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Encyclopedia > Great Britain
See also: Kingdom of Great Britain
Great Britain
Great Britain lies between Ireland and Scandinavia.
Great Britain lies between Ireland and Scandinavia.
Geography
Location Western Europe
Archipelago British Isles
Area 80,823 sq mi (2.09331×105 km²)
Rank 8th
Highest point Ben Nevis
1344 m
Administration
Flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom
Home Nations England
Scotland
Wales
Largest city London
Demographics
Population 58,845,700 (as of 2006)[1]
Indigenous people Cornish, English, Scots, Welsh, others
Satellite Image of Great Britain
Satellite Image of Great Britain

Great Britain (Scottish Gaelic: Breatainn Mhòr, Welsh: Prydain Fawr, Cornish: Breten Veur, Scots: Graet Breetain) is the largest island of the British Isles, the largest island in Europe and the eighth-largest island in the world (Great Britain is also the third most populated island on earth). It lies to the northwest of Continental Europe, with Ireland to the west, and makes up the largest part of the territory of the state known as the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. It is surrounded by over 1,000[citation needed] smaller islands and islets. “UK” redirects here. ... . For the disagreement and different views on using the term British Isles, particularly in relation to Ireland, see British Isles naming dispute. ... Great Britain is the name of a major island off of Europe which is also the island that most of the United Kingdom is on. ... For an explanation of terms such as Scotland, Wales, England, (Great) Britain and United Kingdom, see British Isles (terminology). ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A current understanding of Western Europe. ... This article explains the archipelago in north-western Europe. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... Islands by area. ... Ben Nevis (Gaelic: Beinn Nibheis) is the highest mountain in Great Britain. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Home Nations (often written as the common noun home nations) is a term used to refer to the four constituent countries of the United Kingdom — England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland — collectively but as separate entities, distinct from the United Kingdom as a state. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Cornish people are a British ethnic group originating in Cornwall. ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... This article is about the Scottish people as an ethnic group. ... This article is about Welsh people who are considered to be an ethnic group and a nation. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2781x4052, 1644 KB) Satellite image of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in April 2002. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2781x4052, 1644 KB) Satellite image of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in April 2002. ... // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... For the Cornish-English dialect, see West Country dialects. ... This article is about the Anglic language of Scotland. ... This article explains the archipelago in north-western Europe. ... Islands by area. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... This is a list of islands in the world ordered by population. ... Continental Europe, also referred to as mainland Europe or simply the Continent, is the continent of Europe, explicitly excluding European islands and, at times, peninsulas. ... Types of administrative and/or political territories include: A legally administered territory, which is a non-sovereign geographic area that has come under the authority of another government. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... A small island in the Adriatic sea An island is any piece of land smaller than a continent and larger than a rock, that is completely surrounded by water. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ...


England, Scotland and Wales are mostly situated on the island, along with their capital cities, London, Edinburgh and Cardiff respectively. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ...

Contents

Geographical definition

Main article: Geography of Great Britain
Further information: Geography of EnglandGeography of Scotland, and Geography of Wales

Great Britain is the largest island of the British Isles. It lies to the northwest of Continental Europe, with Ireland to the west, and makes up the larger part of the territory of the United Kingdom. It is surrounded by 1000 smaller islands and islets. It occupies an area of 209,331 km² (80,823 square miles)[2] The geography of England England comprises the central and southern two-thirds of the island of Great Britain, plus offshore islands of which the largest is the Isle of Wight. ... Map of Scotland Although Scotland is a relatively small country, with a land area of 78 772 km², its geography is highly varied, from the rural lowlands, to the barren highlands, and from large cities to uninhabited islands. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This article explains the archipelago in north-western Europe. ... Continental Europe, also referred to as mainland Europe or simply the Continent, is the continent of Europe, explicitly excluding European islands and, at times, peninsulas. ... Types of administrative and/or political territories include: A legally administered territory, which is a non-sovereign geographic area that has come under the authority of another government. ... A small island in the Adriatic sea An island is any piece of land smaller than a continent and larger than a rock, that is completely surrounded by water. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ...


It is the third most populous island after Java and Honshū.[3] This is a list of islands in the world ordered by population. ... Java (Indonesian, Javanese, and Sundanese: Jawa) is an island of Indonesia, and the site of its capital city, Jakarta. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Great Britain stretches over about ten degrees of latitude on its longer, north–south axis. Geographically, the island is marked by low, rolling countryside in the east and south, while hills and mountains predominate in the western and northern regions. This article is about the geographical term. ...


Before the end of the last ice age, Great Britain was a peninsula of Europe; the rising sea levels caused by glacial melting at the end of the ice age caused the formation of the English Channel, the body of water which now separates Great Britain from continental Europe at a minimum distance of 21 miles (34 km). Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ... A peninsula in Croatia A peninsula is a piece of land that is bordered on three or more sides by water. ... For the Thoroughbred racehorse of the same name, see English Channel (horse). ...


Political definition

"Great Britain" is the eastern island of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Politically, "Great Britain" describes the combination of England, Scotland, and Wales, and therefore also includes a number of outlying islands such as the Isle of Wight, Anglesey, the Isles of Scilly, the Hebrides, and the island groups of Orkney and Shetland, but does not include other outlying islands such as the Isle of Man or the Channel Islands.[citation needed] For an explanation of terms such as Scotland, Wales, England, (Great) Britain and United Kingdom, see British Isles (terminology). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Isle of Wight (disambiguation). ... Anglesey (historically Anglesea; Welsh: , pronounced (IPA)) is a predominantly Welsh-speaking island off the northwest coast of Wales. ... Scilly redirects here. ... This article is about the Hebrides islands in Scotland. ... Location Geography Area Ranked 16th  - Total 990 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Kirkwall ISO 3166-2 GB-ORK ONS code 00RA Demographics Population Ranked 32nd  - Total (2006) 19,800  - Density 20 / km² Scottish Gaelic  - Total () {{{Scottish council Gaelic Speakers}}} Politics Orkney Islands Council http://www. ... For other uses, see Shetland (disambiguation). ... This article is about the British dependencies. ...


Great Britain evolved politically into a union of England and Scotland from a personal union in 1603 with the Union of Crowns under James VI of Scotland, I of England. The political union that merged the two countries happened with the Acts of Union in 1707 which merged the parliaments of each nation and thus resulted in the formation of the Kingdom of Great Britain, which covered the entire island. Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... Motto Latin: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) (Scots: Wha daur meddle wi me) Capital Edinburgh¹ Language(s) Gaelic, Scots Government Monarchy King/Queen  - 843-860 Kenneth I  - 1587–1625 James VI  - 1702-1714 Anne Legislature Parliament of Scotland History  - United 843  - Union of the... James VI of Scotland/James I of England and Ireland (Charles James Stuart) (June 19, 1566 – March 27, 1625) was King of Scots, King of England, and King of Ireland and was the first to style himself King of Great Britain. ... James VI and I King of England, Scotland and Ireland James VI of Scotland and I of England (Charles James) (19 June 1566–27 March 1625) was a King who ruled over England, Scotland and Ireland, and was the first Sovereign to reign in the three realms simultaneously. ... James VI and I King of England, Scotland and Ireland James VI of Scotland and I of England (Charles James) (19 June 1566–27 March 1625) was a King who ruled over England, Scotland and Ireland, and was the first Sovereign to reign in the three realms simultaneously. ... The Acts of Union were a pair of Acts of Parliament passed in 1706 and 1707 (taking effect on 1 May 1707) by, respectively, the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland. ... For an explanation of terms such as Scotland, Wales, England, (Great) Britain and United Kingdom, see British Isles (terminology). ...


In turn, in 1801, an Act of Union between Great Britain and Ireland created the larger United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (UK). The UK became the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in 1922 following the independence of five-sixths of Ireland as the Irish Free State. This article is about the historical state called the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1927). ... “UK” redirects here. ... This article is about the prior state. ...


History

Main article: History of Great Britain
Further information: Prehistoric BritainRoman BritainMedieval Britain, and Early Modern Britain
Further information: History of England, History of Scotland, and History of Wales

Traces of early humans have been found in Great Britain from some 700,000 years ago and modern humans from about 30,000 years ago. Up until about 9,000 years ago, Great Britain was joined to Ireland. As recently as 8,000 years ago Great Britain was joined to the continent. The southeastern part of Great Britain was still connected by a strip of low marsh to the European mainland in what is now northeastern France. In Cheddar Gorge near Bristol, the remains of animal species native to mainland Europe such as antelopes, brown bears, and wild horses have been found alongside a human skeleton, 'Cheddar Man', dated to about 7150 B.C. Thus, animals and humans must have moved between mainland Europe and Great Britain via a crossing.[4] History of Great Britain (volume 1) is a book by David Hume published in 1754. ... Prehistoric Britain was a period in the human occupation of Great Britain that extended throughout prehistory, ending with the Roman invasion of Britain in AD 43. ... Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... Mediæval Britain is a term used to suggest that there is a unity to the history of Great Britain from the 5th centurys withdrawal of Roman forces and Germanic invasions until the 16th century Reformations in Scotland and England. ... Early Modern Britain is a term used to define the period in the history of Great Britain roughly corresponding to the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries. ... The history of England is similar to the history of Britain before the arrival of the Saxons. ... Stirling Castle has stood for centuries atop a volcanic crag defending the lowest ford of the River Forth. ... Caerphilly Castle. ... Cheddar Gorge is the largest gorge in the United Kingdom Cheddar Gorge is the largest gorge in the United Kingdom, near the village of Cheddar in the Mendip Hills in Somerset, England. ... This article is about the English city. ... This article is about the herbivorous mammals. ... Bears are big and have big ass, thats why bears are hot, and thats why cats are not. ... This article is about genetically wild horses which have never been domesticated. ... Cheddar Man is the name given to the remains of a human male found in Gough’s Cave in Cheddar Gorge, Somerset, England. ...


The island of Great Britain formed at the end of the Pleistocene ice age when sea levels rose due to isostatic depression of the crust and the melting of glaciers. The island was first inhabited by people who crossed over the land bridge from the European mainland. Its Iron Age inhabitants are known as the Britons, a group speaking a Celtic language, and most of it (not the northernmost part (beyond Hadrian's Wall), where the majority of Scotland lies today) was conquered to become the Ancient Roman province of Britannia. After the fall of the Roman Empire, over a period of 500 years, the Britons of the south and east of the island of Britain became assimilated by colonising Germanic tribes (Angles, Saxons, and Jutes) who became known as the English people. Beyond Hadrian's wall, the major ethnic groups were the Scots, who may have emigrated from Ireland, and the Picts as well as other Brythonic peoples in the south-west. The Pleistocene epoch (IPA: ) on the geologic timescale is the period from 1,808,000 to 11,550 years BP. The Pleistocene epoch had been intended to cover the worlds recent period of repeated glaciations. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ... Glacier Isostatic Depression is the term used by geologists for the sinking of large parts of the earths crust into the asthenosphere. ... Perito Moreno Glacier Patagonia Argentina Aletsch Glacier, Switzerland Icebergs breaking off glaciers at Cape York, Greenland This article is about the geological formation. ... Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ... The Celtic languages are the languages descended from Proto-Celtic, or Common Celtic, a branch of the greater Indo-European language family. ... Hadrians Wall is a stone and turf fortification built by the Roman Empire across the width of modern-day England. ... This article is about the country. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... The famous parade helmet found at Sutton Hoo, probably belonging to Raedwald of East Anglia circa 625. ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... Hadrians Wall is a stone and turf fortification built by the Roman Empire across the width of modern-day England. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Scottish ethnicity. ... A replica of the Hilton of Cadboll Stone. ... Brythonic is one of two major divisions of Insular Celtic languages (the other being Goidelic). ... Strathclyde (Welsh: Ystrad Clud) was one of the kingdoms of ancient Scotland in the post-Roman period. ...


The south-east of Scotland was colonised by the Angles and formed, until 1018, a part of the Kingdom of Northumbria. To speakers of Germanic languages, the Britons were called Welsh, a term that eventually came to be applied exclusively to the inhabitants of what is now Wales, but which survives also in names such as Wallace. In subsequent centuries Vikings settled in several parts of the island, and The Norman Conquest introduced a French ruling élite who also became assimilated. White cliffs of Dover in England White cliffs of Rugen down the Baltic coast from Schleswig The Angles is a modern English word for a Germanic-speaking people who took their name from the cultural ancestor of Angeln, a modern district located in Schleswig, Germany. ... Northumbria is primarily the name of an Anglian or Anglo-Saxon kingdom which was formed in Great Britain at the beginning of the 7th century, and of the earldom which succeeded the kingdom. ... This article is about the country. ... Wallace is a surname, of Scottish origin (see Clan Wallace), and may refer to: Alfred Russel Wallace, British naturalist and biologist, who identified the Wallace Line and co-discovered natural selection Andy Wallace (producer) Andy Wallace (racer) Aria Wallace Barbara Brooks Wallace Barret Wallace Ben Wallace, an NBA player, currently... The name Viking is a loan from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse seafaring warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, Europe and the British Isles from the late 8th century to the 11th century, the period of European history referred to as the Viking Age. ... Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman Conquest of England was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. ...


Since the union of 1707, the entire island has been one political unit, first as the Kingdom of Great Britain, later as part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and then as part of the present United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Since the formation of this unified state, the adjective British has come to refer to things associated with the United Kingdom generally, such as citizenship, and not the island of Great Britain. The Acts of Union were a pair of Acts of Parliament passed in 1706 and 1707 (taking effect on 1 May 1707) by, respectively, the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland. ... For an explanation of terms such as Scotland, Wales, England, (Great) Britain and United Kingdom, see British Isles (terminology). ... This article is about the historical state called the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1927). ... “UK” redirects here. ...


The term was used officially for the first time during the reign of King James VI of Scotland, James I of England. Though England and Scotland each remained legally in existence as separate countries with their own parliaments, on 20 October 1604 King James proclaimed himself as 'King of Great Brittaine, France and Ireland', a title that continued to be used by many of his successors.[5] In 1707, an Act of Union joined both parliaments. That act used two different terms to describe the new all island nation, a 'United Kingdom' and the 'Kingdom of Great Britain'. However, the former term is regarded by many as having been a description of the union rather than its formal name at that stage. Most reference books therefore, describe the all-island kingdom that existed between 1707 and 1800 as the "Kingdom of Great Britain". James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 14 – Hampton Court conference with James I of England, the Anglican bishops and representatives of Puritans September 20 – Capture of Ostend by Spanish forces under Ambrosio Spinola after a three year siege. ... The Acts of Union were twin Acts of Parliament passed in 1707 (taking effect on 26 March) by the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland. ...


In 1801, under a new Act of Union, this kingdom merged with the Kingdom of Ireland, over which the monarch of Great Britain had ruled. The new kingdom was from then onward unambiguously called the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. In 1922, 24 of Ireland's 32 counties attained independence to form a separate Irish Free State. The remaining truncated kingdom has therefore since then been known as the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. The phrase Act of Union 1800 (or sometimes Act of Union 1801) (Irish: Acht an Aontais 1800) is used to describe two complementary Acts[1] whose official United Kingdom titles are the Union with Ireland Act 1800 (1800 c. ... This article is about the Irish kingdom existing from 1541 to 1800. ... This article is about the historical state called the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1927). ... For much of its history, the island of Ireland was divided into 32 counties (Irish language contae or condae, pronounced IPA: ). Two historical counties, County Desmond and County Coleraine, no longer exist, while several county names have changed. ... This article is about the prior state. ... “UK” redirects here. ...


Great Britain went on to become a rich 'Great Power' in the 19th and 20th centuries. A vast empire, covering one quarter of the globe emerged after the Industrial Revolution, under the reign of Queen Victoria. As territories declared their freedom from The British Empire, the power was lost. The United Kingdom was one of the major parties participating in The First World War, fighting for Triple Entente. After World War One was won, Germany rose up again and caused The United Kingdom and its colonies to fight and win (alongside Russia, the USA and other countries), The Second World War. For a comprehensive list of the territories that formed the British Empire, see Evolution of the British Empire. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... Victoria Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819–22 January 1901) was a Queen of the United Kingdom, reigning from 20 June 1837 until her death. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and a member of the European Union. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... European military alliances in 1914. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and a member of the European Union. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... German soldiers at the Battle of Stalingrad World War II was the most extensive and costly armed conflict in the history of the world, involving the great majority of the worlds nations, being fought simultaneously in several major theatres, and costing tens of millions of lives. ...


Terminology

Etymology

Main article: Britain (name)

The earliest known name of Great Britain is Albion (Ἀλβίων) or insula Albionum, the "island of the Albiones", first mentioned in the Massaliote Periplus and by Pytheas.[6] This article is about the archaic name for Great Britain. ... The Massaliote Periplus or Massaliot Periplus is the name of a now-lost merchants handbook possibly dating to as early as the sixth century BC describing the searoutes used by traders from Phoenecia and Tartessus in their journeys around Iron Age Europe. ... Pytheas (Πυθέας), ca. ...


The name Britain is derived from the Latin name Britannia, via Old French Bretaigne (whence also Modern French Bretagne) and Middle English Bretayne, Breteyne. The French form replaced Old English Breoton, Breoten, Bryten, Breten (also Breoton-lond, Breten-lond). Old French was the Romance dialect continuum spoken in territories corresponding roughly to the northern half of modern France and parts of modern Belgium and Switzerland from around 1000 to 1300. ... French (français, spelled françois until 1835, both pronounced in standard French, but often heard pronounced ), or French language (langue française, formerly langue françoise, both pronounced ), is the third of the Romance languages in terms of number of speakers, after Spanish and Portuguese. ... (Région flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Rennes Regional President Jean-Yves Le Drian (PS) (since 2004) Departments Côtes-dArmor Ille-et-Vilaine Morbihan Finistère Arrondissements 15 Cantons 201 Communes 1,268 Statistics Land area1 27,208 km² Population (Ranked 7th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... Middle English is the name given by historical linguistics to the diverse forms of the English language spoken between the Norman invasion of 1066 and the mid-to-late 15th century, when the Chancery Standard, a form of London-based English, began to become widespread, a process aided by the... Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon[1], Old English: ) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ...


Brittannia or Brittānia was the name used by the Romans from the 1st century BC for the British Isles taken together. Latin Britannia is derived from the travel writings of the ancient Greek Pytheas around 320 BC, which described various islands in the North Atlantic as far North as Thule (probably Iceland). This article explains the archipelago in north-western Europe. ... The term ancient Greece refers to the periods of Greek history in Classical Antiquity, lasting ca. ... Pytheas (Πυθέας), ca. ... Thule as Tile on the Carta Marina by Olaus Magnus. ...


The peoples of these islands of Prettanike were called the Πρεττανοι, Priteni or Pretani.[6] Priteni is the source of the Welsh language term Prydain, Britain, which has the same source as the Goidelic term Cruithne used to refer to the early Brythonic speaking inhabitants of Ireland and the north of Scotland.[7] The latter were later called Picts or Caledonians by the Romans. For the asteroid sometimes (incorrectly) identified as Earths second moon, see 3753 Cruithne. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... Prydain is the Welsh name of the island of Britain. ... The Goidelic languages (also sometimes called, particularly in colloquial situations, the Gaelic languages or collectively Gaelic) have historically been part of a dialect continuum stretching from the south of Ireland, the Isle of Man, to the north of Scotland. ... For the asteroid, see 3753 Cruithne. ... The Brythonic languages (or Brittonic languages) form one of the two branches of the Insular Celtic language family. ... This article is about the country. ... A replica of the Hilton of Cadboll Stone. ... // The Caledonians (Latin: Caledonii) or Caledonian Confederacy, is a name given by historians to a group of the indigenous Picts of Scotland during the Iron Age. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ...


Derivation of 'Great'

After the Old English period, Britain was used as a historical term only. Geoffrey of Monmouth in his pseudohistorical Historia Regum Britanniae (circa 1136) refers to the island of Great Britain as Britannia major ("Greater Britain"), to distinguish it from Britannia minor ("Lesser Britain"), the continental region which approximates to modern Brittany. Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon[1], Old English: ) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... Geoffrey of Monmouth (in Welsh: Gruffudd ap Arthur or Sieffre o Fynwy) (c. ... Pseudohistory is a pejorative term applied to texts which purport to be historical in nature but which depart from standard historiographical conventions in a way which undermines their conclusions. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: History of the Kings of Britain Geoffrey of Monmouths Historia Regum Britanniae (English: The History of the Kings of Britain) is a pseudohistorical account of British history, written around 1136. ... This article is about the historical kingdom, duchy and French province, as well as one of the Celtic nations. ...


The term Britain re-surfaces in Early Modern period, in the context of efforts toward unification of England and Scotland. In 1604, James I proclaimed himself "King of Great Britain". Early Modern Britain is a term used to define the period in the history of Great Britain roughly corresponding to the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries. ... James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary...


Sources such as the New Oxford American Dictionary (NOAD) define Great Britain as "England, Wales, and Scotland considered as a unit" and Britain as "an island that consists of England, Wales, and Scotland." The New Oxford American Dictionary (NOAD) is a single-volume dictionary of North American English by the American editors at the Oxford University Press. ...


Thus, Britain is the name of the island, while Great Britain is the name of the geopolitical unit. NOAD advises that while Britain "is broadly synonymous with Great Britain ... the longer form is usual for the political unit." However, in the United Kingdom itself, "Britain" is usually taken to be synonymous with the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland [8]. The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent...


In Irish, Wales is referred to as An Bhreatain Bheag which means, literally, Little Britain, although a truer translation would be Britain Minor. On the other hand, the closely-related language, Scottish Gaelic, uses the term, A'Bhreatainn Bheag, to refer to Brittany. This article is about the country. ... // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ...


Use of the term Great Britain

"Great Britain" often is used to mean the "United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland" (UK). However, Great Britain is only the largest island within the United Kingdom; still within the United Kingdom, but not on the island of Great Britain are several much smaller surrounding islands, as well as Northern Ireland in the island of Ireland. In the introduction to his history book The Isles, Norman Davies explains how confusion persists about what "Great Britain" and the "United Kingdom" denote, even in some eminent educational institutions.[9] The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... This article is about the constituent country. ... Norman Davies, Warsaw (Poland), October 7, 2004 Norman Davies (born June 8, 1939 in Bolton, Lancashire) is an English historian of Welsh descent, noted for his publications on the history of Poland, Europe and the British Isles. ...


Terms associated with Great Britain – such as Britain or British – generally are used as short forms for the United Kingdom or its citizens respectively.


Great Britain and its abbreviations GB and GBR are used in some international codes as a synonym for the United Kingdom, largely due to potential confusion with "UA" or "UKR" for Ukraine[10][original research?]. Examples include: Universal Postal Union, the International Olympic Committee, international sports teams, NATO, the International Organization for Standardization, and other organisations. (See also country codes, international licence plate codes, and technical standards such as the ISO 3166 geocodes GB and GBR.) Stamp The International Olympic Committee (French: Comité International Olympique) is an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin and Demetrios Vikelas on June 23, 1894. ... This article is about the military alliance. ... ISO 3166-1, as part of the ISO 3166 standard, provides codes for the names of countries and dependent areas. ... This is a list of vehicle country identification codes: Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Note * Non-official Note1  There are other, unofficial codes in common... A geocode is a geographical code to identify a point or area at the surface of the earth. ... The ISO 3166-2 codes for the United Kingdom correspond to the nations administrative divisions. ... ISO 3166-1 alpha-3 codes are three-letter country codes in the ISO 3166-1 standard to represent countries and dependent territories. ...


On the Internet, .uk is used as a country code top-level domain for the United Kingdom. A .gb top-level domain was also used to a limited extent in the past, but this is now effectively in abeyance because the domain name registrar will not take new registrations. Ireland has its own separate Internet code, .ie, which can be used in both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. A country code top-level domain (ccTLD) is a top-level domain used and reserved for a country or a dependent territory. ... .gb is a reserved Internet country code top-level domain (ccTLD) for the United Kingdom. ... .ie is the Internet country code top-level domain ( ccTLD) for the Republic of Ireland. ... This article is about the constituent country. ...


Capital cities

For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ...

Other major settlements

Main article: List of largest United Kingdom settlements by population

This is a list of the largest cities and towns of the United Kingdom ordered by population. ... This article is about the British city. ... This article is about the town in England. ... For other uses, see Bradford (disambiguation). ... For other places with the same name, see Brighton (disambiguation). ... This article is about the English city. ... This article is about the city in England. ... For other places with the same name, see Colchester (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Coventry (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in England. ... For other places with the same name, see Doncaster (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Exeter (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city of Gloucester in England; for other uses see Gloucester (disambiguation). ... , Huddersfield is a large town within the Metropolitan Borough of Kirklees, in West Yorkshire, England, near the confluence of the River Colne and the River Holme. ... Hull or Kingston upon Hull is a British city situated on the north bank of the Humber estuary. ... For other uses, see Ipswich (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ... This article discusses Leicester in England. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... This article is about the town in North East England. ... , Newcastle upon Tyne (usually shortened to Newcastle) is a large city in Tyne and Wear, England. ... Northampton is a large market town and a local government district in the English East Midlands region. ... For other places with the same name, see Norwich (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Nottingham (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... This article is about the city in England. ... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... This article is about Preston, Lancashire. ... , Reading is a town, unitary authority (the Borough of Reading) and urban area in the English county of Berkshire. ... For other uses, see Sheffield (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Southampton (disambiguation). ... This page is about Stoke-on-Trent in England. ... For other uses, see Sunderland (disambiguation). ... , For other places with the same name, see Swindon (disambiguation). ... Wolverhampton is a city in the historic county of Staffordshire and metropolitan county of the West Midlands. ... For other uses, see York (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city of Newport in Wales. ... For other places with the same name, see Swansea (disambiguation). ... This article is about Wrexham the settlement. ... For other uses, see Aberdeen (disambiguation). ... -1... This article is on the Scottish town. ... For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in Scotland. ... Broad Street at the heart of Stirlings Old Town area (called Top of the Town by locals) Stirling Castle (Southwest aspect) The main courtyard inside Stirling Castle. ... For other uses, see Kilmarnock (disambiguation). ...

See also

This is a list of the islands of England, the mainland of which is part of the island of Great Britain, as well as a table of the largest English islands by area. ... This is a list of the islands of Scotland, the mainland of which is part of the island of Great Britain, as well as a table of the largest Scottish islands. ... This is a list of the islands of Wales, the mainland of which is part of Great Britain, as well as a table of the largest Welsh islands by area. ...

References

  1. ^ Population of England, Scotland, and Wales. National Statistics mid-2006 Population estimates. Published 22 August 2007.
  2. ^ United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) ISLAND DIRECTORY TABLES "ISLANDS BY LAND AREA". Retrieved from http://islands.unep.ch/Tiarea.htm on August 25, 2006.
  3. ^ See Geohive.com Country data; Japan Census of 2000; United Kingdom Census of 2001. The editors of List of islands by population appear to have used similar data from the relevant statistics bureaux, and totalled up the various administrative districts that comprise each island, and then done the same for less populous islands. An editor of this article has not repeated that work. Therefore this plausible and eminently reasonable ranking is posted as unsourced common knowledge.
  4. ^ Lacey, Robert. Great Tales from English History. New York: Little, Brown and Company, 2004. ISBN 0-316-10910-X.
  5. ^ Proclamation styling James I King of Great Britain on October 20, 1604
  6. ^ a b Snyder, Christopher A. (2003). The Britons. Blackwell Publishing. ISBN 0-631-22260-X. 
  7. ^ Foster (editor), R F; Donnchadh O Corrain, Professor of Irish History at University College Cork: (Chapter 1: Prehistoric and Early Christian Ireland) (1 November 2001). The Oxford History of Ireland. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-280202-X. 
  8. ^ B | Style guide | guardian.co.uk
  9. ^ Davies, Norman (1990) The Isles. A History. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-513442-7
  10. ^ Ukraine has ISO 3166 codes UA and UKR

A LAND attack is a DoS (Denial of Service) attack that consists of sending a special poison spoofed packet to a computer, causing it to lock up. ... This is a list of islands in the world ordered by population. ... Blackwell Publishing was formed in 2001 from two Oxford-based academic publishing companies, Blackwell Science and Blackwell Publishers and is the worlds leading society publisher, partnering with 665 academic and professional societies. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... ISO 3166-1 alpha-3 codes are three-letter country codes in the ISO 3166-1 standard to represent countries and dependent territories. ...

External links

Part of an Ordnance Survey map at 1 inch to the mile scale from 1945 Ordnance Survey (OS) is an executive agency of the United Kingdom government. ... This article explains the archipelago in north-western Europe. ... . For the disagreement and different views on using the term British Isles, particularly in relation to Ireland, see British Isles naming dispute. ... It has been suggested that British Isles#Names of the islands through the ages be merged into this article or section. ... Islands of the North Atlantic (IONA) was suggested by Sir John Biggs-Davison as a less contentious alternative to the term British Isles to refer to Britain and Ireland and the smaller associated islands. ... This article discusses states as sovereign political entities. ... // Constituent country is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a historical, currently non-legally officially recognised country makes up a part of a larger entity or grouping. ... “UK” redirects here. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the constituent country. ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the country. ... The Isle of Man is situated in the Irish Sea between Great Britain and Ireland, and the bailiwicks of Jersey and Guersey are situated in the English Channel to the west of the Cotentin Crown dependencies are possessions of The Crown in Right of the United Kingdom, as opposed to... The British–Irish Council (sometimes known as the Council of the Isles) is a body created by the Belfast Agreement (also known as the Good Friday Agreement). ... The British-Irish Inter-Parliamentary Body (BIIPB) was established in 1990 to bring together 25 members of the United Kingdom Parliament and 25 members of the Oireachtas (the Irish parliament) to develop understanding between elected representatives of the UK and Ireland . ... The Common Travel Area includes the UK, the Isle of Man, Jersey, Guernsey, and the Republic of Ireland The Common Travel Area (or, informally, the passport free zone) refers to the fact that citizens of the Republic of Ireland, the United Kingdom and the Crown Dependencies (the Isle of Man... The North/South Ministerial Council (NSMC, Irish: An Chomhairle Aireachta Thuaidh/Theas, Ulster-Scots: The Noarth-Sooth Cooncil o Männystèrs) is a body established under the Belfast Agreement (also known as the Good Friday Agreement) to co-ordinate activity and exercise certain limited governmental powers across the whole... This article is about the British dependencies. ... Map showing location of the islands The Islands of the lower Firth of Clyde is the smallest of the three major Scottish island groups after the Hebrides and the Northern Isles. ... This article is about the Hebrides islands in Scotland. ... Scilly redirects here. ... The Northern Isles are a chain of islands off the north coast of Scotland. ... Location Geography Area Ranked 16th  - Total 990 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Kirkwall ISO 3166-2 GB-ORK ONS code 00RA Demographics Population Ranked 32nd  - Total (2006) 19,800  - Density 20 / km² Scottish Gaelic  - Total () {{{Scottish council Gaelic Speakers}}} Politics Orkney Islands Council http://www. ... For other uses, see Shetland (disambiguation). ... This is a list of islands of the Isle of Man: Isle of Man (Population - c. ... This is a list of the islands of England, the mainland of which is part of the island of Great Britain, as well as a table of the largest English islands by area. ... This is a list of the islands of Scotland, the mainland of which is part of the island of Great Britain, as well as a table of the largest Scottish islands. ... This is a list of the islands of Wales, the mainland of which is part of Great Britain, as well as a table of the largest Welsh islands by area. ... Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to Norman conquest of England, a moment that defined much of the history of the British Isles since. ... The history of England is similar to the history of Britain before the arrival of the Saxons. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Stirling Castle has stood for centuries atop a volcanic crag defending the lowest ford of the River Forth. ... Caerphilly Castle. ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... Motto Latin: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) (Scots: Wha daur meddle wi me) Capital Edinburgh¹ Language(s) Gaelic, Scots Government Monarchy King/Queen  - 843-860 Kenneth I  - 1587–1625 James VI  - 1702-1714 Anne Legislature Parliament of Scotland History  - United 843  - Union of the... This article is about the Irish kingdom existing from 1541 to 1800. ... This article is about the historical state known as the Principality of Wales (1267-1542). ... For an explanation of terms such as Scotland, Wales, England, (Great) Britain and United Kingdom, see British Isles (terminology). ... This article is about the historical state called the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1927). ... This article is about the prior state. ... Auregnais or Aurignais was the Norman dialect of the Channel Island of Alderney (French:Aurigny, Auregnais:Aoeurgny/Auregny). ... British Sign Language (BSL) is the sign language used in the United Kingdom (UK), and is the first or preferred language of an unknown number of Deaf people in the UK (published estimates range from 30,000 to 250,000 but it is likely that the lower figures are more... For the Cornish-English dialect, see West Country dialects. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Guernésiais, also known as Dgèrnésiais, Guernsey French, Guernsey Norman French, is the variety of Norman language spoken in Guernsey. ... Irish Sign Language (ISL) is the sign language of Ireland, used primarily in the Republic of Ireland. ... Jèrriais is the form of the Norman language spoken in Jersey, in the Channel Islands. ... Northern Ireland Sign Language (NISL) is a sign language used in Northern Ireland, mainly Belfast. ... This article is about the Anglic language of Scotland. ... Ulster Scots, also known as Ullans, Hiberno-Scots, or Scots-Irish, refers to the variety of Scots (sometimes referred to as Lowland Scots) spoken in parts of the province of Ulster, which spans the six counties of Northern Ireland and three of the Republic of Ireland. ... // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... Sercquiais also known as Sarkese or Sark-French is the Norman dialect of the Channel Island of Sark. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... This article concerns those peoples who consider themselves, or have been considered by others, to be Celts in modern times, ie post 1800. ... The Cornish people are a British ethnic group originating in Cornwall. ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... Romnichal or Romanichal is the name by which groups of Romani people (often known as Gypsies) found in some parts of the United Kingdom, notably England, are called in their own language, Anglo-Romany. ... Irish Travellers (sometimes known as Tinkers) are a nomadic or itinerant people of Irish origin living in Ireland, Great Britain and the United States. ... This article is about the Scottish people as an ethnic group. ... This article is about Welsh people who are considered to be an ethnic group and a nation. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Great Britain. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-07 (8282 words)
Britain’s overseas possessions (see British Empire) were augmented by the victorious outcome of the War of the Spanish Succession, ratified in the Peace of Utrecht (1713).
Great political leaders of the late 18th cent., such as the earl of Chatham (see Chatham, William Pitt, 1st earl of) and his son William Pitt, could not govern in disregard of the crown.
Britain’s sometimes stormy relationship with the EU was heightened in 1996 when an outbreak of “mad cow disease” (see prion) in England led the EU to ban the sale of British beef; the crisis eased when British plans for controlling the disease were approved by the EU.
Great Britain - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1260 words)
Great Britain is an island lying off the north-western coast of Europe and to the east of Ireland, comprising the main territory of the United Kingdom.
Before the end of the last ice age, Great Britain was a peninsula of Europe; the rising sea levels caused by glacial melting at the end of the ice age caused the formation of the English Channel, the body of water which now divides Great Britain from the European mainland.
The climate of Great Britain is milder than that of other regions of the Northern Hemisphere at the same latitude, because the warm waters of the Gulf Stream pass by the British Isles and exert a moderating influence on the weather.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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