FACTOID # 17: Though Rhode Island is the smallest state in total area, it has the longest official name: The State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Greatest lower bound

In mathematics the infimum of a subset of some set is the greatest element, not necessarily in the subset, that is smaller than all other elements of the subset. Consequently the term greatest lower bound is also commonly used. Infima of real numbers are a common special case that is especially important in analysis. However, the general definition remains valid in the more abstract setting of order theory where arbitrary partially ordered sets are considered.


Infima are in a precise sense dual to the concept of a supremum and thus additional information and examples are found within the corresponding article.


Infima of real numbers

In analysis the infimum or greatest lower bound of a set S of real numbers is denoted by inf(S) and is defined to be the biggest real number that is smaller than or equal to every number in S. If no such number exists (because S is not bounded below), then we define inf(S) = -∞. If S is empty, we define inf(S) = ∞ (see extended real number line).


An important property of the real numbers is that every set of real numbers has an infimum (any bounded nonempty subset of the real numbers has an infimum in the non-extended real numbers).


Examples:

Note that the infimum does not have to belong to the set (like in these examples). If the infimum value belongs to the set then we can say there is a smallest element in the set.


The infimum and supremum of S are related via

.

In general, in order to show that inf(S) ≥ A, one only has to show that xA for all x in S. Showing that inf(S) ≤ A is a bit harder: for any ε > 0, you have to exhibit an element x in S with xA + ε (of course, if you can find an element x in S with xA, you are done right away).


See also: limit inferior.


Infima within partially ordered sets

The definition of infima easily generalizes to subsets of arbitrary partially ordered sets and as such plays a vital role in order theory. In this context, especially in lattice theory, greatest lower bounds are also called meets.


Formally, the infimum of a subset S of a partially ordered set (P, ≤) is an element l of P such that

  1. lx for all x in S, and
  2. for any p in P such that px for all x in S it holds that pl.

Any element with these properties is necessarily unique, but in general no such element needs to exist. Consequently, orders for which certain infima are known to exist become especially interesting. More information on the various classes of partially ordered sets that arise from such considerations are found in the article on completeness properties.


The dual concept of infimum is given by the notion of a supremum or least upper bound. By the duality principle of order theory, every statement about suprema is thus readily transformed into a statement about infima. For this reason, all further results, details, and examples can be taken from the article on suprema.


Greatest lower bound property

See the article on the least upper bound property.


For information on the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, go here: INF


  Results from FactBites:
 
Greatest lower bound - definition of Greatest lower bound in Encyclopedia (584 words)
In mathematics the infimum of a subset of some set is the greatest element, not necessarily in the subset, that is smaller than all other elements of the subset.
In analysis the infimum or greatest lower bound of a set S of real numbers is denoted by inf(S) and is defined to be the biggest real number that is smaller than or equal to every number in S.
The dual concept of infimum is given by the notion of a supremum or least upper bound.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m