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Encyclopedia > Great Seal of the United States

The Great Seal of the United States is used to authenticate certain documents issued by the United States federal government. The phrase is used both for the physical seal itself (which is kept by the United States Secretary of State), and more generally for the design impressed upon it. The Great Seal was publicly first used in 1782. Image File history File links US-GreatSeal-Obverse. ... The term obverse, and its opposite, reverse, describe the two sides of units of currency and many other kinds of two-sided objects, most often in reference to coins, but also to medals, drawings, old master prints and other works of art. ... The term obverse, and its opposite, reverse, describe the two sides of units of currency and many other kinds of two-sided objects, most often in reference to coins, but also to medals, drawings, old master prints and other works of art. ... United States Government redirects here. ... This article is about the authentication means. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


The design on the obverse of the great seal is the national coat of arms of the United States. It is officially used on documents such as United States passports, military insignia, embassy placards, and various flags. As a coat of arms, the design has official colors; the physical Great Seal itself, as affixed to paper, is monochrome. A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... Cover of a biometric passport (2007) Cover of a passport (1930) Cover of a passport (1976) Cover of a non-biometric passport Passports are issued by national governments to facilitate international travel. ... ... - Seal on the building of German Embassies. ... 1942 US government war poster. ... This is a list of flags used in or otherwise associated with the United States. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... A photograph of a sign in grayscale The same photograph in black and white Monochrome comes from the two Greek words mono (μωνο, meaning one), and chroma (χρωμα, meaning surface or the color of the skin). A monochromatic object has a single color. ...


Since 1935, both sides of the Great Seal appear on the reverse of the one-dollar bill. 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... For the US one-dollar coin, see United States dollar coin. ...

Contents

Design

Obverse

Image File history File links US-GreatSeal-Obverse. ...

Obverse

The main figure on the obverse (or front) of the seal is the coat of arms of the United States, a bald eagle with its wings outstretched (or "displayed," in heraldic terms). From the eagle's perspective, it holds a bundle of 13 arrows in its left talon, (referring to the 13 original states), and an olive branch, in its right talon, both of which symbolize that the United States of America has "a strong desire for peace, but will always be ready for war." (see Olive Branch Petition). Although not specified by law, the olive branch is usually depicted with 13 leaves and 13 olives, again representing the 13 original states. The eagle has its head turned towards the olive branch, said to symbolize a preference for peace. The eagle clutches the motto E pluribus unum ("Out of Many, One") in its beak; over its head there appears a "glory" with 13 mullets (stars) on a blue field. In the current (and several previous) dies of the great seal, the 13 stars above the eagle are arranged in rows of 1-4-3-4-1, forming a six-pointed star. Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1766) Bald Eagle range  Resident, breeding Summer visitor, breeding Winter visitor On migration only Star: accidental records Subspecies (Linnaeus, 1766) Southern Bald Eagle (Audubon, 1827) Northern Bald Eagle Synonyms Falco leucocephalus Linnaeus, 1766 The Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is a bird of prey found in North America... Heraldry in its most general sense encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. ... This article is about the weapon. ... Talon may refer to several different things: Places: Talon, Nièvre, a commune in the Nièvre département, in France Characters: a professional wrestler a fictional character in the Static Shock animated series a fictional character from the Nintendo 64 game The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time Objects... In 1775, the British claimed authority over the red and pink areas on this map and Spain ruled the orange. ... Olive branch Olive branch is a colloquial term referring to a concession or a gesture of peace, as well as a peace symbol. ... The Olive Branch Petition The Olive Branch Petition, written in the early days of the American Revolutionary War, was a letter to King George III from members of the Second Continental Congress who—for the final time—appealed to their king to readdress colonial grievances in order to avoid more... E pluribus unum included in the Great Seal of the United States, being one of the nations mottos at the time of the seals creation E Pluribus Unum was one of the first mottos adopted by the United States government. ... In heraldry the term mullet or molet refers to a charge or a difference in the conventional shape of a star - by default one with five points (compare pentagram). ... The star, as an ideograph, most commonly represents the astronomical star for which it is named. ...


The shield the eagle bears on its breast, though sometimes drawn incorrectly, has two main differences from the American flag. First, it has no stars on the blue chief (though other arms based on it do: the chief of the arms of the United States Senate may show 13 or 50 , and the shield of the 9/11 Commission has, sometimes, 50 mullets on the chief). Second, unlike the American flag, the outermost stripes are white, not red; so as not to violate the heraldic rule of tincture. In heraldry, the shield is the principal portion of a heraldic achievement or coat of arms. ... Union Jack. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... The Commissions seal The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, also known as the 9/11 Commission, was set up in late 2002 to prepare a full and complete account of the circumstances surrounding the September 11, 2001 attacks including preparedness for and the immediate response... Heraldry in its most general sense encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. ... The first rule of heraldry is the rule of tincture: metal should not be put on metal, nor colour on colour (Humphrey Llwyd, 1568). ...


The 1782 resolution of Congress adopting the arms, still in force, legally blazoned the shield as "Paleways of 13 pieces, argent and gules; a chief, azure." As the designers recognized, this is a technically incorrect blazon under traditional English heraldic rules, since in English practice a vertically striped shield would be described as "paly," not "paleways," and it could not be striped of an uneven number. A more technically proper blazon would have been argent, six pallets gules... (six red stripes on a white field), but the phrase used was chosen to preserve the reference to the 13 original states. 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... This is an article about Heraldry. ... For other uses, see Argent (disambiguation). ... In heraldry, gules is the tincture with the colour red, and belongs to the class of dark tinctures called colours. In engraving, it is sometimes depicted as a region of vertical lines or else marked with gu. ... We dont have an article called Chief (heraldry) Start this article Search for Chief (heraldry) in. ... The term Azure (from Persian لاژورد lazhward) can refer to any of the following: The blueish color of the sky. ... The shield above depicts a black pale placed on a gold shield, and its blazon is A pale is a term used in heraldic blazon to describe a charge on a coat of arms that takes the form of a band running vertically down the center of the shield. ...


Reverse

Reverse

The 1782 resolution adopting the seal describes the image on the reverse as "A pyramid unfinished. In the zenith an eye in a triangle, surrounded by a glory, proper." The pyramid is conventionally shown as consisting of 13 layers of blocks to refer to the 13 original states. There are also 13 sides shown on the ribbon. The adopting resolution provides that it is inscribed on its base with the date MDCCLXXVIM (1776) in Roman numerals. Where the top of the pyramid should be, the Eye of Providence watches over it. Two mottos appear: Annuit Cœptis signifies that the Eye of Providence has "approved of (our) undertakings."[1] Novus Ordo Seclorum, freely taken from Virgil, means "a new order of the ages." It is incorrectly rendered as "New World Order" by some theorists, and "a new secular order" by others. The word seclorum does not mean "secular," as one might assume, but is the genitive (possessive) plural form of the word saeculum, meaning (in this context) generation, century, or age. Saeculum did come to mean "age, world" in late, Christian, Latin, and "secular" is derived from it, through secularis. However, the adjective "secularis," meaning "worldly," is not equivalent to the genitive plural seclorum, meaning "of the ages."[2]. The reverse has never been cut (as a seal) but appears, for example, on the back of the one-dollar bill. For other meanings, see pyramid (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... Roman numerals are a numeral system originating in ancient Rome, adapted from Etruscan numerals. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Insert non-formatted text here Reverse side of the Great Seal of the United States Annuit CÅ“ptis (sometimes misspelled Daniel, due to unfamiliarity with conventional Latin spelling) is one of two mottos (the other being Novus Ordo Seclorum) on the reverse side of the Great Seal of the United... Reverse side of the Great Seal of the United States The phrase Novus Ordo Seclorum (Latin for New Order of the Ages) appears on the reverse of the Great Seal of the United States, first designed in 1782 and printed on the back of the American dollar bill since 1935. ... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... One World Government redirects here. ... This article concerns secularity, that is, being secular, in various senses. ... The genitive case is a grammatical case that indicates a relationship, primarily one of possession, between the noun in the genitive case and another noun. ...


The Eye of Providence, or "all-seeing eye," was a well-known classical symbol of the Renaissance. The eye in a triangle design originally was suggested by Pierre Eugene du Simitiere, and later heraldist William Barton improved upon the design. In Du Simitière's original sketch, two figures stand next to a shield with the all-seeing pyramid above them. The August 20, 1776 report of the first Great Seal Committee describes the seal as "Crest The Eye of Providence in a radiant Triangle whose Glory extends over the Shield and beyond the Figures." This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... Pierre Eugene du Simitiere (1736? - October 1784) was a philosopher and member of the American Philosophical Society. ... William Barton (1754-1817) was a Pennsylvania lawyer, scholar, and the designer (with Charles Thomson) of the Great Seal of the United States. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ...


Abstract of all elements counting 13

In honor of the fact that there were originally 13 states in the Union, items consisting of this number is a common motif in the seal. There are: 13 (thirteen) is the natural number after 12 and before 14. ...

  • 13 stars (in the "glory" above the eagle's head)
  • 13 stripes on the shield
  • 13 arrows in the eagle’s talon
  • 13 letters in the mottos "e pluribus unum" and "annuit coeptis" (apparently coincidental; there are 52 characters on the whole seal, which is itself evenly divisible by 13)
  • 13 olive leaves (by custom, not by law)
  • 13 olives on the branch (by custom, not by law)
  • 13 brick levels of the pyramid (by custom, not by law)
  • 13 sides showing on the ribbon (by custom, not by law)

History

Design for the obverse of the Great Seal, 1782.
Design for the obverse of the Great Seal, 1782.
William Barton’s design for the reverse of the Great Seal, 1782 appears in the upper right.
William Barton’s design for the reverse of the Great Seal, 1782 appears in the upper right.
Design for the Great Seal by Pierre Eugene du Simitiere, 1776. The shield, Eye of Providence, and motto were adopted.
Design for the Great Seal by Pierre Eugene du Simitiere, 1776. The shield, Eye of Providence, and motto were adopted.

On July 4, 1776, the same day that independence from Great Britain was declared by the thirteen states, the Continental Congress named the first committee to design a Great Seal, or national emblem, for the country. Similar to other nations, The United States of America needed an official symbol of sovereignty to formalize and seal (or sign) international treaties and transactions. It took six years and three committees in order for the Continental Congress to agree on a design. Download high resolution version (1059x1050, 903 KB)Design for the Verso of the Great Seal of the United States, 1782. ... Download high resolution version (1059x1050, 903 KB)Design for the Verso of the Great Seal of the United States, 1782. ... Download high resolution version (757x714, 626 KB)Design for the Recto of the Great Seal of the United States, 1782. ... Download high resolution version (757x714, 626 KB)Design for the Recto of the Great Seal of the United States, 1782. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... The Continental Congress resulted from the American Revolution and was the de facto first national government of the United States. ...


The first of these committees consisted of Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, and John Adams. Each of these men proposed a design for the seal. Franklin chose an allegorical scene that demonstrated the motto, "Rebellion to Tyrants is Obedience to God," where there is a depiction of the biblical story of the Exodus, when the Children of Israel are confronted by Pharaoh and achieve their liberation from slavery in Egypt. Jefferson suggested a depiction of the Children of Israel in the wilderness, led by a cloud by day and a pillar of fire by night for the front of the seal; and Hengest and Horsa, the two brothers who were the legendary leaders of the first Anglo-Saxon settlers in Britain, for the reverse side of the seal. Adams chose the painting known as the "Judgment of Hercules" where the young Hercules must choose to travel either on the flowery path of self-indulgence or the rugged, more difficult, uphill path of duty to others and honor to himself. Congress ultimately chose none of these initial designs.[3] An additional design was submitted by a consultant to this committee, Pierre Du Simitière, and two design elements of in his design appear in the final design (the "Eye of Providence" and the motto E Pluribus Unum - Out of Many, One).[4] Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most well known Founding Fathers of the United States. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... This article is about the second book in the Torah. ... The Children of Israel, or Bnei Yisrael (בני ישראל) in Hebrew (also Bnai Yisrael, Bnei Yisroel or Bene Israel) is a Biblical term for the Israelites. ... For other uses, see Pharaoh (disambiguation). ... A Pillar of Fire was one of the manifestations of the God of the Israelites (for Nontrinitarians, Yahweh; for Trinitarians, God in the Person of the Holy Spirit) in the Old Testament. ... Hengest or Hengist (d. ... Horsa, according to tradition, was a fifth century warrior and brother of Hengest who took part in the invasion and conquest of Britain from its native Romano-British and Celtic inhabitants. ... The Anglo-Saxons refers collectively to the groups of Germanic tribes who achieved dominance in southern Britain from the mid-5th century, forming the basis for the modern English nation. ...


Two other committees were formed, but they too could not agree on a final design. Finally the problem was turned over to Charles Thomson, the Secretary of the Congress, who merged elements from all three previous attempts. Congress finally approved Thomson's integrated design on June 20, 1782, still in use today; and had it engraved into brass matrices, which were about 2.25 inches in diameter. For other persons named Charles Thomson, see Charles Thomson (disambiguation). ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... In the kind of printing which involves setting type, a matrix (often called a mat) is a mold for shaping the letters -- the mats of all the letters to go on one page are assembled, and then hot metal is poured into that matrix to make the plate to go...


On September 16, 1782 Thomson used these matrices for the first time, to verify signatures on a document that authorized George Washington to negotiate an exchange of prisoners. Thomson took care of the Seal until the U.S. Constitution installed the new federal government in 1789, when he passed it over to the Secretary of State, Thomas Jefferson. All subsequent Secretaries of State have been responsible for applying the Seal to diplomatic documents. is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ...


The first matrices of the seal were replaced in 1841 when they became too worn to be effective. 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ...


There have been a total of seven re-engravings of the Seal since the original, which is now on display in the National Archives in Washington, D.C. The National Archives building in Washington, DC The United States National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is an independent agency of the United States federal government charged with preserving and documenting government and historical records. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...


Symbolism

Upon close inspection one may notice strong symbolic themes used in the seal. For example, the shield is reminiscent of the national flag, and the Bald Eagle is a well-known national symbol of the United States.[5] Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1766) Bald Eagle range  Resident, breeding Summer visitor, breeding Winter visitor On migration only Star: accidental records Subspecies (Linnaeus, 1766) Southern Bald Eagle (Audubon, 1827) Northern Bald Eagle Synonyms Falco leucocephalus Linnaeus, 1766 The Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is a bird of prey found in North America...


The pyramid symbolizes strength and duration, and the arrows, as well as the olive branches, represent the power of war and peace together.[citation needed]


Among unanswered questions is if there is any historical significance of the six pointed star pattern formed by the glory of stars above the eagle's head on the obverse side. Beginning in 1841, the individual stars themselves were drawn with only five points, rather than six.[6] 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ...


That of the reverse is murkier. Some conspiracy theorists believe the eye atop the pyramid to have its origins in Masonic iconography.[7] However, the pyramid is not a Masonic symbol and while the eye is used by the Masons, it is also a common symbol in Christian iconography. More importantly, the seal was not designed by a Mason. Benjamin Franklin was the only Mason among the various Great Seal committees,[8] and his ideas were not adopted. This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Freemasons redirects here. ... Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most well known Founding Fathers of the United States. ...


Current seal

The obverse side of the Great Seal is used to emboss the design on international treaties and other official United States Government documents. It is stored in the Exhibit Hall of the U.S. Department of State inside a locked glass enclosure. An officer from the State Department does the actual sealing of documents after the U.S. Secretary of State has countersigned the President's signature. It is used approximately 2,000 to 3,000 times a year. The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ...


See also

Confederate Seal The Confederate Seal was the seal of the Confederate States of America. ... A Secret Service agent placing the seal on the presidents podium. ... The Seal of the Senate, based on the Great Seal of the United States, includes a scroll inscribed with E Pluribus Unum floating across a shield with thirteen stars on top and thirteen vertical stripes on the bottom. ...

References

  1. ^ Journals of the Continental Congress, June 20, 1782
  2. ^ Lewis and Short, A Latin Dictionary: Founded on Andrews' Edition of Freund's Latin Dictionary: Revised, Enlarged, and in Great Part Rewritten by Charlton T. Lewis, Ph.D. and Charles Short, LL.D. The Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1879, s. vv.
  3. ^ www.greatseal.com page on the first committee
  4. ^ www.greatseal.com page on De Simitière's design
  5. ^ www.eagles.org
  6. ^ The Great Seal of the United States - U.S. Department of State Bureau of Public Affairs
  7. ^ www.masoncode.com
  8. ^ Patterson, Richard S.; Richardson Dougall (1976). The Eagle and the Shield: a History of the Great Seal of the United States. Department of State, Office of the Historian, Bureau of Public Affairs, 529. 

is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... A Latin Dictionary is a popular English-language lexicographical work of the ancient Latin language, completed in 1879, published by the Oxford University Press, and still widely used by classical scholars and Latinists. ...

External links

This is a list of countries spanning more than one continent. ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas in an equal-area projection The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World, consisting of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... See also Flags of the U.S. states Lists of U.S. state insignia Categories: U.S. state insignia | U.S. state seals ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... The Great Seal of Alabama The Great Seal of Alabama is the state seal of the U.S. state of Alabama. ... The Alaska State Seal was first adopted before statehood, when the area was know as the District of Alaska. ... The Arizona State Seal was adopted in 1911. ... The Arkansas State Seal was adopted in 1864, and in its present form in 1907. ... The Great Seal of the U.S. state of California. ... The circular Seal of the State of Colorado is an adaptation of the Territorial Seal which was adopted by the First Territorial Assembly on November 6, 1861. ... A first version of the seal A second version A modern version Seal of Connecticut (also Connecticut State Seal, in full: Great Seal of the State of Connecticut) is a coat of arms of Connecticut. ... The Seal of Delaware was first adopted on January 17, 1777, with the current version being adopted April 29, 2004. ... The Great Seal of the State of Florida The Great Seal of the State of Florida is used to represent the Government of the State of Florida, and for various official purposes, such as to seal official documents and legislation. ... The current design of the Seal of Hawaii was commissioned by the Republic of Hawaii, derived from several features of the heraldry of the Kingdom of Hawaii. ... The Idaho State Seal was adopted in 1863. ... The Great Seal of the State of Illinois was first adopted in 1819 by the first Illinois General Assembly. ... The seal of Indiana has gone through several revisions since the region was a part of the Northwest Territory. ... The Great Seal of Iowa pictures a citizen soldier standing in a wheat field surrounded by farming and industrial tools, with the Mississippi River in the background. ... Kansas Seal Details The Kansas state seal 2 tells the history of Kansas. ... The Kentucky State Seal was adopted in December of 1792. ... The Louisiana State Seal was adopted as the official state seal of Louisiana in 1902. ... The State Seal of Maine was adopted in June of 1820. ... Great Seal of Maryland, reverse The less seen obverse side of the Great Seal of Maryland The Great Seal of Maryland is the official government emblem of the State of Maryland in the United States. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... The seal of Michigan depicts the states coat-of-arms on a dark blue field. ... The Great Seal of the State of Minnesota is the insignia that the secretary of state affixes to government papers and documents to make them official. ... The Mississippi State Seal was adopted in 1798, when Mississippi was a United States Territory. ... The Missouri State Seal was adopted on January 11, 1822. ... The Montana State Seal was adopted in 1865, when Montana was a United State Territory. ... The Nebraska State Seal was adopted in 1867. ... The Nevada State Seal is derived from the seal of the Territory of Nevada. ... New Hampshire has held two Seals since it Declared its Independence from Britain prior to the US Declaration of Independence, and retains both seals, although most people are only familiar with the corporate seal of the State of New Hampshire. ... The Great Seal of the State of New Jersey includes: A shield with three plows emblazoned, representative of New Jerseys agricultural tradition. ... The Great Seal of New Mexico is the official seal of the U.S. State of New Mexico and was adopted in [1913] The Great Seal of New Mexico When New Mexico became a state in 1912, the Legislature named a Commission for the purpose of designing a State Seal. ... The New York State seal is the same as the flag, but in a seal. ... The Great Seal of North Carolina was standardized in design by the North Carolina General Assembly in 1971: The Governor shall procure of the State a Seal, which shall be called the great seal of the State of North Carolina, and shall be two and one-quarter inches in diameter... The Great Seal of North Dakota The Great Seal of North Dakota is the official seal of the state of North Dakota. ... The Ohio Stae Seal features The Scioto River, as it flows across the center of the seal, separating cultivated fields from Mount Logan. ... All informaton herein is from the website of the Oklahoma Secretary of State. ... The Oregon State Seal consists of an outer ring with the text State of Oregon, 1859. The inner circle contains an eagle atop a shield. ... The Pennsylvania State Seal has a central image of a crest containing a ship under full sail, a plow, and three sheaves of wheat. ... The Rhode Island State Seal features a maritime anchor as its central image. ... The South Carolina State Seal was adopted in 1776. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... The Great Seal of the State of Tennessee An official Great Seal of Tennessee is provided for the in the Constitution of the State of Tennessee of 6 Febuary 1796. ... The Seal of the Great State of Texas. ... Great Seal of the State of Utah Adopted April 3, 1896, at the first regular session of the Legislature (January, February, March, April 1896). ... Categories: Stub | U.S. state seals | Government of Vermont ... In May of 1776 the colony of Virginia declared its independence from England. ... The Washington State Seal contains a portrait of George Washington, painted by Gilbert Stuart. ... The West Virginia State Seal was adopted in 1863. ... The Secretary of State is the keeper of Wisconsins great seal. ... The Great Seal of the State of Wyoming was adopted by the second legislature in 1893, revised by the sixteenth legislature in 1921. ... Image File history File links US-GreatSeal-Obverse. ... Federal districts are subdivisions of a federal system of government. ... The Great Seal of the District of Columbia depicts Lady Justice hanging a wreath on a statue of George Washington; the motto of the District of Columbia, JUSTITIA OMNIBUS (Latin: Justice for All); and 1871, the year of the seals creation. ... An insular area is United States territory that is neither a part of one of the fifty states nor a part of the District of Columbia, the nations federal district. ... The Seal of American Samoa is based in traditional local design. ... The Coat of arms of the Northern Mariana Islands takes its inspiration from the United Nations, as the NMI had once been a UN Trust Territory. ... The coat of arms of Puerto Rico were first granted by the Spanish Crown in 1511, and are the oldest arms still used in the New World. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Great Seal of the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1188 words)
The Great Seal of the United States is used to authenticate certain documents issued by the United States government.
Though the United States has never adopted any "national coat of arms", the image from the obverse of the great seal is often used informally as national arms, and is used on state documents such as passports in this capacity.
Masoncode.com examines the esoteric symbolism of the Great Seal.
Seal of the United States Senate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (511 words)
The Seal of the United States Senate, based on the Great Seal of the United States, includes a scroll inscribed with E Pluribus Unum floating across a shield with thirteen stars on top and thirteen vertical stripes on the bottom.
Surrounding the seal is the legend, "United States Senate." The seal is affixed to impeachment documents and resolutions of consent to international treaties.
The seal is kept in the custody of the Secretary of the Senate, in accordance with a resolution adopted in 1886 which mandates that it be used to authenticate transcripts, copies, and certificates as directed by the Senate.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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