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Encyclopedia > Greater curvature of the stomach
Greater curvature of the stomach
Outline of stomach, showing its anatomical landmarks.
Diagram from cancer.gov:
* 1. Body of stomach
* 2. Fundus
* 3. Anterior wall
* 4. Greater curvature
* 5. Lesser curvature
* 6. Cardia
* 9. Pyloric sphincter
* 10. Pyloric antrum
* 11. Pyloric canal
* 12. Angular notch
* 13. Gastric canal
* 14. Rugal folds

Work of the United States Government
Latin curvatura major gastris
Gray's subject #247 1162
Artery short gastric (upper part), left gastroepiploic (middle)
Dorlands/Elsevier c_67/12272250

The greater curvature of the stomach is directed mainly forward, and is four or five times as long as the lesser curvature. Image File history File links Gray1046. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Illu_stomach. ... A plane passing through the incisura angularis on the lesser curvature and the left limit of the opposed dilatation on the greater curvature divides the stomach into a left portion or body and a right or pyloric portion. ... The left portion of the body of the stomach is known as the fundus, and is marked off from the remainder of the body by a plane passing horizontally through the cardiac orifice. ... The cardia is the anatomical term for the junction orifice of the stomach and the esophagus. ... From Greek pylorus; pyl- = gate, -orus = guard. ... Pyloric antrum is initial portion of the pyloric part of the stomach, which may temporarily become partially or completely shut off from the remainder of the stomach during digestion by peristaltic contraction of the prepyloric sphincter; it is demarcated, sometimes, from the second part of the pyloric part of the... Nearer the pyloric end of the stomach than its cardiac end is a well-marked notch, the angular incisure (or notch), which varies somewhat in position with the state of distension of the viscus. ... Nearer the pyloric end of the stomach than its cardiac end is a well-marked notch, the angular incisure (or notch), which varies somewhat in position with the state of distension of the viscus. ... Rugae are the mucus-covered ridges, or folds, located on the inside of the stomach wall. ... A work of the United States Government is, as defined by United States copyright law, a work prepared by an officer or employee of the United States Government as part of that persons official duties. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... Section of an artery For other uses, see Artery (disambiguation). ... The short gastric arteries (vasa brevia) consist of from five to seven small branches, which arise from the end of the lienal artery, and from its terminal divisions. ... The left gastro-omental artery (or left gastroepiploic artery), the largest branch of the splenic artery, runs from left to right about a finger’s breadth or more from the greater curvature of the stomach, between the layers of the greater omentum, and anastomoses with the right gastroepiploic. ... Elseviers logo. ... The lesser curvature of the stomach, extending between the cardiac and pyloric orifices, forms the right or posterior border of the stomach. ...

Contents

Surface

Starting from the cardiac orifice at the incisura cardiaca, it forms an arch backward, upward, and to the left; the highest point of the convexity is on a level with the sixth left costal cartilage. The cardia is the anatomical term for the junction orifice of the stomach and the esophagus. ... The costal cartilages are bars of hyaline cartilage which serve to prolong the ribs forward and contribute very materially to the elasticity of the walls of the thorax. ...


From this level it may be followed downward and forward, with a slight convexity to the left as low as the cartilage of the ninth rib; it then turns to the right, to the end of the pylorus. From Greek pylorus; pyl- = gate, -orus = guard. ...


Directly opposite the incisura angularis of the lesser curvature the greater curvature presents a dilatation, which is the left extremity of the pyloric part; this dilatation is limited on the right by a slight groove, the sulcus intermedius, which is about 2.5 cm, from the duodenopyloric constriction.


The portion between the sulcus intermedius and the duodenopyloric constriction is termed the pyloric antrum. Pyloric antrum is initial portion of the pyloric part of the stomach, which may temporarily become partially or completely shut off from the remainder of the stomach during digestion by peristaltic contraction of the prepyloric sphincter; it is demarcated, sometimes, from the second part of the pyloric part of the...


At its commencement the greater curvature is covered by peritoneum continuous with that covering the front of the organ. In higher vertebrates, the peritoneum is the serous membrane that forms the lining of the abdominal cavity - it covers most of the intra-abdominal organs. ...


The left part of the curvature gives attachment to the gastrolienal ligament, while to its anterior portion are attached the two layers of the greater omentum, separated from each other by the gastroepiploic vessels. The spleen is almost entirely surrounded by peritoneum, which is firmly adherent to its capsule. ... The greater omentum (great omentum; gastrocolic omentum; epiploon) is a large fold of peritoneum that hangs down from the stomach, and extends from the stomach to the transverse colon. ...


Blood supply

There are three arteries which primarily supply the greater curvature:

  • short gastric arteries - upper part
  • gastric branches of left gastro-omental artery - middle part
  • gastric branches of right gastro-omental artery - lower part

The short gastric arteries (vasa brevia) consist of from five to seven small branches, which arise from the end of the lienal artery, and from its terminal divisions. ... The left gastro-omental artery (or left gastroepiploic artery), the largest branch of the splenic artery, runs from left to right about a finger’s breadth or more from the greater curvature of the stomach, between the layers of the greater omentum, and anastomoses with the right gastroepiploic. ... The right gastro-omental artery (or right gastroepiploic artery) runs from right to left along the greater curvature of the stomach, between the layers of the greater omentum, anastomosing with the left gastroepiploic branch of the splenic artery. ...

Additional images

External links

This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained herein may be outdated. Please edit the article if this is the case, and feel free to remove this notice when it is no longer relevant. eMedicine is an online clinical medical knowledge base that was founded in 1996. ... Georgetown University, incorporated as the The President and Directors of the College of Georgetown, is a private university in the United States, located in Georgetown, a historic neighborhood of Washington, D.C. With roots extending back to March 25, 1634 and founded in its current form on January 23, 1789... Georgetown University, incorporated as the The President and Directors of the College of Georgetown, is a private university in the United States, located in Georgetown, a historic neighborhood of Washington, D.C. With roots extending back to March 25, 1634 and founded in its current form on January 23, 1789... Elseviers logo. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy after Henry Gray, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


 
 

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