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Encyclopedia > Greater Prairie Chicken
Greater Prairie Chicken
Greater Prairie Chicken(Photo by South Dakota Tourism)
Greater Prairie Chicken
(Photo by South Dakota Tourism)
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Galliformes
Family: Tetraonidae
Genus: Tympanuchus
Species: T. cupido
Binomial name
Tympanuchus cupido
(Linnaeus, 1758)
Subspecies

Tympanuchus cupido attwateri
Tympanuchus cupido cupido
Tympanuchus cupido pinnatus The conservation status of a species is an indicator of the likelihood of that species remaining extant either in the present day or the near future. ... This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Scientific classification redirects here. ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Classes See below Chordates (phylum Chordata) are a group of animals that includes the vertebrates, together with several closely related invertebrates. ... For other meanings of bird, see bird (disambiguation). ... Families Megapodiidae Numididae Odontophoridae Phasianidae Meleagrididae Tetraonidae Cracidae (?)Mesitornithidae Galliformes is an order of birds containing turkeys, grouse, chickens, quails, and pheasants. ... Genera Tetrao Lagopus Falcipennis Centrocercus Bonasa Dendrapagus Tympanuchus Grouse are from the order Galliformes which inhabit temperate and subarctic regions of the northern hemisphere. ... Latin name redirects here. ... Carl Linnaeus, Latinized as Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 13, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... Attwaters prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus cupido attwateri) is a highly endangered subspecies of prairie chicken related to the now extinct heath hen. ... wtf why youtake it off u mother fuckers Trinomial name Tympanuchus cupido cupido (Linnaeus, 1758) The Heath Hen (Tympanuchus cupido cupido) was a distinctive subspecies of the Greater Prairie Chicken, Tympanuchus cupido, a large North American bird in the grouse family. ...

The Greater Prairie Chicken, Tympanuchus cupido, is a large bird in the grouse family. This North American species was once abundant, but has become extremely rare or extinct over much of its range due to habitat loss. There are current efforts to help this species gain the numbers that it once had. One of the most famous aspects of these creatures is the mating ritual called booming. For other uses, see Bird (disambiguation). ... Genera Tetrao Lagopus Falcipennis Centrocercus Bonasa Dendrapagus Tympanuchus Grouse are from the order Galliformes which inhabit temperate and subarctic regions of the northern hemisphere. ... The hierarchy of scientific classification In biological classification, family (Latin: familia, plural familiae) is a rank, or a taxon in that rank. ... North American redirects here. ... For other uses, see Species (disambiguation). ... This article is in need of attention. ... Dates romantically sharing a chili cheese dog, in a dream sequence Courtship (sometimes called dating or going steady) is the process of selecting and attracting a mate for marriage. ...

Contents

Description

Adults of both sexes are 14 inches (360 mm) long, medium sized, stocky, and round-winged. Their tails are short, round, and dark. Adult males have yellow-orange comb over their eyes. Males also have dark, elongated head feathers that can be raised or lain along neck. A circular, orange unfeathered neck patch can be inflated while displaying. Adult females have shorter head feathers and lack the male's yellow comb and orange neck patch. Species L. (silver cockscomb) L. (crested cockscomb) Vahl (West Indian cockscomb) S. Wats. ... For other uses, see Feather (disambiguation). ...


Subspecies

There are three subspecies;

  • The Heath Hen, Tympanuchus cupido cupido, which was historically found along the Atlantic coast is extinct. It was possibly a distinct species; in this case the two other forms would be T. pinnatus pinnatus and T. p. attwateri.
  • Attwater's Prairie Chicken, T. c. attwateri is endangered and restricted to coastal Texas.
  • The Greater Prairie Chicken, T. c. pinnatus, is now restricted to a small section of its former range.

wtf why youtake it off u mother fuckers Trinomial name Tympanuchus cupido cupido (Linnaeus, 1758) The Heath Hen (Tympanuchus cupido cupido) was a distinctive subspecies of the Greater Prairie Chicken, Tympanuchus cupido, a large North American bird in the grouse family. ... Trinomial name Tympanuchus cupido attwateri Attwaters Prairie Chicken (Tympanuchus cupido attwateri) is a highly endangered subspecies of prairie chicken related to the now extinct heath hen. ... The Siberian Tiger is a subspecies of tiger that are critically endangered. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ...

Population and habitat

Greater Prairie Chickens prefer undisturbed prairie and were originally found in tall grass prairies. They can tolerate agricultural land mixed with prairie, but the more agricultural land the less prairie chicken. Their diet consists primarily of seeds and fruit but during the summer they also eat insects and green plants. These birds were once widespread all across the oak savanna and tall grass prairie ecosystem. The prairie chicken was almost extinct in the 1930s due to hunting pressure and habitat loss. They now only live on small parcels of managed prairie land. It is thought that their current population is about 459,000 individuals. In May 2000, the Canadian Species at Risk Act listed the Greater Prairie-Chicken as extirpated in its Canadian range (Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario)[1]. For other uses, see Prairie (disambiguation). ... Prairie grasses The tallgrass prairie is an ecosystem native to central North America, with fire as its primary periodic disturbance. ... For other uses, see Fruit (disambiguation). ... Orders Subclass Apterygota Archaeognatha (bristletails) Thysanura (silverfish) Subclass Pterygota Infraclass Paleoptera (Probably paraphyletic) Ephemeroptera (mayflies) Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) Infraclass Neoptera Superorder Exopterygota Grylloblattodea (ice-crawlers) Mantophasmatodea (gladiators) Plecoptera (stoneflies) Embioptera (webspinners) Zoraptera (angel insects) Dermaptera (earwigs) Orthoptera (grasshoppers, etc) Phasmatodea (stick insects) Blattodea (cockroaches) Isoptera (termites) Mantodea (mantids) Psocoptera... An oak savanna is a type of savanna, or lightly-forested grassland, found in central North America. ... A coral reef near the Hawaiian islands is an example of a complex marine ecosystem. ... For other uses, see Alberta (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Saskatchewan (disambiguation). ... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Official languages English French (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 14 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 15, 1870 (5th) Area  Ranked 8th Total 647,797... This article is about the Canadian province. ...


Threats

The Prairie chickens are not threatened by severe winter weather. When the snow is thick they "dive" in to the snow to keep warm. A greater threat to the prairie chickens comes in the spring rains. These sometimes drenching rains can wreak havoc on their chicks. Another major natural threat is drought. A drought can destroy food and make it difficult for the chicks. Fields outside Benambra, Victoria, Australia suffering from drought conditions A drought is an extended period of months or years when a region notes a deficiency in its water supply. ...


Human interactions are by far the greatest threat. The conversion of native prairie to cropland is very detrimental to these birds. It was found in a radio telemetry study conducted by Kansas State University that "most prairie chicken hens avoided nesting or rearing their broods within a quarter-mile of power lines and within a third-mile of improved roads." (Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks) It was also found that the chickens avoided communication towers and rural farms. Kansas State University, officially called Kansas State University of Fashion and Design [2] but commonly shortened to K-State, is an institution of higher learning located in Manhattan, Kansas, in the United States. ...


Sexual behavior

Greater Prairie Chickens do not migrate. They are territorial birds and often defend their booming grounds. These booming grounds are the area in which they perform their displays in hopes of attracting females. Their displays consist of inflating air sacs located on the side of their neck and snapping their tails. These booming grounds usually have very short or no vegetation. The male prairie chickens stay on this ground displaying for almost two months. The breeding season usually begins in the United States starting in Late March throughout April. During this time the males establish booming sites where they display for the females. The one or two most dominant males will do about 90% of the mating. After mating has taken place, the females will move about one mile from the booming grounds and begin to build their nests. Hens lay between 5 and 17 eggs per clutch and the eggs take between 23 and 24 days to hatch. There are between five and 10 young per brood. (INRIN, 2005). The young are raised by the female and fledge in one to four weeks, are completely independent by the tenth to twelfth week, and reach sexual maturity by age one (Ammann, 1957). One problem facing prairie chickens is the ring neck pheasants. Pheasants will lay their eggs in prairie chicken nest. The pheasant eggs hatch first; this causes the prairie chickens to leave the nest thinking that the young have hatched. In reality the eggs did not hatch and the young usually die because the mother is not there to incubate the eggs. Flock of Barnacle Geese during autumn migration Bird migration refers to the regular seasonal journeys undertaken by many species of birds. ... A lek is a gathering of males of certain species of animal for the purposes of competitive mating display, held before and during the breeding season, day after day. ... Deep cup nest of the Great Reed-warbler (Acrocephalus arundinaceus) A bird nest is the spot in which a bird lays and incubates its eggs and raises its young. ... In most birds and reptiles, an egg (Latin ovum) is the zygote, resulting from fertilization of the ovum. ... Fledge is the stage in a young birds life when the feathers and wing muscles are sufficiently developed for flight. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The Common Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), otherwise known as the Ring-necked Pheasant or Chinese Pheasant is a gamebird in the pheasant family Phasianidae of the order Galliformes, gallinaceous birds. ... The word incubate in the context of birds refers to the development of the chick (embryo) within the egg and the constant temperature required for the development of it over a specific period. ...


See also

Binomial name Tympanuchus pallidicinctus (Ridgway, 1873) The Lesser Prairie Chicken, Tympanuchus pallidicinctus, is slightly smaller and paler than its near relative the Greater Prairie Chicken. ... A lek is a gathering of males of certain species of animal for the purposes of competitive mating display, held before and during the breeding season, day after day. ...

References

  1. ^ Species at Risk - Greater Prairie Chicken. Environment Canada (2006-05-08). Retrieved on 2007-08-16.

Environment Canada is the department of the government of Canada with responsibility for coordinating environmental policies and programs as well as preserving and enhancing the natural environment and conservation of wildlife. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (also known as the IUCN Red List and Red Data List), created in 1963, is the worlds most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species and can be found here. ... The World Conservation Union or International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) is an international organization dedicated to natural resource conservation. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
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PRAIRIE RIDGE STATE NATURAL AREA (5380 words)
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The Prairie Chicken in Minnesota, University of Minnesota, Crookston.
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