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Encyclopedia > Great Western Railway
The original Bristol Temple Meads station, first terminus of the GWR, is the building to the left of this picture

The Great Western Railway (GWR) was a British railway company, linking South West England, the West Country and South Wales with London. It was founded in 1833, kept its identity through the 1923 grouping, and became part of British Railways at nationalisation in 1948. Known admiringly to some as "God's Wonderful Railway", jocularly to others as the "Great Way Round" (some of its earliest routes were not the most direct), and by some as the "Goes When Ready" due to the casual way in which some of its branch lines were run, it gained great fame as the "Holiday Railway", taking huge numbers of people to resorts in the southwest. The company's best-known livery was Middle Chrome Green (similar to Brunswick green) for the locomotives (above Indian red, later black, frames) and two-tone "chocolate and cream" for the carriages. Bristol Temple Meads railway station with Isambard Kingdom Brunels original terminal station on the left and Matthew Digby Wyatts through station on the far right. ... Bristol Temple Meads railway station with Isambard Kingdom Brunels original terminal station on the left and Matthew Digby Wyatts through station on the far right. ... The original station (left) closed in 1965. ... The Midland Railways London terminus at St Pancras. ... South West England is one of the regions of England. ... The West Country is an informal area of southwestern England, roughly corresponding to the administrative region South West England. ... For an explanation of often confusing terms such as Great Britain, Britain, United Kingdom, England and Wales and England, see British Isles (terminology). ... For other uses, see London (disambiguation). ... 1833 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Railways Act of 1921, also known as the Grouping Act, was an enactment by the British government of David Lloyd George intended to stem the losses being made by many of the countrys one hundred and twenty railway companies, move the railways away from internal competition, and to... Logo of British Rail British Railways (BR), later rebranded as British Rail, ran the British railway system from the nationalisation of the Big Four British railway companies in 1948 until its privatisation in stages between 1994 and 1997. ... Nationalization or nationalisation is the act of taking assets into state ownership. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ...

Contents


Early history

Replica of Gooch's 1840 Fire Fly

The Great Western Railway originated from the desire of Bristol merchants to maintain the position of their port as the second port in the country and the chief one for American trade. The increase in the size of ships and the gradual silting of the River Avon made Liverpool an increasingly attractive port, and with its rail connection with London developing in the 1830s it threatened Bristol's status. The answer for Bristol was, with the co-operation of London interests, to build a line of their own, a railway built to unprecedented standards of excellence to outperform the other lines being constructed to the north-west. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 417 KB) Summary firefly at didcot railway centre. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 417 KB) Summary firefly at didcot railway centre. ... Sir Daniel Gooch was the first chief mechanical engineer of the Great Western Railway from 1837 to 1864. ... Bristol (IPA: brĭstəl) is a city, unitary authority and ceremonial county in South West England, 115 miles (185 km) west of London at , . With a population of 400,000, and metropolitan area of 550,000, it is Englands sixth, and the United Kingdoms ninth, most... The Avon Gorge and Clifton Suspension Bridge The River Avon is a river in the south west of England. ... Liverpool waterfront by night, as seen from the Wirral. ... Events and Trends Electromagnetic induction discovered by Michael Faraday Dutch-speaking farmers known as Voortrekkers emigrate northwards from the Cape Colony Croquet invented in Ireland Railroad construction begins in earnest in the United States Egba refugees fleeing the Yoruba civil wars found the city of Abeokuta in south-west Nigeria...


The Company was founded at a public meeting in Bristol in 1833, and was incorporated by Act of Parliament in 1835. Isambard Kingdom Brunel was appointed as engineer at the age of 27, and made two controversial decisions: to use a broad gauge of seven feet (actually 7 ft 0.25 in or 2140 mm) for the track, to allow large wheels, providing smoother running at high speeds; and to take a route which passed north of the Marlborough Downs, an area with no significant towns, though it did offer potential connections to Oxford and Gloucester and then to follow the Thames Valley into London. He surveyed the entire length of the route between London and Bristol himself. Bristol (IPA: brĭstəl) is a city, unitary authority and ceremonial county in South West England, 115 miles (185 km) west of London at , . With a population of 400,000, and metropolitan area of 550,000, it is Englands sixth, and the United Kingdoms ninth, most... 1833 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... In Westminster System parliaments, an Act of Parliament is a part of the law passed by the Parliament. ... Brunel before the launching of the Great Eastern. ... Great Western Railway broad gauge steam locomotives awaiting scrapping in 1892 after the conversion to standard gauge. ... The North Wessex Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) is located in the English counties of Berkshire, Hampshire, Oxfordshire and Wiltshire. ... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 ( 2001 census). ... This article is about the city of Gloucester in England; for other uses see Gloucester (disambiguation). ... Several places exist with the name Thames, and the word is also used as part of several brand and company names Most famous is the River Thames in England, on which the city of London stands Other Thames Rivers There is a Thames River in Canada There is a Thames...


The initial group of locomotives ordered by Brunel to his own specifications proved unsatisfactory, apart from the North Star locomotive, and 20-year-old Daniel Gooch (later Sir) was appointed as Superintendent of Locomotives. Brunel and Gooch chose to locate their locomotive works at the village of Swindon, at the point where the gradual ascent from London turned into the steeper descent to the Avon valley at Bath. A Star class locomotive was a particular type of steam locomotive of the Great Western Railway. ... Sir Daniel Gooch was the first chief mechanical engineer of the Great Western Railway from 1837 to 1864. ... A locomotive (from Latin loco motivus) is a railway vehicle that provides the motive power for a train, and has no payload capacity of its own; its sole purpose is to move the train along the tracks. ... Swindon railway works was built by the Great Western Railway in 1840 in the town of Swindon in the English county of Wiltshire. ... Swindon is a large town in the South West of England. ... The Avon Gorge and Clifton Suspension Bridge The River Avon is a river in the south west of England. ... For other uses, see Bath (disambiguation). ...


Openings

The first stretch of line, from London Paddington to Taplow near Maidenhead, opened in 1838. The full line to Bristol Temple Meads opened on completion of Box Tunnel in 1841. For other uses, see London (disambiguation). ... Paddington Station, March 2005 during rush hour Paddington station or London Paddington station is a major National Rail and London Underground station complex in the Paddington area of London. ... Taplow is a village near Maidenhead, in England. ... Maidenhead is a town in Berkshire, England, and has a population of around 60,000. ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The original station (left) closed in 1965. ... Box Tunnel is a railway tunnel in western England, between Bath and Chippenham, dug through the Box Hill. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ...

The London terminus is here at Paddington
The London terminus is here at Paddington

From then onwards, by amalgamations and new construction, the railway took shape, as can be seen from the following list (dates are when opened/absorbed): Paddington station from pixelquelle. ... Paddington station from pixelquelle. ...

  • Cheltenham & Great Western Union Railway: 1836-41/1843 (linking with the GWR at Swindon)
  • Oxford Railway 1843/1844
  • Bristol and Exeter Railway 1844
  • South Devon Railway 1844 (originally atmospheric, loco-hauled standard by 1849)
  • Berkshire and Hampshire Railway 1845/1846
  • Cornwall Railway 1846-49 finally absorbed 1889
  • Oxford & Rugby Railway 1845/1846
  • Birmingham & Oxford Junction Railway 1846/1848
  • Birmingham, Wolverhampton and Dudley Railway 1846/1848
  • Wiltshire, Somerset & Weymouth Railway 1845-48/1850
  • West Cornwall Railway 1852
  • Shrewsbury & Birmingham Railway 1846-49/1854
  • Shrewsbury & Chester Railway 1846/1854
  • Wolverhampton Junction Railway 1852/1854

See also List of early British railway companies William Spreats print shows the original St Davids station, built by the Hoopers in Pennyroyal Fields in 1844. ... The South Devon Railway Company built and operated the railway from Exeter to Plymouth and Torquay in Devon, England. ... The Cornwall Railway was a broad gauge railway (7 feet 0. ... The following list sets out to show all the railway companies set up by Acts of Parliament in the 19th century until the late 1850s. ...


The Bristol and Exeter Railway reached Exeter by 1844, and the Bristol and Gloucester Railway brought the broad gauge to Gloucester in the same year. Gloucester was already served by the standard-gauge Birmingham and Gloucester Railway (opened throughout in 1841), resulting in a break of gauge, and the need for all passengers and goods travelling through Gloucester to change trains. William Spreats print shows the original St Davids station, built by the Hoopers in Pennyroyal Fields in 1844. ... A number of other places have taken their names from Exeter The city of Exeter is the county town of Devon, in England, UK. It is located at 50° 43 25 N, 3° 31 39 W. In the 2001 census its population was recorded at 111,066. ... 1844 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Bristol and Gloucester Railway opened in 1844 between Bristol and Gloucester, meeting the Birmingham and Gloucester Railway. ... 5593 Kolhapur climbing Lickey Incline (painting by Terence Cuneo) The Birmingham and Gloucester Railway is a railway route linking Birmingham to Gloucester in England. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... With railways, a break-of-gauge is where a line of one gauge meets a line of a different gauge. ...


The GWR commissioned the world's first commercial telegraph line. This ran for 13 miles (21 km) from Paddington station to West Drayton and came into operation on 9 April 1839. It has been suggested that Electrical telegraph be merged into this article or section. ... West Drayton is a place in the London Borough of Hillingdon to the west of central London. ... April 9 is the 99th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (100th in leap years). ... 1839 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


The "gauge war"

This was the beginning of the "gauge war", and resulted in the appointment by Parliament of a Gauge Commission, which duly recommended in favour of standard gauge. The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative body in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories. ... As railways developed and expanded one of the key issues to be decided was that of the rail gauge (the distance between the two rails of the track) which should be used. ...


The undaunted GWR pressed ahead into the West Midlands, in hard-fought competition with the London and North Western Railway. Birmingham was reached in 1852, at Snow Hill (although the GWR had initially considered building to Rugby instead of Birmingham), Wolverhampton Low Level (the furthest-north broad-gauge station) and Birkenhead (on standard-gauge track) in 1854. The Bristol and Gloucester had been bought by the Midland Railway in 1846 and converted to standard gauge in 1854, bringing mixed gauge track (with three rails, so that both broad and standard gauge trains could run on it) to Bristol. By the 1860s the gauge war was lost; with the merger of the standard-gauge West Midlands Railway into the GWR in 1861 mixed gauge came to Paddington, and by 1869 there was no broad-gauge track north of Oxford. The West Midlands is a geographical term describing the western half of central England, known as the Midlands. ... The London and North Western Railway (LNWR) was formed in 1846 by the merger of three railway companies - the Grand Junction Railway, London and Birmingham and Manchester and Birmingham. ... The city from above Centenary Square. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The station entrance Birmingham Snow Hill station is a railway station located in the centre of Birmingham, England. ... Rugby is a market town in the county of Warwickshire in central England on the River Avon. ... Wolverhampton is an city and metropolitan borough in the English West Midlands, traditionally part of the county of Staffordshire. ... 1854 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Midland Railway (MR) was a railway company in the United Kingdom, which existed from 1844 to 1922. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1854 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Sunlight reflects off dual-gauge tracks near Chur, Switzerland Mixed-gauge track and pointwork (1435 mm and 1067 mm) at Odawara in Japan Dual-gauge or mixed-gauge railway is a special configuration of railway track, allowing trains of different gauges to use the same alignment. ... // Events and trends Technology The First Transcontinental Railroad in the United States is built in the six year period between 1863 and 1869. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Paddington Station, March 2005 during rush hour Paddington station or London Paddington station is a major National Rail and London Underground station complex in the Paddington area of London. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...

South of Exeter the railway clings to the coastline
South of Exeter the railway clings to the coastline

Meanwhile, further developments were made in the GWR's heartland: the South Devon Railway (which for a time experimented with the “atmospheric” system of propulsion) was opened in 1849, extending the broad gauge to Plymouth, and the Cornwall Railway took it over the Royal Albert Bridge and into Cornwall, reaching Penzance by 1867. The South Wales Railway, terminating at Neyland, opened in 1850 and was connected to the GWR via Brunel's ungainly Wye bridge in 1852. The route from Wales to London via Gloucester was a roundabout one, so work on the Severn Tunnel began in 1873, but unexpected underwater springs slowed the work down and prevented its opening until 1886. from http://www. ... from http://www. ... The city of Exeter is the county town of Devon, in England, UK. It is located at , . In the 2001 census its population was recorded at 111,066. ... The South Devon Railway Company built and operated the railway from Exeter to Plymouth and Torquay in Devon, England. ... An atmospheric railway is a railway in which air pressure or vacuum is used to drive trains. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Plymouth is a city in the South West of England, or alternatively the Westcountry, and is situated within the traditional county of Devon. ... The Cornwall Railway was a broad gauge railway (7 feet 0. ... The Royal Albert bridge seen from Saltash railway station The Royal Albert Bridge (sometimes called the Brunel Bridge or Saltash Bridge) spans the River Tamar in the U.K. between Plymouth, on the Devon bank, and Saltash on the Cornish bank. ... Cornwall (Cornish: Kernow) is a county at the extreme South-West of England on the peninsula that lies to the west of the River Tamar. ... Penzances old docks with Abbey Slip and St Marys Church behind Penzance is a port in Cornwall, England, facing east onto the English Channel. ... 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Neyland is a town in Pembrokeshire, Wales, lying on the River Cleddau and the upstream end of the Milford Haven estuary. ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The approach to the tunnel. ... 1873 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calaber). ... 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) is a common year starting on Friday (click on link to calendar) // Events January 18 - Modern field hockey is born with the formation of The Hockey Association in England. ...


Through this period the conversion to standard gauge continued, with mixed-gauge track reaching Exeter in 1876. By this time most conversions were bypassing mixed gauge and going directly from broad to standard. The final stretch of broad gauge was converted to standard in a single weekend in May 1892. The city of Exeter is the county town of Devon, in England, UK. It is located at , . In the 2001 census its population was recorded at 111,066. ... 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) is a leap year starting on Saturday. ...


The 1890s also saw improvements in service of the generally conservative GWR - restaurant cars, much improved conditions for third class passengers, and steam heating of trains. The company also built new track to shorten its previously circuitous routes. The 1890s were sometimes referred to as the Mauve Decade, because William Henry Perkins aniline dye allowed the widespread use of that colour in fashion, and also as the Gay Nineties, under the then-current usage of the word gay which referred simply to merriment and frivolity, with no...


New locomotives

After 1902 G. J. Churchward developed nine standard locomotive types, with flat-topped Belpaire fireboxes, tapered boilers, long smokeboxes, boiler top feeds, long lap, long travel valve gear and many standard parts between locomotive types. Most of these were developed from five experimental locomotives, No's 40, 97, 98, 99 and 115. From these were developed the famous Star class locomotives, the Saint class locomotives and the 2800 class locomotives. Such was the success of these locomotives that they influenced locomotive design in the United Kingdom until the demise of steam traction. Two notable locomotives were 111 The Great Bear, the first 4-6-2 locomotive in the United Kingdom and 3440 City of Truro, the first locomotive to be recorded at a speed of 100 mph (160 km/h) in 1904 (although this speed has never been formally confirmed). George Jackson Churchward (1857-1933) was chief mechanical engineer of the Great Western Railway from 1902 to 1921. ... A PRR N1s. ... A Star class locomotive was a particular type of steam locomotive of the Great Western Railway. ... The Great Western Railway Saint Class 4-6-0 steam locomotives for passenger train work. ... 2818 at National Railway Museum, York with the Mallard in the background The Great Western Railway (GWR) 2800 Class is a class of steam locomotive designed for heavy freight work. ... The Great Bear, number 111, was a locomotive of the Great Western Railway. ... GWR 3700 Class (City) 4-4-0, no. ...


Churchward also remodelled Swindon works, building the one-and-a-half-acre (6,000 m²) boiler-erecting shops and the first static locomotive-testing plant in the United Kingdom.


1923 Grouping

At the outbreak of World War I the GWR, along with the other major railways, was taken into government control. After the war the government considered permanent nationalisation, but preferred a compulsory amalgamation of the railways into four large groups. The GWR alone preserved its identity through the grouping, which took effect on January 1, 1923. The Railways Act of 1921, also known as the Grouping Act, was an enactment by the British government of David Lloyd George intended to stem the losses being made by many of the countrys one hundred and twenty railway companies, move the railways away from internal competition, and to... Combatants Allies: Serbia, Russia, France, Romania, Belgium, British Empire, United States, Italy, and others Central Powers: Germany, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, Ottoman Empire Casualties Military dead: 5 million Civilian deaths: 3 million Total of dead: 8 million Military dead: 4 million Civilian deaths: 3 million Total dead: 7 million The First... The Railways Act of 1921, also known as the Grouping Act, was an enactment by the British government of David Lloyd George intended to stem the losses being made by many of the countrys one hundred and twenty railway companies, move the railways away from internal competition, and to... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Constituent companies

The new Great Western Railway comprised the following constituent companies:

Total route mileage of the GWR was 3800 miles (6116 km) The Barry Railway (Barry) was incorporated by Act of Parliament on August 14 1884, for the construction of a dock at Barry Island, 7 miles from Cardiff, and the construction of railways about 26 miles in length from the docks to the Rhondda Valley, with access by junctions with the... The Cambrian Railways (Cambrian) owned a total of 230 miles of track, over a large area of mid-Wales. ... The Cardiff Railway came into being from the need to service Bute Docks, so as to provide facilities for the traffic to and from the Docks. ... The Rhymney Railway (Rhymney) was virtually a single stretch of main line, some twenty-five miles in length, by which the Rhymney Valley was connected to the docks at Cardiff in the county of Glamorgan, South Wales. ... The Taff Vale Railway (TVR) is a railway in Glamorgan, South Wales, and is one of the oldest in Wales. ...


The details of all railways within the new Great Western Railway are given in the List of constituents of the Great Western Railway. The list of constituent companies of the Great Western Railway (GWR) as a result of the the Railways Act 1921: Constituent companies The new Great Western Railway comprised the following constituent companies: Great Western Railway route mileage 3005 miles (4808 km) Barry Railway (Barry) 68 miles (109 km) Cambrian Railways...


One final company was absorbed, in 1930 - the narrow gauge Corris Railway. Narrow-gauge railways are railroads (railways) with track spaced at less than the standard gauge of 4 ft 8 in (1. ... Maespoeth Junction locomotive shed in the early 1980s, members of the Corris Railway Society at work restoring the line The Corris Railway (Welsh: Rheilffordd Corris) is a narrow gauge 23 (686mm) preserved railway line along the Dulas Valley on the border between Merionethshire (now Gwynedd) and Montgomeryshire (now Powys...


Other statistics

  • Locomotives: tender 1550, tank 2500; coaching vehicles 10,100; freight vehicles 90,000; electric vehicles 60; rail motor cars 70
  • 213 miles (343 km) of canals
  • 16 turbine and twin-screw steamers, plus several smaller vessels
  • docks, harbours etc at Barry, Cardiff, Fishguard, Newport, Penarth, Plymouth, Port Talbot and other places
  • ten hotels

Much of the infrastructure had come into being for handling the South Wales coal traffic. Though this appeared to be a great coup for the GWR, the coal traffic declined significantly as the use of coal as a naval fuel declined, and within a decade the GWR was itself the largest single user of Welsh coal. Barry (Welsh: Y Barri) is a town in the Vale of Glamorgan, Wales. ... Cardiff (Welsh: ) is the largest city in Wales and the countrys capital. ... Lower town, Fishguard Fishguard (Welsh: Abergwaun - Mouth of the River Gwaun) is a coastal town in Pembrokeshire, Wales. ... Newport (Welsh: Casnewydd) is the third-largest city in Wales (after Cardiff and Swansea). ... Penarth (Welsh: pen head, + garth cliff or hill, or arth bear) is a town in the Vale of Glamorgan, Wales, lying on the Bristol Channel and Cardiff Bay. ... Plymouth is a city in the South West of England, or alternatively the Westcountry, and is situated within the traditional county of Devon. ... Arms of Port Talbot Port Talbot is an industrial town in the traditional county of Glamorgan, south Wales, UK, with a population of approximately 50,000. ... Coal (previously referred to as pitcoal or seacoal) is a fossil fuel extracted from the ground by underground mining or open-pit mining (surface mining). ...


New locomotives (1920s)

The 1920s also saw the introduction of the GWR's most famous locomotives - the Castle and King classes developed by Churchward's successor, C. B. Collett. The 1930s brought hard times, and the records set by the Castles and Kings were surpassed by other companies, but the company remained in relatively good financial health despite the Depression. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Social issues of the 1920s. ... Specifications Cylinders: 4; 16 diameter, 26 stroke Valve gear: inside cylinders – Walschaerts; outside cylinders – derived from inside cylinders via rocking bars. ... The Great Western Railway 6000 Class or King is a class of steam locomotive designed for express passenger work. ... Charles Benjamin Collett (September 10, 1871 - April 5, 1952) was chief mechanical engineer of the Great Western Railway from 1922 to 1941. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... The Great Depression was a worldwide economic downturn, starting in 1929 and lasting through most of the 1930s. ...

One of the many engineering firsts on the line was Maidenhead Railway Bridge, at the time the largest span for a brick arch bridge
One of the many engineering firsts on the line was Maidenhead Railway Bridge, at the time the largest span for a brick arch bridge

Looking north, Maidenhead Railway Bridge (Isambard Kingdom Brunel, 1838) crossing the River Thames at Maidenhead. ... Looking north, Maidenhead Railway Bridge (Isambard Kingdom Brunel, 1838) crossing the River Thames at Maidenhead. ... Maidenhead Railway Bridge is a railway bridge carrying the main line of the Great Western Railway over the River Thames in Maidenhead, Berkshire, England. ...

Post WWII

World War II brought a further period of direct government control, and by its end a Labour government was in power and planning to nationalise the railways. The war damaged GWR became part of British Railways on January 1, 1948. On privatisation the "Great Western" name was revived for the train operating company providing passenger services to the West. Combatants Allies: Soviet Union, United Kingdom, France/Free France, United States, Canada, China, India, Australia, Poland, New Zealand, South Africa, Greece, and others Axis Powers: Germany, Italy, Japan, Bulgaria, Finland, Romania, Hungary, Burma, Slovakia Casualties Military dead: 17 million Civilian dead: 33 million Total dead: 50 million Military dead: 8... Nationalization or nationalisation is the act of taking assets into state ownership. ... Logo of British Rail British Railways (BR), later rebranded as British Rail, ran the British railway system from the nationalisation of the Big Four British railway companies in 1948 until its privatisation in stages between 1994 and 1997. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Privatization (sometimes privatisation, denationalization, or, especially in India, disinvestment) is the process of transferring property from public ownership to private ownership and/or transferring the management of a service or activity from the government to the private sector. ...


The traditions of the GWR are kept alive by many heritage railways including at Didcot Railway Centre, the South Devon Railway, the Severn Valley Railway, the Paignton and Dartmouth Steam Railway, the Gloucestershire and Warwickshire Railway and at Tyseley Locomotive Works. A scene on a heritage railway. ... General view, including engine sheds, of part of the site on a cold January day The Didcot Railway Centre, located in the Oxfordshire town of Didcot, is a comprehensive exhibition of Great Western Railway rolling stock. ... The South Devon Railway Trust operates this former Great Western Railway branch line from Totnes to Ashburton in Devon, along the River Dart. ... LMS Ivatt Class 2MT 2-6-0 no. ... Situated in Devon and arguably one of the most picturesque lines in England, the standard gauge Paignton & Dartmouth Steam Railway operates from Paignton to Kingswear along the former Great Western Railway branch line. ... GWR 2-8-0T 4200 Class no. ... The Birmingham Railway Museum Trust operates two subsidiaries: Tyseley Locomotive Works and Vintage Trains. ...

Further information: List of British heritage and private railways

This list of British heritage and private railways is intended as a list of railways (railroads) in Britain. ...

References

  • GWR Engineering Work, 1928-1938, R. Tourret, 2003, Tourret Publishing, ISBN 0-905878-08-6.

See also

Swindon railway works was built by the Great Western Railway in 1840 in the town of Swindon in the English county of Wiltshire. ... This page to be created in due course. ... The list of constituent companies of the Great Western Railway (GWR) as a result of the the Railways Act 1921: Constituent companies The new Great Western Railway comprised the following constituent companies: Great Western Railway route mileage 3005 miles (4808 km) Barry Railway (Barry) 68 miles (109 km) Cambrian Railways... The following list sets out to show all the railway companies set up by Acts of Parliament in the 19th century until the late 1850s. ... The Great Western Railway had an uninterrupted life of over a century to develop its locomotive designs as it was barely unaffected by the Grouping of 1923. ... Categories: Rail stubs | British railway lines ... Sonning Cutting is on the original Great Western Railway built by Isambard Kingdom Brunel. ...

External links

  • Description of the work required for the conversion from broad to narrow gauge
  • Great Western heritage rolling stock


The "big four" pre-nationalisation British railway companies:

Great Western | London Midland & Scottish | London & North Eastern | Southern British Railways (BR), later rebranded as British Rail, ran the British railway system, from the nationalisation of the Big Four British railway companies in 1948 until its privatisation in stages between 1994 and 1997. ... The London, Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS1) was a British railway company. ... LNER timetable for Autumn 1926 detailing the resumption of services after the General Strike. ... The Southern Railway in the United Kingdom was geographically the smallest of the four railway systems created in the Grouping ordered by the Railways Act 1921. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Didcot Railway Centre - Great Western Society (448 words)
The Great Western retained its independence until nationalisation in 1948 and is still with regarded with affection by those who knew it.
The Great Western Railway was one of the most recognisable of the old private operators with its express trains to the holiday resorts in the West of England of chocolate and cream carriages being pulled by the famous Brunswick green locomotives.
It became necessary to put the scheme on a proper footing and thus in 1964 was born the Great Western Society.
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Great Western Railway or ‘Brunels Billiard Table’ as it was known at the time is without doubt the most famous of railways in England.
Steamships of undreamt of size and power, the Great Western, Great Britain and finally the Great Eastern, docks, tunnels and even a complete prefabricated hospital building shipped in parts to the Crimea in 1855 are to mention just a few of the more notable.
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  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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