glass bowl. ... For other uses, see Octopus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... Feta (Greek φέτα, feminine gender) is a classic curd cheese in brine whose tradition dates back to Greece thousands of years ago. ... A dolma (in Turkish; dolmadaki/dolmades in Greek; sarmale in Romanian) is a grape leaf filled with a savoury mixture of rice, onions, minced beef and other ingredients, sometimes served with lemon-like sauce/dressing. ... The Food and Agricultural Organisation of the United Nations (FAO) defines pulses as annual leguminous crops yielding from one to 12 grains or seeds of variable size, shape and colour within a pod. ... Binomial name L. 19th century illustration The Olive (Olea europaea) is a species of small tree in the family Oleaceae, native to coastal areas of the eastern Mediterranean region, from Syria and the maritime parts of Asia Minor and northern Iran at the south end of the Caspian Sea. ... Cheese is a solid food made from the milk of cows, goats, sheep, and other mammals. ... For the Popeye cartoon character, see Olive Oyl. ... Galaktoboureko (Greek: Γαλακτομπούρεκο) is a Greek dessert made with phyllo dough that is stuffed with lemon custard, and baked with a clear syrup. ... A small souvenir bottle of ouzo Ouzo (ούζο) is a Greek anise-flavored liqueur that is widely consumed in Greece. ... Metaxa Seven Star in its characteristic amphora bottle Metaxa bottle in its box Metaxa (Greek Μεταξά) is a Greek distilled spirit invented by Spyros Metaxas in 1888. ... For other uses, see Wine (disambiguation). ... Retsina is a Greek resinated white (or rosé) wine dating back at least 2700 years. ...


Sports

Main article: Sport in Greece
Inside the Athens Olympic Stadium
Inside the Athens Olympic Stadium

Greece has a long tradition in sports with several important achievements. The Greek national football team is the reigning UEFA European Champions having won the UEFA Euro 2004 as underdogs.[52] They are as of April 2008 ranked 8th in the world,[53] and qualified for the UEFA Euro 2008 to defend their crown. The Greek Super League is the highest professional football league in the country comprising of 16 teams. The most known and successful football clubs are Olympiacos, Panathinaikos and AEK Athens, which compete in the Super League Greece. The men's Greek national basketball team has a decades-long tradition of excellence in the sport. Greece is generally considered an important power in international basketball and the national team is regarded as one of the best in the world. They are as of January 2008 ranked 6th in the world.[54] They have won the European Championship twice in 1987 and 2005,[55] and have reached the final four in three of the last four FIBA World Championships in 1994, 1998 and 2006, taking the second place in 2006. The domestic top basketball league, A1 Ethniki, is composed of fourteen teams. The most successful Greek teams are Panathinaikos and Olympiacos, who both have won the Euroleague, while Aris, AEK Athens and PAOK have also won european trophies. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3076x848, 243 KB) Summary Pics taken and stitched by me personally. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3076x848, 243 KB) Summary Pics taken and stitched by me personally. ... First international  Greece 1 - 4  Italy (Athens, Greece; 7 April 1929) Biggest win  Greece 8 - 0  Syria (Athens, Greece; 25 November 1949) Biggest defeat  Hungary 11 - 1  Greece (Budapest, Hungary; 25 March 1938) World Cup Appearances 1 (First in 1994) Best result Round 1, 1994 European Championship Appearances 3 (First... The UEFA European Football Championship is the main football competition of the mens national football teams governed by UEFA (the Union of European Football Associations). ... The UEFA Euro 2004 (or just Euro 2004) was the twelfth edition of UEFAs quadriennial European Football Championship and was held in Portugal, for the first time, between 12 June and 4 July 2004. ... This article is about the mens rankings. ... This article is about the 2008 sporting event. ... For other sports leagues which may be referred to by this name, see List of professional sports leagues. ... Current season Panathinaikos F.C. (Greek: Π.Α.Ε. Παναθηναϊκός), also known as P.A.O. (Greek: Π.Α.Ο.), is a Greek professional football club based in Athens, Greece. ... Current season AEK F.C., (Greek: – Athlitiki Enosis Konstantinoupoleos), the Athletic Union of Constantinople, known in European competitions as AEK Athens, is a Greek association football club based in the city of Athens, Greece. ... The Greece national basketball team for men is the basketball side that represents Greece in international competitions. ... The International Basketball Federation (FIBA, from its French meaning) calculates the world rankings of all of its basketball teams. ... This article is about the basketball tournament. ... The 1987 European Basketball Championship, commonly called Eurobasket 1987, was the 25th regional championship held by FIBA Europe. ... Eurobasket 2005 Logo The 2005 European Basketball Championship, commonly called Eurobasket 2005, was held in Serbia and Montenegro between 16 September and 25 September 2005. ... The FIBA World Championship (also called the Basketball World Championship) is a world basketball tournament for mens national teams held quadrennially by the International Basketball Federation (FIBA). ... Official logo The 1994 FIBA World Championship was an international basketball competition hosted by Canada from August 4 to August 14, 1994. ... The 1998 FIBA World Championship was an international basketball tournament held by the International Basketball Federation in Greece. ... Official logo The winner, Spain, is being celebrated The 2006 FIBA World Championship was an international basketball competition hosted by Japan from August 19 to September 3, 2006. ... The A1 Ethniki is the highest professional basketball competition among clubs in Greece. ... The 100 years celebration (2008). ... The Euroleague (EL) is the highest caliber professional basketball competition in Europe, with teams from thirteen different European countries. ... Aris Basketball Club (Greek name, transliterated into English: K.A.E. Aris) is the basketball team of the Thessaloniki-based Greek sport club Aris Thessaloniki. ...


Cricket, Handball, Water Polo and Volleyball are also practiced in Greece with the first being particularly popular in Corfu due to its long connections with the British. This article is about the sport. ... Handball is the name of several different sports: Team handball, or Olympic/European Handball is a game somewhat similar to association football, but the ball is played with the hand, not the foot. ... Water polo is a team water sport. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... This article is about the Greek island Kerkyra known in English as Corfu or Corcyra. ...


As the birth place of the Olympic Games, Greece was most recently host of 2004 Summer Olympics and the first modern Olympics in 1896. The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... The 1896 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the I Olympiad, were celebrated in 1896 in Athens, Greece. ...


Armed forces

Main article: Military of Greece

The Hellenic Armed Forces are overseen by the Hellenic National Defense General Staff (Γενικό Επιτελείο Εθνικής Άμυνας - ΓΕΕΘΑ) and consists of three branches: The armed forces of Greece consist of the Hellenic Army Hellenic Navy Hellenic Air Force Hellenic Coast Guard The civilian authority for the Greek military is the Ministry of National Defence. ... The Chief / Hellenic National Defense General Staff conducts the HNDGS (Hellenic National Defence General Staff) and is the main adviser to the Governmental Council on Foreign Policy and National Defence and to the Minister of Defence on military issues. ...

  • Hellenic Army
  • Hellenic Navy
  • Hellenic Air Force

The civilian authority for the Greek military is the Ministry of National Defence. This article is about the land force of the modern nation of Greece. ... The Hellenic Navy (Greek: , Polemikón Nautikón) is the naval force of the modern nation of Greece (Hellenic Republic). ... Hellenic Air Force ensign The Hellenic Air Force (HAF) (Greek: (ΠΑ), Polemikí Aeroporía) is the air force of Greece. ... The Hellenic Ministry of Defense (Greek Υπουργείο Εθνικής Άμυνας, abbreviated (ΥΠΕΘΑ), is the civilian cabinet organization responsible for managing the Military of Greece. ...


Greece currently has universal compulsory military service for males while females (who may serve in the military) are exempted from conscription.


As a member of NATO, the Greek military participates in exercises and deployments under the auspices of the alliance. This article is about the military alliance. ...


International Rankings

Organization Survey Ranking
United Nations Development Programme Human Development Index 2006[56]
Human Development Index 2004[57]
Human Development Index 2000[57]
24 out of 177
24 out of 177
24 out of 177
International Monetary Fund GDP per capita (PPP)[58] 18 out of 180
The Economist Worldwide Quality-of-life Index, 2005[59] 22 out of 111
Heritage Foundation/Wall Street Journal Index of Economic Freedom[60] 57 out of 157
Reporters Without Borders Worldwide Press Freedom Index 2006[61]
Worldwide Press Freedom Index 2005[62]
Worldwide Press Freedom Index 2004[63]
32 out of 168
18(tied) out of 168
33 out of 167
Transparency International Corruption Perceptions Index 2006[64]
Corruption Perceptions Index 2005[65]
Corruption Perceptions Index 2004[66]
54 out of 163
47 out of 158
49 out of 145
World Economic Forum Global Competitiveness Report[67] 47 out of 125
Yale University/Columbia University Environmental Sustainability Index 2005[68] 67 out of 146
Nationmaster Labor strikes[69] 13 out of 27
A.T. Kearney / Foreign Policy Globalization Index 2006 [70]
Globalization Index 2005 [71]
Globalization Index 2004 [72]
32 out of 62
29 out of 62
28 out of 62

The United Nations Development Programe (UNDP), the United Nations global development network, is the largest multilateral source of development assistance in the world. ... IMF redirects here. ... Gross Domestic Product (GDP), a calculation method in national accounting (see Measures of national income and output) is defined as the total value of final goods and services produced within a countrys borders in a year, regardless of ownership. ... PPP of GDP for the countries of the world (2003). ... The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London. ... The Heritage Foundation is one of the most prominent conservative think tanks in the United States. ... The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ... Map of Economic Freedom released by the Heritage Foundation. ... Reporters Without Borders, or RWB (French: Reporters sans frontières, Spanish: Reporteros Sin Fronteras, or RSF) is a French origin international non-governmental organization that advocates freedom of the press, founded by its current general-secretary, Robert Menard. ... Reporters Without Borders, or RWB (French: Reporters sans frontières, Spanish: Reporteros Sin Fronteras, or RSF) is a French origin international non-governmental organization that advocates freedom of the press, founded by its current general-secretary, Robert Menard. ... Transparency International (TI) is an international organisation addressing corruption, including, but not limited to, political corruption. ... Overview of the index of perception of corruption, 2006 Since 1995, Transparency International has published an annual Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI)[1] ordering the countries of the world according to the degree to which corruption is perceived to exist among public officials and politicians.[2] The organization defines corruption as... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... World map of the 2006-2007 Global Competitiveness Index. ... Yale redirects here. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... The Environmental Sustainability Index (ESI) is a composite index tracking 21 elements of environmental sustainability covering natural resource endowments, past and present pollution levels, environmental management efforts, contributions to protection of the global commons, and a societys capacity to improve its environmental performance over time. ... Nationmaster is the name for a website created by Rapid Intelligence an Australian Web tech company. ... A.T. Kearney is an international management consulting firm, dating its origins back to the early days of the management consulting profession. ... A countrys foreign policy is a set of political goals that seeks to outline how that particular country will interact with other countries of the world and, to a lesser extent, non-state actors. ...

See also

Greece Portal

Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... This article or section should be merged with Hellenes Greeks in Ancient History In Latin literature, Græci (or Greeks, in English) is the name by which Hellenes are known. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... This is a list of Greek people. ... This article covers the Greek civilization. ... This is a timeline of Greek history. ... Aegean civilization is a general term for the Bronze Age civilizations of Greece and the Aegean. ... The term ancient Greece refers to the periods of Greek history in Classical Antiquity, lasting ca. ... The Hellenistic period of Greek history was the period between the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and the annexation of the Greek peninsula and islands by Rome in 146 BC. Although the establishment of Roman rule did not break the continuity of Hellenistic society and culture, which... Roman Greece is the period of Greek history following the Roman victory over the Corinthians at the Battle of Corinth in 146 BC until the reestablishment of the city of Byzantium and the naming of the city by Emperor Constantine I as the capital of the Roman Empire (as Nova... Byzantine redirects here. ... Greece was part of the Ottoman Empire from the 14th century until its declaration of independence in 1821. ... Belligerents Greek revolutionaries United Kingdom France Russian Empire Ottoman Empire Egyptian Khedivate Commanders Theodoros Kolokotronis Alexander Ypsilanti Andreas Miaoulis Georgios Karaiskakis â€  Omer Vryonis Mahmud Dramali Pasha ReÅŸid Mehmed Pasha Ibrahim Pasha. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In Greece, the independence of the justice is safeguarded by the Constitution. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... In Greece, the Supreme Special Court (Greek: Ανώτατο Ειδικό Δικαστήριο) is provided for in the article 100 of the Constitution. ... The Court of Cassation is the Supreme Court of Greece. ... In Greece, the Counil of State (sometimes Counsel of State or State Council, Greek: Συμβούλιο της Επικρατείας) is, at the same time, an administrative organ (one of the three Big Bodies of the greek Public Administration) and the Supreme Administrative Court. ... In Greece, the Chamber of Accounts (or Court of Accounts or Court of Auditors or Audit Court, French: Cour des Comptes , Greek: Ελεγκτικό Συνέδριο) is, at the same time, an administrative organ (one of the three Big Bodies of the greek Public Administration) and a Supreme Administrative Court with a special jursdiction... The Politics of Greece takes place in a large parliamentary representative democratic republic, whereby the Prime Minister of Greece is the head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. ... In the modern history of Greece, starting from the Greek War of Independence, the Constitution of 1975/1986/2001 is the last in a series of democratically adopted Constitutions (with the exception of the Constitutions of 1968 and 1973 imposed by a dictatorship). ... The Hellenic Parliament (Greek: Βουλή των Ελλήνων; transliterated Vouli ton Ellinon; literally Council of the Greeks) is the parliament of Greece, located in Syntagma Square in Athens. ... Note on Greek names: There is no firm convention for the rendering of Greek personal names into English. ... This is a list of presidents of Greece. ... The cabinet of Greece comprises the heads of the major ministries. ... Elections in Greece gives information on election and election results in Greece. ... Under the current electoral system, a party needs to surpass a 3% threshold in the popular vote in order to enter parliament. ... Prominent issues in Greek foreign policy include the enduring Cyprus problem, Greek-Turkish differences over the Aegean, a dispute over the name of the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, and relations with the United States. ... The term Aegean dispute refers to a set of interrelated controversial issues between Greece and Turkey over sovereignty and related rights in the area of the Aegean Sea. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Relations between Greece and Turkey have been marked by alternating periods of mutual hostility and reconciliation ever since Greece won its independence from the Ottoman Empire in 1832. ... For an in depth analysis of the often confusing terms regarding Macedonia, see Macedonia (terminology). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Greece faces a wide range of environmental issues common to other countries in Southern Europe. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ... This is a list of banks from Greece. ... Not to be confused with the National Bank of Greece. ... Shipping is arguably the oldest form of occupation of the Greeks. ... Topics of Greece Culture - Education Geography - History - Politics Greece Portal Greece attracts well over 16 million tourists a year contributing 15% of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of the nations Economy. ... The military history of Greece is the history of the wars and battles of the Greek people in Greece, the Balkans and the Greek colonies in the Mediterranean Sea and the Black Sea since classical antiquity. ... This article is about the land force of the modern nation of Greece. ... The Hellenic Navy (Greek: , Polemikón Nautikón) is the naval force of the modern nation of Greece (Hellenic Republic). ... Hellenic Air Force ensign The Hellenic Air Force (HAF) (Greek: (ΠΑ), Polemikí Aeroporía) is the air force of Greece. ... The Demographics of Greece refer to the demography of the population that inhabits the Greek peninsula, a region where the Greek language has been continuously spoken for over 3500 years. ... Population censuses in Greece take place the first year of every decade. ... There are a variety of social issues that Greece currently faces. ... ΠΡΟΣΟΧΗ!! ΣΤΟ ΤΕΛΟΣ ΤΟΥ ΚΑΘΕ ΑΡΘΡΟΥ ΓΙΑ ΤΑ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΑ ΝΗΣΙΑ ΤΟΥ ΑΙΓΑΙΟΥ ΕΧΟΥΝ ΒΑΛΕΙ ΤΟΥΡΚΙΚΗ ΣΗΜΑΙΑ !!  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece ΠΡΟΣΟΧΗ!! ΣΤΟ ΤΕΛΟΣ ΤΟΥ ΚΑΘΕ ΑΡΘΡΟΥ ΓΙΑ ΤΑ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΑ ΝΗΣΙΑ ΤΟΥ ΑΙΓΑΙΟΥ ΕΧΟΥΝ ΒΑΛΕΙ ΤΟΥΡΚΙΚΗ ΣΗΜΑΙΑ !!  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece ΠΡΟΣΟΧΗ!! ΣΤΟ ΤΕΛΟΣ ΤΟΥ ΚΑΘΕ ΑΡΘΡΟΥ ΓΙΑ ΤΑ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΑ ΝΗΣΙΑ ΤΟΥ ΑΙΓΑΙΟΥ ΕΧΟΥΝ ΒΑΛΕΙ ΤΟΥΡΚΙΚΗ ΣΗΜΑΙΑ !!  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece ΠΡΟΣΟΧΗ!! ΣΤΟ ΤΕΛΟΣ ΤΟΥ ΚΑΘΕ ΑΡΘΡΟΥ ΓΙΑ ΤΑ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΑ ΝΗΣΙΑ ΤΟΥ ΑΙΓΑΙΟΥ ΕΧΟΥΝ ΒΑΛΕΙ ΤΟΥΡΚΙΚΗ ΣΗΜΑΙΑ !!  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece  Greece... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Indigenous minorities in Greece are relatively small and the country is largely ethnically homogeneous. ... The architecture and purpose of the Parthenon in Athens epitomises many facets of Greek culture, both ancient and modern. ... Greece has a rich and varied artistic history, spanning some 5000 years and beginning in the Cycladic and Minoan prehistorical civilization, giving birth to Western classical art in the ancient period (further developing this during the Hellenistic Period), to taking in the influences of Eastern civilizations and the new religion... // Beginning In the spring of 1897, the Greeks of Athens had the opportunity and privilege to watch the first cinematic attempts (short movies in journal). The projection of an animated movie resulted in excited reactions and the new-seen spectacle became a usual matter of discussion. ... Greek dance is a very old and common tradition from the ancient land of Greece. ... // Main article: Ancient Greek literature Ancient Greek literature refers to literature written in Ancient Greek from the oldest surviving written works in the Greek language until the 4th century and the rise of the Byzantine Empire. ... Greek cuisine is the cuisine of Greece or perhaps of the Greeks. ... History (Timeline and Samples) Genres: Classical music -Folk - Hip hop - Jazz - Rock Regional styles Aegean Islands - Arcadia - Argos - Athens - Crete - Cyclades - Dodecanese Islands - Epirus - Ionian Islands - Lesbos - Macedonia - Peloponnesos - Thessaloniki - Thessaly - Thrace - Cyprus The musical legacy of Greece is as diverse as its history. ... // Television broadcasting in Greece began in 1966, with the first network, EPT (Elliniki Radiophonia Tileorassi) broadcasting out of Athens, as a state-owned monopoly. ... Flag Ratio: 2:3 (Naval Flag 1822-1828, Sea Flag 1828-1969; 1975-1978 (Flag Ratio 7:12), National Flag 1969-1975; 1978 to date) The flag of Greece (Greek: , popularly referred to as the Γαλανόλευκη or the Κυανόλευκη, the blue-white) is based on nine equal horizontal stripes of blue alternating... The National Emblem of Greece consists of a blue escutcheon with a white cross totally surrounded by two laurel branches. ... The Hymn to Freedom (Ύμνος εις την Ελευθερίαν, Imnos is tin Eleftherian) is a poem written by Dionýsios Solomós in 1823 that consists of 158 stanzas. ... Greek Evzone soldiers marching in formation Evzones changing the guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Greek Evzones changing guards at the tomb of the unknown soldier Evzones in Athens gaurding the grave of the Unknown Soldier. ... Holidays in Greece: ...

Notes

  1. ^ Eurostat
  2. ^ National Statistical Service of Greece: Population census of March 18, 2001: Πίνακας 1. Πληθυσμός κατά φύλο και ηλικία
  3. ^ World Factbook - Greece: Government. CIA. www.cia.gov (2007-03-15). Retrieved on 2007-04-07.
  4. ^ Sir Steven Runciman, Conclusion, The Fall of Constantinople
  5. ^ "Greece." Encyclopædia Britannica. 2006. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. 6 Sept. 2006 <http://search.eb.com/eb/article-9106266>.
  6. ^ Finley, M. I. Democracy Ancient and Modern. 2d ed., 1985. London: Hogarth.
  7. ^ History of Philosophy, Volume 1 by Frederick Copleston
  8. ^ Brockett, Oscar G. History of the Theatre. sixth ed., 1991. Boston; London: Allyn and Bacon.
  9. ^ Member States of the EU: Greece. European Union. europa.eu. Retrieved on 2007-04-07.
  10. ^ On the 14 August 1974 Greek forces withdrew from the integrated military structure of NATO in protest at the Turkish occupation of northern Cyprus. Greece rejoined NATO in 1980.
  11. ^ Convention on the OECD. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. www.oecd.org. Retrieved on 2007-04-07.
  12. ^ a b Greece becomes 16th ESA Member State. European Space Agency. www.esa.int (2005-03-22). Retrieved on 2007-04-07.
  13. ^ Millennium issue: Trouble with Turkey | The fall of Constantinople | Economist.com
  14. ^ Mazower, Mark. After the War was Over
  15. ^ NATO Update 1974
  16. ^ History, Editorial Consultant : Adam Hart-Davis, Dorling Kindersley Limited publisher, ISBN : 978 1 8561 3062 2
  17. ^ History, Editorial Consultant : Adam Hart-Davis, Dorling Kindersley Limited publisher, ISBN : 978 1 8561 3062 2
  18. ^ a b The Constitution of Greece: Article 1
  19. ^ The Constitution of Greece: Article 30
  20. ^ P.D. Dagtoglou, Individual Rights, I, 21
    * E. Venizelos, The "Acquis" of the Constitutional Revision, 131-132, 165-172
  21. ^ The Constitution of Greece: Article 26
  22. ^ K. Mavrias, Constitutional Law, 477-478
  23. ^ The Constitution of Greece: Article 37
  24. ^ K. Mavrias, Constitutional Law, 477-478, 486-487
  25. ^ The Constitution of Greece: Articles 51, 53
  26. ^ The Constitution of Greece: Article 42
  27. ^ The Constitution of Greece: Article 41
  28. ^ The Constitution of Greece: Article 84
  29. ^ For a diachronic analysis of the Greek party system see T. Pappas, Transformation of the Greek Party System Since 1951, 90-114, who distinguishes three distinct types of party system which developed in consecutive order, namely, a predominant-party system (from 1952 to 1963), a system of polarised pluralism (between 1963 and 1981), and a two-party system (since 1981).
  30. ^ a b c Greece.
  31. ^ Country Fact Sheets: Greece. UNDP. hdr.undp.org. Retrieved on 2007-04-08.
  32. ^ The Economist Intelligence Unit's quality-of-life index (2005). The Economist. www.economist.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-08.
  33. ^ IMF World Economic Outlook, October 2007.. International Monetary Fund. www.imf.org (2007-10). Retrieved on 2007-10-18.
  34. ^ ELKE Hellenic Center for Investment - Economic Stability
  35. ^ a b Polemis, Spyros M.. The History of Greek Shipping. www.greece.org. Retrieved on 2007-04-09.
  36. ^ Greek shipping is modernized to remain a global leader and expand its contribution to the Greek economy. National Bank of Greece. www.nbg.gr (2006-05-11). Retrieved on 2007-04-08.
  37. ^ a b Engber, Daniel. "So Many Greek Shipping Magnates...", Slate, Washington Post/slate.msn.com, 2005-08-17. Retrieved on 2007-04-09. 
  38. ^ a b Top 20 Ranking of World Merchant Fleet by Country of Owner as of January 1, 2001a. Bureau of Transportation Statistics. www.bts.gov (2001). Retrieved on 2007-04-08.
  39. ^ a b c d e f g Greece in Numbers. National Statistical Service of Greece. www.statistis.gr (2006). Retrieved on 2007-12-14.
  40. ^ a b c d e f g Athena 2001 Census. National Statistical Service of Greece. www.statistics.gr. Retrieved on 2007-12-14.
  41. ^ See Ethnologue ([1]); Euromosaic, Le (slavo)macédonien / bulgare en Grèce, L'arvanite / albanais en Grèce, Le valaque/aromoune-aroumane en Grèce, and Mercator-Education: European Network for Regional or Minority Languages and Education, The Turkish language in education in Greece. cf. also P. Trudgill, "Greece and European Turkey: From Religious to Linguistic Identity", in S Barbour, C Carmichael (eds.), Language and nationalism in Europe, Oxford University Press 2000.
  42. ^ Greek Helsinki Monitor, Minority Rights Group, Greece, Report about Compliance with the Principles of the Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities (along guidelines for state reports according to Article 25.1 of the Convention) 8 September 1999
  43. ^ Ethnologue, Joseph (1999)
  44. ^ P. Trudgill, "Greece and European Turkey: From Religious to Linguistic Identity", in S Barbour, C Carmichael (eds.), Language and nationalism in Europe, Oxford University Press 2000.
  45. ^ a b c d e f g h International Religious Freedom Report 2007: Greece. US Dept. of State/Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor. www.state.gov (2006-09-15). Retrieved on 2007-04-14.
  46. ^ a b c d Eurobarometer: Social values, science, and technology. Eurobarometer. europa.eu.int (2005-06). Retrieved on 2007-04-14.
  47. ^ a b c d e f Executive Summary Discrimination on the grounds of religion and belief GREECE. Dr Ioannis Ktistakis & Dr Nicholas Sitaropoulos. ec.europa.eu (2004-06-22). Retrieved on 2007-04-14.
  48. ^ [2]
  49. ^ Synod of Apostolic Church of Christ
  50. ^ CNN, http://edition.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/europe/01/21/ancient.gods.ap/index.html
  51. ^ US Department of State, http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/irf/2006/71383.htm
  52. ^ McNulty, Phil. "Greece win Euro 2004", BBC News, news.bbc.co.uk, 2004-07-04. Retrieved on 2007-05-07. 
  53. ^ FIFA World Rankings. FIFA. www.fifa.com (April 2007). Retrieved on 2007-05-07.
  54. ^ Greece Fiba Ranking
  55. ^ Wilkinson, Simon. "Greece tops Germany for Euro Title", ESPN, sports.espn.go.com, 2005-09-26. Retrieved on 2007-05-07. 
  56. ^ Human Development Report 2006. United Nations Development Program. hdr.undp.org (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
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  58. ^ Gross domestic product per capita, current prices. International Monetary Fund. Retrieved on 2007-05-04.
  59. ^ Worldwide Quality of Life - 2005. The Economist. www.economist.com (2005). Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  60. ^ Index of Economic Freedom. Heritage Foundation & The WSJ. www.heritage.org (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  61. ^ North Korea, Turkmenistan, Eritrea the worst violators of press freedom. Reporters Without Borders. www.rsf.org (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  62. ^ North Korea, Eritrea and Turkmenistan are the world’s “black holes” for news. Reporters without Borders. www.ref.org (2005). Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  63. ^ East Asia and Middle East have worst press freedom records. Reporters without Borders. www.ref.org (2004). Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  64. ^ CPI Table. Transparency International. www.transparency.org (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  65. ^ Transparency International's Annual Report 2005. Transparency International. www.transparency.org (2005). Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  66. ^ Transparency International's Annual Report 2004 (2004). Retrieved on 2006-04-28.
  67. ^ Global Competitiveness Report 2006-2007. World Economic Forum. www.weforum.org (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  68. ^ Environmental Sustainability Index. Yale and Columbia University. www.yale.edu (2005). Retrieved on 2007-04-27.
  69. ^ Labor Statistics: Strikes by Country. Nation Master. www.nationmaster.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-27.
  70. ^ A.T. Kearney/Foreign Policy Globalization Index 2006. A.T. Kearney/FOREIGN POLICY. www.atkearney.com (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-27.
  71. ^ A.T. Kearney/Foreign Policy Magazine Globalization Index 2005. A.T. Kearney/FOREIGN POLICY. www.atkearney.com (2005). Retrieved on 2007-04-27.
  72. ^ A.T. Kearney/Foreign Policy Magazine Globalization Index 2004. A.T. Kearney/FOREIGN POLICY. www.atkearney.com (2004). Retrieved on 2007-04-27.

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... The Encyclopædia Britannica is a general English-language encyclopaedia published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the military alliance. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Dagtoglou, P.D. (1991). "Protection of Individual Rights", Constitutional Law — Individual Rights — Volume I (in Greek). Athens-Komotini: Ant. N. Sakkoulas Publishers. 
  • Mavrias, Kostas G. (2002). Constitutional Law (in Greek). Athens: Ant. N. Sakkoulas Publishers. ISBN 9-60150-663-2. 
  • (2004) The Constitution of Greece. Athens: Hellenic Parliament. ISBN 9-605-60073-0. Retrieved on 2007-09-20. 
  • Venizelos, Evangelos (2002). "The Contribution of the Revision of 2001", The "Acquis" of the Constitutional Revision (in Greek). Athens: Ant. N. Sakkoulas Publishers. ISBN 9-60150-617-9. 
  • Pappas, Takis (April 2003). "The Transformation of the Greek Party System Since 1951". West European Politics 26 (2): 90–114. doi:10.1080/01402380412331333338 (inactive 2008-06-29). Retrieved on 2008-06-08. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Evangelos Venizelos (Greek: ) (born January 1, 1957) is a former Greek Minister for Culture. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Richard Clogg, A Concise History of Greece, Second Edition, Cambridge University Press 2002.
  • Minorities in Greece - historical issues and new perspectives. History and Culture of South Eastern Europe. An Annual Journal. München (Slavica) 2003.

External links

Find more about Greece on Wikipedia's sister projects:
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Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ...

Government

  • President of the Hellenic Republic
  • Prime Minister of the Hellenic Republic
  • Hellenic Parliament
  • Greek News Agenda Newsletter
  • Greece — information and links related to Greece from the ministry of foreign affairs
  • Greek missions abroad (embassies, consulates, representations)
  • Foreign missions in Greece
  • Greek National Tourism Organisation
  • National Statistical Service of Greece

Other

  • National Geographic: Greece
  • Encyclopaedia Britannica - Greece's country page
  • Hellenic History
  • The Greek Heritage
  • Open Directory Project: Greece
  • Chronology of Greece from the World History Database
  • History of Greece: Primary Documents
  • Greek Council for Refugees


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