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Encyclopedia > Great Northern Railway (Great Britain)

The Great Northern Railway (GNR) was a British railway company, founded by the London & York Railway Act of 1846. 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


The main line ran from London via Hitchin, Peterborough, and Grantham, to York, with a loop line from Peterborough to Bawtry south of Doncaster via Boston and Lincoln, and branch lines to Sheffield and Wakefield. St. ... Location within the British Isles. ... Peterborough is a city in the east of England. ... Location within the British Isles. ... York is a city in northern England, at the confluence of the Rivers Ouse and Foss. ... Map sources for Bawtry at grid reference SK6593 Bawtry is a village which lies at the point where the Great North Road crosses the River Idle. ... Map sources for Doncaster at grid reference SE5702 Doncaster is a town in South Yorkshire, England. ... For other uses, see Boston (disambiguation). ... Lincoln (pronounced Lin-kun) is a cathedral city and county town of Lincolnshire, England, a bridging point over the River Witham that flows to Boston. ... This article is about the city in England. ... For other uses of the word, see Wakefield (disambiguation). ...


The first section of line was opened in 1848 between Louth and Grimsby. This was followed in 1849 by Peterborough to Doncaster via Lincoln. In 1850 the line was opened to Peterborough from a temporary station at Maiden Lane in London, and Doncaster to York via Askern. By 1852 the main line from London to Doncaster was open, as was the new London terminus of King's Cross. A locomotive works was completed at Doncaster in 1853. 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Louth is a market town in Lincolnshire, England. ... Location within the British Isles. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... This GNER train serving Kings Cross is named White Rose after the traditional symbol of Yorkshire. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


The Peterborough-Grantham-Retford direct route was opened in 1853, and by either purchasing other railways or obtaining running powers over them the GNR gained access to Bradford, Cambridge, Halifax, Leicester and Nottingham. By 1857, a working arrangement was made with the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway (MSLR), which enabled the GNR to run London-Sheffield-Manchester express services. From 1858 the GNR line into London from Hitchin was also used by the Midland Railway. Both these developments helped to undermine the "Euston Square Confederacy" established by the London and North Western Railway. 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... This article discusses the city Bradford, in West Yorkshire, England. ... The city of Cambridge is an old English university town and the administrative centre of the county of Cambridgeshire. ... Halifax is a town in the county of West Yorkshire, northern England, with a population of about 90,000. ... Leicester (pronounced ) is the largest city in the English East Midlands, on the River Soar. ... Nottingham is a city located in Nottinghamshire, in the East Midlands of England. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... This is about the historic company; see also about the present day preserved Great Central Steam Railway. ... 1858 is a common year starting on Friday. ... The Midland Railway (MR) was a railway company in the United Kingdom which existed from 1844 to 1922. ... The London and North Western Railway (LNWR) was formed in 1846 by the merger of three railway companies - the Grand Junction Railway, London and Birmingham and Manchester and Birmingham. ...


By the late 1850s the GNR had access to all the important West Yorkshire towns. The profits gained from the coal traffic from this area to London prompted the Great Eastern and Lancashire and Yorkshire Railways to promote a bill for a trunk line from Doncaster through Lincolnshire. This was rejected by Parliament in both 1865 and 1871. The GNR pursued territorial interests outside its original areas of interest by jointly promoting a Manchester-Liverpool route with the MSLR in 1865. This grew with further expansion into Cheshire and Lancashire via its involvement with the Cheshire Lines Committee, in concert with MSLR and MR. Events and Trends Technology Production of steel revolutionised by invention of the Bessemer process Benjamin Silliman fractionates petroleum by distillation for the first time First transatlantic telegraph cable laid First safety elevator installed by Elisha Otis Science Charles Darwin publishes The Origin of Species, putting forward the theory of evolution... West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county in England, corresponding roughly to the core of the West Riding of the traditional county of Yorkshire. ... The Great Eastern Railway (GER) was formed in 1862 as an amalgamation of the Eastern Counties Railway; and also with several other smaller railways: Norfolk, the Eastern Union, the Newmarket, the Harwich, the East Anglian Light and the East Suffolk; among others. ... The Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway was a pre-grouping (1923) British railway company. ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... 1871 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Cheshire Lines Committee (CLC) was the second largest joint railway in Great Britain. ...


Expanding rapidly through the 1860s, the GNR was most profitable in 1873. GNR was running a more intensive service of express trains than either the LNWR or MR. Hauled by Patrick Stirling's single-driving-wheel locomotives, they were some of the fastest in the world. Events and trends Italian unification under King Victor Emmanuel II. Wars for expansion and national unity continue until the incorporation of the Papal States (March 17, 1861 - September 20, 1870). ... 1873 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Patrick Stirling (29 June 1820 - 11 November 1895) was Chief Mechanical Engineer of the Great Northern Railway His father Robert Stirling was also an engineer. ...


However, in 1875, the increase in revenue was out-paced by investment, which included items such as block signalling systems and interlocking, and improvements to stations and goods sidings. The railway risked over-extending itself by marginally profitable extensions to the CLC network and construction of lines in Nottinghamshire and Leicestershire under joint control with the LNWR. Access was gained to the Norfolk coast by a joint acquisition with the MR of the Eastern and Midlands Railway from 1889, the system being known as the Midland and Great Northern Joint Railway. 1875 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is an English county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. ... Leicestershire (abbreviated Leics) is a landlocked county in central England. ... For alternative meanings see: Norfolk (disambiguation) Norfolk (pronounced NOR-fk) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ... 1889 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... A British railway company. ...


The GNR's role in the establishment of an Anglo-Scottish East Coast route was confirmed by establishment of the East Coast Joint Stock in 1860, whereby a common pool of passenger vehicles was operated by the GNR, North Eastern and North British Railways. The main express trains were the 10am departures from King's Cross and Edinburgh Waverley, which began running in June 1862. By the 1870s they were known as the "Flying Scotsman". The GNR's trains were improved and expanded from the late 1870s, notably with the introduction of the first regular restaurant car service in 1879 and the fitting of continuous vacuum braking by 1881. 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... The North Eastern Railway (NER) , unlike many other of the pre-Grouping companies, had a relatively compact territory, having the district it covered to itself. ... A Scottish railway company which was absorbed into the London and North Eastern Railway at the grouping in 1923. ... This GNER train serving Kings Cross is named White Rose after the traditional symbol of Yorkshire. ... Waverley Station, from the Scott Monument. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Flying Scotsman is a named passenger service operating in the United Kingdom. ... 1879 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1881 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Suburban development in North London brought a rapid increase in season ticket traffic. The City was catered for by trains running to Broad Street, following reciprocal arrangements with the North London Railway set up in 1875. Widening of the London end of the main line was completed in the 1890s. North London is that part of Greater London that is north of the River Thames. ... This article is about a small section of central London. ... Broad Street station in 1865 Broad Street station was a major railway station in the City of London, which served as the terminus for the North London Railway. ... Originally called the East & West India Docks & Birmingham Junction Railway and opened between 1850 and 1852, the railway linked the docks at Blackwall to Camden Town. ... 1875 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The 1890s were sometimes referred to as the Mauve Decade, because William Henry Perkins aniline dye allowed the widespread use of that color in fashion, and also as the Gay Nineties, under the then-current usage of the word gay which referred simply to merriment and frivolity, with no...


The main revenue of the GNR was derived from freight, mainly coal, for which major marshalling yards were built at Doncaster, Colwick (Nottingham), New England (Peterborough) and Ferme Park (London). For merchandise traffic, the GNR was a pioneer of the fully braked goods train.


Under the 1923 Grouping, it became part of the London and North Eastern Railway. The London and North Eastern Railway or LNER was the second-largest of the Big Four railway companies created by the Railways Act 1921 in Britain. ...



Major constituent railway companies of the London and North Eastern Railway:

Great Central | Great Eastern | Great Northern | Great North of Scotland | Hull & Barnsley | North British | North Eastern

(Full list of constituents) The London and North Eastern Railway or LNER was the second-largest of the Big Four railway companies created by the Railways Act 1921 in Britain. ... The Great Central Railway (GCR) was the latter day name of a railway company of the United Kingdom which earlier was known as the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway (MS&LR). ... The Great Eastern Railway (GER) was formed in 1862 as an amalgamation of the Eastern Counties Railway; and also with several other smaller railways: Norfolk, the Eastern Union, the Newmarket, the Harwich, the East Anglian Light and the East Suffolk; among others. ... The ‘’Great North of Scotland Railway’’ (GNSR) received its Parliamentary approval on June 26 1846, following over two years’ of local meetings. ... The Hull and Barnsley Railway (HBR) was opened on July 20 1885. ... A Scottish railway company which was absorbed into the London and North Eastern Railway at the grouping in 1923. ... The North Eastern Railway (NER) , unlike many other of the pre-Grouping companies, had a relatively compact territory, having the district it covered to itself. ... The London and North Eastern Railway (LNER) was formed out of a number of constituent railway companies at the grouping in 1923. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Romance of the L.N.E.R. (5791 words)
With great confidence the promoters of the new railway had announced that the line would be opened on Tuesday, September 27, and as early as half-past five in the morning hundreds of vehicles of all kinds were moving towards the railway.
The port was formerly served by the Great Northern and Great Central Railways.
During the latter half of 1829 an extension of the railway from Stockton to an obscure village known as Middlesbrough, situated near the mouth of the River Tees, was proposed.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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