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Encyclopedia > Great saphenous vein
Great saphenous vein and its tributaries.
Great saphenous vein and its tributaries.

The great saphenous vein (also greater saphenous vein) is the large (subcutaneous) superficial vein of the leg and thigh. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (184x800, 52 KB)Great saphenous vein http://us. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (184x800, 52 KB)Great saphenous vein http://us. ... Superficial vein is a term used to describe a vein that is close to the surface of the body. ... Leg has multiple meanings: For the limbs of animals that support them above the ground: in the case of the legs of humans, see Human leg; in the case of the legs of horses, see Equine leg; in the case of the legs of crabs, lobsters, and their close relatives... Diagram of the human thigh bone In humans the thigh is the area between the pelvis and buttocks and the knee. ...


It originates from where the dorsal vein of the first digit (the large toe) merges with the dorsal venous arch of the foot, which attaches to the small saphenous vein. After passing anterior to the medial malleolus (where it often can be visualized and palpated), it runs up the medial side of the leg and the thigh and joins with the femoral vein (at the femoral triangle) through an opening in the surrounding fascia. The dorsal venous arch of the foot is a superficial vein that connects the small saphenous vein and the great saphenous vein. ... Small saphenous vein and its tributaries. ... Palpation is a method of examination in which the examiner feels the size or shape or firmness or location of something (of body parts when the examiner is a health professional). ... For the meaning of medial in anatomy, see anatomical terms of location. ... In the human body, the femoral vein is a blood vessel that accompanies the femoral artery in the same sheath. ... The femoral triangle is an anatomical region of the human thigh, important as a number of important structures pass through here. ... Fascia is a specialized connective tissue layer which surrounds muscles, bones, and joints, providing support and protection and giving structure to the body. ...


The vein is often removed by cardiothoracic surgeons and used for auto-transplantation in coronary artery bypass operations, when arterial grafts are not available or many grafts are required. Coronary artery bypass surgery Image showing a tube leading into the heart as well as the chest spreaders used to keep the chest cavity open. ...


The great saphenous vein is the conduit of choice for vascular surgeons[1][2], when available, for doing peripheral arterial bypass operations because it has superior long-term patency compared to synthetic grafts (PTFE, Dacron) and human umbilical vein grafts. Often, it is used in situ (in place), after tying off smaller tributaries and stripping the valves with a device called LeMaitre's valvulotome. Vascular surgery is the branch of surgery that occupies itself with surgical interventions of arteries and veins, as well as conservative therapies for disease of the peripheral vascular system. ... Teflon is the brand name of a polymer compound discovered by Roy J. Plunkett (1910-1994) of DuPont in 1938 and introduced as a commercial product in 1946. ... The term plastics covers a range of synthetic or semi-synthetic organic condensation or polymerization products that can be molded or extruded into objects or films or fibers. ... A human umbilical vein graft (HUVG) is a specially prepared human umbilical vein that is used as a vascular graft. ... In situ (in place in Latin), a term used in: biology, where it means to examine the phenomenon exactly in place where it occurs (without removing it in some special medium etc. ... A valve is a mechanical device that regulates the flow of fluids (either gases, fluidised solids, slurries or liquids) by opening, closing, or partially obstructing various passageways. ...


The saphenous nerve runs along side of the great saphenous vein and is not infrequently damaged in surgeries that that make use the similarly named venous conduit.


See also

A coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) or heart bypass is a surgical procedure performed in patients with coronary artery disease (see atherosclerosis) for the relief of angina and possible improved heart muscle function. ... Varicose veins are veins on the leg which are large, twisted, and ropelike, and can cause pain, swelling, or itching. ...

References

  1. ^  Muhs BE, Gagne P, Sheehan P. Peripheral arterial disease: clinical assessment and indications for revascularization in the patient with diabetes. Curr Diab Rep. 2005 Feb;5(1):24-9. PMID 15663913
  2. ^  Mamode N, Scott RN. Graft type for femoro-popliteal bypass surgery. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2000;(2):CD001487. PMID 10796649

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Great saphenous vein - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (500 words)
The great saphenous vein, also greater saphenous vein, is the large (subcutaneous) superficial vein of the leg and thigh.
It originates from where the dorsal vein of the first digit (the large toe) merges with the dorsal venous arch of the foot, which attaches to the small saphenous vein.
The vein is often removed by cardiothoracic surgeons and used for auto-transplantation in coronary artery bypass operations, when arterial grafts are not available or many grafts are required, such as in a triple bypass or quadruple bypass.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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